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Publication numberUS1999325 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 30, 1935
Filing dateSep 11, 1933
Publication numberUS 1999325 A, US 1999325A, US-A-1999325, US1999325 A, US1999325A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ferro-concrete container
US 1999325 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Apr 3Q, i935. H. BoRsARl-FlscHl-:R 1,999,325

FERRO CONCRETE CONTAINER Fild sept. 11, 1933 Mg@ ff 777%/ /Vezwarj @y jf. Borsari ,L /schaf /NVfNTa/ /75/esz1/e layer" v Patented Apr. 30, 1935 UNITED STTES PTET OFFICE FERRO-CONCRETE CONTAINER Heinrich Borsari-Fischer, Zollikon, near Zurich, Switzerland 2 Claims.

It is well known to coat the ferroconcrete containers used as storage containers and fermentation vessels with plates of indifferent material in order to protect the inner walls of the same and 5 to prevent any disadvantageous change in the contents thereof, said plates consisting of asphalt, mineral wax, pitch or pitch-like masses, to which fillers may be added. The interstices between the Y separate plates are carefully closed so that the contents of the container are completely shut 01T from the interior wall. As compared with protective coatings of other kinds for the lining of such ferroconcrete containers this lining with plates possesses considerable advantages; it has the disadvantage, however, that blistering of the protective coating frequently occurs, which entails the danger of the said coating becoming damaged. According to the process which frms the subject matter of the present invention the blistering is prevented by arranging between the inner wall and the lining plates a porous intermediate layer, e. g. by fastening a thin layer of cork on the concrete layer of the inner wall or even by arranging plates of some other porous material, e. g. plates of cellulose, asbestos plates, dried plates made from plastic pumice and kieselguhr masses, and the like. The cork layer has the particular advantage that not only does it prevent blistering as a result of its porosity but at the same time it acts as a heat insulator as well and as a result diminishes the heat or cold loss of the contents of the container.

The porous plates used for making the intermediate layer are, before being fixed, cut, and if necessary surface shaped as well, so that when they are stuck on side by side the inner wall of the concrete container is completely covered.

The procedure may, for example, be as follows:

Cork plates about 1.5 to 3 cm. thick are fastened to the inner wall of the concrete container by means of a xative, e. g. an asphalt adhesive mass, and upon the cork layer a wire network is fixed, which is provided with a plastering of mortar of l to 2 om. thick. After the plaster has sufficiently dried plates of asphalt and the like masses are fused and pressed on to the same with careful heating of the inner surfaces of the plates and in this way a protective layer is made which completely covers the inner wall. It has already been proposed for the purposes of lining and sealing off the concrete wall of a container in a acid-proof manner from the contents of said container to cement on to the inner surface of the vessel, either during the Vcernenting or subsequently, a jute fabric whereby the latter is held in the cement; after the jute fabric has dried liquid asphalt is applied to the same and in this Way a protective layer is formed on the inner (Cl. Y2-14) wall. In contradistinction to this known process the protective layer provided by the present process consists of the plates which are used for lining ferro-concrete containers and which consist of asphalt and the like masses, preferably together with fillers. In the resulting lined containers a porous intermediate layerV is enclosed between the wall and these plates in the ssures of which the vapours (steam) which cause the blistering condense without the lining becoming blistered. The present process, therefore, has nothingwhatever to do with the known process in which jute fabric is employed.

The wall covering of the ferro-co11crete,con tainers which is made according to the present process is shown in a constructional form in the accompanying drawing.

Figure 1 represents a vertical Wall section and Figure 2 cross section of a stepwise broken wall.

It is obvious from the drawing that the porous layer c is affixed to the ferro-concrete wall a by means of an adhesive layer t applied to the inside. The said porous layer is covered by a wire network d, the mortar layer e is applied thereto and after the latter is dried the layer of asphalt or similar material f is applied and aflixed to the mortar layer.

It will be readily obvious from the drawing that the novelty as compared with the known ferroconcrete containers or the like consists in the fastening of the porous layer c; the possibility that the gases can be sufficiently compressed in this layer prevents the blistering of the water and gastight layer.

What I claim is:

1. A heat insulating, non-blistering lining for ferro-concrete containers, comprising a layer of porous material covering the inner surface of the walls of the container, an adhesive securing said layer to said walls, a wire network covering the surface of the porous material, dried mortar plastering seeming the network to said porous layer, and a water-tight covering over said plastering.

' 2. A heat insulating, non-blistering lining for ferro-concrete containers, comprising a layer of porous material covering the inner surface of the walls of the container, an adhesive securing said layer to said walls, a wire network covering the surface of the porous material, dried mortar plastering securing the network to said porous layer, and a water-tight covering over said plastering; said porous material consisting of cork and said water-tight covering being of asphaltlike material selected from;v a group consisting of asphalt, mineral Wax, pitch and similar materials.

HEINRICH BORSARI-FISCHER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4182466 *Jun 27, 1977Jan 8, 1980Didier-Werke AgWear part for sliding gates and process for the production of such wear parts and sliding gate with such wear parts
US4212926 *Aug 13, 1976Jul 15, 1980Didier-Werke AgParts subject to wear which come into contact with metal melts
US7311964 *Jul 30, 2002Dec 25, 2007Saint-Gobain Technical Fabrics Canada, Ltd.Inorganic matrix-fabric system and method
USRE33700 *Dec 9, 1987Sep 24, 1991Didier-Werke AgParts subject to wear which come into contact with metal melts