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Publication numberUS2000386 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1935
Filing dateJul 28, 1934
Publication numberUS 2000386 A, US 2000386A, US-A-2000386, US2000386 A, US2000386A
InventorsCharles F. Haynes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric fan
US 2000386 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 7, 1935.

C. F. HAY NES ELECTRIC FAN 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 28, 1934 CZuznles WHQ 7165, I

Ms Gum/M11 5 C. F. HAYNES May 7, 1935.

ELECTRIC FAN Filed July 28, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented May 7, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ELECTRIC FAN Charles F. Haynes, Weatherford, Tex., assignor of one-half to E. M. Schenecker, Fort Worth,

Tex.

This invention relates to improvements in motor driven fans and particularly fans employed for ventilation purposes in restaurants, stores, schools and such places where quietucle is desirable.

One object of the invention is to provide a fan mountingwhich will maintain perfect balance of the fan, motor, and motor casing at all times and under all operating conditions.

A further object is to provide a novel form of fan mounting wherein the fan and motor are yieldingly supported within a main supporting ring and said ring also constitutes the support for the fan guard.

A still further object is to provide a fan mounting with novel means for altering the plane in which the blast of air is propelled by the fan.

More specifically, the mounting consists of inner and outer concentrically arranged ring 20 members, preferably but not necessarily of circular shape, the inner ring being yieldingly suspended at a number of points from the outer ring. The inner ring is somewhat flexible and W is connected to the motor casing by lag screws which extend loosely through the ring but the proper degree of stability is obtained by the use of buffers interposed between the ring and casing and resilient washers between the heads of the lag screws of the inner ring. 3 With these and other objects in view the invention consists in certain details of construction and combinations and arrangements of parts, all as will hereinafter be more fully described and the novel features thereof particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings- Figure 1 is a front elevational view illustrating the preferred embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation; I

Fig. 3 is a sectional view on the line 33 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view on line 4--l of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view on the line 55 of Fig. 1; and

Fig.6 is a detail perspective view illustrating the devices for varying the inclination of the fan.

Fig. 7 is a. side view of the support of the fan. 50 The mounting proper of the present fan consists of inner and outer ring members I0, II, respectively, with resilient connections between the two rings and between inner ring I0 and the motor casing I2. This mounting may, in turn be used 5:, in combination with difierent forms of supporting means but in the present instance there is illustrated a supportingstandard I3 provided with a plurality of lateral stabilizing extensions I4 at its lower end. The mounting is attached to the upper extremity of standard I3 and in order to 5 facilitate adjustment of the fan to vary the direction of the air currents created thereby, the ring II is formed with extensions I5. A pivot pin I6 extends through the standard and said extensions I5 and at opposite sides of said pin, the extensions I5 are connected by cross bars I1. Adjusting screws I8 are threaded through the cross bars I! and engage against opposite sides of standard I 3 so that by backing off one screw and advancing the other, the ring II of the mounting may be 15 adjusted to vary the inclination of the fan.

In order to provide stability to the fan, motor and motor casing,and still secure the degree of resiliency in the mounting that is necessary to maintain perfect balance and quiet operation, the ring I0 is interposed between the main supporting ring II and the fan and is connected to the fan by means which aiford a firm but never theless resilient support for the fan parts. Described in detail, the inner ring III is connected to outer ring I I by connecting rods I9 which extend loosely or slidably through both rings. At the inner side of ring I0, rods I9 are provided with heads 20 and at the exterior of outer ring II with nuts 2I, and surrounding each rod between the two rings is a coil spring 22, so that by taking up on nuts 2I, springs 22 can be placed under the desired compression. Ring I0 is, in turn connected to motor casing I2 by lag screws 23 which extend loosely or slidably through said ring and are threaded into the casing. Interposed between said ring and casing are a plurality of buffer elements 24, preferably in the form of rather heavy rubber sleeves which may be held in place by the 4C lag screws. At the exterior of the ring III, rubber washers 25 are provided between said ring and the heads of the lag screws. Ring I0 is somewhat fiexible and with the present form of P connection, vibratory motion of the motor and motor casing will be taken care of by the resiliency of the buffers 24 and washers 25 and the flexing of the ring itself. At the same time, the density of the buffers is such as to impart considerable firmness to the support of the fan as compared to the structures wherein the main supporting ring is directly connected to the fan by springs.

It will be appreciated that the compression of springs 22 and of the bufiers 24 can be adjusted 2?. 2,000,886 simply ts-sang or relieving the rods i9 and spaced from the casing, resilient spacer elements lag screws 23, respectively.

In the preferred construction, the guard 28 for the Ian 21, is mounted on ring I I. As illustrated, the ring I I is provided with a plurality of lateral, forwardly projecting extensions 28 to which the guard is attached.

With the mounting constructed as illustrated, the fan although quite large is capable of operating at high speeds with a minimum amount of noise. This is believed to be due to the fact that the fan, its motor, and the motor casing are yieldingly though firmly secured within the inner ring In and the latter is, likewise, yieldingly suspended within the outer ring II. The ring I0 is preferably of metal but sufilciently light to possess the desired resiliency or flexibility. It will also be noted that the bolts l9 and the buffers 24 surrounding the lag screws 23 are offset with respect to one another in the sense that said bolts are spaced circumferentially of the rings with respect to said buffers.

While specific embodiments of the invention are illustrated in the drawings, by way of example, it will, of course, be understood that changes and obvious variations in the construction shown, and the carrying out of the invention in other forms as will appear to those skilled in the art, and falling within the scope of the appended claims, may be practiced without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim is: 7

1. In a motor driven fan, a motor casing, and supporting means for said casing comprising concentrically arranged inner and outer ring members encircling said casing, said inner ring being spaced from said casing and resilient connections between said inner ring and both the outer ring and motor casing.

2. In a motor driven fan, a motor casing, and supporting means for said casing comprising concent-rically arranged inner and outer ring members encircling said casing, said inner ring being spaced from said casing and resilient connections between said inner ring and both the outer ring and motor casing, and means for varying the resiliency of each of said connections.

3. In a motor driven fan, a fan casing, radially spaced inner and outer ring members encircling said casing, said inner ring being spaced from said casing, lag screws extending loosely through said inner ring into said casing, resilient buffer members interposed between said inner ring and casing and between the outer surface of said inner ring and the heads of said screws, and means for resiliently supporting said inner ring within said outer ring.

4. In a motor driven fan, a fan casing, a flexible ring surrounding said casing, said ring being interposed between said casing and ring, a supporting member, and means for yieldingly suspending said ring from said supporting member.

5. In a motor driven fan, a fan casing, an inner flexible ring around said casing in spaced relation thereto, an outer ring arranged concentrically of the flexible ring, connections between said casing and flexible ring, resilient buffers interposed between the flexible ring and casing, and resilient supporting connections between said two rings.

6. In a motor driven fan, a fan casing, inner and outer ring members arranged concentrically around said casing, lag screws extending loosely through the inner ring and thr-einto said casing, rubber buffers compressed between said inner ring and casing, rubber washers between the heads of said screws and the outer surface of said inner ring, connecting bolts extendirv. loosely through the inner and outer rings and springs under compression between said inner and outerrings.

7. In a motor driven fan, a fan casing, a encircling said casing, means for yieldingly porting said casing within said ring, a Stan-Lia a radial extensions on said ring, a pivot pin extending through said standard and extensions, cross pieces connecting said extensions at opposite sides of said pin, and adjusting screws threaded through said cross pieces and engaging said standard.

8. In a motor driven fan, a fan casing, an inner ring member spaced from said casing, means for resiliently supporting said casing within said ring member, an outer ring member, connecting elements extending from said outer member loosely through said inner ring into the space between said inner ring and casing, and springs on said connecting elements yieldingly maintaining said ring members in spaced relation.

9. In a motor driven fan, a fan casing, an inner ring member spaced from said casing, connecting elements loosely securing said ring and casing together, resilient means for yieldingly holding said ring and casing in spaced relation, an outer ring member, and means for yieldingly holding said inner and outer ring members in spaced relation.

10. In a motor driven fan, a fan casing. an inner flexible ring spaced from and encircling the casing, means for resiliently holding said ring and casing in spaced relation, an outer ring member, and means for yieldingly holding said inner and outer ring members in spaced relation, aid means for holding the inner ring spaced i the casing being off-set circumferentially of said ring from the spacing means for the inner and outer rings.

CHAS. F.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2634906 *Feb 10, 1950Apr 14, 1953Heiman Sidney JCabinet-enclosed window ventilating fan
US3128036 *Oct 17, 1960Apr 7, 1964Mcbride Le Roy CMachine to generate and control an airstream
US4722674 *Jun 19, 1986Feb 2, 1988Lennox Industries, Inc.Combustion air blower motor isolating spring
US5411373 *Jun 7, 1993May 2, 1995Duracraft CorporationConvertible floor fan
US6145798 *Mar 11, 1999Nov 14, 2000Markrep Associates, Inc.Quick release fan mount
DE853022C *Mar 24, 1936Oct 20, 1952Otto AldingerNachgiebige Abstuetzeinrichtung fuer Elektromotoren
DE1112603B *Nov 21, 1959Aug 10, 1961Siegfried MagerKlein-Geblaese mit Elektromotor in zylindrischem Gehaeuse, insbesondere zum Einbau in Koffer-Harmonien
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/604, 415/121.2, 416/246
Cooperative ClassificationH02K5/24