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Publication numberUS2000462 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1935
Filing dateMar 28, 1932
Priority dateMar 28, 1932
Publication numberUS 2000462 A, US 2000462A, US-A-2000462, US2000462 A, US2000462A
InventorsGeorge S Brodd
Original AssigneeGeorge S Brodd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin selector
US 2000462 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 5- G. s. BRODD 2,000,462

COIN SELECTOR Filed March 28, 1932 3 Shets-Sheet 1 n H Sm May 7, 1935. G. s. BRODD COIN SELECTOR Filed March 28, 1932 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 =//////////////////Z //////J7/ AI G. S. BRODD COIN SELECTOR May 7, 1935.

Filed MaTch 28, 1932 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 0w nm w /Z033 wz Patented May 7,

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE COIN SELECTOR George 8. Brodd, Chicago, 111.

Application March 28,

16 Claims.

The present invention relates to coin receiving devices for-machines of various sorts, and has a particular relation to such a device for a vending and change-making machine.

Particular objects of the coin receiver are the selection of genuine coins from non-genuine coins; the sounding of an alarm or signal in the event false coins are inserted; the exhibiting of false coins; the immediate rejection of magnetic metal slugs; the immediate separation of genuine and non-genuine inserts; and the crediting of accepted genuine coins to an account.

One object of the invention is the provision of selective electric switches operated-by an insert as a selector, according to its diameter.

Another object of the invention is the use of the coin itself to bridge electrical contacts, and the selection of the contacts by the denomination, or physical characteristics of the coin or insert.

Another object of the invention is the prevention of breaking at the coin of the electrical connection established by the coin, whereby there can be no sparking at the coin to result in injury thereto, or to the contacts employed.

Various other and ancillary objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the description and explanation of the invention which will be hereinafter given in reference to an exemplary embodiment thereof shown in the accompanying drawings and described in detail explanation of i parts and functions.

The inventio here described and claimed does not include th entire merchandising machine above referred to, but only a part thereof. The invention is not limited to the specific use hereinafter described, and it is to be. understood that it may be used as described, or altered for other purposes. Because the invention itself is illustrated by a specific embodiment and is described in combination with parts which are useful in such a machine, it is not to be construed as a limitation of the invention short of its scope as expressed in the appended claims.

The device shown in the accompanying drawings includes a magnetic selector for preventing magnetic slugs from entering parts adapted for the receipt of genuine coins. It is operative automatically to reject the magnetic slug and to condition itself for immediate receipt of a genuine coin. It is preferably placed immediately within the coin receiving slot. The magnetic ejector will pass non-magnetic coins or false coins into another selector which receives the coin in a generally tapered space adapted to re- 1932, Serial No. 601,478

ceive the coins edgewise between the tapering sides. The taper may be gradual but is preferably stepped so that coins of different denominations have a definite resting place. In that place each coin, when genuine, has its correct 5 diameter such that it bridges two fixed electrical contacts. When it falls into correct place and bridges the said contacts it operates a specific relay, which causes the coin immediately to be ejected in a direction predetermined to receive genuine coins. The specific relay also operates electrical mechanism to cause registration and crediting of the genuine coin. The relay also energizes itself to continue its function after the coin is removed from the contacts initially bridged by the coin. Other mechanism functions to deenergize the relay after the crediting operations are initiated.

In the event a non-genuine coin or slug is used it is quite usual that such coins are larger or go smaller in diameter than the minted coins for which the operating crediting contacts are spaced. On each side of the position predetermined for genuine coins, there may be other contacts which will be bridged by either larger 5 or smaller slugs, or even imperfect or damaged genuine coins. Such contacts operate the ejecting mechanism in a direction predetermined to! receive such bad inserts, and may incidentally give an alarm or signal, and cause the bad inserts to be exhibited, or returned.

The operations above described may readily be accomplished by simple structures as shown in the illustrated device. In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a front view of the device.

Fig. 2 is a side view of the device taken from the right hand side of Fig. 1, illustrating an electromagnet on each face of the device.

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 1, with a part of the facial devices removed.

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1, showing in detail the coin finger.

Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic view of certain parts of the device and an electrical diagram, the parts being operably associated for the preferred use of the device.

Fig. 6 is a modified form of bank of switches which may be selectively operated by a coin or insert.

The device comprises a plate III which may serve as a partition for chambers which are to receive good coins and bad inserts. There is an opening II in the plate in which lies a swinging coin-finger l2, preferably pivoted on pin it. The location of the axis is such that the side of the plate, as shown in the two lateral positions l2 and I2? of Fig. 4. The plate [8 the coin may .lie edgewise.

has parallel cars 14 and I5 projecting on the front side for the pin I3, and the finger I2 has two ears I8 and I1 for said pivotal pin l3. Resilient means is provided to cause the coin-finger l2 to remain normally in its opening in the plate I8, and to return thereto after being forced to either side position. Suitable means for doing this comprises a pin l8 on the finger projecting upwardly between the ends of two parallel leaf springs 19' and 28 which are mounted at their other ends on a bracket 2| on the plate It.

The finger I2 is comprised of two plates 23 and 24 with a coin-holding space between them to receive a coin by edgewise entry. In Fig. 3 the front plate 23 of the finger is removed exposing the inner side of finger plate 24. Coins are received by'edgewise entry at the top right end (Figs. 1 and 3) of the finger f'roma runway therefor, and on entering the finger strike .the curved baflie web 25 which deflects the coin downwardly into the finger.

n the faces of the finger are armature plates 26 and 21 (Figs. 3 and 4) which serve to swing the finger according to which of the electromagnets 28 and 29 is energized. Each of the electromagnets comprises two solenoids with cores, mounted on a bracket 38 secured to the top of plate In. The bracket" has a forwardly and downwardly projecting arm 3| carrying electro-magnet 28, and a rearwardly and back--' wardly projecting arm 32 carrying electromagnet 29. Thus the electromagnets are positioned at angles to correspond with the lateral positions of the finger l2.

By reason of the construction described th coin space in the finger between finger plates 23 and 24 lies forward of the partition and base plate l8. Suitable means are located laterally of said coin space to retain coins therein. Such means preferably form a tapered space in which Such means are utilized as electrical contacts to be bridged by the coin. A plurality of circuits,'and hence of contacts, is provided for successful selective operation of the device. On one side there is a 'metal plate 35, separated from the face plate II by an insulating sheet 36, and also covered by a second insulating sheet 31 (Fig, 1). The

edge is tapered, preferably in stepped arrangement as indicated by the steps'38. The depth and extent of the steps is determined by the coins for which the machine is designed.

' 0n the opposite side of the finger there are a line of contacts 39, preferably not stepped, but insulated one from the other, by insulation 40, and alined at the end to form a straight edge against which a coin maymove when it drops in the finger. A coin or slug thus may drop in the finger until it is obstructed at some point by the tapered space between said contacts 39 and contact plate 35. At the resting point the coin completes a circuit and causes the finger to be moved by one or the other of electromagnets 28 and 29. Certain of the contacts which are spaced for genuine coins cause the finger to move to one side for such coins, and others of the contacts cause the finger to move to the other side for coins or slugs refused by the machine. It is pointed out that when the finger I2 is moved laterallyfrom normal position there are no means to retain a coin or $1118 in the finger, and it slides out endwlse of the finger to either side of the partition ll.

A magnetic selector is employed to discard magnetic slugs before they enter the coin finger. It is preferably associated with the coin chute leading to the coin finger, and may form a part thereof. An illustrative structure comprises a coin chute of which one face is parallel to plate l8, on which isa sloping nmway 58 (Fig. 1) formed as a flange on a non-magnetic plate secured to face plate ll. At this region the plate III is preferably non-magnetic. The plate 5-! leads a coin C sliding or rolling against it, directly to the space in the coin finger. A

. swingin plate 52, 'onyertical axis 53, is held by a light spring 54 so. that it normally closes and defines the coin chute.

The structure may best be understood by reference to Figs. 1, 2 and 5. A permanent magnet 55 is located in front of the swinging plate 52 and spaced therefrom so that when a magnetic slug enters the chute it is drawn by the magnet and swings the plate forward. The

coin adheres to the plate 52 by the force of the .magnet. A spring contact 56 meets a fixed contact 51 and closes electrical circuit comprising wire 58 connected to the plate 52 and spring contact 56, battery 59, wire 58, which is connected to an electromagnet 8|, and wire 5P, connecting' the electromagnet to fixed contact 51. Electromagnet 5| is positioned to draw an armature 52, pivoted at 83, which may be the line of axis 53 (as shown in Pig. 1). The armature 62 carries the permanent magnet 55, so that as the armature is drawn forward upon swinging of plate 52, the permanent magnet 55 is so far removed from the coin, that the force is insufficient to cause the slug to adhere to the plate. The coin then drops in front of plate In. It may there be returned or exhibited, as by lying on a surface 54 behind a window 55. As soon as the coin drops, the plate 52 swings back. to define the chute, the electric circuit is broken, and a spring- 65 on the pivotal axis 53 causes the permanent magnet 55 to return to normal position for arepetition of the operation. If desired an alarm bell or other signal 51 may be placed in the circuit to function whenever an attempt is made to insertmagnetic coins.

In using the coin selector, auxiliary devices are employed which may be related to a crediting ma hine as above referred to. A part of the st cture of such a machine is referred to in connection with the remainder of this description, having reference particularly toFig. 5.

In Fig. 5 certain parts of the structure previously described are shown diagrammatically, and are similarly designated by .the numerals first applied. They are as follows: coin finger l2, contact plate 35, contacts 39, electromagnet 28 and electromagnet 29. It is to be'noted that bad coins or slugs are preferably thrown to the front for exhibition, along with magnetic slugs. Consequently electromagnet 28 operates for rejections, and electromagnet 29 operates for accepted coins. Legends in the drawings (Fig. 5) indicate the function. The contacts 39 are also marked with denominations of U. S. coins which each is designed to register. Contacts indicated S refer to slugs or rejections.

Each contact 39 is connected to a relay, and all the S contacts are connected in common to a single relay. The wire 18 is connected to each slug contact S and to the first relay ll of the series. Contact plate 35 is connected by a resistance element 12 to a power line 13 which contains switch 14. As shown, it is connected to live wire 60 of battery 59. The other terminal of the battery is connected by wire 15 which extends as a live wire past all the relays ter minating at both the electromagnets 28 and 29. The relay circuit is established as follows: Battery 59, wire 60, switch 14 (normally closed),

wire 13, resistance 12, plate 35, slug. contact" S", wire'l0, relay ll, a wire 10 from relay to wire 15, wire 15, battery 59.

When the relay is energized, an armature is employed to continue energization of the relay after the coin is removed, and also to energize electromagnet 28 for ejecting the slug. An armature is shown at 18, connected by wire 19 to power line 13. Contact 80 and wire 8| connect the armature electrically to wire 10, thus to continue energization of the relay. Contact 82 and wire 83 connect the armature to rejecting electromagnet 28, thus energizing the latter. Contact 84 and wire 85 connect the armature to wire 86 which leads to a relay 8! operable to open switch 14 in the power line 13, by action on an armature member 88 in said switch. The relay 8! is connected by wire 89 to the live wire 15. Thus the relay II energizes itself sufiiciently long to cause a magnetic impulse in electromagnet 28, which exists only momentarily because relay 8! breaks the main line at switch 14. In parallel with the relay H for rejecting slugs there may be an alarm or signal designated 90.

For accepting a coin similar units are provided for the various denominations- One will be described as illustrative. The five-cent denomination is selected. The 5 contact 39 is connected by wire 9| to relay 92 which is also connected by wire 93 to live wire 15. Armature 94 for the relay is connected by wire 95 to the control power line 13. Contact 95 and wire 91 serve to connect the armature 94 to wire 9| for continuing energization of the relay as the coin is removed. Contact 98 and wire 99 serve to connect the armature 94 to bus-bar I00, which is common to the acceptance relays, and which connects with the acceptance electromagnet 29. Contact I! and wire I02 serve to connect the armature 94 to mechanism generally indicated at I03 associated with crediting devices (not shown) whereby each specific coin accepted is credited to an account. Within the mechanism I03 contact is made between wire I02 and a wire leading from such mechanism to wire 86, so that after the coin is credited or the operation for crediting it has been initiated, the relay 8! can attract armature 88, and open the switch 14 in the control power line 13.

In Fig. 1, the step is the receiving space for a 5 coin. The contact 8 is the receiving contact for a genuine 5 piece. The step 5 may be made slightly tapered, so that an oversize slug which might be used for a 5 coin will not drop as far down as a genuine coin, and will hence make contact with the upper contact I. A slug which is of less diameter than a genuine coin will drop lower and will make contact with contact 8. Contact 5 operates the acceptance relay 29, and contacts 1 and 8 operate the rejection relay 28.

Numerous changes and modifications may be made. For example, the contact plate 35 may be stepped or tapered, as shown in the diagrammatic view of Fig. 5, or otherwise formed, and the number sizes and arrangement of ,contacts 39 may be varied as desired. The machine may thus be adapted for coins of various realms, or for inserts of any particular character.

The bank of contacts 39 which has beenillustrated is merely exemplary of any bank of separate means upon which the coin or insert may be effective. By using the coin or slug as a bridging member for contacts, a quick operation results. However, each set can be a mechanical device operated by the insert, either to perform some operation, or to close an electric switch. In Fig. 6 such a bank of mechanical devices is shown, each of which acts on a switch, or forms a part of a switch. The bank shown is a combination of the mechanical devices and of the contacts bridged by an insert. The slugs may more readily be used as bridging members, but good coins must be protected against possible injury, as where the non-sparking parts of the relay above described are omitted.

In Fig. 6 the same finger I2 is shown. The

.metal contact plate '35 is shown on the base plate l0. The pins 0 are comparable to the 5 contacts 39 of Fig. 5' and are shown as connected in common to wire by wires Ill and H2. Contact plate 35 may be connected as in Fig. 5 to wire 13.

For the coins several tilting devices are employed, such as the metal triangular pieces H3, pivoted at H4. Each is so arranged that the weight of a coin causes its edge H5 to swing in, raising the other edge against a contact H6. A wire Ill connects the piece H3 to the power line 13 through resistance 12 so that these have the same potential as the plate 35. A pin H8 may be provided to prevent the edge H5 swinging in too far, so that undesired circuit closures are eflected. For example, if the edge 5 extends in too far, the weight of a small coin passing it may raise it with a momentum which will close the circuit, when the coin should pass without such closure.

Various other changes and modifications, omissions and additions, may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A coin receiving device comprising in combination a coin receiver adapted to be moved in two directions from a normal position, separate moving means to move said receiver in said directions, and a selective actuating means for said moving means, said actuating means being selectively sensitive and responsive to coinlike inserts received by said receiver in normal postion of the latter.

2. A coin receiver comprising in combination a partition plate having an opening therein, a coin-receiving finger mounted to move freely through said opening, means toposition said finger normally between two lateral positions with respect to said openin said finger comprising a bifurcated member providing a space to receive a coin-like insert face-wise between its two fork members and being narrow to permit the edges of an insert to project simultaneously at opposite sides of the finger, means arranged along the edges of said space to arrest the motion of an insert in said space, said means being tapered, and electrical means opcrated by electrical contact made with the insert at said arrested position for moving the finger and the insert therein out of normal position, whereby the insert may drop from said finger.

3. A coin receiver comprising in combination a partition plate having an opening therein, a

coin-receiving finger mounted to move freely through said opening, means to position said finger normally between two lateral positions with respect to said opening, said finger comprising a bifurcated member providing a space to receive a coin-like insert face-wise between its two fork members and being narrow to permit the edges of an insert to project simultaneously at opposite sides of the finger, means arranged along the edges of said space to arrest the motion of an insert in said space, said means being tapered-and selective for inserts of various diameters, and electrical means operated by electrical contact made with an insert at said arrested position for moving the finger in one direction or the other selectively as predetermined by the diameter of the insert and said selective means, whereby the arrested insert in said finger may drop from said fingera 4. A coin receiver comprising in combination a partition plate having an opening therein, a coin-receiving finger mounted to move freely through said opening, means to positlon said finger normally between two lateral positions with respect to said opening, said finger com- :fjhrising a bifurcated member providing a space to receive a coin-like insert face-wise between its two fork members and being narrow to permit the edges or" an insert to project simultaneously at opposite sides of the finger, tapered means arranged along side said finger space in the normal position of the finger including a plurality of electrical contacts for arresting the motion of an insert in said finger according to the diameter of the insert, a plurality of electric circuits associated with said contacts, two separate devices for moving the finger in one direction or the other with reference to its normal position at said opening, one of said devices being operated by some of said circuits, and the other device being operated by others of said circuits, whereby the finger is moved to carry the insert away from said arresting means to free the insert for dropping from the finger at one side or the other of said plate according to the diameter of the insert.

5. A coin receiving device comprising in combination, a partition member, a movable coinfinger mounted to receive a coin-like insert at one end and to discharge it at the other end, said finger comprising two members forming a recess between them for holding an insert facewise, means to hold the finger in a normal median position, separate means to move the finger to either direction from said median position, stop means arranged opposite the sides of said space when the finger is in said median position to arrest an insert in the finger at a predetermined position therein according to the diameter of the insert, a plurality of electric circuits including'contacts bridged by said inserts of predetermined limits of diameters for closing said circuits by introduction of an insert into the finger, and means associating said circuits with either one of the two finger-moving means to effect movement of the finger upon closure of one of said circuits. I

6. A coin receiving device comprising in combination a movable coin-running element into which a coin-like insert may be placed for gravity movement therein, a plurality of arresting means associated with said element adapted to stop the insert in said element at a position determined by its diameter, a plurality of electrical circuits each containing separate arresting means, each of said means including an electrical contact adapted to make electrical contact with the insert, separate means to move the element away from the insert-arresting relation with said arresting means to ultimately different relative positions, each of said moving means being operated by closure of its respective circuit through said insert.

7. A coin receiving device comprising in combination a coin-running element into which a coin-like insert may be placed for gravity movement therein, a plurality of arresting means associated with said element adapted to stop the insert in said element at a position determined by its diameter, said element and said arresting means being relatively movable for displacing the parts from the arresting relation, a plurality of electrical circuits each containing separate arresting means each of said means including an electrical contact adapted to make electrical contact with the insert, separate moving means for relatively displacing the element and the arresting means to ultimately different relative positions, each of said moving means being operated by closure of its respective circuit through said insert.

8. A coin selector comprising in combination, receiving means providing a space for holding a metal coin-like insert face-wise between two surfaces, said means being narrower than the diameter of the insert at the arresting place for said insert, separate pairs of electrical contacts, each pair having one contact on each side of said space for arresting said insert thereby determining said arresting place when said insert bridges said contacts, a member on which said contacts are fixed relative to each other, a plurality of electromagnets, a circuit for each electromagnet each circuit being energized by the bridging of a different pair of said contacts, said receiving means and said member beingrelatively movable whereby the insert and the contacts maybe relatively separated, and armature means on said relatively movable parts responsive to said electromagnets for effecting mutual separation to different relative positions for each electromagnet, whereby the insert may be free to move out of ,the holding means at a selected position thereof.

9. A coin selector comprising in combination, receiving means providing a space for holding a metal coin-like insert face-wise between two surfaces, said means being tapered whereby an insert may project edgewise at opposite sides thereof, a contact plate on one side of said space, a plurality of electrical contacts arranged on the other side of said space in tapered relation to said contact plate on the first side of said space, said plate and said contacts being in positions to arrest movement of an insert insaid space according to the diameter of said insert, said insert making electrical connection between the arresting contact and the contact plate, a member relative to which said contacts are fixed, said receiving means and said member being relatively movable whereby the insert and the contacts may be relatively separated, two electromagnets, a circuit for each electromagnet, each circuit being energized by the bridging of a different contact with the contact plate, and armature means on one of said relatively movable parts responsive to said electromagnets for effecting movement of said last mentioned movable part to either of two different positions, respectively, whereby the insert may be free to move out of the holding means into different places.

'10. A coin receiver comprising in combination a movable finger comprising two spaced means adapted to receive a coin-like insert face-wise between them, said finger being narrow to permit the edges of the insert to project, separate pairs of electrical contacts, each pair comprising contacts positioned on opposite sides of said finger in the path of the insert to arrest motion of said insert and cause the insert to bridge the contacts, and at least two electrically operated devices controlled by different pairs of contacts for movingsaid finger and the bridging insert away from said contacts to ultimately different relative positions, whereby the insert may drop from said finger into different places.

11. A coin receiver comprising in combination a movable finger comprising two spaced means adapted to receive a coin-like insert face-wise between them, said finger being narrow and tapered to permit a series of different sized inserts to project edgewise therefrom at arrested positions in the finger, a plurality of electrical contacts arranged along one side of said space, a complementary contact for each of the plurality of contacts arranged on the other side of the said space, said complementary sets of contacts being arranged in a tapered relation to provide arresting stops for said inserts and to be bridged by said inserts, and at least two electrically operated means controlled by different bridgings of said contacts for moving said finger and the bridging insert away from said contacts into ultimately'difierent relative positions, whereby the insert may drop from said finger into different places.

12. A coin receiver comprising in combination, a partition plate having an opening therein, a finger mounted to move through said opening, said finger comprising two spaced members defining a space between them for holding a coinlike insert face-wise and being narrow to permit said insert to project from said finger at a resting place therein, separate electrical contacts positioned on opposite sides of said finger in the path of an insert of predetermined diameter to cause the insert to be arrested in its motion in the finger space and to bridge said contacts, a second pair of contacts adjacent the first pair and adapted to arrest the motion of an insert of slightly difierent diameter and to cause the difierently sized insert to bridge said second pair of contacts, and electrically operated means adapted by bridging of the first pair of contacts to move the finger and the bridging insert in one direction from its normal position, and by bridging of the second pair of contacts to move the finger and the insert in the other direction from its normal position, whereby the insert may move out o! the finger on either side of the partition plate as determined by the size of the insert.

13. In a device or the character described an electric circuit comprising two electrical contacts adapted to be bridged by a coin-like insert, and a relay operated by closure of the circuit, a pair of contacts closed by energizing the relay to continue energization of the relay upon removing said bridging-insert, a removing device to' remove said insert from bridging relation, and a second electrical circuit closed by energization of said relay, said second circuit being associated with said removing device to effect its operation on closure of said second circuit.

14. In a device of the character described an electric circuit comprising two electrical contacts adapted to be bridged by a coin-like insert, and a relay operated by closure of the circuit, a pair of contacts closed by energizing the relay to continue energization of the relay upon removing said bridging-insert, a removing device to remove said insert from bridging relation, and a second electrical circuit closed by energization of said relay, said second circuit being associated with said removing device to effect its operation on closure of said second circuit, a third electric circuit including an electromagnet and contacts closed by energizing the first relay, and a switch which is normally closed, which switch controls the power line to said first relay, and which is responsive to energization of said electromagnet for cutting ofi power to said first relay.

15. In a device of the character described an electric circuit comprising two electrical contacts adapted to be bridged by a coin-like insert, and a relay operated by closure of the circuit, a pair of contacts closed by energizing the relay to continue energization of the relay upon removing said bridging-insert, a removing device to remove said insert from bridging relation, and a second electrical circuit closed by energization of said relay, said second circuit being associated with said removing device to effect its operation on closure of said second circuit, a third electric circuit including a registering device, an electromagnet and contacts closed by energizing the first relay, and a switch which switch is normally closed, which controls the power line to said first relay, and which is responsive to energization of said electromagnet for cutting of! power to said first relay.

16. In a coin selector, means providing a passageway for movement of a coin-like insert edgewise therein, a bank of selective devices arranged in association with said means for operation by an insert in said means, said devices be ing arranged in tapered form for selective operation according to the diameter of the coin, and two separate means to remove said insert in diflerent directions from the passageway, one of said removing means being actuated by a selected one of said devices, and the other removing means being activated by another selected one of said devices.

GEORGE S. BRODD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2829753 *Jul 13, 1953Apr 8, 1958Jules A FremonCoin machine slug ejector
US4263924 *Nov 2, 1978Apr 28, 1981U.M.C. Industries, Inc.Coin separating device
US4491213 *Feb 22, 1982Jan 1, 1985Times Mirror CompanyCoin mechanism for vending machine
US7635059 *Feb 2, 2000Dec 22, 2009Imonex Services, Inc.Apparatus and method for rejecting jammed coins
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/219, 194/244, 194/313, 194/306
Cooperative ClassificationG07D5/00
European ClassificationG07D5/00