Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2000746 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1935
Filing dateApr 21, 1934
Priority dateApr 21, 1934
Publication numberUS 2000746 A, US 2000746A, US-A-2000746, US2000746 A, US2000746A
InventorsMichael Dray
Original AssigneeMichael Dray
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic submarine safety apparatus
US 2000746 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 7, 1935. M. DRAY AUTOMATIC SUBMARINE SAFETY APPARATUS Filed April 21, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR MICHAEL DR-AY B ATTORNEY May 7, 1935. DRAY 2,000,746

AUTOMATTC SUBMARINE SAFETY APPARATUS Filed April 21, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTQR MICHAEL DR AV ATTORNEY Patented May 7, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFiCE AUTOMATIC SUBMABINI SAI'I'I'! APPARATUS Michael Dray,

Bronx, N. Y.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in an automatic submarine safety apparatus.

The invention has for an object the construction of an apparatus as mentioned which is characterized by the provision of a plurality of deflateable and inflateable bags arranged in a plurality of cavities in the top and sides of the body of a submarine and associated with means for inflating and deflating the bags from the interior of the submarine so that the submarine may be lifted when desired.

Still further the invention also proposes a novel arrangement of mounting the bags within the cavities so that they may be drawn back into the cavities when desired.

Still further as another object of this invention an arrangement is proposed whereby an air tube is mounted upon the top of the submarine and is adapted to project into the air when the inflated bags support the submarine near the surface of the water.

As another object of this invention it is proposed to arrange the deflateable bags in groups in which spherical bags are arranged at the top of the submarine and elongated bags completely along the sides of the submarine.

As another object of this invention it is proposed to arrange a rotatable disc in the cavities at the top of the submarine and associated with cables for holding the inflated bag, and also associated with an arrangement for rotating the discs for the purpose of drawing in the bags in deflated conditions.

Still further the invention proposes the construction of a device as mentioned which is simple and durable and which may be manufactured and sold at a reasonable cost. 7

For further comprehension of the invention, 40 and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:-

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a submarine equipped with an automatic safety ap- 50 paratus according to this invention, and illustrated supported by the apparatus a short distance below the water level.

I Fig. 2 is an end elevational view of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional view taken on the line 33 of Fig. l.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary enlarged longitudinal sectional view of a portion of the submarine body.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional view taken on the line 0-! of Fig. 1.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional view taken on the line 0-0 of Fig 1.

The submarine safety apparatus according to this invention is used in conjunction with a submarine having a body I. formed with a plurality of cavities H at the top and cavities I! along the sides. Deflateable bags it are associated with the top cavities II- and are adapted to be engaged in and stored in the cavities when deflated. Other deflateable bags I are associated with the side cavities l2 and are adapted to assume positions within the cavities when deflated. Means are associated with all of the bags for the purpose of holding these bags in extended positions from the cavities. These means, as respects to the bags l3, comprise bands I! fixed upon the horizontal circumference of the bags II and connected with chains l0 extended down into the cavities II and attached as hereinafter further described. As respecting the side bags ll, a plurality of chains I! are extended over the bags and are attached at their inner ends it upon the top and bottom walls of the cavities.

Doors are provided for closing the cavities. As respecting the top cavities II, the doors for each of the cavities comprise a pair of door sections I! and 20 arranged on opposite sides of the cavity and hingedly supported so as to be adapted to assume closed positions or to be moved into open positions as clearly illustrated in Fig. 3. The door section !0 is formed with a lip 2| adapted to be engaged beneath the, free edge of the door 20 as is customary in door constructions. A mechanism is provided whereby from the interior of the submarine the doors may be opened and closed and this mechanism comprises a pair of. links 22 pivotally connected at one of their ends upon the side edges of the door sections I! and 20 and pivotally connected at the other of their ends upon a bracket 23 fixed on a rod 24 extending into the interior of the submarine. A waterproof packing 25 is arranged upon the wall through which the rod 24 extends so' as to prevent leakage of water through the submarine. i

The inner end of the rod 24 is provided with threads 26 threadediy engaging a bevel gear 21 rotatively supported on a base member II.

This base member is formed with an inturned top flange 29 engaging a circumferential groove in the hub of the bevel gear 21 to provide a rotative support. Another gear 33 meshes with the bevel gear 21 and is rotatively supported with a bracket 3| and is provided with a handle 32 by which it may be turned. The arrangement is such that the handle 32 may be turned for causing rotation of the bevel gear 21 in one or the other direction and causing the raising and lowering of the screw 23 for moving the rod 24 to open and close the door sections.

Each of the side cavities I2 are adapted to be closed with doors 33. These doors are hingedly mounted along the bottom sides of the cavities I2. Several springs 34 are arranged upon the hinged points of the doors 33 and act between the side wall of the submarine body and the doors 33 normally urging the-doors 'into' closed positions. When the bags I4 expand they automatically open the doors, into the position as illustrated in Fig. 6.

A means is provided within the submarine for inflating the bags when desired. This means comprises several air pumps 35 associated with a plurality of air holding tanks 33. These tanks 33 are of various sizes and arranged in various portions of the submarine. Each of the tanks 34 are provided with one way valves 31 through which air may be injected. Each of the air compressors 35 are provided with. flexible discharged hoses 33 equipped at their ends with connections 33 adapted to engage over the valves 33 for the purpose of opening the valves to allow the discharge of air by the compressors into the tanks. The construction is very similar to that of the inflating of automobile tires equipped with the self closing valves, and there-' fore, complete details of the construction will not be given.

The tanks 33 are connected by pipes 43 through which a supply of air may be' discharged into' the bags. Fig. 5 it should be noticed that the pipe line 43' connects with a branch pipe 4I extending into the cavity II and'connected with a flexible hose 42 connected with the bag I3 for the purpose of inflating the bag. The branch 4| is provided with a valve 43. The air supply 43 is provided with a valve 441 A take-off pipe 45 provided with a valve 46 connects with the branch 4] and connects with the inlets to the compressors 35 as clearly illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4. I'he arrangement is such that after the bags I3 have been inflated'they may be deflated by proper operations of the valves 43 and 43 and proper operation of the compressors.

The side bags I4 may also be inflated and deflated as desired. More particularly, air supply pipes 44 are connected with branch pipes 4| extending into the cavities I2. A control valve 44 is arranged in the supply 43 for controlling the e of air through the branch. A tough flexible hose 42 connects from the branch 4| with the bag I4. A take-off pipe 45 connects with the branch H and is controlled with a valve 43.

Each of the top cavities II are equipped with I mechanism which allows the bags I3 to be of the disc 40 and the base wall of the cavity. The cavity II is provided with a window 50 so that one of the men within the submarine can inspect the condition of the drawn in bag. Each of the chains I6 connect with the periphery of the disc 41. A pinion SI meshes with teeth upon the periphery of the disc 41 and is flxed upon a shaft 52 extending through the bottom wall of the cavity into the interior of the submarine. This shaft 52 is provided with a gear 53 of. a reduction mechanism connected with a motor drive 54.

The shaft 52 extends from the bottom of the casing of the reduction mechanism and is provided with a head by which it may be manually raised. A bracket 53 is adjustably mounted upon the casing of the motor 54 and is adapted to assume a position indicated by the dot and dash lines in Fig. 5 in which position it is adapted to hold the head 55 raised so that the gear Si is raised into the dot and dash position for the purpose of being out of mesh with the disc 41. It is desirable that the disc 41 be free to rotate when the bag I3 is inflated so as to be capable of unwinding the chains Ii to allow the expansion of the bag.

An inflated bag I3, such asillustrated in Fig. 1 may be drawn in by operating the motor 34' to rotate the shaft 52, the gear SI and the disc 41. Since the hose 42 remains stationary and the disc is rotating the chains will be gradually wound around the stationary hose 42 and so the bag will be drawn inwards. Of course it is necessary that the bag be deflated during this operation which is possible by proper operation of the air compressors and the valves 43, 44 and 43. After the bag I3 has been completely drawn into the cavity II, which condition may be seen from the inspection window 53, then the handle 32 'of the door closing mechanism is operated for the purpose of closing the doors I3, 23. This constitutes the inoperative or closed condition of the safety device.

Normally the submarine functions with all of the bags collapsed and held within their cavities with the doors closed. In the event that trouble develops and the submarine cannot rise to the surface then the bags are operated to lift of course they are provided with means by which r they may be deflated. Upon being deflated the doors 33 will automatically close which usually will correctly place the bags I4 into'the'cavities I2. When the submarine reaches dry dock or docks, the bags I4 may be properly adjusted within the cavities I2. As previously described the bags I3 can be drawn into the cavities I I into the proper conditions when desired. When the bags I3 and I4 are inflated the submarine will be lifted by these bags acting as floats, illustrated in Fig. 1.

The submarine is also equipped with an air tube 53 extending above the water level 33 so that air may be drawn into the submarine in its lifted position.

The operation of the device may be understood from the following brief description.- Normally compressed air is stored in the tanks 33 by operation of the compressors ll. In the event that the submarine runs into trouble, the valves 46 should be closed and the valves 43 and 44 open so that the compressed air from the tanks 36 engages into the bags and inflates-the bags. The doors 1! and 20 must previously be open so as to allow the bags It to extend in their inflated conditions. Furthermore the gears 8| must be moved to their inoperative positions relative to the disc 41 so as to allow free turning of the discs and so allow the bags I! to assume their natural extended positions.

While I have shown and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it is tobe,

understood that I do not limit myself to the precise construction herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and mo cations coming within the scope of the inventi as deflned in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

1. ,A submarine safety apparatus, comprising a submarine having a body with a plurality of cavities in the top and the sides, deflateable and inflateable bags in said cavities, means for holding said bags in extended positions from said cavities when inflated, doors for said cavities. and means within the submarine for inflating and deflating said bags, comprising a plurality of storage tanks for storing compressed air and an air compressor for supply ng air .to said tanks, and a piping system including valves whereby air in the inflated bags may be removed by. the air compressors and redischarged in said storage tanks. I

2. A submarine safety apparatus, comprising a submarine having a body witha plurality of cavities, a deflateable and inflateable bag in one of said cavities, a disc rotative in the base of the cavity, a stationary air pipe from the interior 0! the body extending through the center of said disc and connected with said bag for. the inflation and deflation of the bag, a plurality of chains attached upon the periphery of said disc and to a band flxed around said bag, means for inflating and deflating said bag from the interior of said body, and means for releasably rotating said disc for drawing in the bag when deflated. 3. A submarine safety apparatus,v comprising a submarine having a body with a plurality of cavities, a deflateable and inflateable bag in one of said cavities, a disc rotative in the base of the cavity, a stationary air pipe from the interior oi the body extending through the center of said disc and connected with said bag for the inflation and deflation of the bag, a plurality of chains attached upon the periphery of said disc and to a band flxedaround said has, means for inflating and deflating said bag from the interior of said body, andmeans for releasably rotating said disc for drawing in the bag when deflated, comprising a pinion meshing with teeth upon the p riphery of said disc and mounted upon a shaftextending into the interior oi the body, and an arrangement whereby said shaft may be moved to disengage the pinion with said teeth.

4. A submarine safety apparatus, comprising a submarine having a body with a plurality of cavities, a deflateable and inflateable bag in one of said cavities, a disc rotative in the base of the cavity, a stationary air pipe from the-interior of the body extending through the center of said disc and connected with said bag for the inflation and deflation of the bag, a plurality of chains attached upon the periphery of said disc and to a band flxed around said bag, means for inflating and deflating said bag from the interior of said body, and means for releasably rotating said disc for drawing in the bag when deflated, comprising a pinion meshing with teeth'upon theperiphery of said disc and mounted upon a shaft extending into the interior of the body, and an arrangement whereby said shaft may be moved to disengage the pinion with said teeth, said mechanism being connected with said shaft for rotating said pinion for rotating the disc to draw in the bagwhen desired.

5. A submarine safety apparatus, comprising a submarine having a body with a plurality of cavities, a deflateable and inflateable bag in one of said cavities, a disc rotative in the base of the cavity, a stationary air pipe from the interior of the body extending through the center of said disc and connected with said bag for the inflation and deflation of the bag, a plurality of chains attached upon the periphery of saiddisc and to a band flxed around said bag, means for inflating and deflating said bag from the interior of said body, and means for releasably rotating said disc for drawing in the bag when deflated, comprising a pinion meshing with teeth upon the periphery of said disc and mounted upon a shaft extending into the interior of the body, and an arrangement whereby sa-id shaft maybe moved to disengage the pinion with said teeth, said mechanism being connected with said shaft for rotating said pinion "for rotating thedisc to draw in the bag when desired, said mechanism including a braek etadiustably mounted and adapted to engage against one end of the shaft to hold the shaft raised so that the pinion disengages from said teeth.

MICHAEL DRAY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2487786 *Jan 23, 1945Nov 15, 1949Bogle Homer TSubmergible fuel cell
US3157145 *Dec 7, 1960Nov 17, 1964Oceanic Systems CorpUnderwater glider
US4713896 *Sep 6, 1985Dec 22, 1987Jennens Eric GInshore submersible amphibious machines
US5458250 *Aug 16, 1994Oct 17, 1995Martinez; Elio R.Buoyant crane
WO2010089436A1 *Jan 21, 2010Aug 12, 2010Enrique Alejandro SaavedraSelf-propelled air or water vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/336, 441/30, 114/54
International ClassificationB63G8/24, B63G8/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63G8/24
European ClassificationB63G8/24