Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2000953 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 14, 1935
Filing dateOct 30, 1933
Priority dateOct 30, 1933
Publication numberUS 2000953 A, US 2000953A, US-A-2000953, US2000953 A, US2000953A
InventorsPaul Hooker, Rue John D
Original AssigneeHooker Electrochemical Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for reacting semifluid materials
US 2000953 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 14, 1935. P. HOOKER ET AL MEANS FOR REACTING SEMIFLUID MATERIALS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 50, 1933 j gums/T2252. BY .0

ATTORNEY.

I May l4,- 1935.

P. HOOKER ET AL MEANS FOR REACTING SEMIFLUID MATERIALS Filed 001;. I so," 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 m m m m ATTORNE Patented May 14, 1935 r 'MEANS FOR REACTING SEMIFLUID MATERIALS PaulHooker, Thomas L. B. Lyster, and John D. Rue, Niagara Falls, N. Y., assignors to Hooker Electrochemical Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application October 30, 1933, Serial No. 695,876

6. Claims.

Our invention relates to means for reacting materials, one or more of which may be plastic or in semi-fluid suspension and one or more liquid or gaseous. More particularly, our invention relates to means for mixing chemical reagents, such as chlorine, with plastic or fibrous materials, such as paper pulp in water suspension.

The mixing of gases with semi-fluid materials is by no means a simple matter. This is especially true when the reaction is rapid, as when chlorine is reacted with paper pulp, since the mixing must be promptly effected to avoid over-chlorination of a portion of the pulp beforethe remainder comes into contact with the chlorine. The difliculty is increased by the fact that wet chlorine is highly corrosive to metals.

In co-pending application Serial No. 547,755 there is disclosed an apparatus for reacting chlo rine with paper pulp in a closed system under pressure. The present invention is an improvement in detail upon that apparatus.

Figure l is a diagram of the apparatus of this invention showing the mixing device in its relation to the remainder of the apparatus.

Figure 2 is an elevation of the mixing device with outer shell sectioned along the line a-a of Figure 3, the inner structure remaining intact.

Figure 3 is an end view of the mixing device I looking in the direction of the arrows in Figure 4.

Figure 4 an elevation of the mixing device partly in section along line 21-12 of Figure 3 and partly with outer shell removed and inner structure intact.

Figure 5 is an end elevation of a modification -of our invention.

Referring to Figure l, a pump (not shown) maintains a continuous flow of pulp through the system comprising the mixer 2, retention tower 3 and a second mixer 4. 5 is the inlet for chlorine and 6 a second inlet for milk of lime arranged in accordance with the process of the copending application before mentioned.

Figures 2, 3 and 4 illustrate in detail the mixer, i. e., parts 2 and 4 of Figure 1. The mixer consists of a section of flanged pipe 1 which in this case is rubber lined, into which is fitted the helix 8. This helix is wound around and welded to a central shaft 9 provided with collars ill of which there are several for each convolution of the helix. The helix 8 is also provided with longitudinal members I of which, in this illustration, there are three, spaced 120 degrees apart, cutting through the outer rim of the helix and welded to it. The convolutions of the helix 8 are provided with holes l2 spaced as shown. The collars Suspensions of paper pulp in water, containing two to four percent of fibre, while they may be pumped, behave in somerespects as plastic material. When a liquid is pumped through a pipe, the inner core moves faster than the outer layers and there is a natural mixing. When a pulp suspension is pumped through a pipe there is much less of this mixing. The stream moves through the pipe more as a rope pushed or pulled through a conduit. The outer layer remains the outer layer and the inner core remains the inner core for appreciable distances. If chlorine is injected into such a stream it will not diffuse readily, unless means are employed to cause transposition of layers. This can easily be proven by observing the bleaching action of the chlorine upon the fibre, which will appear streaked if not well mixed.

In the co-pending application above referred to there is illustrated a mixing device employing a helix in a pipe and having pinsprojecting from the central shaft. The function of these pins is to cause mixing by eddies. In the present device, the pins are replaced by the collars l0 and members H, the function of which is to act as battles and cause definite transposition of layers, so that what was the outer layer at the entrance to the device leaves it as the central core layer and vice versa. This is effected as follows:

Referring to Figure 2, it will be noticed that the flow of the pulp is illustratedby arrows. This pulp moves as a large rope of rectangular cross section, or would do so if it .were not for the baffles. Thus the layer that starts out next the central shaft 9 meets with resistance from the collars ll] successively tending to deflect it backwards and tangentially outward, as illustrated by the arrows l4, Figure 3, and the layer that starts out next the outer shell meets with resistance from the members I l successively, tending to de fleet it forwards and inward as illustrated by the arrow l5, Figure 3. There is-thus produced a clockwise torsional movement or rotation of the rope of material. The movement of the inner layer is illustrated by the arrow l6, Figure 2.

It will be seen that this follows a helical path closeto the shaft 9 until it strikes the collar, then is deflected outward and resumes its helical path at a point about half way to the outer shell. The movement of the outer layer is similarly illustrated by the arrow [1. It will be seen that this, starting along a helical path next the outer shell, strikes one of the members II and is deflected inward, finally resuming its helical path at a point about half way in toward the shaft 9.

It is not possible to illustrate the exact path of a fibre for any considerable distance, owing to its complexity. However, the fact that the inner layers are being continually forced outward and the outer layers continually forced inward as illustrated will be self evident, and this cannot fail to result in transposition of layers.

The notches in the baflles break up the layers still further.

The holes I2 permit some of the material to take a shorter path as illustrated by the arrows l3 and thus cause a transposition in the direc-' tion of flow. It has been found that this device gives excellent mixing and that the material issuing from it shows almost perfectly uniform color and freedom from streaks.

Referring to Figure 5:

In this modification the longitudinal members II are placed next the shaft 9 and thecollars ID are replaced by rings fitted against the outer shell. In other words, the longitudinal and transverse baflles are transposed in position. It will be obvious that this arrangement is the equivalent of that previously shown and deScrlbed and the effect uponthe moving stream of material similar, except that the rotation is in the opposite direction; that it to say, the outer layer is deflected inward and backward and the inner layer outward and forward, producing a counter-clockwise rotation.

It will be observed that this device is free from moving parts and adapted to operate under a pressure.

What we claim is: I

1. In a system for contacting a reagent with a stream of seml-fiuidmaterial flowing in a closed cylindrical conduit, a mixing device comprising a helical baflie wound around a shaft and coaxially disposed within said conduit, in combination with a plurality of collars upon said shaft and a plurality of longitudinal ribs upon the inner face of said conduit, said collars and ribs projecting into the path of flow defined by said helia stream of semi-fluid material flowing in a cylindrical conduit, a mixing device comprising fixed means defining a helical path of flow through said conduit, in combination with a plurality of straight longitudinal ribs and fiat circular transverse baille plates within said conduit, projecting into said path and causing transposition of layers of said material.

3. In a system for reacting a gas with a stream of semi-fluid material flowing in a cylindrical conduit, a mixing device comprising fixed means defining a helical path of flow through said conduit, in combination with a plurality of straight longitudinal ribs and flat circular transverse baflle plates within said conduit projecting into said path and causing transposition of layers of said material.

4. In a system for reacting chlorine with asuspension of paper pulp flowing in a cylindrical conduit, a mixing device comprising fixed means defining a helical path of flow through said conduit, in combination with a plurality of straight into the path of flow defined by said helical baflle and causing transposition of layers of said material.

6. In a system for contacting a reagent with a stream of semi-fluid material flowing in a closed cylindrical conduit, a mixing device comprising a fixed helical baflle co-axially disposed within said conduit, in combination with a plurality of transverse and longitudinal baflles within said conduit projecting into the path of flow defined by said helical baflie, the edgesof said transverse andhelical bafiies being serrated.

PAUL HOOKER. THOMAS L. B. LYSTER. JOHN D. RUE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2514254 *May 13, 1946Jul 4, 1950Walgreen CoApparatus for diffusing edible substances into composite masses
US2838178 *Mar 22, 1955Jun 10, 1958Bankes Frank ODevice for separating crude oil from water
US2933293 *Sep 12, 1956Apr 19, 1960Technicon InstrMethod of intermixing a plurality of liquids of different specific gravities
US2999673 *Aug 5, 1959Sep 12, 1961Technicon InstrLiquid mixing means
US3108060 *May 10, 1960Oct 22, 1963Phillips Petroleum CoLoop reactor and process for sulfonating asphalt
US3128993 *Jan 16, 1961Apr 14, 1964 Device for commingling slowly flowing liquids
US3506460 *Feb 20, 1968Apr 14, 1970Schlitz Brewing Co JControl system for cold sterilization process
US3675901 *Dec 9, 1970Jul 11, 1972Phillips Petroleum CoMethod and apparatus for mixing materials
US3682446 *Aug 21, 1970Aug 8, 1972Robert E EronFoam-solids blender
US4014463 *Nov 28, 1975Mar 29, 1977Kenics CorporationPlural component dispenser
US6027241 *Apr 30, 1999Feb 22, 2000Komax Systems, Inc.Multi viscosity mixing apparatus
US6451268Apr 16, 1999Sep 17, 2002Minerals Technologies Inc.Method and apparatus for continuous gas liquid reactions
US6830368 *Aug 9, 2002Dec 14, 2004Smc Kabushiki KaishaMixing valve with agitation chamber and helical fluid supply passages
US6935769 *Feb 6, 2002Aug 30, 2005Cargill LimitedApparatus for production of striated, laminated lipid-based confections
US7066207Oct 14, 2003Jun 27, 2006Ecotechnology, Ltd.Flow development chamber
US7082955Jun 4, 2003Aug 1, 2006Ecotechnology, Ltd.Axial input flow development chamber
US7160024 *Dec 5, 2003Jan 9, 2007Ecotechnology, Ltd.Apparatus and method for creating a vortex flow
US7387769May 8, 2002Jun 17, 2008Minerals Technologies Inc.Method and apparatus for continuous gas liquid reactions
US7650909Jan 26, 2010Spiroflo, Inc.Flow development chamber
US8033714 *Oct 11, 2011Hitachi High-Technologies CorporationFluid mixing apparatus
US9004744 *Mar 30, 2010Apr 14, 2015Techni-Blend, Inc.Fluid mixer using countercurrent injection
US9248418Mar 31, 2014Feb 2, 2016Komax Systems, Inc.Wafer mixing device
US20020176813 *May 8, 2002Nov 28, 2002Minerals Technologies Inc.Method and apparatus for continuous gas liquid reactions
US20030031087 *Aug 9, 2002Feb 13, 2003Smc Kabushiki KaishaMixing valve
US20030148000 *Feb 6, 2002Aug 7, 2003Van MillerProcess and apparatus for production of striated, laminated lipid-based confections
US20050000581 *Jun 4, 2003Jan 6, 2005Lane Darin L.Axial input flow development chamber
US20050039813 *Dec 5, 2003Feb 24, 2005Dougherty Gregory A.Apparatus and method for creating a vortex flow
US20060245296 *Apr 27, 2006Nov 2, 2006Hitachi, Ltd.Fluid mixing apparatus
US20070028976 *Jun 26, 2006Feb 8, 2007Ecotechnology, Ltd.Flow development chamber
US20070247969 *Dec 11, 2006Oct 25, 2007Ecotechnology, Ltd.Apparatus and method for creating a vortex flow
US20090073801 *Nov 15, 2005Mar 19, 2009Basf AktiengesellschaftProcess and device for producing finely divided liquid-liquid formulations, and the uses of the liquid-liquid formulations
US20140247687 *Jan 30, 2014Sep 4, 2014Ricoh Company, Ltd.Fluid stirrer, method of stirring fluid and method of preparing toner
EP0106460A1 *Aug 24, 1983Apr 25, 1984The Black Clawson CompanyImproved method and apparatus for oxygen delignification
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/339, 366/181.5, 366/174.1, 422/224, 68/175, 366/181.8
International ClassificationB01F7/00, B01F15/00, D21C9/10
Cooperative ClassificationD21C9/10, B01F7/0065
European ClassificationD21C9/10, B01F7/00B16N2B