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Publication numberUS20010005495 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/043,258
Publication dateJun 28, 2001
Filing dateAug 9, 1996
Priority dateSep 15, 1995
Also published asDE69628565D1, DE69628565T2, EP0850194A1, EP0850194B1, EP1334951A1, US6379635, WO1997010175A1
Publication number043258, 09043258, US 2001/0005495 A1, US 2001/005495 A1, US 20010005495 A1, US 20010005495A1, US 2001005495 A1, US 2001005495A1, US-A1-20010005495, US-A1-2001005495, US2001/0005495A1, US2001/005495A1, US20010005495 A1, US20010005495A1, US2001005495 A1, US2001005495A1
InventorsPaul O'Brien, Tito Trindade
Original AssigneePaul O'brien
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process for preparing a nanocrystalline material
US 20010005495 A1
Abstract
A process for preparing a nanocrystalline material comprising at least a first ion and at least a second ion different from the first ion, and wherein at least the first ion is a metal ion, is described. The process comprises contacting a metal complex comprising the first ion and the second ion with a dispersing medium suitable to form the nanocrystalline material and wherein the dispersing medium is at a temperature to allow formation by pyrolysis of the nanocrystalline material when contacted with the metal complex.
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Claims(23)
1. A process for preparing a nanocrystalline material comprising at least a first ion and at least a second ion different from the first ion, and wherein at least the first ion is a metal ion, the process comprising contacting a metal complex comprising the first ion and the second ion with a dispersing medium suitable to form the nanocrystalline material and wherein the dispersing medium is at a temperature to allow formation by pyrolysis of the nanocrystalline material when contacted with the metal complex.
2. A process according to claim I wherein the metal ion is a divalent metal ion or a trivalent metal ion.
3. A process according to
claim 1
or
claim 2
, wherein the metal ion is selected from a cadmium ion, a zinc ion, a lead ion, a mercury ion, an indium ion and a gallium ion, including combinations thereof.
4. A process according to any one of the preceding claims wherein the second ion is selected from an oxide ion, a selenide ion, a sulphide group, a phosphide group or an arsenide ion, or combinations thereof.
5. A process according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the second ion is or is part of a thiol-carbamate group or a seleno-carbamate group.
6. A process according to
claim 5
, wherein the second ion is or is part of a dithiol-carbamate group or a diseleno-carbamate group.
7. A process according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the metal complex additionally comprises an organic group and/or a thio group.
8. A process according to
claim 7
, wherein the organic group is an alkyl group, which may be substituted and/or unsaturated.
9. A process according to
claim 7
or
claim 8
, wherein the organic group is a dialkyl group, which may be substituted and/or unsaturated, and/or wherein the thio group is a dithio group.
10. A process according to
claim 9
, wherein the organic group is a di-Cl1-6alkyl group and/or the thio group is a dithio group or a diseleno group.
11. A process according to
claim 10
, wherein the organic group is a diethyl group.
12. A process according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the dispersing medium is at a temperature of 250° C. or more, preferably about from 300° C. to 350° C.
13. A process according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the dispersing medium passivates the surface of the nanocrystalline material.
14. A process according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the dispersing medium is TOPO, or a related coordinating medium, including combinations thereof.
15. A process according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nanocrystalline material comprises or is selected from any one of cadmium selenide, cadmium sulphide, zinc selenide, zinc sulphide, indium phosphide and gallium arsenide, including ternary and quaternary combinations thereof.
16. A process according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the nanocrystalline material is cadmium selenide.
17. A process according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the metal complex is diethyl diselenocarbamato cadmium or dithio diselenocarbamato cadmium, or related mixed alkyl complexes thereof.
18. A nanocrystalline material obtained by the process according to any one of the preceding claims.
19. A device comprising a nanocrystalline material according to
claim 18
.
20. A device according to
claim 19
wherein the device is an optical device.
21. A device according to
claim 19
or
claim 20
wherein the device is any one of a non-linear optic device, a solar cell or an LED.
22. A device according to any one of
claims 19
to
21
wherein the device is an LED.
23. A process substantially as described herein.
Description

[0001] The present invention relates to a process. In particular, the present invention relates to a process for synthesising nanocrystalline materials, such as nanocrystalline CdSe.

[0002] Nanocrystalline materials, which are sometimes referred to as nanoparticles, Q-particles, quantum dots or nanocrystallites, have been recognised as suitable systems for studying the transition from the molecular to the macrocrystalline level and have been extensively studied in the recent years.1−11

[0003] Interest in research into new synthetic routes for semiconductor nanocrystallites is now enhanced as devices based on such materials have been fabricated. 12−14 A number of synthetic methods have been reported for the preparation of a wide range of semiconductor nanoparticles.1-7,15-23

[0004] Known processes for preparing nanocrystalline materials, such as nanocrystalline CdSe, have included arrested precipitation in micelles21 or the reaction of molecular species at high temperature in organic solvents.22−25

[0005] In more detail, Murray et al 22 report on the preparation of CdE (where E is S, Se or Te) by the pyrolysis of two organometallic reagents by injection into a hot coordinating solvent. In particular, the Murray process involves injecting a solution of (CH3)2Cd in TOP (tri-n-octylphosphine) into a hot solution of TOP containing Se (TOPSe and TOP). Alternatively, any one of (TMS)2S (bis(trimethylsilyl)sulphide), (TMS)2Se (bis(trimethylsilyl)selenide), and (BDMS)2Te (bis(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)tellurium) may be used instead of TOPSe.

[0006] In the Murray process (CH3)2Cd is chosen as the only Cd source. Moreover, Murray et al state that (TMS)2Se or TOPSe and TOPTe are selected as chalcogen sources with TOPSe and TOPTe preferred due to their ease of preparation and their stability.

[0007] Chemical reactions in TOPO (tri-n-octylphosphine oxide) are also described by Murray24. These processes have been used to prepare nanocrystallites of II/VI semiconductors12,13,24,25. In this instance, TOPO is used as dispersing medium and a metal source (e.g Cd(CH3)2) and a chalcogenide source (e.g. TOPSe) are injected into the hot TOPO (typically at 250° C.) to form CdSe nanocrystallites. The size distribution of the semiconductor can be controlled by the temperature of heating during the synthesis and by size selective precipitation of the final material.24,25

[0008] A refinement of the Murray process has been proposed by Katari et al23. As with the Murray process, in the Katari process CdE is prepared by the pyrolysis of two organometallic reagents by injection into a hot coordinating solvent. In the Katari process Se is dissolved in TBP (tributylphosphine) to which (CH3)2Cd is then added. The resultant (CH3)2Cd/Se solution is then added to a heated solution of TOPO.

[0009] As with the Murray process, in the Katari process (CH3)2Cd is chosen as the only Cd source.

[0010] There are however problems associated with the prior art processes for preparing nanocrystalline materials. For example, both the Murray process (ibid) and the Katari process (ibid) involve the use of hazardous chemicals, in particular (CH3)2Cd. In this regard, (CH3)2Cd is toxic, volatile and extremely difficult to handle. Moreover, on exposure to air it undergoes spontaneous combustion.

[0011] Aside from using the hazardous compound Cd(CH3)2 12,13 to prepare nanocrystalline CdSe, other workers have used the equally hazardous H2Se14 for the synthesis of the CdSe.

[0012] The present invention seeks to overcome the problems associated with the prior art processes for making nanocrystalline materials.

[0013] According to a first aspect of the present invention there is provided a process for preparing a nanocrystalline material comprising at least a first ion and at least a second ion different from the first ion, and wherein at least the first ion is a metal ion, the process comprising contacting a metal complex comprising the first ion and the second ion with a dispersing medium suitable to form the nanocrystalline material and wherein the dispersing medium is at a temperature which allows formation of the nanocrystalline material by pyrolysis when contacted with the metal complex.

[0014] According to a second aspect of the present invention there is provided a nanocrystalline material obtained by the process of the present invention.

[0015] According to a third aspect of the present invention there is provided a device comprising a nanocrystalline material obtained by the process of the present invention.

[0016] Preferably the metal ion is a divalent metal ion or a trivalent metal ion.

[0017] Preferably the metal ion is selected from a cadmium ion, a zinc ion, a lead ion, a mercury ion, an indium ion and a gallium ion, including combinations thereof.

[0018] Preferably the second ion is selected from an oxide ion, a selenide ion, a sulphide group, a phosphide group or an arsenide ion, or combinations thereof.

[0019] Preferably the second ion is or is part of a thiol-carbamate group or a selenocarbamate group.

[0020] Preferably the second ion is or is part of a dithiol-carbamnate group or a diselenocarbamate group.

[0021] Preferably the metal complex additionally comprises an organic group and/or thio group. The organic group can be an alkyl group or an aryl group, which may be substituted.

[0022] Preferably the organic group is an alkyl group, which may be substituted and/or unsaturated.

[0023] Preferably the organic group is a dialkyl group, which may be substituted and/or unsaturated, and/or wherein the thio group is a dithio group.

[0024] Preferably the organic group is a di-C1-6alkyl group and/or the thio group is a dithio group or a diseleno group.

[0025] Preferably the organic group is a diethyl group.

[0026] Preferably the dispersing medium is at a temperature of 250° C. or more, preferably about from 300° C. to 350° C.

[0027] Preferably the dispersing medium passivates the surface of the nanocrystalline material.

[0028] Preferably the dispersing medium is TOPO, or a related coordinating medium, including combinations thereof. Another dispesing medium could be TBP.

[0029] Preferably the nanocrystalline material comprises or is selected from any one of cadmium selenide, cadmium sulphide, zinc selenide, zinc sulphide, indium phosphide and gallium arsenide, including ternary and quaternary combinations thereof.

[0030] Preferably the nanocrystalline material is cadmium selenide.

[0031] Preferably the metal complex is diethyl diselenocarbamato cadmium or dithio diselenocarbamato cadmium, or related mixed alkyl complexes thereof.

[0032] Preferably the device is an optical device.

[0033] Preferably the device is any one of a non-linear optic device, a solar cell or an LED.

[0034] Preferably the device is an LED.

[0035] Preferably the device is a blue LED.

[0036] The present invention is therefore based on the surprising finding that nanocrystalline materials can be prepared by using as a reactant a metal complex which provides at least two of the ions of the nanocrystalline material. The process of the present invention is therefore very different to the Murray process (ibid) and the Katari process (ibid) wherein in each of those processes it is necessary to use two independent sources to provide at least two of the ions of the nanocrystalline material. Thus, the use of a molecular precursor containing both elements in the present process provides an attractive route to metal selenides, especially if a large scale preparation is anticipated.

[0037] The present invention is further advantageous over the prior art processes as it does not rely on the use of hazardous chemicals such as (CH3)2Cd.

[0038] The present invention is further advantageous as it provides a low cost route to prepare photovoltaic materials and optoelectronic materials, preferable examples of which include non-linear optic devices, solar cells and LEDs.

[0039] Thus the present invention shows that a single source can be used in a dispersing medium, such as TOPO, to replace the use of the hazardous metal alkyls. In a highly preferred embodiment, the present invention provides the synthesis of CdSe nanocrystallites using methyl diethyldiselenocarbamato cadmium (II) MeCddsc: [(CH3)CdSe2CN(C2H5)2]2) as a precursor. The synthetic method of this preferred embodiment is diagrammatically illustrated in FIG. 1, which makes no efforts to represent a mechanistic pathway.

[0040] Even though the pathway shown in FIG. 1 is for the synthesis of CdSe it is to be understood that the process of the present invention is useful for preparing a series of nanocrystalline materials.

[0041] Examples of nanocrystalline materials that can be prepared using an appropriate single molecule precursor can be represented by the general formulae A and B as shown below.

MIIE  GENERAL FORMULA A

[0042] wherein M is Zn, Cd, Hg or a divalent transition metal; and wherein E is O, S, Se, P, or As.

MIIII xEy  GENERAL FORMULA B

[0043] wherein M is Al, In, Ga or a trivalent transition metal; and wherein E is O, S, Se, P, or As; and wherein x and y are appropriate intergers.

[0044] Formulae A and B also encompass related ternary systems.

[0045] Therefore, examples of nanocrystalline materials other than cadmium selenide include cadmium sulphide, zinc selenide, zinc sulphide, indium phosphide and gallium arsenide.

[0046] The general formula of the metal complex for use in the process of the present invention can be represented as:

MLn  FORMULA I

[0047] wherein M represents a metal ion; L represents one or more ligands which need not be the same; n represents the valency of the metal; and wherein M is the first ion of the nanocrystalline material and at least one L provides the second ion for the nanocrystalline material.

[0048] Typically M is a divalent metal ion or a trivalent metal ion, such as any one of cadmium, zinc, lead, mercury, indium gallium, including combinations thereof.

[0049] Typically L is any one of an oxide ion, a selenide ion, a sulphide group, a phosphide group or an arsenide ion, or combinations thereof. More in particular L is or is part of any one of a thiol-carbamate group or a seleno-carbamate group such as a dithiol-carbamate group or a diseleno-carbamate group.

[0050] In a preferred embodiment, at least one L is an organic group and/or a thio group. If at least one L is an organic group then preferably that organic is an alkyl group, which may be substituted and/or unsaturated, such as a C1-10 (preferably C1-6, more preferably C1-4) alkyl group, which may be substituted and/or unsaturated.

[0051] Preferably, at least one L is a dialkyl group, which may be substituted and/or unsaturated, and/or wherein the thio group is a dithio group. Preferably, the organic group is a di-C1-6 alkyl group and/or the thio group is a dithio group or a diseleno group. In a highly preferred embodiment, at least one L is a diethyl group.

[0052] Typical general formulae for suitable metal complexes containing at least one organic group for use as single molecule precursors in the process of the present invention are shown below as Formula II (for metals that are divalent) and as Formula III (for metals that are trivalent):

[RII−MII−(ExCNRR1)y]z  FORMULA II

[(RII)(RIII)−MIII−(ExCNRR1)y]z  FORMULA III

[0053] wherein R, R1, RII and RIII independently represent an aryl or alkyl group as defined above, which may be substituted and/or unsaturated; MII is a divalent metal ion; MIII is a trivalent metal ion; E is any one of an oxide ion, a selenide ion, a sulphide group, a phosphide group or an arsenide ion, or combinations thereof (such as, by way of example, —O—S—); x is an integer, preferably 2; y is an integer; and z is an integer, usually 1 or 2.

[0054] As mentioned above, a highly preferred metal complex containing at least one organic group for use as a single molecule precursor in the process of the present invention is methyl diethyldiselenocarbamato cadmium (II) (MeCddsc) wherein R is C2H5; R1 is C2H5; RII is (CH3); M is CdII; E is Se; x is 2; y is 1; and z is 2.

[0055] However, other preferred metal complexes containing at least one organic group for use as single molecule precursors in the process of the present invention include

M−(E2CNAlk2)n  FORMULA IV

[0056] wherein n is 2 for metals such as zinc, cadmium and lead; n is 3 for metals such as gallium or indium; E is S or Se; and A is an aryl or alkyl group, preferably ethyl; including carbamate (i.e. O-donors) thereof: and either

RII−M−(E2CNA2)n  FORMULA V

[0057] or

(RII)n−M−(E2CNA2)  FORMULA VI

[0058] wherein n is 1 for metals such as zinc, cadmium and lead; n is 2 for metals such as gallium or indium; E is S or Se; A is an aryl or an alkyl group, preferably ethyl; and RII is independently selected from an alkyl or aryl group as defined above, such as methyl.

[0059] Other possible metal complexes for use as single molecule precursors in the process of the present invention include related thiolates, thiophosphinates or phosphinochalcogens and related selenium containing compounds.

[0060] The present invention will now be described only by way of examples. In the examples, reference is made to the attached Figures wherein

[0061]FIG. 1 is a scheme of the synthetic method of CdSe nanocrystallites using a single source;

[0062]FIG. 2 is an optical absorption spectrum of CdSe nanocrystallites dispersed in toluene (fraction 3)—the inset shows the particle size distribution of the same sample as determined by TEM; and

[0063]FIG. 3 is a fluorescence emission spectra of size fractionated CdSe (Xexc = 465 nm).

Experimental 1. Preparation of nanocrystalline cadmium selenide

[0064] 1.1 MeCddsc was synthesised by the comproportionation reaction27 between Cd(CH3)2 (Epichem) and bisdiethyldiselenocarbamato cadmium (II) in dry toluene, at room temperature, using Schlenk techniques and a nitrogen atmosphere. The TOPO (90%, Aldrich) was purified using the method described in the literature.28 The identity of MeCddsc and the purity of TOPO were checked by 1H nmr and IR spectroscopy and melting point measurements.

[0065] 1.2 MeCddsc (0.5 mmol) was placed in 10 ml of TOP (98%, Aldrich) and the mixture formed was filtered after which was injected in 30 g of TOPO at 200° C. The temperature of the solution was then raised to 250° C. and heated for half an hour. The deep red solution that formed was allowed to cool down to 75° C. after which a large excess of dry CH3OH (BDH) was added. A flocculate precipitate formed and was isolated by centrifugation and redispersed in toluene, any insoluble material was then discarded. The toluene was pumped off under vacuum (10 −2 Torr) to give a deep red material which was washed with CH3OH. The solid was redispersed in toluene to give solutions with a Port wine red colour which remained optically clear for weeks. Size selective precipitation was performed by adding CH3OH to this solution until turbidity was observed followed by centrifugation the solid. This procedure was successively applied to the supernatant solutions obtained during the fractionation process until no optical absorption was detected.

[0066] 1.3 The toluene solutions containing the nanocrystallites were characterised by optical absorption spectroscopy (Philips PU 8710 spectrophotometer) and fluorescence emission spectroscopy (Perkin Elmer LS50 luminescence spectrometer), at room temperature. The fluorescence spectra were normalized with the maximum set to one hundred. The X-ray powder diffraction experiments were performed using a Philips 1130 X-ray generator and a Guinier camera. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the nanocrystallites was performed using a JEOL-JEM 1200 EX II scanning and transmission electron microscope, operating at 100 kV, on samples deposited over carbon coated copper grids. The histogram was obtained after measuring the diameter of around 300 nanoparticles shown on the TEM images. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was performed using a JEOL FX 2000 instrument, operating at 200 kV, on samples deposited over carbon coated copper grids.

[0067] 1.4 The optical absorption spectrum of a toluene solution containing nanodispersed CdSe obtained from the thermal decomposition of MeCddsc is shown in FIG. 2. The absorption edge of the spectrum is clearly blue shifted in relation to the bulk band gap of CdSe (716 nm, 1.73 eV) suggesting the presence of nanoparticles with sizes below the bulk exciton dimensions of CdSe. The maximum observed in the optical spectrum of nanodispersed CdSe has been associated with the lowest energy electronic transition occurring in the CdSe nanocrystallites.21-25

[0068] 1.5 The emission fluorescence spectra of different size fractionated samples of CdSe are depicted in FIG. 3. The size selective precipitation is based on the fact that the largest particles are the first to precipitate, due to the stronger Van der Waals interactions, on the addition of a non-solvent to the nanodispersed material. Using this procedure it is possible to obtain initial solid fractions richer in larger particles as compared with the later fractions. The maximum of the emission band in FIG. 3 is gradually blue shifted as the size distributions become weighted of smaller dimensions particles. Such shifts on the band edge (FIG. 2) and band maximum (FIG. 3) in the absorption and emission spectra, respectively, have been reported as an evidence of quantum size effects.1-7

[0069] 1.6 The fluorescence spectrum of fraction 3 corresponds to the optical absorption spectrum in FIG. 2. The emission band maximum is observed at a wavelength close to the absorption edge of the optical spectrum (band edge emission); the typical red emission due to the recombination of charge carriers on deep traps located at the particles surface was not detected. These results suggest that surface coverage with TOPO molecules should have occurred on the CdSe nanocrystallites.2,24-26 The energy dispersive analysis X-ray results (EDAX) for CdSe nanocrystallites (after several washings with methanol) still show the presence of phosphorous, suggesting that the TOPO molecules are quite firmly bond to the CdSe nanocrystallites.

[0070] 1.7 The dark red powder obtained from the synthesis gave an X-ray diffraction pattern consistent with hexagonal CdSe. The TEM image of the fraction 3 of CdSe giving the spectra in FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 was studied. The mean particle diameter of the nanocrytalline material was found to be 51.9±7.4 Angstroms. The TEM results show that the CdSe nanocrystallites are approximately spherical and close to monodispersed. On the basis of the effective mass approximation4 the excitonic peak located at 568 nm (2.18 eV) suggests the presence of CdSe nanoparticles with a diameter close to 57 Angstroms, discrepancies between the experimentally measured particle diameter and the predictions of the effective mass approximation have been reported by other authors.24

[0071] 1.8 The crystallinity of the CdSe nanoparticles was confirmed by HRTEM. The HRTEM images showed the typical hexagonal pattern of the wurtzite structure for some of the particles in agreement with the X-ray powder diffraction results. The analysis of several images are consistent with the presence of some CdSe nanocrystallites with stacking faults. This type of defect for CdSe nanocrystallites has been reported by other authors24. Alivisatos et al.25 reported the synthesis of CdSe nanocrystallites, using a TOPO method at higher temperatures for which no stacking faults were detected.

2. Preparation of nanocrystalline indium sulihide

[0072] 2.1 Initially Me2InS2CNEt2 was prepared by a comproportionation reaction between stoichiometric amounts of tris(diethyldithiocarbarmato)indium(III) (5.7 g, 10.2 mmol) and trimethylindium (3.3 g) in toluene (40 mL). The mixture was stirred at room temperature for half an hour and then heated to 50° C. and stirred for further 10 min. On concentration, white crystals settled out from the clear solution (7.90 g, 88%), mp 84° C.

[0073] 2.2 The compound prepared by the process of 2.1 was then used to replace MeCddsc in Section 1.2 (supra). The product, nanocrystalline indium sulphide, was then analysed using the methods outlined in Sections 1.4-1.8 (supra).

3. Preparation of nanocrystalline gallium sulhide

[0074] 3.1 Initially Me2GaS2CNEt2 was prepared by a comproportionation reaction between stoichiometric amounts of tris(diethyldithiocarbarmato)gallium(III) and trimethylgallium in toluene (40 mL). The mixture was stirred at room temperature for half an hour and then heated to 50° C. and stirred for further 10 min. On concentration, crystals settled out from the solution.

[0075] 3.2 The compound prepared by the process of 3.1 was then used to replace MeCddsc in Section 1.2 (supra). The product, nanocrystalline gallium sulphide, was then analysed using the methods outlined in Sections 1.4-1.8 (supra).

4. Preparation of other precursors for the preparation of nanocrystalline indium sulphide and nanocrystalline gallium sulphide

[0076] 4.1 The precursor molecules described in Sections 2.1 and 3.1 could be respectively replaced with Et2InS2CNEt2, Np2InS2CNEt2, Et2GaS2CNEt2, and Np2GaS2CNEt2. In this regard these compounds were prepared by the following general protocol, which refers to the preparation of Et2InS2CNEt, though of course the other compounds are prepared by use of similar and appropriate reactants.

[0077] 4.2 Et2InS2CNEt2 was prepared by adding sodium diethyldithiocarbarmate (2.73 g, 15.97 mmol) to a solution of chlorodiethylindium (3.33 g, 15.97 mmol) in ether (60 mL) and stirred for 12 h at room temperature. A white solid (NaCl) formed during the reaction which was removed by filtration. The colourless filtrate containing the product was evaporated to dryness under vacuum. The solid product contained traces of salt and was dissolved in petroleum spirits (60-80° C.) and filtered. The filtrate, on concentration, gave white crystals of diethyldiethyldithiocarbamatoindium (III) (3.33 g, 65%), mp 57° C.

[0078] 4.3 As mentioned above, Np2InS2CNEt2 was prepared in a similar manner and was obtained as a white crystalline solid (2.97 g, 70%), mp 44° C.

[0079] 4.4 As mentioned above, Et2GaS2CNEt2 (4.51 g, 75%) and Np2GaS2CNEt2 (3.25 g. 72%), both liquids, were prepared in a similar manner.

[0080] 4.5 The compounds of 4.1 to 4.4 were then used to replace MeCddsc in Section 1.2 (supra). The respective nanocrystalline products were then analysed using the methods outlined in Sections 1.4-1.8 (supra).

5. Preparation of nanocrystalline zinc sulphide

[0081] 5.1 Initially [Zn[S2CNMe1Pr]2]2 was prepared as follows. A mixture of “zinc hydroxide” (4.77 g, 48 mmol), N-methylisopropylamine (10 ml, 96 mmol) and carbon disulphide (5.76 ml, 96 mmol) were suspended in ethanol and stirred at ca. 60° C. for 2 hours. On cooling, the reaction mixture was filtered affording a white solid which was then dried at room temperature in vacuo and recrystallised from acetone. Yield 11.7 g, 67.6%.

[0082] 5.2 The compound prepared by the process of 5.1 was then used to replace MeCddsc in Section 1.2 (supra). The product, nanocrystalline zinc sulphide, was then analysed using the methods outlined in Sections 1.4-1.8 (supra).

6. Preparation of nanocrystalline cadmium sulphide

[0083] 6.1 Initially [Cd[S2CNMe1Pr]2]2 was prepared as follows. A mixture of cadmium hydroxide, N-methylisopropylamine and carbon disulphide were suspended in ethanol and stirred at ca. 60° C. for 2 hours. On cooling, the reaction mixture was filtered affording a solid which was then dried at room temperature in vacuo and recrystallised from acetone.

[0084] 6.2 The compound prepared by the process of 6.1 was then used to replace MeCddsc in Section 1.2 (supra). The product, nanocrystalline cadmium sulphide, was then analysed using the methods outlined in Sections 1.4-1.8 (supra).

7. Preparation of nanocrystalline zinc arsenide

[0085] 7.1 Initially [Zn[As2CNMe1Pr]2]2 was prepared by appropriately adapting the process of Section 5.1 (supra).

[0086] 7.2 The compound prepared by the process of 7.1 was then used to replace MeCddsc in Section 1.2 (supra). The product, nanocrystalline zinc arsenide was then analysed using the methods outlined in Sections 1.4-1.8 (supra).

8. Preparation of nanocrystalline cadmium arsenide

[0087] 8.1 Initially [Cd[As2CNMe1Pr]2]2 was prepared by appropriately adapting the process of Section 6.1 (supra).

[0088] 8.2 The compound prepared by the process of 8.1 was then used to replace MeCddsc in Section 1.2 (supra). The product, nanocrystalline cadmium arsenide was then analysed using the methods outlined in Sections 1.4-1.8 (supra).

9. Preparation of further nanocrystalline materials

[0089] 9.1 The following compounds were used to replace MeCddsc in Section 1.2 (supra). The respective nanocrystalline materials were then analysed using the methods outlined in Sections 1.4-1.8 (supra).

[0090] 9.2 The following commentary describes the preparation of (C5H11)2GaPtBu2, however the process can be appropriately adapted for the preparation of (C5H11)2IndiumPtBu2, (C5H11)2GalliunAsBu2, and (C5H11)2IndiumAsBu2.

[0091] 9.3 To prepare (C5H11)2GaPtBu2, LiPtBu2 was initially prepared by the addition of HPtBu2(5 g, 33.4 mmol) to a stirred solution of nBuLi (14.24 cm3 of 2.5 M solution in hexanes, 35.6 mmol) diluted further with petroleum spirits (60-80° C., 50 cm3, 0° C.). The solution was left to stir overnight, concentrated, and then left to crystallise. (C5H11)2GaCl(2) (2.56 g, 10.34 mmol) was dissolved in ether (60 cm3) and stirred at 0° C. LiPtBu2 (1.57 g, 10.33 mmol) was slowly added and the mixture was allowed to reach ambient temperature. After stirring overnight, the solvent was removed under vacuum leaving a white solid. Petroleum spirits (60-80° C.) (30 cm3) were added to the solid. After decanting the supernatant, the solution was concentrated and left to crystallise at −-25° C. Colourless, triangular shaped crystals formed, yield 3.12 g, (84 %), m.p. 81° C.

10. Summary

[0092] The results reported here clearly show that nanocrystalline materials such as nanocrystalline MeSe can be easily prepared from molecular compounds such as MeCddsc. Moreover, these prepared nanocrystalline materials can be used as or in high quality semiconductors.

[0093] Other modifications of the present invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification423/87, 423/566.1, 423/509, 423/92, 423/122, 423/101, 257/E33.005
International ClassificationH01L31/032, H01L33/20, H01L31/18, C01B19/00, C01G15/00, C01B25/08, C01G9/08, C01G11/02, C01B31/02, C01B17/20, H01L33/18
Cooperative ClassificationH01L31/032, C01P2002/70, C01P2002/85, C01B17/20, C01P2002/84, C01B25/08, B82Y30/00, C01P2004/64, Y02E10/543, C01P2004/04, C01P2004/22, C01P2006/60, B82Y40/00, C01P2002/80, C01B31/0206, C01P2006/34, C01G15/00, H01L33/20, H01L33/18, H01L31/1828, C01G9/08, C01G11/02, C01B19/007
European ClassificationB82Y30/00, H01L31/032, H01L31/18D, B82Y40/00, C01G11/02, C01G15/00, C01B25/08, C01G9/08, C01B31/02B, C01B19/00P, C01B17/20
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