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Publication numberUS20010007640 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/733,370
Publication dateJul 12, 2001
Filing dateDec 8, 2000
Priority dateJul 16, 1997
Also published asEP1012579A2, US6025985, US6033100, US6071748, US6159425, US6187267, US6313960, US6499366, US20010021074, WO1999004228A2, WO1999004228A3, WO1999004228A9
Publication number09733370, 733370, US 2001/0007640 A1, US 2001/007640 A1, US 20010007640 A1, US 20010007640A1, US 2001007640 A1, US 2001007640A1, US-A1-20010007640, US-A1-2001007640, US2001/0007640A1, US2001/007640A1, US20010007640 A1, US20010007640A1, US2001007640 A1, US2001007640A1
InventorsGlenn Edwards, Derrick Richardson, Joseph Leytes, Douglas Modlin
Original AssigneeEdwards Glenn R., Richardson Derrick A., Leytes Joseph S., Modlin Douglas N.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shelf and frame structure defining support area; central opening permitting analysis of sample from below holder; transfer device configured to transfer sample container to holder through open end in support area
US 20010007640 A1
Abstract
Devices and methods for supporting a sample container. In one embodiment, the device includes a holder for supporting a sample container, and a releasable clamp mechanism that applies a force against a side of the sample container. In another embodiment, the device includes a holder for supporting a sample container, wherein the holder has a central opening that permits analysis of a sample to be carried out from below the holder, and an open end that permits a sample container transfer device to enter a portion of the holder. In yet another embodiment, the device includes a holder for supporting a sample container, and drive mechanisms that move the holder between a docking station outside an analyzer and an examination site inside the analyzer, so that the holder can function both as a sample delivery device in and out of the analyzer, and as a moveable stage for supporting the sample container at the examination site. The method includes automatically delivering a sample container just outside an opening to the analyzer, moving a gripping device from inside the analyzer, through the opening, to a location immediately below the sample container, and gently placing the sample container onto the gripping device.
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Claims(20)
We claim:
1. A support device for a sample container, the device comprising:
a holder including shelf structure and associated frame structure at least partially defining a support area for supporting a sample container;
wherein the holder has a central opening that permits analysis of a sample to be carried out from below the holder; and
wherein the holder has an open end that permits a transfer device to enter the support area through a side of the holder, the transfer device being configured to transfer the sample container to the holder.
2. The support device of
claim 1
, wherein the sample container is a microplate.
3. The support device of
claim 1
, wherein the support area is generally rectangular.
4. The support device of
claim 3
, further comprising the transfer device, where the transfer device, after moving into the support area, can move down relative to the holder, thereby placing the sample container into the generally rectangular area of the holder.
5. The support device of
claim 1
further comprising a removable connector portion configured to close the open end.
6. The support device of
claim 1
further comprising a first releasable clamp mechanism that applies a force against a first side of the sample container, thereby securing the sample container in the holder.
7. The device of
claim 6
further comprising a second releasable clamp mechanism that applies a force against a second side of the sample container, thereby securing the sample container in the holder from two sides.
8. The device of
claim 7
, wherein the first and second releasable clamp mechanisms operate in series.
9. The device of
claim 8
, wherein the first and second releasable clamp mechanisms include releasable arm members.
10. The support device of
claim 1
further comprising a first drive mechanism that moves the holder along an X-axis between a docking station outside an analyzer and an examination site inside the analyzer.
11. The support device of
claim 10
further comprising a second drive mechanism that moves the holder along a Y-axis perpendicular to the X-axis when the holder is at the examination site, so that the holder can function both as a sample delivery device in and out of the analyzer, and as a moveable stage for supporting the sample container at the examination site.
12. A support device for a sample container, the device comprising:
a holder;
a first drive mechanism that moves the holder along an X-axis between a docking station outside an analyzer and an examination site inside the analyzer; and
a second drive mechanism that moves the holder along a Y-axis perpendicular to the X-axis when the holder is at the examination site, so that the holder can function both as a sample delivery device in and out of the analyzer, and as a moveable stage for supporting the sample container at the examination site.
13. The device of
claim 12
, wherein the holder includes shelf structure and associated frame structure at least partially defining a generally rectangular area for supporting a microplate, the generally rectangular area having a central opening so that analysis can be carried out from below the holder when the holder is functioning as a stage at the examination site.
14. The device of
claim 12
, wherein the first and second drive mechanisms are capable of optimizing the acceleration/deceleration profiles of the sample container to minimize shaking of samples contained within the sample container.
15. A method of automatically feeding sample containers in and out of an analyzer, the method comprising:
automatically delivering a sample container just outside an opening to the analyzer;
moving a gripping device from inside the analyzer, through the opening, to a location immediately below the sample container; and
placing the sample container onto the gripping device.
16. The method of
claim 15
, wherein the sample container is a microplate.
17. The method of
claim 15
, further comprising clamping the sample container in the holder by applying a first force against a first side of the sample container.
18. The method of
claim 17
, further comprising clamping the sample container in the holder by applying a second force against a second side of the sample container.
19. The method of
claim 18
, further comprising serially performing the clamping steps.
20. The method of
claim 15
, the gripping device having a central aperture and an open end, wherein the step of placing the sample container onto the gripping device includes the steps of entering the central aperture through the open end and moving down relative to the gripping device until the sample container is supported by the gripping device above the central aperture.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/144,575, filed Aug. 31, 1998, which is incorporated herein by reference.

[0002] This application is a continuation of the following patent applications, each of which is incorporated herein by reference: U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/062,472, filed Apr. 17, 1998; PCT Patent Application Ser. No. PCT/US98/14575, filed Jul. 15, 1998; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/118,141, filed Jul. 16, 1998; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/118,310, filed Jul. 16, 1998; and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/118,341, filed Jul. 16, 1998.

[0003] This application is based upon and claims benefit under 35 U.S.C. § 119 of the following U.S. Provisional Patent Applications, each of which is incorporated herein by reference: Ser. No. 60/052,876, filed Jul. 16, 1997; Ser. No. 60/059,639, filed Sep. 20, 1997; Ser. No. 60/063,811, filed Oct. 31, 1997; Ser. No. 60/072,499, filed Jan. 26, 1998; Ser. No. 60/072,780, filed Jan. 27, 1998; Ser. No. 60/075,414, filed Feb. 20, 1998; Ser. No. 60/075,806, filed Feb. 24, 1998; Ser. No. 60/082,253, filed Apr. 17, 1998; Ser. No. 60/084,167, filed May 4, 1998; Ser. No. 60/085,335, filed May 13, 1998; Ser. No. 60/085,500, filed May 14, 1998; Ser. No. 60/089,848, filed Jun. 19, 1998; Ser. No. 60/094,275, filed Jul. 27, 1998; Ser. No. 60/094,276, filed Jul. 27, 1998; and Ser. No. 60/094,306, filed Jul. 27, 1998.

[0004] This application incorporates by reference the following U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/144,578, filed Aug. 31, 1998.

[0005] FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0006] The invention relates to a device for high-throughput screening. More particularly, the invention relates to a device for supporting and transporting microplates in an analyzer for high-throughput screening.

[0007] BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0008] High-throughput screening instruments (or analyzers) are critical tools in the pharmaceutical research industry and in the process of discovering and developing new drugs. High-throughput analyzers are used to assess the efficacy of candidate drug compounds. Dramatic increases in the number of these compounds and in the number of targets against which they may be directed have created a bottleneck in the development of new drugs and a need for analyzers that can operate with a high degree of analytical flexibility and speed. Analytical flexibility and speed are necessary because high-throughput applications may involve repeating the same operations hundreds of thousands of times, greatly magnifying even the smallest shortcomings.

[0009] One way to increase speed and analytical flexibility is to house a variety of small-volume samples in a single container. Toward this end, high-density containers known as microplates have been developed. Microplates are generally rectangular containers that include a plurality of sample wells for holding a plurality of samples. Microplates enhance speed by reducing transit time between samples and reduce cost by employing small amounts of reagents. Unfortunately, microplates also have a number of shortcomings. For example, microplates do not conform to any exact standard, so that their size, shape, and construction materials may vary, depending on vendor or batch. In addition, microplates may vary from opaque to transparent, so that analytical approaches developed for some microplates will not work for other microplates. Moreover, preferred microplates may differ, depending on application. Furthermore, microplates may allot only a small volume for each sample, reducing signal and making it easier to spill sample during transit.

[0010] Another way to increase speed and analytical flexibility is to use robots and other devices to automate high-throughput screening procedures. For example, robots permit analyzers to run 24 hours a day. Unfortunately, current robotic systems have a number of shortcomings. For example, robots may have difficulty setting and positioning a sample container in a holder, particularly if different sample containers are of different sizes.

[0011] Another way to increase speed and analytical flexibility is to use a luminescence assay. These assays typically are run in the dark, so that analyzers must be placed in a housing or in a light-tight room, which is darkened when the analyzer is in use. Unfortunately, such an approach has a number of shortcomings. For example, the housing may block convenient access to the examination area, where samples are analyzed. The light-tight room may require a dedicated room, which wastes space. The light-tight room also may require the operator of the optical system to work in the dark, which is inherently unsafe, because the operator may have difficulty seeing the equipment, and because the operator may become drowsy.

[0012] SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0013] The present invention addresses these and other shortcomings by providing a sample container support device that includes (1) a holder including shelf structure and associated frame structure at least partially defining a support area for supporting a microplate, and (2) a first releasable clamp mechanism that applies a force against a first side of the microplate, thereby securing the microplate in the holder. The support area is slightly larger than an expected peripheral dimension of the sample container. The sample container support device may include a second releasable clamp mechanism that applies a force against a second side of the sample container, thereby securing the sample container in the holder from two sides. The first and second releasable clamp mechanisms may operate in series, and/or may position the sample container in a preselected portion of the holder.

[0014] The invention also may provide a sample container support device that includes a holder including (1) shelf structure and associated frame structure at least partially defining a support area for supporting a sample container, (2) a central opening that permits analysis of a sample to be carried out from below the holder, and (3) an open end that permits a sample container transfer device to enter the support area of the holder.

[0015] The invention also may provide a sample container support device that includes (1) a holder, and (2) drive mechanisms that move the holder between a docking station outside an analyzer and an examination site inside the analyzer, so that the holder can function both as a sample delivery device in and out of the analyzer, and as a moveable stage for supporting the sample container at the examination site. The first and second drive mechanisms may be capable of optimizing the acceleration/deceleration profiles of the sample container to minimize shaking of samples contained within the sample container.

[0016] The invention also may provide a method of automatically feeding sample containers in and out of an analyzer that includes (1) automatically delivering a sample container just outside an opening to the analyzer, (2) moving a gripping device from inside the analyzer, through the opening, to a location immediately below the sample container, and (3) gently placing the sample container onto the gripping device. The method further may include clamping the sample container in the holder by applying a first force against a first side of the sample container, a second force against a second side of the sample container, and/or serially performing the clamping steps.

[0017] The invention will be understood more readily after consideration of the drawings and the detailed description of the invention that follow.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

[0018]FIG. 1 is a partially exploded perspective view of an analyzer, showing a transporter and sample feeder constructed in accordance with the invention.

[0019]FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the top of a transporter constructed in accordance with the invention.

[0020]FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the bottom of the transporter shown in FIG. 2.

[0021]FIG. 4 is a partial cross-sectional view of the transporter shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, taken generally along the line 4-4 in FIG. 3.

[0022]FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a base platform and associated drive mechanisms for moving a transporter along X and Y axes relative to the base platform.

[0023]FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a sample feeder constructed in accordance with the invention, with bins removed so that internal mechanisms of the sample feeder can be viewed.

[0024]FIGS. 7A and 7B are cross-sectional views through a first (input) station of the sample feeder shown in FIG. 6, taken generally along the line 7AB-7AB in FIG. 6 and showing latch and lifter cooperation to remove a microplate from the bottom of a stack.

[0025]FIGS. 8A and 8B are cross-sectional views through a third (output) station of the sample feeder shown in FIG. 6, taken generally along the line 8AB-8AB in FIG. 6 and showing latch and lifter cooperation to add a microplate to the bottom of a stack.

[0026]FIG. 9 is a side elevation view of a lifter from the sample feeder shown in FIG. 6.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0027]FIG. 1 shows a high-throughput luminescence analyzer 50 constructed in accordance with the invention. Components of the analyzer are maintained in a housing 100, both for organization and for protection. Housing 100 is substantially rectangular and includes light-tight exterior top 102, side 103 a-d, and bottom walls 104 that reduce background in luminescence measurements. The walls may include vents 106 to facilitate air flow through the analyzer and a transporter port 107 for sample input/output. Housing 100 also may include feet 108 to support the analyzer and to permit air flow between the analyzer and any support structure on which the analyzer is placed.

[0028] Analyzer 50 is substantially automated. The analyzer is designed so that user interactions occur primarily through a control unit 110, an electronic input/output panel 112, and a break-out box (not shown), each of which supports a variety of input/output functions. The analyzer also is designed so that sample input/output occurs primarily through a transporter/stage 114 and an optional sample feeder 116.

[0029] Transporter 114 generally comprises any device for supporting a sample container. In analyzer 50, transporter 114 moves between the interior and exterior of the analyzer, and may be used alone or together with sample feeder 116 for sample input/output.

[0030] Sample feeder 116 generally comprises any device for automatically processing multiple samples. In analyzer 50, sample feeder 116 includes a first (input) station 118 for holding sample containers to be read, a third (output) station 120 for holding sample containers that have been read, and a second (direct transporter access) station 122 for inputting or outputting sample containers that bypasses the input and output stations. Input and output stations 118, 120 accommodate preprocessing and postprocessing sample containers bins 124, 126 that hold and organize stacks of sample containers before and after reading, respectively. Sample feeder 116 also may include a barcode reader 128 for automatically identifying labeled sample containers.

[0031] The sample container generally comprises any container for holding at least one sample. Preferred sample containers include microplates. Other suitable sample containers include any sample containers having a shape and rigidity suitable for processing in an analyzer, such as slides or supported gels.

Sample Transporter

[0032] FIGS. 2-5 show a stage, which generally comprises any mechanism for supporting a composition in a sample container for analysis by the analyzer. In analyzer 50, the stage includes a transporter 200 and base platform 300.

[0033] FIGS. 2-4 show transporter 200, which includes a transporter body 202 and substantially parallel first and second transporter flanges 204 a,b that extend outward from transporter body 202. First and second transporter flanges 204 a,b terminate in first and second transporter extensions 206 a,b that turn in toward one another without contacting one another. Transporter extensions 206 a,b may be joined by a connector portion 207. Transporter body 202, flanges 204 a,b, and extensions 206 a,b lie substantially in a plane and define a transporter cavity 208 that is larger than the expected peripheral dimension of any sample containers which the transporter is intended to support. The shape of this cavity is chosen to accommodate the shape of the preferred sample containers. In analyzer 50, cavity 208 is generally rectangular to accommodate generally rectangular sample containers, such as microplates. In analyzer 50, long sides of the rectangular sample container are positioned against flanges 204 a,b.

[0034] Transporter 200 includes a shelf structure and associated frame structure for supporting a microplate or other sample container. For example, transporter shelves 210 along portions of body 202, flanges 204 a,b and extensions 206 a,b form a shelf structure that supports the bottom of the sample container. The shelf structure also could include other support mechanisms, such as pins or pegs.

[0035] The transporter also includes an automatic sample container positioning mechanism 220 for positioning sample containers precisely and reproducibly within cavity 208. Mechanism 220 includes Y and X axis positioning arms 222 a,b that contact the sample container to control its Y and X position, respectively. Here, a Y axis is defined as generally parallel to transporter flanges 204 a,b, and an X axis is defined as perpendicular to the Y axis and generally parallel to transporter extensions 206 a,b. Other coordinate systems also can be defined, so long as they include two noncolinear directions.

[0036] Y-axis positioning arm 222 a lies substantially within a channel 224 in body 202. Y-axis positioning arm 222 a includes a rod 226 a, which is bent at substantially right angles to form three substantially coplanar and equal-lengthed segments. A first end segment 228 a of rod 226 a terminates near cavity 208 in a bumper 232 for engaging a sample container. A second end segment 234 a of rod 226 a terminates away from cavity 208 in an actuator tab 236 a for controlling movement of arm 222 a. Actuator tab 236 a is bent away from body 202. First and second end segments 228 a, 234 a are substantially parallel. A middle segment 238 a of rod 226 a connects the two end segments at their nontabbed ends 240, 241. An X-axis biasing spring 242 a having first and second spring ends 244, 248 is slipped over rod 226 a. First spring end 244 is held to second end segment 234 a of rod 226 a by a clamping-type retaining ring 250. Second spring end 248 rests against a rod bearing 252. The Y-axis biasing spring extends substantially parallel to first and second end segments 228 a, 234 a. The force from spring 242 a is transmitted to rod 226 a by the clamping action of retaining ring 250.

[0037] X-axis positioning arm 222 b also lies substantially within channel 224 in body 202 and is similar to Y-axis positioning arm, except that (1) first end segment 228 b is longer and middle segment 238 b is shorter in rod 226 b of the X-axis positioning arm than in rod 226 a of the Y-axis positioning arm, (2) first end segment 228 a terminates in a lever tab 253 in the X-axis positioning arm rather than in bumper 232 in the Y-axis positioning arm, and (3) the two rods bend in opposite directions between first end segments 228 a,b and second end segments 234 a,b.

[0038] X-axis positioning arm 222 b is connected via lever tab 253 to an X-axis positioning lever 254 that lies along transporter flange 204 b. X-axis positioning lever 254 includes first and second lever projections 256, 258 and is pivotally mounted about a lever pivot axis 259 to transporter 200 near the intersection of body 202 and flange 204 b. First lever projection 256 is substantially perpendicular to flange 204 b and abuts lever tab 230 b on X-axis positioning arm 222 b for actuating the positioning lever. Second lever projection 258 also is substantially perpendicular to flange 204 b and includes an edge 260 for contacting a sample container.

[0039] Transporter 200 functions as follows. For loading, the transporter occupies a loading position substantially outside a housing. In this position, actuator tabs 236 a,b abut an actuator bar 270, shown in FIG. 5. In addition, biasing springs 242 a,b are compressed, and bumper 232 and second projection 258 having edge 260 are pulled out of cavity 208. A person, robot, or mechanical stacker then can place a sample container into cavity 208 so that the bottom of the sample container rests on shelves 210. Cavity 208 is larger than the sample container to facilitate this placement and to accommodate variations in sample container size.

[0040] In some configurations, connector portion 207 may be removed, such that transporter 200 has an open end. This open end permits a microplate transfer device to enter cavity 208 and the generally rectangular area of the holder. The microplate transfer device may, after moving into the generally rectangular area, move down relative to transporter 200, thereby gently placing the microplate into the generally rectangular area.

[0041] For reading, the transporter must deliver the sample container to an examination site inside the housing. In this process, the transporter moves parallel to second end segments 234 a,b, and actuator tabs 236 a,b disengage actuator bar 270. Biasing spring 242 a pushes Y-axis positioning arm 222 a toward cavity 208. Bumper 232 engages the sample container and pushes it away from body 202 until it abuts extensions 206 a,b. Biasing spring 242 b pushes X-axis positioning arm 222 b toward cavity 208. Edge 260 of second projection 258 engages the sample container and pushes it away from flange 204 b until it abuts flange 204 a.

[0042] As long as the sample container is placed in any position on the lower guide shelves, it may be positioned (registered) precisely and reproducibly against a reference corner 272 within cavity 208 under the action of both positioning arms. Biasing springs 242 a,b can be chosen to have different strengths, so that the X-Y positioning action is performed less or more forcefully. In analyzer 50, middle segment 238 b and first lever projection 256 of positioning lever 254 can be varied in length to cause registration to occur in series, first along the X-axis or first along the Y-axis, and second along the Y-axis or second along the X-axis, respectively. For example, reducing the length of middle segment 238 b and reducing the length of projection 256 will cause registration to occur first in the X-axis, and second in the Y-axis.

[0043] Positioning lever 254 and bumper 232 are retracted when body 202 of the automatic microplate positioning transporter is moved to the eject position by the X,Y stage. Thus, the microplate is placed on transporter shelf 210 only when the lever and bumper are retracted. Two springs 242 a,b are attached to the rods, which run along the length of the transporter body and end perpendicular to the body. When the transporter is moved to the eject position, the two perpendicular ends of the rods encounter a stop 270, which consists of a rectangular structure located above and parallel to the body. The stop prevents the two perpendicular ends of the actuators, and thus the actuators, from moving with the transporter body. This causes the two springs to contract, changing the position of the transporter arms and increasing the amount of room for the microplate. The microplate then can be placed on the guide shelf of the body. When the body of the automatic microplate positioning transporter is moved back away from the stop, the two perpendicular ends of the actuators no longer are blocked, which allows the actuators, springs, and transporter arms to move into their original position. The expansion of the springs pushes the microplate exactly into position, as defined by the reference corner.

[0044] Thus, components of transporter 200 act as first and second releasable clamp mechanisms. The first releasable clamp mechanism applies a force against a first (e.g., Y or X) side of the microplate, thereby securing the microplate in the holder. The second releasable clamp mechanism applies a force against a second (e.g., X or Y) side of the microplate, thereby securing the microplate in the holder from two sides. These clamp mechanisms may sandwich a microplate between the positioning arms and opposing portions of the frame structure, such that the positioning arms function as pushers and the opposing portions of the frame structure function as bumpers for the clamp mechanisms.

[0045] The invention provides a method of automatically feeding microplates in and out of an analyzer. The method comprises (1) automatically delivering a microplate just outside an opening to the analyzer, (2) moving a gripping device from inside the analyzer, through the opening, to a location immediately below the microplate; and (3) gently placing the microplate onto the gripping device. The method further may comprise clamping the microplate in the holder by applying a first force against a first side of the microplate, applying a second force against a second side of the microplate, and/or serially performing the clamping steps.

[0046]FIG. 5 shows a base platform 300 with drive mechanisms for moving a transporter 302 between loading and examination positions or sites. As previously described, transporter 302 includes flanges 304 a,b defining a cavity 306 for receiving and gripping a microplate (not shown). A Y-axis drive mechanism 307 is provided for moving transporter 302 along a first track 308 relative to the Y-axis, from a loading position 310 toward an examination position 312. An X-axis drive mechanism 313 is provided to move transporter 302 to examination position 312 along a second track 314 relative to the X-axis.

[0047] In operation, a microplate is loaded in transporter 302 at loading position 310. Transporter 302 is driven toward the examination position by Y-axis drive mechanism 307. A sensor (not shown) detects the presence of the sample container. The analyzer may be configured automatically to read the microplate once the sensor detects its presence, or the analyzer may be configured to signal the system controller through a data port that a microplate has been received and that the analyzer is ready to accept a command to begin reading. The X- and Y-axis drive mechanisms then operate together to align selected microplate wells with an optical axis, substantially parallel to a Z-axis, along which a sensed volume for luminescence detection may be defined by optical components contained in one or both of a top and bottom optics head positioned above and below base platform 300, respectively.

[0048] Transporter 300 thus may function both as a sample delivery device in and out of the analyzer, and as a moveable stage for supporting the sample container at the examination site. The cavity in the transporter permits analysis to be carried out from below the holder, when the transporter is functioning as a stage at the examination site.

[0049] X- and Y-axis drive mechanisms 307 and 313 may be controlled by a high-performance motion control system that maximizes throughput while minimizing detection errors. A preferred high-performance control system includes precision five-phase stepper motors that employ encoder feedback to move the microplate quickly and accurately to each read position. The control system may optimize the acceleration/deceleration profiles of the microplate to minimize shaking of fluid within the microplate, for example, by minimizing “jerk” (the time rate of change of the acceleration of the microplate). Alternatively, the control system may increase throughput by moving plates more quickly, if higher variation in results due to increased shaking and settling time may be tolerated.

Sample Feeder

[0050] FIGS. 6-8 show a sample feeder 400, which generally comprises any mechanism for automatic processing of multiple sample containers. Sample feeder 400 enhances convenience by reducing the amount of human intervention required to run the analyzer. Sample feeder 400 also enhances throughput by reducing the amount of time required to process multiple sample containers.

[0051] Generally, sample feeder 400 operates as follows. Before reading, a robot (1) removes a sample container from the bottom of an input stack of sample containers at an input station, (2) transports the sample container to a direct transporter access station, and (3) transfers the sample container to a transporter. After reading, the robot (1) takes the sample container from the transporter, (2) transports the sample container to an output station, and (3) transfers the sample container to the bottom of an output stack of sample containers. Sample feeder 400 requires only two motors to provide these functions with high throughput (˜5 seconds for load and unload time).

[0052]FIG. 6 shows sample feeder 400 with its preprocessing and postprocessing bins removed, so that internal mechanisms can be viewed. A microplate 402 is loaded from the bottom of a stack of microplates in the input bin into a first (input) station 404. Microplate 402 then is transported on a tray (not shown) to a second (direct transporter access) station 406, where the microplate is handed off to a transporter (not shown). The transporter transports microplate 402 generally along an axis 408 to an examination site inside the analyzer. After analysis, the transporter transports microplate 402 back along axis 408 generally in the opposite direction to second station 406. Microplate 402 then is handed back to the tray, and transported to a third (output) station 410, where the microplate is added to the bottom of a stack of microplates in an output bin.

[0053] In analyzer 50, a first linear path defined by axis 408 connects the examination site to the second station, and a second linear path connects the first, second, and third stations, wherein the first linear path is substantially perpendicular to the second linear path. However, analyzer 50 also may have other configurations. For example, the examination site and the first, second, and third stations may all be positioned along a single substantially linear path.

[0054] In input station 404, a combination of two lifters and four latches cooperate to singulate or pick a single microplate from the bottom of a stack. (These lifters are concealed by microplate 402 in FIG. 6.) Latches 412 have pick portions that extend into the cavity of first station 404 and support a stack of microplates. Latches 412 are disposed toward the microplates by configuring the latch to have a center of gravity above and inward relative to a pivot point. As the lifters are raised in the input station, the pick portions of the latches are pushed out of the way, so that the microplate can be supported and lowered by the lifters. After one microplate has passed below the latch, latches 412 move back into a supporting position relative to the remainder of the stack.

[0055] In output station 410, a different latch configuration is employed. Latches 414 are urged inward toward the microplates by a spring (not shown). When lifter 416 lifts a microplate against latches 414, the microplate pushes the latches out of the way. After one microplate has passed above the latch, latches 414 move back into a supporting position relative to the remainder of the stack.

[0056]FIGS. 7A and 7B show how input station 404 operates. FIG. 7A shows microplate 402 as it is being picked up at input station 404 prior to analysis. Lifters 418 have moved up through holes in tray 420 to contact the bottom of microplate 402, and in the process have pushed latches 412 out of the way. FIG. 7B shows the same structures as FIG. 7A, except that lifters 418 have dropped, thereby lowering microplate 402 onto tray 420 for transport to the analyzer. Pick portions of latches 412 have moved back into the cavity to support the remainder of the stack.

[0057]FIGS. 8A and 8B show how output station 410 operates. FIG. 8A shows microplate 402 after it has been delivered to output station 410 following analysis. Lifters 416 then move through holes in tray 420 to raise microplate 402 toward a stack of microplates in the output bin (not shown). FIG. 8B shows the same structures as FIG. 8A, except that lifters 416 have raised microplate 402 past latches 414. Latches 414 are spring biased toward the cavity of third station 410. As lifters 416 raise microplate 402, latches 414 are pushed out of the way by the outer contour of microplate 402. Once microplate 402 is above latches 414, the latches return to their inward position to support the stack of microplates in the output bin. Lifters 416 then retreat downward completely out of the holes in tray 420, so that the tray can translate back to input station 404 to collect another microplate for delivery to the analyzer.

[0058]FIG. 9 shows how lifter 416 operates. Generally, the lifter comprises any mechanism configured to raise or lower a sample container. Lifter 416 is substantially rectangular and includes top 422, side 423, and bottom 424 walls. Each of an opposed pair of side walls 423 includes two sloped drive channels 426, which function as cams, and a vertical guidance channel 428. In sample feeder 400, pins are inserted into drive channels 426 and guide channel 428. In alternative embodiments, pins and channels may be replaced with other components, including ridges, bearings, or rollers. Pins inserted into drive channels 426 are connected to a drive motor, which moves the pins through drive channels 426 between a top position A nearer top wall 422 and a bottom position B nearer bottom wall 424. The pins move horizontally along a line 430, so that the pins push against a side 432 of drive channels 426, urging lifter 416 to move both horizontally and vertically. Pins inserted into guidance channels 428 are connected to relatively fixed portions of sample feeder 400, preventing horizontal motion, but permitting vertical motion, so that lifter 416 only moves vertically. As the pin moves between positions A and B, the pin moves a horizontal distance H and a vertical distance V. It is the vertical displacement that creates the raising and lowering motions. H and V may be optimized for particular sample containers and travel distances; in sample feeder 400, H and V are optimized for microplates and are approximately 10 cm and 3.5 cm, respectively. Lifter 416 is raised when the pin is near position A, and lifter 416 is lowered when the pin is near position B.

[0059] In use, the drive motor moves the pins horizontally at a substantially uniform rate; consequently, the slope of drive channel 426 determines the mechanical advantage and the rate of vertical motion. Near positions A, B, and an intermediate position C, the slope of drive channel 426 is substantially zero, so that there is substantially no vertical motion. Stated differently, near positions A, B, and C, a preselected vertical position corresponds to a range of horizontal positions. This configuration makes the vertical position relatively insensitive to motor precision or manufacturing tolerance, because the lifter will be at the same vertical position whenever it simply is near positions A, B, or C. Between positions A and C, and between positions B and C, the slope of drive channel 426 is nonzero, so that there is vertical motion. The slope is largest (approximately 30°) between positions A and C, so that the lifter raises and lowers relatively rapidly when it is farthest from the bottom of the stack of sample containers. The slope is smallest (approximately 15°) between positions B and C, so that the lifter raises and lowers relatively slowly when it is nearest to the bottom of the stack of sample containers.

[0060] The drive motor generally comprises any mechanism configured to generate a driving motion. The drive motor used in sample feeder 400 is a stepper motor, which generates a constant torque. Generally, stepper motors and cams provide alternative mechanisms for performing the same function, in this case, generating a varying rate of motion. However, pairing a stepper motor and cam together in the invention provides several advantages. In particular, the cam provides mechanical advantage and positional insensitivity, and permits the stepper motor to be run at a constant, optimal speed. If the stepper motor were used alone, an electronic control system would be necessary to vary raising and lowering speed. Conversely, if the cam were used alone, with a nonstepper motor, an electronic control system with feedback control would be necessary to vary raising and lowering speed.

[0061] Together, the lifters and latches form a singulation mechanism configured to separate a microplate (or other sample container) from a stack of microplates in the down-stacking or input operation. This mechanism has inherently low sensitivity to the exact size, shape, construction material, and surface finish of the microplate. As described, the invention may include four inwardly sloping, tapered (or angled) latches that cause the stack of microplates to self-center within the microplates input area to accommodate both relatively small and large microplates sizes. Also as described, the invention may include a feature that causes the microplates to drop gently when the singulation mechanism disengages from the edges of the microplates, thus allowing the microplates to drop onto the lifter mechanism support structure, which lowers the microplates to the tray without spilling fluid from the wells.

[0062] The down-stacking latches pivot on pins and are actuated by the lifter mechanism so as to retract when the lifter mechanism rises, thereby releasing the bottom microplate from the stack and allowing it to drop softly onto the lifter. When the latches retract, they pivot on their support pins such that their centers of gravity are offset. Consequently, when the lifter mechanism is lowered, the latches will be activated by gravity to return to their nonretracted or extended state, thereby preventing the next microplates in the stack from dropping as the lifter mechanism is lowered. Because the offset in the center of gravity of the latches is only enough to cause them to return to their extended position, they press only very lightly on the edges of the microplate as it drops. Because the ends of the latches are polished smooth, they exert only a small frictional force on the edges of the microplates so as not to cause the microplate to tilt or otherwise hang up as the lifter mechanism is lowered and the microplate is placed on the tray.

[0063] Together, the lifters and latches also form a stacking mechanism configured to add a microplate to a stack of microplates. Generally, the up-stacking mechanism resembles the down-stacking mechanism. The lifter mechanism raises the microplate by a fixed amount, thereby causing it to pass by four spring-loaded latches, which retract as the microplate is raised by the lifter. Once the bottom of the microplate is above the top of the latch, the latches are released, and a spring on each latch causes the latch to extend under the microplate. The lifter mechanism then is lowered, causing the microplate to be captured by the now extended latches. The up-stacked microplate thus is added to the bottom of the output stack.

[0064] Sample feeder 400 also may employ alternative singulation mechanisms. For example, singulation mechanisms may (1) take microplates from the bottom of the stack in the input station and add microplates to the bottom of the stack in the output station, as above, (2) take microplates from the bottom of the stack in the input station and add microplates to the top of the stack in the output station, (3) take microplates from the top of the stack in the input station and add microplates to the bottom of the stack in the output station, or (4) take microplates from the top of the stack in the input station and add microplates to the top of the stack in the output station.

[0065] Sample feeder 400 permits a robot to deliver a sample container to the input station and to retrieve a different sample container from the output station, both in the same trip. This feature is known as “process compression” and reduces robot hand travel in servicing analyzer 50. For example, if there were only one loading station (e.g., the transporter), the robot would have to remove the analyzed microplate before delivering the unanalyzed microplate. Thus, process compression replaces two separate robot movements with one robot movement. Sample feeder 400 may be configured so that the input and output stations can hold a microplate to facilitate process compression.

[0066] Sample feeder 400 is designed to be flexible. The input and output stations can accommodate a variety of commercially available microplates and are large enough to allow microplates to be placed in them by a robot or a human hand. Suitable microplates typically have 96 or 384 wells, but other configurations also can be accommodated. The input and output stations also can accommodate a variety of commercially available preprocessing and postprocessing microplate bins for holding a stack of microplates before and after analysis, respectively. Preprocessing bins may be removed from the input station and replaced with another preprocessing bin containing a new stack of microplates with samples to be analyzed. Similarly, postprocessing bins positioned may be removed from the output station and replaced with another postprocessing bin to receive a new stack of microplates with samples that have been analyzed. Microplate bins may be used with other robotics to dispense, wash, and read without restacking microplates. Suitable microplate bins typically can accommodate 0-60 microplates.

[0067] Sample feeder 400 also may include a barcode reader, as shown in FIG. 6, which can be used automatically to identify labeled microplates. The barcode reader 434 preferably is positioned in either of two positions adjacent direct transporter access station 406; these positions permit barcode reader 434 to read barcodes mounted on the long edge or the short edge of microplates. Barcodes are read when sample feeder 400 moves the microplate from input station 404 to direct transporter access station 406. Barcodes cannot be read when microplates are delivered directly to the direct transporter access station 406. Barcode reader 434 can be programmed to decode a variety of symbologies, including SPC (EAN, JAN, UPC), Code 39 (3-43 digits), Codabar (3-43 digits), Standard 2 of 5 (3-43 digits), Interleaved 2 of 5 (4-43 digits), Code 93 (5-44 digits), and MSI-Plessey (4-22 digits), among others. Information obtained from the barcode can be used for various purposes. For example, the barcode can be used to name the report file. The barcode also can be used to convey instructions to the analyzer relating to required changes in assay mode or optics configuration.

[0068] Accordingly, while the invention has been disclosed in its preferred form, the specific embodiment thereof as disclosed and illustrated herein is not to be considered in a limiting sense, because numerous variations are possible and no single feature, function, or property of the preferred embodiment is essential. The invention is to be defined only by the scope of the issued claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6765734 *Mar 14, 2003Jul 20, 2004Hinds Instruments, Inc.Adjustable sample holder for optical equipment
US7600837Jan 23, 2007Oct 13, 2009Brother Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaDroplet ejection apparatus
US7746465Dec 28, 2007Jun 29, 2010Hinds Instruments, Inc.Sample holder for an optical element
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 8, 2000ASAssignment
Owner name: LJL B OSYSTEMS, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:EDWARDS, GLENN R.;RICHARDSON, DERRICK A.;LEYTES, JOSEPH S.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:011350/0347;SIGNING DATES FROM 19981002 TO 19981005