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Publication numberUS20010011887 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 08/873,819
Publication dateAug 9, 2001
Filing dateJun 12, 1997
Priority dateJun 12, 1996
Also published asUS6300756
Publication number08873819, 873819, US 2001/0011887 A1, US 2001/011887 A1, US 20010011887 A1, US 20010011887A1, US 2001011887 A1, US 2001011887A1, US-A1-20010011887, US-A1-2001011887, US2001/0011887A1, US2001/011887A1, US20010011887 A1, US20010011887A1, US2001011887 A1, US2001011887A1
InventorsJames C. Sturm, Kiran Pangal, Samara L. Firebaugh
Original AssigneeJames C. Sturm, Kiran Pangal, Samara L. Firebaugh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Micro-mechanical probes for charge sensing
US 20010011887 A1
Abstract
A method and apparatus for measuring a charge on surface, such as on a semiconductor wafer, arising during plasma processing is provided. Such a charge may be measured on an insulating film applied to such a wafer. By the present invention, the charge on such an insulator exposed to plasma is measured in-situ using micro-cantilevers. The micro-cantilevers include an insulating base positioned on the substrate and a cantilevered beam extending therefrom to over the substrate. The beam is formed of a conductive material. A charge on the beam causes an opposite charge to form on the substrate. The opposite charges attract to move or deflect the beam towards the substrate. The amount of movement or deflection corresponds to the magnitude of the charge. This movement or deflection of the beam can be measured to determine the charge by bouncing a light source, such as a laser, off of the beam. In another embodiment, the cantilever includes a flexible bridge interconnected between the base and a rigid beam. In this embodiment, the surface of the beam does not bend. Rather, movement of the beam is accomplished by the bending of the flexible bridge. This allows for easier measurements of the movement of the beam because the surface of the beam remains planar.
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Claims(20)
What is claimed is:
1. An apparatus for measuring charge on a surface comprising:
insulating base means positioned on the substrate;
beam means extending from the base to over the substrate;
wherein when a charge is formed on the beam, an opposite charge is formed on the substrate causing the beam to deflect towards the substrate; and
means for measuring the deflection of the beam means.
2. The apparatus in
claim 1
wherein the base means and beam means are microscopic in dimension.
3. The apparatus of the
claim 2
wherein the beam means is comprised of polycrystalline silicon.
4. The apparatus of
claim 2
wherein the means for measuring deflection of the beam means comprises light means for reflecting off of the beam means to a light position detector means.
5. The apparatus of
claim 4
wherein the light means comprises a laser.
6. An apparatus for measuring charge on a substrate comprising:
an insulated base positioned on the substrate;
a flexible bridge extending from base;
a conductive beam interconnected with the flexible bridge, the beam having a surface charge mirroring the charge on the substrate, the bridge bending to move the beam towards the substrate based on the electrical attraction between the charge on the beam and the charge on the substrate; and
means for measuring the movement of the beam with respect to the substrate.
7. The apparatus in
claim 6
wherein the base and beam are microscopic in dimension.
8. The apparatus of the
claim 7
wherein the beam is comprised of polycrystalline silicon.
9. The apparatus of
claim 8
wherein the means for measuring the deflection comprises bouncing a light source off the beam to a light position detector.
10. The apparatus of
claim 9
wherein the light source comprises a laser.
11. A method of measuring a charge on a surface comprising the steps of:
positioning an insulated base on a substrate;
interconnecting a conductive beam with the insulating base, the beam extending over the substrate;
allowing a charge to form on the substrate in response to a charge on the beam;
allowing the beam to move towards the substrate because of an electrical attraction between the charge on the beam and the charge on substrate; and
measuring the deflection of the beam.
12. The method of
claim 11
wherein the step of measuring the deflection of the beam comprising reflecting a light source off of the beam to a light position detector.
13. The method of
claim 11
wherein the step of measuring the deflection of the beam comprises measuring the change in angle of a light source reflected off the beam.
14. The method of
claim 11
wherein the step of measuring the deflection of the beam comprises measuring defraction of a light source directed at the beam.
15. The method of
claim 11
further comprising positioning a plurality of beams to extend over the substrate.
16. The method of
claim 15
wherein the step measuring the deflection of the beams comprising inspecting the beams.
17. The method of
claim 15
further comprising utilizing beams of varying size.
18. The method of
claim 17
further comprising the step of allowing the beams to deflect to contact the substrate and stick thereto.
19. The method of
claim 18
wherein the step of measuring the deflection comprises visually inspecting the stuck beams.
20. The method of
claim 11
wherein the substrate is non-conductive and the method includes the step of applying a conductive layer over a portion of the substrate prior to positioning an insulated base on the substrate.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/019,658, filed Jun. 12, 1996.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] 1. Field of the Invention

[0003] This invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for measuring an electrical charge on a surface, and more particularly to a system of one or more micro-cantilevers for measuring charges on a surface layer on a substrate during semiconductor processing on semiconductor wafers.

[0004] 2. Related Art

[0005] Plasmas are widely used in the semiconductor industry for processing to delineate fine line pattern and deposition at low temperature, e.g. plasma etching. During plasma exposure the wafer is exposed to a bombardment of ions, electron, photons, and x-rays which can lead to a charge buildup on the semiconductor device. Such a charge build-up, known as wafer surface charging, can degrade or destroy the device. If such charges develop, a voltage can develop which could cause irreversible damage to the device, especially metal oxide semi conductor (MOS) gate dielectrics. In recent years, it has been reported that plasma non-uniformity across the wafer is the predominant cause of charging. This non-uniformity can arise from non-uniformities in RF current flow, electron current flow, and ion current flow. Such charging can also arise from handling and/or cleaning a semiconductor device. These problems are becoming more important as gate oxides become thinner, and hence, more vulnerable to surface charging.

[0006] It would be beneficial to measure in situ, in a plasma reactor, the charge on a wafer to determine the magnitude of such charges occurring during the manufacturing process. This could lead to improved manufacturing processes. Additionally, if one could measure the charge on a wafer that occurred during the manufacturing process, one may be able to use such measurement as a quality control means, i.e. by discarding chips have too great a charge and therefore, a high likelihood of damage.

[0007] Previous efforts in this area have not yielded a suitable method and apparatus for measuring a charge on a wafer during the manufacturing process. One way that has been used in the past to obtain measurements of charge is to attach leads directly to a specimen. Another way of determining charge is to measure degradation of the transistor after processing. Such previous efforts include:

[0008] Murakawa, et al., “Mechanism of Surface Charging Effects on etching Profile Defects,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Vol 33 (1994) discloses using a magnet placed under a grounded electrode to create a magnetic field at the wafer center. A probe measures the plasma potential along the wafer. The probe comprises a silicon wafer with an Al pad with contacts leading to Cu wires extending out of the chamber to rf chokes and low-pass filters and then to a DC voltmeter. This is not an elegant solution as it requires fishing wires in and out of the reactor chamber.

[0009] Another commercially available method of measuring charge comprises a detection device which can be employed outside the reactor chamber after processing of a device is complete. However, this solution is not entirely satisfactory because it measures an accumulated affect over the total processing time and cannot provide specific information about charge development during processing.

[0010] None of these previous efforts teach or suggest all of the elements of the present invention, nor do any disclose the benefits and utility of the invention.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0011] It is a primary object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for measuring charge on a surface.

[0012] It is another object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for measuring the charged caused by plasma processing of a semi-conductor wafer.

[0013] It is another object of the present invention to provide microscopic cantilevers for use in measuring a charge on a surface.

[0014] It is an additional object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for measuring charge on a semi-conductor surface in situ.

[0015] It is even an additional object of the present invention to provide means for measuring charge on a surface by measuring deflection of a cantilever beam.

[0016] It is still even an additional object of the present invention to provide a means for measuring a charge on a surface wherein a rigid beam is connected to a flexible bridge so that the surface of the beam does not bend during deflection of the device.

[0017] It is still even a further object of the present invention to provide a means for measuring charge on a surface which can map charging across an electrode.

[0018] It is still another object of the present invention to utilize a plurality of micro-cantilevers on a wafer to measure surface charging.

[0019] It is a further object of the present invention to provide test wafers comprising a plurality of probes for experimental use.

[0020] It is also an object of the present invention to provide probes on wafers in combination with actual circuits of chips, which probes do not affect chip performance.

[0021] The present invention provides a method and apparatus for measuring a charge on surface, such as on a semiconductor wafer, arising during plasma processing. Accordingly, such a charge may be measured on an insulating film applied to such a wafer. By the present invention, the charge on such an insulator exposed to plasma is measured in-situ, within the plasma reactor, using micro-cantilevers. The micro-cantilevers include an insulating base positioned on the substrate and a cantilevered beam extending therefrom to over the substrate. The beam is formed of a conductive material. Processing can cause external charges to occur on the beam. A charge on the beam causes an opposite charge to form on the substrate. The opposite charges attract to move or deflect the beam towards the substrate. The amount of movement or deflection corresponds to the magnitude of the charge. This movement or deflection of the beam can be measured to determine the charge by bouncing a light source, such as a laser, off of the cantilevered beam. Alternatively, measuring charge can be performed by allowing the beams to deflect to the point of contact with substrate wherein they stick to the substrate, and the beams can be later inspected to determine charge. In another embodiment, the cantilever includes a flexible bridge interconnected between the base and a rigid beam. In this embodiment, the surface of the beam does not bend. Rather, movement of the beam is accomplished by the bending of the flexible bridge. This allows for easier measurements of the movement of the beam because the surface of the beam remains planar.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0022] Other important objects and features of the invention will be apparent from the following Detailed Description of the Invention taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

[0023]FIGS. 1a and 1 b show schematic views of a cantilever charge sensing structure in undeflected, and deflected states, respectively, of one embodiment of the invention;

[0024]FIGS. 2a and 2 b show top and side elevational views of a paddle structure embodiment of the invention;

[0025]FIG. 3a through 3 d show the main processing steps required for fabricating the paddle structure of FIGS. 2a and 2 b, for one embodiment of the invention;

[0026]FIG. 4 shows a plot of tip deflection angle as a function of voltage for external calibration of the paddles of FIGS. 2a and 2 b;

[0027]FIG. 5 shows a schematic view of an experimental setup of apparatus used to detect charge in plasma, for detecting reflected laser beams from charged and uncharged cantilevers or paddles;

[0028]FIG. 6a shows a plot of charging voltage versus RF input power with constant chamber pressure, and constant flow rate of oxygen;

[0029]FIG. 6b shows a plot of charging voltage versus chamber pressure with both RF power and flow rate of oxygen held constant;

[0030]FIG. 6c shows a plot of charging voltage versus distance from the center of an electrode, where each of RF power, chamber pressure, and the flow rate of oxygen are held constant;

[0031]FIG. 6d shows a plot of charging voltage versus the flow rate of oxygen;

[0032]FIG. 7a is a plot of quasi-static C-V curves of devices exposed at varying rf powers for 1 min;

[0033]FIG. 7b is a plot of the corresponding interface state density as a function of position in the band gap

[0034]FIG. 8 is a comparison of QS C-V curves of devices exposed to plasma and DC bias stressed.

[0035]FIG. 9 is a plot of the changing voltage inferred from DC bias stressing and matching the QS C-V curves for n&p type substrate MOS capacitors.

[0036]FIG. 10 is a comparison of charging voltage as measured by sensor and inferred from QS C-V degradation at different rf power.

[0037]FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a conductive layer placed over a portion of a non-conductive substrate.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0038] Referring to FIG. 1a, a microscopic cantilever (“micro-cantilever”), generally indicated at 10, comprises a beam 12 supported above a substrate 8, by means of an insulator 14 positioned at one end of the beam 12. The insulator 14 electrically isolates the beam 12 from the substrate 8. The beam 12 is formed of a conducting material and acts as a charge-sensing structure. If an interaction with plasma or fluid adds electrons or ions to the surface of the beam 12, the micro-cantilever 10 becomes charged. The substrate 8 mirrors the charge on the micro-cantilever 10, resulting in an electric field between the micro-cantilever 10 and the substrate 8. This electric field creates a force on the micro-cantilever 10 leading to deflection of the beam 10 as shown in FIGS. 1a and 1 b. The charge on the micro-cantilever 10 can be calculated from the deflection of the beam 12. It should be pointed out that the beam 12 could be supported at both ends thereof, and the deflection could be measured at the center of the beam 12. It is also within the scope of the present invention to replace the beam 12 with panel or membrane, supported at all four corners, and measure deflection at the center thereof.

[0039] One way to measure the deflection of the beam 12 is to reflect a light source or beam 16, such as, for example, a laser, off the surface of the deflected beam 12 and onto a screen. As the beam 12 deflects, the reflection of the light source shifts, as shown by angle a, and this sift shows up at the screen. The magnitude of deflection, and hence, the magnitude of the charge on the substrate can be determined from this shift. The deflection could also be measured through defraction of a light source bared on movement of the beam 12. Another way to measure deflection is to deflect the cantilevered beams far enough to touch the substrate and stick thereto. This is a well-known phenomena in the field of micro-mechanical structures, often referred to as “stiction.” By using a plurality of cantilevers of different size and/or rigidity, by examining the “stuck” cantilevered beams, the voltage range can be determined. Deflection could also be measured by capacitance sensing.

[0040] Referring now to FIGS. 2a and 2 b, paddle-like structures (“paddles”), generally indicated at 110, can be used. These paddles 110 are more sensitive to electrostatic force than the micro-cantilevers 10, and also have larger reflecting area, so that deflection is easier to detect. The paddles 110 comprise a large pad 112 connected to the support 114 by a flexible bridge comprising thin arms 116. An additional advantage of this structure is that majority of the distortion occurs in the arms 116, with the pads 112 remaining unbowed. Various sized paddles 110 can be used to detect a particular range of voltage. The paddle 112 could be formed of any desired material such a Poly-Si, while the support 114 could formed of SiO2.

[0041] The paddle structures and the cantilevers are fabricated by standard surface micro-machining technique. The fabrication steps are shown in FIGS. 3a through 3 d. N+-type silicon wafers (0.5-2.0 Ω-cm) are used as substrate. First a layer of silicon nitride of thickness 150 nm is deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This serves to alleviate “stiction” problems during processing. Stiction occurs when the cantilever deflects all the way and sticks to the substrate. The second step involves creating the sacrificial layer which will be isotropically etched to realize free standing structures. In this case a 2 μm thick silicon dioxide (SiO2) layer is deposited by atmospheric pressure CVD. A 1 μm thick polycrystalline silicon layer is then deposited by low-pressure CVD and is doped heavily with phosphorus (˜1020 cm−3) to have high conductivity, and annealed to reduce the internal stress in the polysilicon cantilevers.

[0042] The polysilicon is first dry-etched in SF6 plasma (RF power 30 W, pressure 150 mTorr & flow rate 15 sccm) as shown in FIG. 3b. Next photoresist (AZ1518) is spin-coated on the support structure to prevent the silicon dioxide underneath the support from being etched during the release step (FIG. 3c). The final processing step to create free-standing micro mechanical structures is sacrificial layer etching of SiO2 by buffered hydrofluoric (HF) acid (FIG. 3d). The wafers are then rinsed in deionized water and later in acetone to remove the photoresist. Drying the wafers under atmospheric conditions leads to stiction. Hence, various drying methods were attempted, like vacuum drying and drying the wafer on a hot plate. The second method gave better results. It involved soaking the wafer in pure isopropyl alcohol for 10 min. until the alcohol displaces the water underneath the paddles and then evaporating the alcohol by placing the wafer on a hot plate at 200° C. The reflecting pad areas of the paddles can range from 60 μm×50 μm to 30 μm×50 μm with arm lengths from 40 μm to 30 μm, although other dimensions are within the scope of the invention. The structures preferably have an arm width of 10 μm. The dimensions of all the paddle structures are designed for a sacrificial layer etch of about four hours.

[0043] Prior to exposure to plasma, the devices are externally calibrated by observing the deflection in response to an applied electrical voltage, using a needle probe to apply voltage to the polysilicon on top of the support. FIG. 4 shows the tip deflection angle of the paddle as a function of voltage. Simulations of deflection vs. voltage can be performed by finite difference modeling.

[0044] The schematic of the experimental set-up used to detect charging in situ in the parallel-plate reactor is shown in FIG. 5. A He—Ne laser 30 produces a beam 32 which is directed into the reactor chamber 34 through a quartz window 36 after passing through a beam-splitter 38. The laser beam covers several identical paddles so no focusing is necessary. The reflected light 40 is projected onto a screen 42. When charging occurs, the paddles 110 deflect (dotted lines) leading to a shift in the reflected laser spot on the screen 42. From the tip deflection angle, which can be easily computed from this shift, the charging voltage in the plasma can be determined. The advantage of this technique is that it is direct and gives fairly accurate results (<5% error). But the disadvantage is that it requires an optical port and one cannot measure charging voltage at different parts of the electrode.

[0045] During plasma exposure, cantilevers that deflect far enough suffer “pull-in” and touch the substrate. When this occurs they often suffer from “stiction”, i.e. they remain stuck after the removal of the charge. This can be quickly detected by external inspection under an optical microscope after the plasma exposure. The charging voltage can be estimated by having a range of paddle sizes with different pull-in voltages on the wafer, and observing which ones have pulled-in. The main advantage of this method is that no optical ports are required and one can quickly map charging non-uniformities across the electrode.

[0046] As described herein, it has been assumed that a conducting or semiconducting substrate is used. If the substrate is insulating, such as glass, the sensor could be fabricated on top of a conductive coating placed over a portion of the substrate. This is shown in FIG. 11, wherein the micro-cantilever 210 includes a beam 212 extending from an insulator 214. A conducting layer 209 is positioned over the insulating substrate 208, and the beam 212 extends over conducting layer 209.

[0047] Experiment

[0048] The charging voltage in a parallel-plate reactive-ion-etching (RIE) reactor has been measured by both techniques. The electrode diameter is 24 cm and spacing between the electrodes is 5 cm. The gases are injected into the chamber through a shower head in the top electrode. All experiments were done in an Oxygen or Argon plasma with RF frequency being 13.56 MHZ.

[0049] Results

[0050] The charging voltage near the electrode edge (9.5 cm. from the center) is measured by the in situ technique. The charging voltage was found to increase as RF input power increased (see FIG. 6a), and charging voltage as large as 20 V was seen. The charging voltage decreased as the chamber pressure was increased (see FIG. 6b). These results clearly demonstrate the utility and versatility of the technique. Note that the voltages measured are sufficient to damage thin gate dielectrics (e.g. 50 nm oxide has a breakdown voltage of ˜7 V). Charging voltages were also measured at the different points on the electrode by the ex-situ method. The charging voltage was found to be lower at the center compared to that at the edge (see FIG. 6c). The charging voltage was also found to vary as the flow rate of the gas varied with charging voltage decreasing as the flow rate of oxygen increased at the electrode edge (see FIG. 6d).

[0051] When the MOS capacitors were exposed to plasma, varying the rf power, time of exposure and the chamber pressure, the quasi-static (QS) capacitors vs. voltage (C-V) was measured after a fixed interval of time (14 min.). The QS C-V curve reflected the degradation of the gate oxide and this degradation scaled with the sensor reading. FIG. 7a shows the QS C-V curves of various devices exposed to Argon plasma at different rf powers for one minute, and FIG. 7b shows the corresponding interface state density, clearly showing that the degradation of gate oxide scales with rf power.

[0052] By varying the DC stress, electrical voltage on the gate during plasma exposure could be estimated by comparing QS C-V curves. It was found that the negative bias stress on the gate gave QS C-V curve which must closely resemble that measured after plasma exposure (FIG. 8). Similar results were found from MOS capacitors with p-type substrates, and the plasma-induced voltage increased with oxide thickness as shown in FIG. 9. A comparison of the charging voltage as measured by the sensors at different plasma rf power and that inferred from the MOS capacitors is shown in FIG. 10. There is a direct one-to-one relation between the two measurements.

[0053] The main advantage of the present invention is that charging of insulator surfaces exposed to plasma can be detected in-situ without disturbing the plasma, unlike other probes. It requires no wires and can detect the charge ex-situ too if there are no optical ports. The technique is direct and there is no need for further processing to estimate charging in plasmas. The probe is location specific so that one can map the charging voltage across the electrode and thereby determine the degree of plasma non uniformity.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6939726 *Aug 4, 2003Sep 6, 2005Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Via array monitor and method of monitoring induced electrical charging
US7112533 *Oct 1, 2002Sep 26, 2006Micron Technology, Inc.Plasma etching system and method
US7507672 *Sep 26, 2006Mar 24, 2009Micron Technology, Inc.Plasma etching system and method
US7767484 *May 30, 2007Aug 3, 2010Georgia Tech Research CorporationMethod for sealing and backside releasing of microelectromechanical systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification324/109
International ClassificationH01J37/32
Cooperative ClassificationH01J37/32935
European ClassificationH01J37/32S4
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 26, 2013FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20131009
Oct 9, 2013LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
May 17, 2013REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Apr 9, 2009FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Apr 11, 2005FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
May 21, 2002CCCertificate of correction
Feb 13, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: AIR FORCE, UNITED STATES, OHIO
Free format text: CONFIRMATORY LICENSE;ASSIGNOR:PRINCETON UNIVERSITY;REEL/FRAME:012602/0269
Effective date: 20020109
Owner name: AIR FORCE, UNITED STATES 2240 B STREET ROOM 100 WR
Owner name: AIR FORCE, UNITED STATES 2240 B STREET ROOM 100WRI
Free format text: CONFIRMATORY LICENSE;ASSIGNOR:PRINCETON UNIVERSITY /AR;REEL/FRAME:012602/0269
Nov 10, 1997ASAssignment
Owner name: PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, NEW JERSEY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:STURM, JAMES C.;PANGAL, KIRAN;FIREBAUGH, SAMARA L.;REEL/FRAME:008924/0108;SIGNING DATES FROM 19970917 TO 19970922