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Publication numberUS20010016846 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/811,108
Publication dateAug 23, 2001
Filing dateMar 16, 2001
Priority dateAug 29, 1998
Also published asUS6334131, US6336112, US20010039544
Publication number09811108, 811108, US 2001/0016846 A1, US 2001/016846 A1, US 20010016846 A1, US 20010016846A1, US 2001016846 A1, US 2001016846A1, US-A1-20010016846, US-A1-2001016846, US2001/0016846A1, US2001/016846A1, US20010016846 A1, US20010016846A1, US2001016846 A1, US2001016846A1
InventorsSoumen Chakrabarti, Byron Dom, David Gibson, Prabhakar Raghavan, Sridhar Rajagopalan, Shanmugasundaram Ravikumar, Andrew Tomkins
Original AssigneeInternational Business Machines Corp.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for interactively creating an information database including preferred information elements, such as, preferred-authority, world wide web pages
US 20010016846 A1
Abstract
A method for cataloging, filtering and ranking information; as for example, World Wide Web pages of the Internet. The method is preferably implemented in computer software and features steps for enabling a user to interactively create an information database including preferred information elements such as preferred-authority World Wide Web pages. The method including steps for enabling a user to interactively creating a frame-based, hierarchical organizational structure for the information elements, and steps for identifying and automatically filtering and ranking by relevance, information elements, such as World Wide Web pages for populating the structure, to form; for example, a searchable, World Wide Web page database. Additionally, the method featuring steps for enabling a user to interactively define a frame-based, hierarchical information structure for cataloging information, identify a preliminary population of information elements for a particular hierarchical category arranged as a frame, based upon the respective frame attributes, and thereafter, expand the information population to include related information, and subsequently, automatically filter and rank the information based upon relevance, and then populate the hierarchical structure with the a definable portion of the filtered, upper-ranked information elements.
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Claims(1)
What we claim is:
1. A method for cataloging, filtering and ranking information comprising the steps of:
a. enabling a user to interactively define a frame-based, hierarchical information structure for cataloging information;
b. identify a preliminary population of information elements for a particular hierarchical category arranged as a frame, based upon the respective frame attributes;
c. expand the information population to include related information;
d. automatically filter and rank the information based upon relevance;
e. thereafter populate the hierarchical structure with the a definable portion of the filtered, upper-ranked information elements.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of Use

[0002] This invention relates generally to a method for cataloging, filtering and ranking information; as for example, World Wide Web pages of the Internet; and more particularly, to method preferably implemented in computer software for interactively creating an information database including preferred information elements such as preferred-authority World Wide Web pages, the method including steps for enabling a user to interactively creating a frame-based, hierarchical organizational structure for the information elements, and steps for identifying and automatically filtering and ranking by relevance, information elements, such as World Wide Web pages for populating the structure, to form; for example, a searchable, World Wide Web page database; the method featuring steps for enabling a user to interactively define a frame-based, hierarchical information structure for cataloging information, identify a preliminary population of information elements for a particular hierarchical category arranged as a frame, based upon the respective frame attributes, and thereafter, expand the information population to include related information, and subsequently, automatically filter and rank the information based upon relevance, and then populate the hierarchical structure with the a definable portion of the filtered, upper-ranked information elements; in the case of World Wide Web pages, the method features steps for enabling a user's to interactively establish a hierarchical database structure having frames defined as categories of information of user interest, searching for and collecting a preliminary population of web pages of interest based upon the respective frame attributes of the hierarchy, subsequently expanding the population based upon links either actual or virtual associated with the pages, followed by filtering and ranking the pages based upon the relevance of the pages derived from the authority of the links, and thereafter, limiting the population to desired number of upper-ranked pages.

[0003] 2. Related Art

[0004] The computer revolution has precipitated an information explosion, the fall out from which has settled on every aspect of human endeavor. Indeed, information and its availability has changing forever the way we do business, conduct personal affairs and manage our lives. Not since Gutenberg's printing press has such a dramatic proliferation of information and knowledge been experienced.

[0005] The consequence of this has been that now, all cognitive process call for the application of information to be effective. Gone are the days of naive decision making, where, because of the unavailability or difficulty in obtaining information decisions were based on instinct, raw opinion or impulse. In fact, not only has unstudied decision making fallen from fashion, but, indeed, if one is found engaging in it, either on the job or at home, he is, at best, likely to be branded unconscientious or, at worst, dumb.

[0006] But, beyond labels which others may apply, the more important consideration is that application of information to decision making, typically, produces better results. If your buying a big item like a new car, you want information on what features makers include in the models they offer, and what prices they're asking. After spending $20,000 to $40,000 on a new family sedan, nobody want to hear they could have gotten then same thing from another maker for $4,000 or $5,000 less. Or, that what he did buy, is more likely to be found in the dealers repair garage, rather than his own.

[0007] And, one can experience comparable annoyance over even small items. For example, there is no better way to ruin a Friday evening than going to a movie and finding you've arrived 15 minutes after its started; or getting there on time, only to find what you're looking at, either puts you to sleep or, worse, offends you. Plainly, its better to know what is playing, where its playing and what others have had to say about it.

[0008] Still further, the importance of informed decision making has yet greater importance where matters of health and finance are involved. When one's health is in question; for example, one wants to find the most knowledgeable medical assistance available, or in matters financial, when IBM stock is likely to next split.

[0009] As a yet further problem, and potentially an even more perplexing one, not only has the computer revolution created a greater need for information, but, it has created an abundance, indeed, and over abundance of information to meet that need. In fact, the computer revolution has spawned so much information, that it is now to the point where the amount of information available on most subjects is typically so large as to create the new and associated problems of going through that wealth of information and selecting from it the specific pieces of information most relevant to the question at hand.

[0010] For example, in the case of the Internet's World Wide Web, if one were looking for information concerning something as straightforward as the restoration of an old car, there would likely be hundreds, if not thousands, of potential Web sites having as many if not more pages of information related to the subject. Accordingly, one faced with the problem of developing information on the subject of automobile restoration, would potentially be required to locate and go through literally hundreds of Web pages in an attempt to find those few most suited to his needs.

[0011] In the past, the World Wide Web's approach to this problem has been to provide so-called search facilities such as Yahoo! and others, to assist Web users in finding the information; i.e., Web pages, they might be looking for. However, search facilities such as Yahoo! typically only provide general organizations of Web subject matter and associated Web pages, those organizations being arranged as categories of Web subject matter that are based on the subjective points of view of the individuals who compile the information for the respective search facilities, or the points of view of the respective providers of the search facilities, or the points of view of the Web information providers, or some combination of all of these points of view. As a result, such Web subject matter organizations are susceptible to over inclusion and under inclusion of information which effects the accuracy and ease-of-use of the respective search facilities.

[0012] Still further, such search facilities, typically, are unable to group the information elements they return; i.e., pages, by their respective “authoritativeness”, that is, the degree to which others have referred to the respective elements; i.e., pages, as sources of information on the subject matter in question, termed in the art “authorities”, or the degree to which the respective elements; i.e. pages, point to sources of information, termed “hubs”, based upon the “hyperlinks”; i.e., “links”, between the respective hub and authority pages.

[0013] While some workers in the field of information retrieval have noted the importance of “links” between hub and authority information elements such as Web pages, and computation of their respective authoritativeness weights, none have proposed systems or methods for enabling a user to interactively create an information databases of preferred-authority data elements such as Web pages, or, procedures for removing spurious factors that arise during computation of the authoritativeness weights for the respective pages.

[0014] With regard to the accuracy of authoritativeness computation, workers in the field have found that the computational accuracy is adversely affected by such factors as “self-promotion”, “related-page promotion.”, “hub redundancy”, and “false authority.” Particularly, it has been found that during authoritativeness computations pages with links to other pages of the same Web site can improperly confer authority upon themselves, thus giving rise to false promotion; i.e., “self-promotion,” and adversely affecting authoritativeness computation accuracy. Further, it has been found that in addition to “self-promotion”, related pages from the same Web site, as for example, a home page and several sub-pages of the home page can improperly accumulate authority weights, giving rise to false promotion in the form of “related-page promotion”, which again adversely affecting authoritativeness computation accuracy. Still further, workers have found that the value of a hub page resides in the links that it processes, and not, typically, the content of the page. Accordingly, where all the links of a hub page can be found in “better” hub pages; i.e., hub pages having a greater number of relevant links, inclusion of the first hub page gives rise to “hub redundancy” which unnecessarily burdens computation. And, still further, it has been found that certain pages pertaining to a number of unrelated topics; e.g., pages of resource compilations, typically refer to; i.e., are linked to, a number of other pages, and accordingly appear as if they are “good hubs” even though many of the associated links point to pages of unrelated subject matter, which in turn causes the relevant links from the same page to become “falls authorities”, which, once again, adversely affecting accuracy of authoritativeness computation.

[0015] For example, J. Kleinberg in his U.S. patent application entitled: “Method and System for Identifying Authoritative Information Resources in an Environment with Content-based Links Between Information Resources”, Ser. No. 08/813,749, filed Mar. 7, 1997 and assigned to the assignee of the current application, describes a method for automatically identifying the most authoritative Web pages from a large set of hyperlinked Web pages. More specifically, Kleinberg explains his method applies to the case where; for example, one has a page whose content is of interest, and desires to find other pages which are authoritative with respect to the content of the page of interest. However, while Kleinberg notes his method includes: steps for conducting a search based upon a query composed from the content of the page of interest; steps for, thereafter, expanding the group of pages initially retrieved with pages that are linked to the pages initially retrieved; and finally, steps for iteratively computing the authoritativeness of the pages retrieved based upon the “weights” for the respective page link structures his method fails to consider the interactive creation by a user of a database structure for the information, or optimization of the authoritativeness computation by removal spurious of factors which adversely effect accuracy.

[0016] Likewise, S. Chakrabarti et al. in their U.S. patent application entitled, “Method and System for Filtering of Information Entities”, Ser. No. 08/947,221 filed Oct. 8, 1997, also assigned to the assignee of the current application, describes a method for determining the “affinity” of information elements, the method including steps for first obtaining an initial set of information elements, thereafter, steps for expanding the initial set with “related” information elements, and subsequently, iteratively computing the relative affinity for the respective information elements. However, as in the case of Kleinberg, Chakrabarti et. al. fails to consider or describe facilities for enabling a user to interactive create a database structure for the information, or optimization of the “affinity” computation by removing spurious factors which adversely effect accuracy.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0017] Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a method for cataloging and ranking information.

[0018] Additionally, it is an object of the present invention to provide a method for interactively creating and or modifying an information database including preferred information elements such as preferred-authority, World Wide Web pages.

[0019] Further, it is an object of the present invention to provide a method for improving the determination of authoritativeness amongst related information elements such as hyperlinked, World Wide Web pages.

[0020] Yet further, it is an object of the present invention to provide a method for improving the determination of authoritativeness amongst related information elements such as Web pages by the filtering spurious factors which adversely effect accuracy.

[0021] Still further, it is an object of the present invention to provide a method for enabling a user to interactively develop a personalized database structure for information organized in accordance with the user preferences, which may be subsequently populated with preferred-authority information elements such as hyperlinked, World Wide Web pages collected by the user.

[0022] Yet additionally, it is also an object of the present invention to provide a method for enabling a user to interactively develop a database of preferred-authority information elements, which database may be subsequently searched conveniently and efficiently to identify information elements such as World Wide Web pages of preferred-authority.

[0023] Briefly, to achieve the above and other objects and advantages, the method of the present invention includes steps for enabling a user to interactively create and or modify an information database featuring a hierarchical, frame-based, organizational structure of the user's selection for receiving information elements, such as World Wide Web pages, also of the user selection. Further, the method features steps for enabling the identification of information elements, such as Web pages, having preferred-authority as determined by improved, automated computation of the link structure between information elements.

[0024] In the interests of simplicity, and to assist understanding, in the following discussion and throughout the specification, usage of the more specific terms “page(s)” and “Web site(s)” will be employed to include, and understood to embrace, respectively, the more general terms “information element(s)” and “information source(s)” unless otherwise expressly stated.

[0025] With the above thought in mind, it is to be noted that in preferred form, the method of the present invention is implemented in computer software suitable to be run on a conventional personal computer having a central processing unit, associated RAM, ROM and disk storage memory, and accompanying input-output devices, such as keyboard, pointing device, display monitor and printer. In preferred form the method includes program steps for facilitating generation of a display; at; for example, the computer monitor, the display featuring an interface for enabling a user to interactively compose and or modify an adjustable, frame-based, hierarchical organizational structure representing an arrangement of topics of the user's design. In accordance with the invention, the user formulates the frame-based organization structure to receive information elements, such as World Wide Web pages, which the users may subsequently select to populate the various frames of the organizational structure based on the respective frame attributes; i.e., descriptive features. In preferred form, the interface includes one or more screens respectively having multiple partitions for presenting: a graphical representation of the frame-based, hierarchical information structure of the users creation; the Web pages contained in the category frames of the structure, and the components employed in selecting the Web pages for populating the frames. More particularly, the interface features graphical presentation of the frame-based hierarchical information structure, together with associated tools for freely navigating and modifying the structure; as for example, by adding, deleting or moving frames within the structure to represent the tastes and preferences of the user. Additionally, the interface includes partitions for displaying the Web pages associated with a user-selected frame of the organizational structure, together with tools for manipulating and managing the pages included at the frame. And, still further in preferred form, the interface includes partitions and associated tools for enabling the user to view respective Web page content, such as page links, associated with selected frames, and the frame attributes used as query terms for initiating automated generation of preferred-authority, Web pages for populating the frames of the organizational structure.

[0026] Further, in preferred form, computation of Web page authoritativeness is undertaken, by defining Web page and associated link structure as including hub pages, and authority pages, wherein a hub page, “points to”; i.e., links to, one or more authorities pages, and an authority page, is “pointed to”; i.e. linked to, by one or more hub pages. Further, the method includes steps for constructing a root set of information Web pages likely to be relevant to a topic selected by the user. The root set it is developed by first generating an initial set of Web pages with the use of a conventional query derived from the attributes of the category frame for the database hierarchical organizational structure the user is interested in populating, the query so derived, thereafter, being applied in conventional fashion against the World Wide Web. Further, the method includes steps for, subsequently, expanding the initial set of Web pages returned responsive to the query, to include pages elements directly linked to the Web pages of the initial set, thus, forming the root set.

[0027] Following creation of the root set, the method includes steps for associating a hub-weight parameter and authority-weight parameter for each Web page, and iteratively calculating the authoritativeness of the respective pages of the root set based on the resulting, respective, hub-weight and authority-weight values for each page.

[0028] In accordance with the invention, the method additionally features steps for improving computational accuracy of the authoritativeness for the Web pages. Specifically, the method features steps executed during the computation of authoritativeness for filtering spurious computational factors such as “self-promotion”, “related-page promotion.”, “hub redundancy”, and “false authority.” In preferred form, the method includes steps for filtering “self-promotion” from the computation, the steps including the discarding of links between pages, from the same Web Site. Further the method includes steps for filtering “related-page promotion” from the computation, which steps include “re-packing” the Web pages, for any Web site, having multiple pages showing non-zero authority, during which re-packing, all authorities other that the largest authority is set to zero.

[0029] Still further, the method in preferred form also includes steps for filtering “hub redundancy”, the steps including identifying the highest weight; i.e., “best,” hub during computation, zeroing the authority values of all pages pointed to by that hub, re-compute hub values, and, subsequently, recalculate authoritativeness. And, yet additionally the method in preferred form includes steps for filtering “false authority”, the steps including: allowing each link in a Web page to have its own hub value; incrementing the authority value of the destination page with the hub value of the link when authority values are calculated; and recomputing the hub values of the original hub page with the authority value of the destination page, and accordingly, by a spreading function, the hub values of neighboring links. As will be appreciated, this makes the final hub value of the page, therefore, the integral of the hub values of its links.

[0030] Still further, in preferred form, the method in accordance with the invention includes steps for ranking the pages of the root set based on authoritativeness following computation of page hub and authority weights, and to thereafter, truncated the root set to a number of highest ranking pages prescribed by the user.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0031] The above and further objects, features and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following more detailed description when read with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

[0032]FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating an Internet, environment including a number of World Wide Web site and associated servers having page information suitable for being maintained in a frame-based, hierarchical database created or maintained in accordance with the method of the present invention;

[0033]FIG. 2 is a diagram illustrating a hierarchical organization of information suitable for being maintained in a frame-based, hierarchical database created or maintained in accordance with the method of the present invention;

[0034]FIG. 3 is a diagram illustrating a hierarchical organization of information suitable for being maintained in a frame-based, hierarchical database in which a new information category frame has been suggested for addition in accordance with the method of the present invention;

[0035]FIG. 4 is a diagram illustrating a hierarchical organization of information suitable for being maintained in a frame-based, hierarchical database in which a new information frame has been added and populated with Web pages in accordance with the method of the present invention;

[0036]FIG. 5 is a schematic illustration of the display interface presented to a user for enabling creation or modification of a database hierarchical organizational structure in accordance with the method of the present invention;

[0037]FIG. 6 is a schematic illustration of the display interface presented to a user for disclosing the page population of an information frame of a database hierarchical organizational structure in accordance with the method of the present invention;

[0038]FIG. 7 is a schematic illustration of the display interface presented to a user for disclosing the content of a page included as a member of the page population for the information frame of a database hierarchical organizational structure in accordance with the method of the present invention;

[0039]FIG. 8 is a diagram illustrating a root set of pages expanded from an initial set of pages returned in response to a query based upon the attributes of a frame proposed to be added to a database hierarchical organizational structure in accordance with the method of the present invention;

[0040]FIG. 9 is a flow diagram illustrating the general steps of the method in accordance with the present invention;

[0041]FIG. 10 is a flow diagram illustrating the more specific steps associated with the “Develop Classification Frame Hierarchy” general step of the method in accordance with the present invention illustrated in FIG. 9;

[0042]FIG. 11 is a flow diagram illustrating the more specific steps associated with the “Prompt User To Modify Frame Structure” step of FIG. 10, FIG. 10 itself illustrating the “Develop Classification Frame Hierarchy” general step in accordance with the invention illustrated in FIG. 9;

[0043]FIG. 12 is a flow diagram illustrating the more specific steps associated with the “Populate Selected Frame With Information Elements” general step of the method in accordance with the present invention illustrated FIG. 9;

[0044]FIG. 13 is a flow diagram illustrating the more specific steps associated with the “Do Key Word Search To Identifying Initial Set Of Information Elements” step of FIG. 12, FIG. 12 itself illustrating the “Populate Selected Frame With Information Elements” general step of the method in accordance with the present invention illustrated in Pig. 9;

[0045]FIG. 14 is a flow diagram illustrating the more specific steps associated with the “Expand Initial Set To Root Set” step of FIG. 12, FIG. 12 itself illustrating the “Populate Selected Frame With Information Elements” general step of the method in accordance with the present invention illustrated in FIG. 9.

[0046]FIG. 15 is a flow diagram illustrating the more specific steps associated with the “Ranking Information Elements Of Root Set” step of FIG. 12, FIG. 12 itself illustrating the “Populate Selected Frame With Information Elements” general step of the method in accordance with the present invention illustrated in FIG. 9;

[0047]FIG. 16 is a flow diagram illustrating the more specific steps associated with the “Generate Weights For Information Elements” of FIG. 15, FIG. 15 itself illustrating the “Rank Information Elements Of Root Set of FIG. 12, FIG. 12 itself illustrating the “Populate Selected Frame With Information Elements” general step of the method in accordance with the present invention illustrated in FIG. 9.

[0048]FIG. 17 is a flow diagram illustrating the more specific steps associated with the “Determine Information Element Authority And Hub Scores” of FIG. 15, FIG. 15 itself illustrating the “Rank Information Elements Of Root Set” of FIG. 12, FIG. 12 itself illustrating the “Populate Selected Frame With Information Elements” general step of the method in accordance with the present invention illustrated in FIG. 9; and

[0049]FIG. 18 is a flow diagram illustrating the more specific steps associated with the “Truncate Ranked Information Elements” step of FIG. 12, FIG. 12 itself illustrating the “Populate Selected Frame With Information Elements” general step of the method in accordance with the present invention illustrated in FIG. 9.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

[0050] As noted, the computer revolution has precipitated an information explosion, the fall out from which has settled on every aspect of human endeavor. The consequence of this explosion has been that now, substantially all cognitive process that we undertake call for some application of information to be effective. Nonetheless, despite this new need, it has become clear that the application of information to decision making has, typically, produced better and more satisfying results in substantially all aspects of our lives. From how we earning our salaries, to the how we spend them on the things we need and enjoy, information and the application of it has provided advantage.

[0051] However, while this explosive growth of information and need for its application has produced benefit, they have provided yet further demands on us for their management. As also noted, a yet additional and potentially even more perplexing problem that the need to apply information to our decision making is the problem of how we locate and retrieve the information we are now required to have. The computer revolution has created an abundance, indeed, and over abundance of information to meet our every desire. In fact, the computer revolution has spawned so much information, that it is now to the point where the amount of information available on most subjects is typically so large as to create the problems of going through that wealth of information and selecting from it the specific pieces of information most relevant to the question at hand.

[0052] For example, one of the most potent information resources ever to be devised has been the Internet's World Wide Web. From its original emergence and recognition as a “treasure chest” of information, literally hundreds of millions of documents of varying quality had been made available online to millions of users in decentralized fashion. However, in its early days, and reflecting the distributed nature of the Web, the only facilities for finding and cataloging pages were “browsing”; i.e., moving from Web site to Web site, and storing the addresses of those found to have interesting information in unordered lists referred to as “bookmarks” which would enable later return without need to recall a specific Web address. As the Web develop, however, in response to the need for centralized page location resources, a number of independent search facilities appeared. These search facilities represent the primary approach to information discovery on the Web today. Good ones are capable of servicing in excess of 20 million queries today with subset and average response times.

[0053] However, the scope of the Web's content and its diverse body of users means that the same search facilities must service information requests ranging from specific, well-crafted queries for particular pieces of information to general, broad-topic queries for pages about an entire field or concept. While responses for specific queries tend to be acceptable, the responses for general or broad-topic queries is not good. Studies show that users typically consider pages returned from traditional search resources on broad-topic searchers to range from fair to bad in quality and relevance. Most typically, traditional search resources are unable to identifying the most authoritative pages which would be responsive to such an inquiry.

[0054] If one were looking broadly for information concerning restoration of an old car, there would likely be hundreds, if not thousands, of potential Web sites having as many if not more pages of information related to the subject. Accordingly, one faced with the problem of developing information on the subject of automobile restoration, would potentially be required to locate and go through literally hundreds of Web pages in an attempt to find those few most suited to his needs.

[0055] However, traditional search facilities such as Yahoo! typically only provide general organizations of Web subject matter and associated Web pages, those organizations being arranged as categories of Web subject matter that are based on the subjective points of view of the individuals who compile the information for the respective search facilities, or the points of view of the respective providers of the search facilities, or the points of view of the Web information providers, or some combination of all of these points of view. As a result, such Web subject matter organizations are susceptible to over inclusion and under inclusion of information which effects the accuracy and ease-of-use of the respective search facilities.

[0056] Still further, such search facilities, as noted are unable to group the pages they return, by their respective “authoritativeness”, that is, the degree to which others have referred to the pages, as sources of information on the subject matter in question, termed in the art “authorities”, or the degree to which the respective elements; i.e. pages, point to sources of information, termed “hubs”, based upon the “hyperlinks”; i.e., “links”, between the respective hub and authority pages.

[0057] While as also pointed out, workers in the field of information retrieval, for example, those noted above, have pointed out the importance of “links” between hub and authority pages, and computation of their respective authoritativeness weights, none have proposed systems or methods for enabling a user to interactively create an information databases of preferred-authority data elements such as Web pages, or, procedures for removing spurious factors that arise during computation that adversely determination of authoritativeness weights for the respective pages.

[0058] With regard to the accuracy of authoritativeness computation, it has been found that computational accuracy is adversely affected by such factors as 'self-promotion”, “related-page promotion.”, “hub redundancy”, and “false authority.” Particularly, it has been found that during authoritativeness computations pages with links to other pages of the same Web site can improperly confer authority upon themselves, thus giving rise to false promotion; i.e., “self-promotion,” and adversely affecting authoritativeness computation accuracy. Further, it has been found that in addition to “self-promotion”, related pages from the same Web site, as for example, a home page and several sub-pages of the home page can improperly accumulate authority weights, giving rise to false promotion in the form of “related-page promotion”, which again adversely affecting authoritativeness computation accuracy. Still further, workers have found that the value of a hub page resides in the links that it processes, and not, typically, the content of the page. Accordingly, where all the links of a hub page can be found in “better” hub pages; i.e., hub pages having a greater number of relevant links, inclusion of the first hub page gives rise to “hub redundancy” which unnecessarily burdens computation. And, still further, it has been found that certain pages pertaining to a number of unrelated topics; e.g., pages of resource compilations, typically refer to; i.e., are linked to, a number of other pages, and accordingly appear as if they are “good hubs” even though many of the associated links point to pages of unrelated subject matter, which in turn causes the relevant links from the same page to become “falls authorities”, which, once again, adversely affecting accuracy of authoritativeness computation.

[0059] The method of the present invention, on the other hand, overcomes problems found in prior approaches to organization and retrieval a information; as for example, pages of the World Wide Web, by providing a method for cataloging, filtering and ranking information, and, particularly, Web pages. More specifically, the method is preferably implemented in computer software suitable for being run on a conventional personal computer and includes steps for enabling a user to interactively create and or modify an information database featuring a hierarchical, frame-based, organizational structure of the user's selection for receiving information elements, such as World Wide Web pages, also of the user selection. Further, the method features steps for enabling the identification of information elements, such as Web pages, having preferred-authority as determined by improved, automated computation of the link structure between information elements.

[0060] As will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, while the invention has application to use by individuals for creating personalized, preferred-authority; e.g., high-authority, information databases, which may be developed from information sources such as the World Wide Web, in which the user can tailor the information organization to his tastes, the invention also has application to broad, business applications, not only for commercially cataloging information sources such as the World Wide Web, and providing facilities for distilling information retrieved to the higher levels of authority, but also, to such applications as building preferred-authority databases for use in law, medicine, engineering and other fields.

[0061] The method in accordance with the present invention is shown in its general aspect at FIG. 9. As shown there, method 2 is seen to broadly include step 4 for enabling a user to develop a personalized, frame-based, hierarchical information classification structure for the database. Further, following developments of the frame-based, hierarchical, information classification structure at step 4, method 2 is seen to include steps 6 for enabling the user to select the information frame from the classification hierarchy he wishes to populate with information elements; e.g., Web pages.

[0062] Following user selection of the hierarchical classification frame to be populated, at step 6, method 2 includes step 8 for enabling the automated retrieval of information elements; e.g. Web pages, from the information source; e.g., the Web, for populating the selected frame. Thereafter, method 2 includes step 10 for prompting the user to indicate whether there are any other frames in the information classification hierarchy the user would like to populate with information. If the user indicates, there are additional frames of the classification hierarchy to be populated, method 2 returns at branch 12 to select frame step 6, where the user is again permitted to designate a frame to be populated, followed by subsequent transition to step 8 for enabling automated retrieval of information for the newly selected frame.

[0063] As will be appreciated, the noted sequence of frame selection at step 6, automated population of the frame at step 8, and query at step 10 as to whether any frames remain to be populated with information, would continue until the user has designate all the frames he wishes to populate.

[0064] Once all the frames the user wishes to populate had been exhausted, method 2 advances over program-flow branch 14 to steps 16, where the user is prompted to indicate whether there are any modifications of the information classification frame hierarchy which the user would like to undertake. In the case where the user would like to make changes to the classification structure; as for example, the addition, deletion or movement of any frames, method 2 would advance over program-flow branch 18 back to classification developments step 4, at which the user would be enabled to enter desired modifications to the information classification organizational structure.

[0065] Thereafter, and to be appreciated by those skilled in the art, following entry of all in a desired modifications to the information classification structure, method 2 program flow would again advance through method steps six 8 and 12 to enable population of modifications to the information classification frame structure as described above.

[0066] Finally, following information population of any modifications to the classification frame structure, the user, at step 16, would again be prompted to indicate whether any further changes to the classification structure were desired. If the user work and then indicate that no further modifications to the information classification structure were desired, method 2 would advance over program-flow branch 20 to finish.

[0067] As the be appreciated, and as noted above, the method of the present invention has application to a broad range of information sources. However, for the sake of clarity and simplicity, and with no sense of limitation, the following more detailed description of method 2 will be undertaken with reference to the World Wide Web and the information pages available there.

[0068] As noted, the World Wide Web of the Internet, referred to here for simplicity as the “Web”, represents a valuable and important information resource, including literally hundreds of millions of documents accessed by tens of millions of users daily. With reference to FIG. 1, as is well known, the Web 22 includes millions of Web sites, several of which, again for simplicity, are schematically represented as Web site servers 24 to 32, it being understood that a single server might host one or more sites. Additionally, and as shown, each Web site 24 to 32 includes numerous information pages arranged in Web applications; e.g., Web sites, Web site databases, etc., 34 to 66. Further, and as is also well known, a user, at his personal computer 68 equipped with a suitable Web browser and communications software, can access Web 22 over his ordinary phone line 70, the public switching network 72 and through an Internet service provider 74, which itself may be in connected to public switching network 72 by an ordinary line 76 and to Web 22 by a high-speed data line 78. And, with this setup and some computer protocol magic, the user can access the literally hundreds on millions of documents available on Web 22 represented by applications 34 to 66 in FIG. 1.

[0069] As pointed out, however, this great mass of information represents difficulties for the user in the form of retrieval and organization problems. And, as also pointed out, method 2 of the present invention provides the user with a means for dealing with those problems.

[0070] Particularly, and as noted in connection with the above description of the broad aspects of the invention, method 2 provides solutions to those problems in the form of steps for enabling the user to interactively create an information database having a organizational structure which the user can interactively personalize to his tastes for holding the information he retrieves, and steps for enabling automated retrieval of reduced size; i.e., distilled, preferred-authority collections of Web pages responsive to his queries.

[0071] As described in connection with FIG. 9, method 2 broadly includes step 4 for enabling the user to develop a frame-based, hierarchical information classification structure for his personalized database. As shown in FIG. 10, step 4 of method 2 includes a serious of more detailed steps for carrying out that procedure. Specifically, classification developments step 4 is seen to include step 80 which would follow activation of the software in which method 2 is implemented and embodied, at users personal computer 68, step 80 prompting the user to identify; i.e., provide the file name and path, for the hierarchical database frame structure method 2 should initially access.

[0072] As will be appreciated, in the case where the user has previously developed a database structure, he could call it at this point, and continue with its use and evolution. In the alternative, where the user wishes to develop a new structure, but, one having some similarity to the preexisting structure, he could designate the preexisting structure and employ it as a basis for the new structure and database. In this case, however, the user would be required to rename the initially-used, preexisting structure if he intended to retain it, otherwise, in conventional fashion, the preexisting structure, as modified would be saved under the original structure filename, thus corrupting the original structure.

[0073] In the case, where no preexisting structure is available, the user could simple start from, scratch; i.e., from nothing, indicate a new name for the structure to be created, and proceed.

[0074] Accordingly, and with reference to FIG. 10, following prompt step 80, method 2 is seen to include step 82 which, responsive to the user's designation, advances either over program-flow branch 84 to retrieve, at step 86, any preexisting structure which the user has identified, or over program-flow branch 88 in the case where the user has indicated he is going to develop a new structure. Where the user has indicated he is going to develop a new frame structure, method 2 advances over branch 88 to step 90 which prompts the user to provide the name for the new classification structure. Following step 90, and the user's submission of an identification for the new structure, method 2 advances to step 92 where the user is prompted to provide an initial structure element; e.g., a classification frame, for the new structure. Subsequently, method 2 program-flow advances from either step 86, for retrieval of a designated preexisting frame structure, or from step 92 for initiation of a new frame structure, to converge at step 94, where method 2 displays the frame structure to begin processing with.

[0075] With regard to the information structure, experience has shown, hierarchically organized data and, particularly frame-based, hierarchical organized data featuring representations of information categories as a hierarchy of frames having frame attributes and attribute values, that characterize and distinguish the respective frames and their associations to each other provides a representation that enable users to more readily understand and appreciate the information elements and their relationships. Still further, it has also been found that the hierarchical organization of information enables a much speedier search when information is sought to be retrieve. Particularly, when a particular element of information is sought, identification of its category affiliation not only designates the features to be looked for, but also, immediately excludes features, and other aspects of the organizational structure not to be looked for, thus more immediately directing the search to the relevant section of the organization.

[0076] Accordingly, method 2 in preferred form, supports frame-based, hierarchical organizational structures for the information the user seeks to catalog. FIG. 2 illustrates such an organizational structure.

[0077] As shown in FIG. 2, a frame-based, hierarchical organization structure 100 which was previously created, is seen to include a plurality of frames arrayed in hierarchical relation for representing a general classification of information. As is well understood in the art, the respective frames feature attributes and attribute values for identifying the nature of each frame and its relationships to the other frames. Particularly, in accordance with association rules commonly applied to hierarchical organizations, attributes appearing at a particular frame level in the hierarchy, apply to all depending frames of lower hierarchical level. Further, within a level, frames may be given different attributes and or different attribute values to, thereby, identify different subcategory types within the category level.

[0078] The nature of frame relationships may be readily understood with reference to structure 100. As seen in FIG. 2, structure 100 features four levels organization, 102 to 104, the highest and most general 102, including four frames, specifically frames 108 concerning “Business”, 110 concerning “Entertainment”, 112 concerning “Science”, and 114 concerning “News.” Beneath frame 108 to 114 is a second categorization level 104 which further defines first level 102. Particularly, and for ease of explanation, with reference to frame 108 “Business”, only, structure 100 is seen to feature frames 116 “Companies ” and 118 “Finance”, both of which depend from frame 102. And, beneath frames 116, 118, structure 100 is further seen to include a third category level 106 which yet additionally defines second level 104 and first level 102. Particularly, third level 106 for frame 108 of level 102 is seen to include frames 120, “Computers”, 122 “Products & Services”, 124, “Savings & Securities” and 128, “Job,” frames 120 and 122 depending from frame 116 “Companies” and frames 124 and 128 from frame 118 “Finance.”

[0079] Accordingly, based on the frame structure and associated frame attributes and attribute values just described, it would follow that frame 122 “Products & Services”, as a “child” of frame 116 “Companies” and “grandchild” or frame 108 “Business”, in view of the above discussion concerning attribute inheritance, carry the attribute limitations of its progenitors. Specifically, frame 102 would be considered to include product and service information of business companies only.

[0080] In the case where a user intending to employ structure 100 for organizing his information found such limitations inappropriate or undesirable, in accordance with the present invention, he could readily undertake interactive modification of structure 100.

[0081] While at first blush, this may seem straight forward, those skilled in the database will appreciate that in the past, is was not readily possible to modify database structure, as to do so would typically require reloading of the database data. As is apparent, for the above discussion of hierarchical frame attribute inheritance rules, if a frame in a hierarchy is changed, the limitations associated with related frames of the hierarchical structure; e.g. parent, child, related frames, must also change, thus potentially causing data previously held at a frame prior to a frame structure change, to no longer be appropriate for the same frame after a modification of the structure.

[0082] In accordance with the invention, however, method 2 over, is that difficulty by providing steps to easily and quickly obtain information for re-populating modify frames, and additionally and independently by providing steps for supporting a display interface that enables the user to readily add, delete, or move frames within a hierarchical information organizational structure.

[0083] To facilitate this, method 2 of the present invention features steps for presenting a display at the monitor of user's computer 24 for enabling the user to interactively and easily modify structure 100. With refer to FIG. 5, users monitor 132 is seen to have a display 136 at which interface 138 in accordance with method 2 is illustrated. In accordance with the invention, method 2 includes program steps for providing interface 138 with one or more screens having multiple partitions. As shown in FIG. 5, interface 138 in preferred form is seen includes a first screen 140 having a partition 142 for displaying the hierarchical, information organizational structure 100. Additionally, interface screen 140 is seem to include a second partition 144, including graphically presented tools for modifying structure 100. Specifically, tool partition 138 for screen 140 is seen to include a tool 146 for selecting frames of structure 100. Additionally, tool partition 138 is also seen to include tools 148 and 150 for respectively adding and deleting frames from structure 100. In accordance with the invention method 2, includes program steps for enabling a user and to also freely move frames within structure 100 using selection tool 146 in conventional “drag-and-drop” fashion. Still further, tool partition 138 is seen to include a “zoom” tool 151 for enabling the user to zoom in and zoom out organizational structure 100 to see, respectively, fewer or more frames;.

[0084] Yet additionally, interface screen 140 is also seen to have a partition 152 including a section 154 for identifying the filename 156 associated with organizational structure 160. Further, partition 152 is also seen to include a section 158 including “drop-down” menus in conventional “Windows” fashion for enabling management of interface 138, the including “File” 160, “Edit” 162, “View” 164 and “Help” 166. Still further, screen partition 152 is also seen to include a section 168 including interface mode buttons for enabling movement between interface mode screen. More specifically, section 168 of partition 152 is seen to include a mode button 170 “Structure” for viewing organizational structure 100 at screen partition 142, a mode button 172 viewing the information element; e.g. Web page content of any frame selected with selection tool 146 as will be more fully described below. Finally, section 168 of screen partition 152 is also seem to include a mode button 174 for viewing the contact of the respective information elements; e.g. Web page is populating a particular frame of structure of 100 as also will be described more fully below.

[0085] Continuing with reference to FIG. 6, screen interface 138 in preferred form is also seen to include a second screen 176 having multiple partitions. Specifically, screen 176 a seem to include a partition 178 for displaying the information elements; e.g. Web pages, which populate a particular frame of organizational structure 100. In accordance with the invention, method 2 includes steps for presenting the pages of a frame identified as authorities in, column 180, and pages identifying as hubs at column 182. Further, partition 178 is also saying to include presentation of the attributes for the frame of structure 100 being presented at partition 178 at region 184, and the title for the respective frame at region 186.

[0086] As also seen in FIG. 6, interface screen 176 includes a partition 188 for displaying frame structure 100. In accordance with method 2, structure 100 at partition 188 may be readily scrolled in typical Windows Explorer fashion. Still further, control of the frame content at partition 178 may be readily effected by selecting frames of structure 100 in conventional fashion; as for example, with a mouse pointer. Also in preferred form, frames of structure 100 may again be freely managed; for example, added, deleted and moved at partition 188.

[0087] Screen 176 in accord with method 2 is also seen to include a partition 190 for enabling editing of the frame page content. More specifically, any partition 190 is seen to include information entry boxes, 194, 196 for respectively entering modifications to the frame attributes which control the initial query for returning information elements; e.g., page is for populating the selected frame in accordance with method 2 as will be described more fully below. Particularly, entry box 192 enables user specification of a frame attributes to be included in the initial query, while entry box 194 enables the user to expressly exclude attributes not desired because of known lack a relevance to the subject frame. Additionally, partition 190 is seen to include a scroll box 198 including a predetermined lists of frame features known to produce pages of authority for listed features. In accordance with method 2, where the usury is uncertain what attributes to include for frame, he can make reference to feature pallet 198.

[0088] Finally, screen 176 is also seen to include a partition 200 identical to partition 152 of screen 140 including respectively, designation of the display structure filename, menus, and mode buttons.

[0089] Continuing with reference to FIG. 7, interface 138 in preferred form is seen to include a third screen 202 again having multiple partitions. In the case of interface screen 202, a partition 204 is provided for displaying the content of a document included in the lists of authority and Hub pages for a selected frame presented at partition 178 of interface screen 176. As the be appreciated, presentation of the content and links for an authority or hub page selected from respective lists 180 and 182 enables the user to quickly and easily monitor the effectiveness of the query and search process, and iteratively adjust the pages returned to populate the selected frame of structure 100.

[0090] To further assists in that process, in preferred form screen 202 also includes an editing partition 206 comparable to partition 190 of screen 176, and a structure display partition 208 comparable to partition 188 of screen 176. Still further, screen 202 is again seen to include a partition 210 comparable to partitions 200 of screen 176 and partition 152 of screen 140 which present the filename for structure 100, drop-down menus and mode buttons.

[0091] Continuing with reference to FIG. 10, following display of the information structure; e.g. structure 100, method 2 includes step 220 for enabling the user to modify structure 100. As better seen in FIG. 11, method 2 includes step 222 for prompting the user to select a frame to modify. As a be appreciated, step 222 would be interactively conducted with the user at method interface 138. Specifically, method 2 includes program steps for successively presenting to the user interface screens at which the user can make judgments as to whether changes in structure 100 are required.

[0092] For example, once the user has selected a frame of structure 100 to modify at step 220, in accordance with the method, interface 138 provides displays; e.g., screens 140, 176 and 202 for enabling the user and to make judgments as to whether frame modification would be desirable. Particularly, at step 224 following step 220 in FIG. 11, the user can make a judgment as to whether frame structure 100 is too general or not based upon a review of the authorities and hubs presented at interface screen 176 and their content at screen 202; for example, as the frame existed prior to being worked or during the course a subsequent population steps. As seen in FIG. 11 if the user finds a selected frame to be too general, method 2 would proceed over branch 226 to step 228 where the user to could code split the selected frame and add at step 230 child frames having more specific frame attributes to specify at step 223. As would be appreciated, addition of a frame could be readily effected and interface 138 as described above.

[0093] Thereafter, method 2 would loop back over method branch 233 to modification prompt step 222 where the user could again assess whether further modifications when necessary. For example, if after specifying addition of a frame at step 230, the user determines the frame specified at step 232 is too specific, the user would advance method 2 over branch 234 to step 236, where the user could then advance method 2 over branch 238 to step 240 where the user could readily delete a frame at interface 138 as above described and respecify a parent frame at step 242. And, again, method 2 would loop back to step 222 at method 2 branch 244.

[0094] Following return to step 222, the user could again determine the if any further modifications of structure 100 were called for. For example, if the user neither found the selected frame too general nor too specific, method 2 would advance over branch 246 to step 248 where the user to determine if the selected frame is misplaced and is required to be moved. If the user determines that the selected frame should be moved, method 2 would advance over branch 250 to steps 252, 254 and 256 where the associated sub frames could be removed and replaced in structure 100 as required at steps to 252, and 254 respectively, and the selected frame re-specified for its new location. Thereafter, method 2 would loop back over branch 258 to step 222 to enable the user to again assess whether any further modifications to structure 100 were called for. In if the user found that no further modifications to the structure were called for, method 2 would exit the structure modification sequence at branch 260.

[0095] The with reference to FIG. 9, following completion of structure development step 4, as noted, method 2 would advance to step 6 where the user could select the frame he would like to populate with information pages. Following designation by the user of the frame he would like to populate, method to advances to step 8 where population of the selected frame is undertaken.

[0096] Before describing program flow for frame population with information elements; e.g. Web pages, a review of the information elements search process would be appropriate.

[0097] While methods previously known for computing authoritativeness exploit the annotative power latent in hyperlinks, method 2 of the present invention seeks to determine what a first information elements, e.g., page, i says about a second information element; e.g., page j. To investigate this, method 2 defines a numeral affinity from i to j denoted aij. At a high level, method 2 consists of three steps:

[0098] 1. Acquisition of a route set As of entities to be analyzed. In many applications of method 2 this process consists of obtaining an initial set via a cap Boolean keyword search and then expanding its too include neighbors one link distance away;

[0099] 2. Approximate calculation of one or more of the eigenvectors of one or both of two possible similarity matrices as noted below;

[0100] 3. Analysis of the computed eigenvectors(s) to rank and/or partition this set of entities.

[0101] If n=|S| and aij be a non-negative real-valued affinity of the ordered pair of entities of entities (i, j), so aij need not equal aji. Typically, each aij is a carefully chosen function of the terms and where applicable links in the entities, this choice is data source and application dependent. Let A=[aij]. In accordance with method 2, the iteration

h←Aa, A←ATh

[0102] is performed to arrive at hub and authority scores converging to the principal eigenvectors, those associated with the largest eigenvalue of ATA and AAT, respective. Then the entities with the largest entities in the principal eigenvector of ATA (resp. AAT) as the top authorities (resp. hub) are outputted.

[0103] In accordance with method 2, the procedure begins by constructing a root set of pages that are likely to be relevant to the topic. This construction is arbitrary, but could be performed by creating an initial set of pages by quering a traditino search engine using the topics as query, and then expanding this set to the full root set by including all pages that point to or are pointed to by a page in the initial set. The procedure the assoicates with each page p a hub weight h(p) and an authority weight a(p), all initialized to 1. Then the weights are updated as follows:

a(p):=Σh(q), h(p):=Σa(q).

[0104] In accordance with method 2 the basic procedure is modify in several ways in order to remove spurious effects that adversely affect the noted computation.

[0105] Particularly to avoid self-promotion of Web sites that confer her authority upon themselves, we discard links to pages on the same site. We defined to pages to be on the same Web site using the following test: class A and B IP addresses must match to most significant octets; class C addresses must match three most significant octets, and class D addresses must match all four octets.

[0106] Regarding redundant hubs, the value of a hub page is by definition in its links rather than its contents. If all the destination is accessible from a particular hub are also accessible from better hubs, we do not need to output this hub. More generally, we seek to return a set of hub pages that together contained as many unique, high-quality links as possible. We therefore apply a well-known greedy tasks as follows: once the iteration step has converged the return the best hub, zero the authority values of all pages pointed to by the hub, recompute hub values, and iterate.

[0107] With respect t related page factors, it has been found that this by the self-promotion removal procedures is possible for instance for an organization home page, and several children of that page to accumulate authority. However in the final output the method seeks to provide the user as much authoritative substance as possible in a small number of pages. To achieve this, entry each step of iteration the method re-packs the authority of any site as follows: if multiple documents within a logical sit as defined above have non-zero authority, the authority of all but the page with the largest authority are set to zero.

[0108] Finally, with regard to false authority, it has been found that many resource compilations such as bookmark files contain pages pertaining to a number of disjoint topics. This causes such compilations to become good hubs, which in turn cause irrelevant links from the same page to become good authorities. To address this problem method 2 notes that pointers to pages on the same topic tend to be clustered together in resource compilations. Method 2 therefore allows each link in a Web page to have its own hub value so the hub value of the page become his a function of the particular link rather than a constant. When computing authority values, the authority of the destination is incremented by the hub value of the link. When computing hub values, the authority value of the destination is used to increment the hub value of the sauce like and according to a spreading function, the hub values of neighboring links. Thus useful regions of a large hub page can be identified. The final hub value of a page is the integral all the hub values of its links.

[0109] Convergence of the filtering computation depends on phraising the iterate in steps as a matrix multiplication. Method 2 described above still fit the framework. Particularly, the self-promotion and rebounded hub procedures are arranged as pre-and post processing steps and the false authority procedure is arranged as a linear transformation that may be expressed as a matrix multiplication.

[0110] While this invention has been described in its preferred form, it will be appreciated that changes may be made in the form, procedure and sequences of its various steps and elements without departing from its spirit or scope.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification1/1, 707/E17.111, 707/999.102, 707/999.005
International ClassificationG06F17/30
Cooperative ClassificationY10S707/99943, Y10S707/99945, Y10S707/99932, Y10S707/99935, Y10S707/99933, Y10S707/99934, Y10S707/99931, G06F17/30873
European ClassificationG06F17/30W3
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