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Publication numberUS20010032351 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/825,170
Publication dateOct 25, 2001
Filing dateApr 3, 2001
Priority dateApr 4, 2000
Also published asCN1211035C, CN1316207A, DE60112155D1, DE60112155T2, EP1142495A1, EP1142495B1
Publication number09825170, 825170, US 2001/0032351 A1, US 2001/032351 A1, US 20010032351 A1, US 20010032351A1, US 2001032351 A1, US 2001032351A1, US-A1-20010032351, US-A1-2001032351, US2001/0032351A1, US2001/032351A1, US20010032351 A1, US20010032351A1, US2001032351 A1, US2001032351A1
InventorsKengo Nakayama, Naoto Ono, Tetsuya Itou, Hiroaki Oshigamo
Original AssigneeKengo Nakayama, Naoto Ono, Tetsuya Itou, Hiroaki Oshigamo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Helmet
US 20010032351 A1
Abstract
A helmet includes a shock absorbing liner fitted on an inner side of a shell, and a layer of an elastic body for absorbing shock having a component directed along an outer surface of the shell provided between the shell and the shock absorbing liner or between an outer layer of the shock absorbing liner and an inner layer of the shock absorbing liner.
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Claims(20)
What is claimed is:
1. A helmet having a shock absorbing liner fitted on an inner side of a shell, wherein an elastic body is provided between said shell and said shock absorbing liner for absorbing shock having a component directed along an outer surface of said shell.
2. A helmet having a shock absorbing liner fitted on an inner side of a shell, wherein said shock absorbing liner is split into an outer liner and an inner liner, and a layer of elastic body is provided between said outer liner and said inner liner for absorbing shock having a component directed along an outer surface of said shell.
3. A helmet as claimed in
claim 1
, wherein said elastic body is a gel.
4. A helmet as claimed in
claim 2
, wherein split surfaces of said outer liner and said inner liner are formed in spherical surfaces.
5. A helmet as claimed in
claim 2
, wherein said elastic body is a gel.
6. A helmet as claimed in
claim 2
, wherein said inner and outer liners are movable relative to each other, and the helmet further includes a stopper which limits movement of the inner and outer liners relative to each other.
7. A helmet as claimed in
claim 2
, wherein one of said inner and outer liners includes a severable projection, and the other of said inner and outer liners includes a recess mating with said projection to initially prevent movement of said inner and outer liners prior to a shock being applied to the helmet, said inner and outer liners being movable relative to each other after said projection is severed.
8. A helmet as claimed in
claim 1
, wherein said elastic body is provided as a layer separating said shell and said shock absorbing liner.
9. A helmet as claimed in
claim 1
, wherein said elastic body comprises a gel having air pockets disposed therewith.
10. A helmet as claimed in
claim 2
, wherein said helmet includes a plurality of elastic bodies disposed in spaced relation to each other.
11. A helmet as claimed in
claim 2
, wherein said elastic body comprises a gel having air pockets disposed therewith
12. A helmet as claimed in
claim 1
, wherein said elastic body permits said shell to move relative to a head of a person wearing the helmet when the shock is applied to said helmet.
13. A helmet as claimed in
claim 2
, wherein said elastic body permits said shell to move relative to a head of a person wearing the helmet when the shock is applied to said helmet.
14. A helmet comprising a shell, shock absorbing liner fitted within said shell, and an elastic body provided in engagement with said shock absorbing liner for absorbing shock having a component directed along an outer surface of said shell.
15. A helmet as claimed in
claim 14
, wherein said elastic body permits said shell to move relative to a head of a person wearing the helmet when the shock is applied to said helmet.
16. A helmet as claimed in
claim 14
, wherein said elastic body is provided between said shell and said shock absorbing liner.
17. A helmet as claimed in
claim 14
, wherein said shock absorbing liner is split into an outer liner and an inner liner, and said elastic body is provided between said outer liner and said inner liner such that said outer and inner liners are movable relative to each other.
18. A helmet as claimed in
claim 14
, wherein said elastic body is a gel.
19. A helmet as claimed in
claim 17
, wherein split surfaces of said outer liner and said inner liner are formed in spherical surfaces.
20. A helmet as claimed in
claim 17
, wherein the helmet further includes a stopper which limits movement of the inner and outer liners relative to each other.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention.

[0002] The present invention relates to a helmet which a driver of a vehicle such as a motorcycle or a racing car wears.

[0003] 2. Discussion of Relevant Art.

[0004] Hitherto, a helmet as shown in Japanese Laid-Open Patent Publication Hei 6-240508 has been known. In this helmet, a reinforcement cloth made of a strengthening fiber is interposed between a shell and a shock absorbing liner fitted within the shell or between two layers of the shock absorbing liner and fixed thereto, in order to obtain improved shock absorbing performance without increasing thickness of the shell.

[0005] Shock load acting on the helmet is classified roughly into a load in a direction toward a center of the helmet and a load in a tangential direction (rotational component) deviating from the center. In the customary helmet, both of these loads are absorbed by deformation of the liner or the like.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] The present invention proposes a helmet capable of absorbing the rotational component of shock effectively.

[0007] For this purpose, the present invention provides a helmet having a shock absorbing liner fitted on an inner side of a shell, wherein an elastic body is provided between the shell and the shock absorbing liner for absorbing shock having a component directed along an outer surface of the shell.

[0008] According to the invention, since the head of the wearer and the shell are not fixed to each other, when shock force acts on the helmet from the outside, rotational acceleration, that is, acceleration component directed along an outer surf ace of the shell is absorbed by the helmet, as is advancing acceleration, that is, acceleration component directed perpendicularly to the outer surface of the shell.

[0009] According to another aspect of the present invention, there is provided a helmet having a shock absorbing liner fitted on an inner side of a shell, wherein the shock absorbing liner is slit into an outer liner and an inner liner, and a layer of an elastic body is provided between the outer liner and the inner liner for absorbing shock having a component directed along an outer surface of the shell.

[0010] Also in this helmet, when shock force acts on the helmet from the outside, rotational acceleration, that is, the acceleration component directed along an outer surface of the shell is absorbed by the helmet, as is advancing acceleration, that is, the acceleration component directed perpendicularly to the outer surface of the shell.

[0011] The elastic body may be a gel. When shock force acts on the helmet, rotational acceleration, that is, the acceleration component directed along an outer surface of the shell is absorbed effectively.

[0012] Split surfaces of the outer liner and the inner liner may be formed in spherical surfaces. Since the layer of the absorbent elastic body is provided along the spherical surface, the outer liner and the inner liner can slip relatively easily, so that a degree of freedom in rotational direction becomes large and the rotational component of the shock force can be absorbed more effectively.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0013]FIG. 1 is a vertical sectional view of a helmet according to a first embodiment of the present invention;

[0014]FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view of a helmet according to a second embodiment of the present invention;

[0015]FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view of a helmet according to a third embodiment of the present invention;

[0016]FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view of a helmet according to a fourth embodiment of the present invention;

[0017]FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view of a helmet according to a fifth embodiment of the present invention;

[0018]FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view of a helmet according to a sixth embodiment of the present invention;

[0019]FIG. 7 is a vertical sectional view of a helmet according to a seventh embodiment of the present invention;

[0020]FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view showing a broken helmet according to the seventh embodiment;

[0021]FIG. 9 is a sectional view showing a eighth embodiment of the present invention; and

[0022]FIG. 10 is a sectional view showing a ninth embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0023]FIG. 1 is a vertical sectional side view showing an embodiment of the present invention. A helmet 10 has a shell 11 made of FRP and a shock absorbing liner 12 of styrene form fitted on an inner side of the shell 11. The shock absorbing liner 12 is divided into an outer liner 13 and an inner liner 14 which have respective different foaming multiples and adhere to each other. In this embodiment, an absorbent elastic body 15 is provided between the shell 11 and the outer liner 13 and stuck to the shell 11 and the outer liner 13.

[0024] The helmet of the present embodiment is so constructed that a head of a wearer and the shell 11 are not fixed to each other. Therefore, when shock force acts on the helmet from the outside, rotational acceleration, that is, the acceleration component directed along the outer surface of the shell 11 is absorbed, as is the advancing acceleration, that is, acceleration component directed perpendicularly to the outer surface of the shell 11.

[0025] As for the absorbent elastic body 15, grease-like material or gel-like material, particularly a gel, NP gel (registered trade marks) and foam gel can be used. This is the same with respect to other embodiments to be described bellow.

[0026]FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional side view showing a second embodiment of the present invention. The helmet 20 has a shell 21 manufactured by injection molding of nylon and a shock absorbing liner 22 of styrene foam fitted and stuck on an inner side of the shell 21. The shock absorbing liner 22 is divided into an outer liner 23 and an inner liner 24 with a split surface extending along a spherical surface 26. In this embodiment, a layer of absorbent elastic body 25 is provided between the outer liner 23 and the inner liner 24 and stuck to both the shock absorbing liners 23, 24.

[0027] Also in this embodiment, like the first embodiment, since a head of a wearer of the helmet is not fixed to the shell 21, when shock force acts on the helmet from the outside, its rotational component, that is, the component directed along the outer surface of the helmet is effectively absorbed, as is the advancing component, that is, the component directed perpendicularly to the outer surface of the shell 21. In this embodiment, since the split surface between the outer liner 23 and the inner liner 24 is along the spherical surface 26 and the layer of absorbent elastic body 25 is provided along the spherical surface, the outer liner 23 and the inner liner 24 can easily slip relatively to each other and a degree of freedom in the rotational direction becomes large so that the rotational component of the shock force can be absorbed easily.

[0028]FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional side view showing a third embodiment of the present invention. The helmet 30 has a shell 31 manufactured by injection molding of polypropylene and a shock absorbing liner 32 of styrene foam fitted and stuck on an inner side of the shell 31. The shock absorbing liner 32 is split into two layers through a split surface extending along a spherical surface 36, and a layer of an absorbent elastic body 35 is disposed between an outer liner 33 and an inner line 34 and stuck thereto. In this embodiment, at the edge of the inner liner 34 is provided a flange 34 c directing outward.

[0029] The present embodiment has the same effect as the above-mentioned second embodiment. Moreover, when the outer liner 33 and the inner liner 34 rotate relatively to a limit, the flange 34 c collides with an edge of the outer liner 33 to restrain an excessive rotation.

[0030] Though the flange 34 c is provided at the edge of the inner liner 34 directing outward, the flange may be provided at the edge of the outer liner 33 directing inward so as to collide with the edge of the inner liner 34.

[0031]FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional side view showing a fourth embodiment of the present invention. The helmet 40 has a shell 41 and a shock absorbing liner 42 fitted and stuck on an inner side of the shell 41. The shock absorbing liner 42 is split into an outer liner 43 and an inner liner 44 through a split surface extending along a spherical surface 46. A layer of an absorbent elastic body 45 is disposed between the outer liner 43 and the inner liner 44 and stuck thereto. In this embodiment, a dent or recess 43 a is provided at a portion of the outer liner 43 and a projection 44 b is provided at a portion of the inner liner 44 opposite to the dent 43 a so that the projection 44 b is fitted into the dent 43 a.

[0032] According to this embodiment, the inner liner 44 is normally fixed to the outer liner 43 to restrain unnecessary movement caused by the absorbent elastic body, but when shock force having a component directed along the outer surface of the shell 41 acts on the helmet, the projection 44 b is broken to allow movement so that the component of the shock force can be absorbed. Of course, the present embodiment can achieve all of the desirable effects of the above-mentioned second embodiment.

[0033] Contrary to the above, the inner liner 44 may be provided with the dent and the outer liner 43 may be provided with the projection. Also, a plurality of pairs of the projections and the dents may be provided.

[0034]FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view showing a fifth embodiment of the present invention. The helmet 50 has a shell 51 and a shock absorbing liner 52 fitted and stuck on an inner side of the helmet 51. The shock absorbing liner 52 is split into an outer liner 53 and an inner liner 54 through a split surface extending along a spherical surface 56. The outer liner 53 and the inner liner 54 have respective dents or recesses 53 a, 54 a opposite to each other. In each space formed by the corresponding dents 53 a, 54 a is disposed a layer of an absorbent elastic body 55 stuck to the outer liner 53 and the inner liner 54. Also the outer liner 53 and the inner liner 54 are stuck to each other.

[0035] This embodiment exhibits the same desirable effects as those of the second embodiment. In this embodiment, the layer of the absorbent elastic body 55 is used in a direction of shear.

[0036]FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view showing a sixth embodiment of the present invention. The helmet 60 comprises a shell 61 and a shock absorbing liner 62 fitted and stuck on an inner side of the shell 61. The shock absorbing liner 62 is split into an outer liner 63 and an inner liner 64 through a split surface extending along a spherical surface 66. The outer liner 63 has wide hollows 63 a and narrow projections 63 b, and the inner liner 64 has wide hollows 64 a and narrow projections 64 b. In each space formed between the outer liner 53 and the inner liner 64 is disposed a layer of an absorbent elastic body 65 which is stuck to the outer liner 63 and the inner liner 64.

[0037] The present embodiment exhibits the same effects as those of the fifth embodiment, but the layer of the absorbent elastic body 65 is used in a direction of compression.

[0038]FIG. 7 is a vertical sectional side view showing a seventh embodiment of the present invention and FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view showing a state of the helmet after a shock is absorbed.

[0039] In FIG. 7, the helmet 70 comprises a shell 71 and a shock absorbing liner 72 fitted and stuck on an inner side of the shell 71. The shock absorbing liner 72 is split into an outer liner 73 and an inner liner 74, and a layer of an absorbent elastic body 75 is disposed between the outer liner 73 and the inner liner 74 and stuck to the outer liner 73 and the inner liner 74. In this embodiment, the split surfaces of the outer liner 73 and the inner liner 74 are not spherical surfaces.

[0040] When shock force having rotational component acts on the helmet 70 from the outside to rotate the outer liner 73 and the inner liner 74 relatively, the layer of the absorbent elastic body 75 is deformed so that a part thereof is compressed to collapse and another part is expanded to produce a cavity. Thus an excessive rotation is restrained.

[0041]FIG. 9 is a sectional view showing an eighth embodiment of the present invention. Similarly to the second through seventh embodiments, a layer of absorbent elastic body 85 is disposed between an outer liner 83 and an inner liner 84 and stuck to both the liners 83, 84. However, in this embodiment, a gel having air rooms or pockets 85 d therein is used as the layer of the absorbent elastic body 85. The air rooms 85 d may be bubbles.

[0042] According to this embodiment, air in the air room 85 d improves cushion effect and contributes to reduce weight of the helmet.

[0043]FIG. 10 is a sectional view showing a ninth embodiment of the present invention. According to this embodiment, between an outer liner 93 and inner liner 94 are disposed some layers or sections of an absorbent elastic body 95 so as to form a suitable number of spaces as air rooms or pockets 97. The layers of the absorbent elastic body 95 are stuck to the outer liner 93 and the inner liner 94. This embodiment exhibits the same desirable effects as those of the eighth embodiment.

[0044] In the above-mentioned embodiments, it is also possible to partly connect or communicate a space inside of the liner with the outside of the shell for ventilation, within a limit not departing from the above-mentioned effects.

[0045] Although there have been described what are the present embodiments of the invention, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that variations and modifications may be made thereto without departing from the gist, spirit or essence of the invention. The scope of the invention is indicated by the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US6996856 *Apr 12, 2005Feb 14, 2006Puchalski Ione GProtective head covering having impact absorbing crumple zone
US7076811 *Jun 16, 2004Jul 18, 2006Puchalski Ione GProtective head covering having impact absorbing crumple or shear zone
US7254843 *Jun 29, 2006Aug 14, 2007Srikrishna TalluriImpact absorbing, modular helmet
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US8567095Apr 27, 2012Oct 29, 2013Frampton E. EllisFootwear or orthotic inserts with inner and outer bladders separated by an internal sipe including a media
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Classifications
U.S. Classification2/412, 2/411
International ClassificationA42B3/12
Cooperative ClassificationA42B3/12, A42B3/064
European ClassificationA42B3/12, A42B3/06C2B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 11, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: HONDA GIKEN KOGYO KABUSHIKI KAISHA, JAPAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:NAKAYAMA, KENGO;ONO, NAOTO;ITOU, TETSUYA;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:011884/0594;SIGNING DATES FROM 20010507 TO 20010510
Owner name: KABUSHIKI KAISHA HONDA ACCESS, JAPAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:NAKAYAMA, KENGO;ONO, NAOTO;ITOU, TETSUYA;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:011884/0594;SIGNING DATES FROM 20010507 TO 20010510