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Publication numberUS20010041330 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/734,337
Publication dateNov 15, 2001
Filing dateDec 11, 2000
Priority dateApr 2, 1993
Also published asUS6186794, US6206700, US20030087218
Publication number09734337, 734337, US 2001/0041330 A1, US 2001/041330 A1, US 20010041330 A1, US 20010041330A1, US 2001041330 A1, US 2001041330A1, US-A1-20010041330, US-A1-2001041330, US2001/0041330A1, US2001/041330A1, US20010041330 A1, US20010041330A1, US2001041330 A1, US2001041330A1
InventorsCarolyn Brown, Jerry Zimmermann
Original AssigneeBrown Carolyn J., Zimmermann Jerry N.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Interactive adaptive learning system
US 20010041330 A1
Abstract
An interactive adaptive learning system. A collection of core stimuli consisting of at least auditory and visual symbols and information, are stored on a computer. A number of different relationships between the core stimuli are created which can then be presented as discrimination or identification tasks to the user. Different sets of stimuli are then presented succeedingly to the user and the user is requested to respond. The form of response can either be to investigate and analyze the stimuli, or attributes of the stimuli, or answer of the quarry regarding the discrimination or identification task. The system has a built in strategy for progressing the user through learning tasks. The users actions and responses in reaction to the stimuli are all recorded and analyzed. Based not only on the success rate of the user responses, but also on other characteristics of the users reaction to the stimuli, the users learning strategy is classified. This classification is then utilized to either allow the learning strategy to continue as initially set, or to dynamically adjusted to find the presently indicated level of difficulty for the user or to adapt to the users particular learning strategies or needs.
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Claims(24)
1. A system for adaptive learning by an individual user comprising:
memory device containing data relating to:
user instructions,
normative responses,
selection presentations;
a control device containing the memory device and a processor;
a user interface including a user perceivable display, a stimuli presentation device, and a tactile selection and input device;
a software program which includes processing steps to facilitate adaptive learning, the program:
presenting stimuli to the user through at least one of the stimuli presentation device and the user perceivable display of the user interface,
reading user input in response to said stimuli,
selecting succeeding stimuli based on both a comparison of user responses and normative data and upon a classification of the user responses irrespective of normative data.
2. The system of
claim 2
wherein the normative responses comprise a variable range of acceptable performance ratings in comparison to the user responses.
3. The system of
claim 1
wherein the stimuli presentation device comprises a device which transducers electrical signals representing sound into at least one of actual sound, analog signals to stimulate a cochlear implant, and electrical signals to actuate a vibratactial device.
4. The system of
claim 1
wherein the tactile selection and input device comprises at least one of a touch screen, keyboard, or mouse.
5. The system of
claim 1
wherein the stimuli comprise one or more of auditory, pictorial, and alpha numeric information.
6. The system of
claim 1
further comprising additionally presenting attributes of the stimuli through at least one of the stimuli presentation device and the user perceivable display of the user interface.
7. The system of
claim 1
further comprising portion of the program whereby a learning strategy can be selected for a particular user, said strategy initially imposing a predetermined initial level of difficulty and rate of progression, but dynamically varying the strategy based on feed back of the user responses.
8. A method of adaptive learning by an individual user comprising:
gathering information from a plurality of sources regarding a given learning goal;
analyzing said information and compiling said information into normative data;
storing the normative data in a storage medium;
storing a variety of user perceivable stimuli into a storage medium;
presenting stimuli from the storage medium to the display;
prompting a user to input a selected response to stimuli by tactile response of a user;
converting the tactile response into a digital format;
reading the digital format;
presenting new stimuli based on a comparison of user selections and normative data and upon a classification of the user responses irrespective of normative data.
9. The method of
claim 9
wherein the user perceivable stimuli include visual and auditory information, and portions of visual and auditory information, and abstractions of the visual and auditory information related to characteristics of the visual and auditory information.
10. The method of
claim 8
wherein the step of presenting new stimuli is based on an initially predetermined level of difficulty related to type of perceptional information provided, amount of perceptional information provided, type of task presented, and rate of progression selected.
11. The method of
claim 10
wherein the initial level of difficulty is coupled with a strategy for progression through a series of stimuli, and where the strategy for progression is dynamically adjusted based on user selection.
12. The method of
claim 11
whereby dynamic changing of strategy includes progression or regression based on user selections, and where progression and regression can be presented by adjustment of strategy variables.
13. A method for interactive adapt of learning comprising:
storing a plurality of core stimuli, the core stimuli including auditory and visual information;
compiling collections of core stimuli into logical correlations, the correlations being related to similar perceptional contrasts between stimuli;
presenting the correlations in the form of perceptional discrimination task to a user;
allowing the user unlimited access to investigate and evaluate the presented stimuli;
requesting a decision on the discrimination task;
monitoring and classifying the user decision and investigation and evaluation; and
determining if succeeding tasks should be changed and difficulty based on the monitoring and classifying.
14. The method of claims 13 further comprising the step of storing a plurality of attribute information regarding the core stimuli, the attribute information including portions of the core stimuli, characteristics of the core stimuli, and abstractions of all or part of the core stimuli.
15. The method of
claim 14
wherein the logical correlations relate to differences in sound between stimuli.
16. The method of
claim 15
wherein the perceptional discrimination tasks include at least one of discrimination or identification of core stimuli.
17. The method of
claim 16
wherein the user is additionally allowed access to at least some of the attributes for the presented stimuli.
18. The method of
claim 13
wherein the step of determining is based on such things as classification of the users investigation evaluation, reaction time, accuracy, and amount of available information.
19. The method of
claim 13
further comprising allowing editing of core stimuli and the logical correlations to provide customized presentations to user.
20. The method of
claim 13
wherein the learning relates to at least one of speech, reading, math, geography, English language, foreign language.
21. The method of
claim 13
further comprising closing an initial learning strategy for the user, the strategy including such factors as order of presentation of stimuli, performance criteria related to percentage of success of correct responses; amount of audio visual support available to the user, and rate of progression through levels of difficulty of stimuli.
22. The method of
claim 21
wherein the initial strategy can be altered based on the monitoring of the user.
23. The method of
claim 22
wherein the strategy can be customized by a teacher, parent, or professional, based on monitoring of the user.
24. The method of
claim 22
wherein the strategy can be changed dynamically and automatically by comparing monitoring of the user with the initial strategy.
Description
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    A. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to the field of learning assistance tools and techniques, and in particular, to computerized systems that can be used in training or learning programs for such things as hearing, speech, reading, writing, mathematics, and language skills.
  • [0002]
    B. Problems in the Art
  • [0003]
    Through history many attempts have been made to facilitate more efficient learning of what will be called rule-based systems. Examples are speech and language skills, and mathematical skills. Historically, and yet today, the most conventional learning methods use repetitive, rote learning, which includes teacher/student interaction.
  • [0004]
    For example, teaching of reading or writing generally involves repetitive exercises by the learner, beginning with very basic, simple tasks and progressing through more and more difficult tasks. This obviously is “labor” intensive, both from the standpoint of the learner and any teacher or assistant that is monitoring or assisting in the learning exercises. Teachers must spend significant amounts of hands-on time, particularly with students that have special needs or learning difficulties.
  • [0005]
    This type of “manual” learning training is therefore time and resource intensive. It also is susceptible to a certain amount of subjectivity on the part of either student or teacher. Still further it relies significantly on the discipline, interest, and skills of student and teacher.
  • [0006]
    A more concrete example is as follows. A young student with hearing impairment is to begin to learn to decode spoken language. A teacher, with or without the assistance of recorded sound, repetitively presents spoken words to the student and attempts to train recognition of spoken language. Pictures or other perceivable information can be manually presented to the student along with the spoken words. The teacher decides the pace and content of each lesson and controls the progression of the student subjectively.
  • [0007]
    The time and effort of the teacher is critical to success of the program. Such valuable one-on-one learning is extremely valuable, and therefore difficult to obtain for a wide range of students. Therefore, one-on-one teaching time is in many cases by necessity essentially rationed. Students are left to practice or train on their own, or without expert assistance. A deficiency in this arrangement is the lack of supervision and the reliance on the individual for progress. Still further, standardized training materials may not function well for students with atypical or problematic learning or perception skills.
  • [0008]
    Attempts at improvement in this area have-involved development of somewhat automated or computerized training systems. A substantial number of interactive computerized systems are based primarily on game-type exercises which present tasks which demand a right or wrong answer. The student simply takes the “test” and is scored on the number of right or wrong answers. The primary deficiency in such systems is the lack of flexibility for students with different learning styles or capabilities.
  • [0009]
    Such a student just may not function efficiently in a stark “right” or “wrong” question/answer system.
  • [0010]
    Still further, such present day interactive systems are somewhat limited in that they are directed only to fairly narrow, limited aspects of learning or training relating to certain subject matter.
  • [0011]
    Systems have therefore been developed, called individual learning systems (ILS) that attempt to tailor the learning task to individual students. These systems are still based primarily on right or wrong answers, and even though somewhat individualized, are not as flexible as might be desired.
  • [0012]
    The present state of the art therefore lacks flexibility. There is no satisfactory system that can be used for wide variety of individualized problems or learning skills, or which is applicable to a wide range of standard course contents or a wide variety of courses. Still further, the state of the art has room for improvement in the way special learning problems are handled. In effect, many allegedly high technology individualized computerized systems may be no better, or even worse than, training on a one-on-one basis with a human teacher. Additionally, a need exists in the art for a powerful training and learning system that is integratable with a number of different learning tasks and subject matter. A need exists with regard to efficiency in terms of economical allocation of resources, speed in terms of providing the most efficient progress for individualized learning skills, incentive in terms of providing motivation for learners and/or teachers to succeed and progress at the most beneficial rate; all to maximize the learning potential and success for the least amount of time and dollars.
  • [0013]
    It is widely acknowledged that education is truly a key to many facets of life. In fact, education is and historically has been, in the United States and many countries, a leading public policy priority. Therefore, improvements in the ability to provide learning, from the standpoint of meaningful success for the students, as well as efficient allocation of resources towards that end, should be a primary goal of all levels of government and its citizens. Studies have shown that one root of illiteracy is lack of foundational learning and training by the first grade level. A need therefore exists regarding efficient and effective training of pre-reading skills for first graders and even kindergartners. The ability of children this age to self-teach is minimal. Therefore, an effective automated learning assistance system would be of tremendous value to children, as well as society in general, if viewed from a long-term perspective.
  • [0014]
    Additionally, there is great need and increasingly reduced resources for assisting in learning for deaf or the hearing impaired, particularly younger children who would value greatly from speech perception and reading training.
  • [0015]
    C. Objectives and Advantages of the Invention
  • [0016]
    It is therefore a principle object and advantage of the present invention to provide an interactive learning assistance system which improves upon the state of the art or solves many problems in the state of the art.
  • [0017]
    Other objects and advantages of the present invention are to provide a system as above described which:
  • [0018]
    Allows most efficient learning, and accommodates different ways of learning both for normal and problem learners.
  • [0019]
    Provides a process-oriented learning training system rather than simply right/wrong learning training.
  • [0020]
    Provides a system that is dynamic in the sense that it is self adjusting to different learners' speeds, styles, and needs.
  • [0021]
    Is multisensory and perceptually based.
  • [0022]
    Allows discovery and exploration for learning rather than imposed rules for learning.
  • [0023]
    Does not focus on a presumed learning technique for everyone.
  • [0024]
    Is truly individualized for each learner.
  • [0025]
    Is flexible but integrateable to many applications and needs.
  • [0026]
    Allows selection or imposition of various performance strategies and levels.
  • [0027]
    Provides for on-call reporting to allow evaluation of progress and changing of strategies at any time.
  • [0028]
    Allows continuous and comprehensive recordation of user responses to derive learning styles along with performance criteria.
  • [0029]
    Can be used for a variety of learning, including speech perception, vocabulary, reading, mathematics, geography, language (English and foreign) and other rule-based subject matter.
  • [0030]
    Empowers efficiency in learning including improved speed in learning which translates into more efficient use of time and money.
  • [0031]
    Is substantially automated and automatic in its dynamic adjustment to learning styles.
  • [0032]
    Allows a number of options and features which can enhance learning, for example, interjecting background noise over speech recognition training stimuli for those who are hard of hearing.
  • [0033]
    These and other objects, features, and advantages of the invention will become more apparent with reference to the accompanying specification and claims.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0034]
    The present invention, in its broadest sense, relates to a system that can be used to transfer learning. It relates to learning assistance, particularly for rule-based systems. Examples are speech, reading, math, and languages. The student interacts with a computer. A user interface includes a computer display, some type of stimuli presentation device (visual, auditory, or otherwise), and a manually operable response device such as a keyboard, touch screen, or mouse. Software presents a series of logically coded analytical units (stimuli) to the user. These analytical units are taken from a predetermined set of core stimuli which can consist, for example, of sentences, words, sounds, images, etc.
  • [0035]
    The user is presented with tasks, for example to compare two stimuli and respond whether they are the same or different. The software allows the user to explore or discover information about the two stimuli before making a decision by allowing the user to selectively access further information regarding the stimuli. Different levels of difficulty of the tasks are available. Difficulty levels can be presented based on the amount of sub-information made available to the user regarding any stimuli, the difficulty of the task, time limits imposed on completing the task, rate of progression from less difficult to more difficult, and other criteria.
  • [0036]
    To begin a session, the range of level of difficulty is determined for a user. Access to a given amount of information regarding the task can either be selected by an instructor, or the software will test the user and automatically select a beginning level. Thereafter, the system will continuously and comprehensively monitor the performance of the user and provide feedback, not solely on success-rate based on right or wrong responses, but also on type of response, the time it takes to respond, and the specific discovery and answering strategy utilized.
  • [0037]
    The user's performance therefore is continuously, essentially in real time, analyzed by comparison to standardized and preset goals or criteria based on right/wrong criteria, but also on non-right/non-wrong criteria. As a result of that feedback, the pre-selected strategies and progression plan will be adjusted. Essentially, tasks can be made more or less difficult depending on performance and method of performance. The level of difficulty can be changed not only as to the subject matter of the stimuli, but also in more subtle aspects, such as rate of progression in each lesson, the amount of information available for exploration and discovery for each task, the type of information made available to discover, etc.
  • [0038]
    Software therefore automatically and dynamically sets and controls strategy and movement of the student through series of lessons. Performance is recorded and quantified. The user has a significant amount of control and can explore and discover to match his/her own learning strategies and techniques. A teacher can at any time request a report on performance and subjectively alter the learning strategy and movement for the student. Still further, software allows as an option the ability for a teacher or instructor to customize lessons for individualized students.
  • [0039]
    The invention therefore presents a learning training system which allows the efficient utilization of teacher or expert supervision, while presenting to a user a learning training tool for intense, long period, repetitive learning tasks which conforms to the learning styles of the individual and therefore is more likely to be motivating and pleasurable to utilize.
  • [0040]
    The invention has a number of options or enhancements that will be discussed in more detail later.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0041]
    [0041]FIG. 1 is a block diagram of the hardware components for a preferred-embodiment according to the present invention.
  • [0042]
    [0042]FIG. 2 is a block diagram of the overall architecture of the software of FIG. 2.
  • [0043]
    FIGS. 3A-3D are Flow charts of portions of programming related to the preferred embodiment.
  • [0044]
    [0044]FIG. 4A is a diagram of the general format for screen displays for training tasks regarding the preferred embodiment of the invention.
  • [0045]
    [0045]FIG. 4B is a specific screen display for a discrimination task according to the preferred embodiment of the invention.
  • [0046]
    [0046]FIG. 4C is a specific example of a screen display for an identification task for the preferred embodiment of the invention.
  • [0047]
    [0047]FIG. 5 is a screen display providing an example of a word list for the preferred embodiment.
  • [0048]
    [0048]FIG. 6A is a collection of screen display examples for varying attributes according to the preferred embodiment.
  • [0049]
    [0049]FIG. 6B is a further collection of screen display examples for attributes of the preferred embodiment.
  • [0050]
    [0050]FIG. 7 is a display and legend key for the various auditory visual levels for either identification tasks or discrimination tasks.
  • [0051]
    FIGS. 8A-8F are screen displays for the various auditory visual levels for discrimination tasks as set forth in FIG. 7.
  • [0052]
    [0052]FIG. 9 is a display of the various strategy types for the preferred embodiment.
  • [0053]
    [0053]FIG. 10 is an exemplary screen display for a preview task.
  • [0054]
    [0054]FIG. 11 is an exemplary display for a production training task.
  • [0055]
    [0055]FIG. 12A is an exemplary screen display of a puzzle feedback.
  • [0056]
    [0056]FIG. 12B is an exemplary display for painting feedback.
  • [0057]
    [0057]FIG. 13 is a screen display for selecting a speech perception level for a user.
  • [0058]
    FIGS. 14A-14D are screen displays for selecting lesson levels for a user.
  • [0059]
    [0059]FIG. 15 is a screen display for selecting a task for a user.
  • [0060]
    [0060]FIG. 16 is a screen display for selecting a strategy for a user.
  • [0061]
    [0061]FIG. 17 is a screen display for selecting a level of audiovisual support for a user.
  • [0062]
    [0062]FIG. 18 is a screen display for selecting specific tasks for a user.
  • [0063]
    [0063]FIG. 19 is a screen display for selecting certain parameters for testing a user.
  • [0064]
    FIGS. 20A-20L are screen displays relating to creating a user file for an individual user.
  • [0065]
    FIGS. 21A-21J are examples of various screen displays for different perception tasks according to the preferred embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0066]
    [0066]FIG. 23 is a block diagram of the editor process available with the preferred embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0067]
    A. Overview
  • [0068]
    To assist in a better understanding of the invention, a preferred embodiment will now be described in detail. It is to be understood that this preferred embodiment is but one form the invention can take and is not exclusive of the forms that are possible.
  • [0069]
    The drawing figures will be referred to throughout this description. Reference numerals and/or letters will be used to indicate certain parts or locations in the drawings. The same reference numerals will be used to indicate the same parts or locations throughout the drawings unless otherwise indicated.
  • [0070]
    B. General Environment of the Preferred Embodiment
  • [0071]
    The example given by this preferred embodiment is particularly relevant to the teaching of young children (kindergarten or first graders) and/or children with hearing loss (either total or partial), or children with other types of perception impairments, such as learning disabilities. It is therefore to be understood that the concepts discussed would be by analogy applicable to any learning training, regardless of age, capabilities, or impairments; and particularly to learning of rule-based systems such as speech, reading, language (English and others), math, and the like.
  • [0072]
    As will be described in more detail below, the preferred embodiment entails a computer-based interactive system. In the above described environment with regard to learning by relatively small children, a teacher or speech/hearing professional is generally involved to initialize and monitor the training. However, the invention certainly can be used at home by non-technically trained persons.
  • [0073]
    Still further it is to be understood that the specific example discussed has some subtle concepts which are generally well known to those in this art, although some will be brought out here to assist those relatively unskilled in the art. First, the learning training discussed is many times very fundamental and highly repetitive. For example, a deaf child trying to distinguish between the sound of a one syllable word and environmental noise such as a car horn or a dog bark, must start at a very fundamental level. The student would be given intensive repetitive tests where the stimuli were simple one syllable words compared to non-speech sounds. Through long period, repetitive training, the child will begin to distinguish the same. This will lay the foundation for movement to more difficult differentiations; for example multi-syllable words or sentences compared to multi-syllable words or sentences of different makeup. One of the main advantages of the present invention is to allow such sometimes tedious, intensive work to be marshalled autonomously by the computer system while maintaining a level of motivation and interest in the user. This allows the teacher, professional, or parent the ability to ration their attention, while maintaining the interest of the user, and in fact, providing the user with the level of difficulty needed for the user's particular needs.
  • [0074]
    The following description will be broken down into these segments. First, a basic discussion of a preferred hardware system will be set forth. Thereafter, a high level description of the software of the preferred embodiment will be given. This will be followed by a specific discussion of various fundamental concepts utilized in the system. Thereafter a specific example of operation of the system will be set forth with reference to various examples of data and stimuli that are useful for these purposes. Finally, a discussion of options, alternatives, and features of the invention will be given.
  • [0075]
    C. Hardware
  • [0076]
    [0076]FIG. 1 diagrammatically depicts a basic hardware setup according to the preferred embodiment of the invention. What will be called collectively system 10 includes a computer processor 12 which is preferably an IBM or IBM compatible 386 microprocessor with four megabyte RAM and an 80-100 megabyte hard drive capacity. System 10 can work with a minimum of a 286 microprocessor with 640 K-RAM and 60 meg hard drive. For institutional use a 386 DX/25+, 8 mega byte RAM, 100-200 megabyte hard disk is recommended.
  • [0077]
    An EGA-VGA adapter and monitor 14 are preferred as the visual display component of the multi-perceptual system 10. Monitor 14 comprises a part of what will be called the user interface to system 10 which includes not only monitor 14 for presentation of visual stimuli and information readout, but also a user input that can consist of either a touch screen 16 (Edmark Corporation Touch Window) available from a variety of vendors; a mouse 18, such as is well known in the art; or a keyboard 20. In the preferred embodiment all three components can be used to facilitate not only user input but also operation of the programming and entry of data.
  • [0078]
    A sound stimuli component for the user interface consists of a speaker 22 (in the preferred embodiment a bookcase size speaker) that is interfaced to processor 12 by a Covox sound board available from Covox, Inc. 675 Conger Street, Eugene, Oreg. 97402 (see reference numeral 24). Optional components related to auditory stimuli can include standard head phones 26 placeable on user 28; or a cochlear input selector 30 which is attachable to a cochlear implant in a user; or a vibrotactile device 32 which is connectable to a vibratory transducer that could be used by a user. A microphone 36 can also be included.
  • [0079]
    As is known to those skilled in the art, each of those auditory components could be used for presenting sound to a user. Speaker 22 and headphones 26 would present sound as is normally understood; whereas the cochlear implant and vibrotactile devices would present it in a electrical or vibrational mode to those who are deaf or have a hearing impairment.
  • [0080]
    [0080]FIG. 1 also shows security key disk 34 (from Dallas semiconductor), such as is well known in the art, is useful in limiting access to system 10. System 10 will not operate unless the key disk 34 is inserted, for example, in the parallel port on processor 12. Furthermore, it can contain initialization information regarding the user which can facilitate easy start up and use of system 10. An alternative is to require users to utilize a pass word which is keyed in on keyboard 20.
  • [0081]
    It is further noted that in the preferred embodiment, a comprehensive manual would be given to the user of system 10 to assist installation of the programming, hookup of the hardware, and initialization and use for a variety of users and purposes.
  • [0082]
    D. Software Configuration
  • [0083]
    [0083]FIG. 2 depicts diagrammatically the high level structure of software according to the preferred embodiment of the present invention, and its use of memory. The software runs on MS-DOS and is written in Turbo C and C+ language.
  • [0084]
    A floppy disk is supplied with the programming and is installed into computer 12 as is conventional and within the skill of those of ordinary skill in the art. For example, floppy would be inserted into drive A, the enter key pressed, and INSTALL typed in and again the enter key pressed. Approximately 4 megabytes of space are needed in RAM and 60-80 meg on the fixed drive for the program and at least 15 files must be set up. If a printer is utilized it should be connected to the LPT1 port. By following the instructions on the screen, completion of installation of the programming can be accomplished. After these basics are installed, audio, picture, and stimuli library and supporting executables are installed in a similar manner.
  • [0085]
    What is called the core stimuli for the programming are approximately 1600 words, sounds, pictures, and the like which form the basis for the training lessons presented with system 10. These core stimuli have been carefully selected on the basis of years of research and study, but system 10 allows the addition of customized stimuli. For example, it is known that personalized information allows better and quicker learning. Thus, picture stimuli that have a personal connection to any learner, (including small children) can be added to the core stimuli according to known in the art methods. Likewise words, sounds, and other stimuli can be added in.
  • [0086]
    As will be discussed in more detail later, different courses can be offered with system 10. In this preferred embodiment, a course on listening will be described. Different courses on listening, or courses dealing with pre-reading and reading subject matter can be separately installed and utilized. As previously mentioned, courses on mathematics, geography, and the like could also be prepared.
  • [0087]
    As will be further described below, memory also contains a plurality of different lessons for each specific course to allow variety for the user as well as varying levels of difficulty. In the preferred embodiment approximately 1000 lessons are utilized.
  • [0088]
    E. Software Overview
  • [0089]
    By referring to FIGS. 2 and 3A-3D a high level diagram of the construction and interrelationship of the software according to the preferred embodiment is shown. As previously explained, various courses would be possible. In this embodiment course 1 dealing with listening is specifically discussed.
  • [0090]
    Under each course is a plurality of lesson packages. Each lesson package (in the preferred embodiment approximately 160 lesson packages) would involve between 1 to 15 lessons. System 10 has about 1,000 lessons available to it.
  • [0091]
    For the listening course each lesson would generally contain one or more word lists. In this context word lists can mean words, combinations of words, sentences, non-speech sounds, or any auditory stimuli.
  • [0092]
    As shown at FIG. 2, the lessons can also consist of feedback, libraries, mode, and tasks.
  • [0093]
    Therefore, when operating system 10, a user, teacher, parent, or professional, can select from a number of different lesson packages related to the specific learning training desired for the user. As can be appreciated, the content of the lessons can cover wide variation of subject matter.
  • [0094]
    [0094]FIG. 2 specifically sets forth what is involved with each possible component of a lesson.
  • [0095]
    First of all, tasks consist of one or more of pretest, posttest, practice, training, and production. Specific examples of these will be given later. Basically the lesson can predetermine whether the user is prepared for the level of difficulty of the lesson using a pretest. It can also posttest the student to better check what has been learned. A practice component can allow the user to familiarize him or herself with the particular task. The term training refers to the actual learning process.
  • [0096]
    A production task involves a variety of tests or processes aimed at requiring the user to essentially produce a result. The production task may differ substantially from the training and-is incorporated as an optional feature to go along with the listening training. One example is to have the student vocalize a word or try to match the word as sounded by system 10.
  • [0097]
    The term “Mode” in the preferred embodiment means selection between essentially a discrimination task or an identification task. A discrimination task merely asks the user to state whether two presented stimuli are the same or different. Identification tasks present a stimuli and then ask which of two or four succeeding stimuli matches the original stimuli. A comprehension mode is also possible which presents the stimuli and then requires language comprehension to select the answer.
  • [0098]
    The “libraries” portion of each lesson relates to the specific audio visual presentations that will be available in the lesson. As can be shown, audio, pictorial, and text are either taken from pre-stored core stimuli, or as indicated by the box labeled “input from stimuli editor”, can be customized and input for use. Still further, the edit feature allows editing of the existing core stimuli.
  • [0099]
    As is also shown in FIG. 2, textual stimuli are coded into the libraries so that essentially the difficulty of their presentation can be quantified in valuing the difficulty of certain lessons. This will be discussed further below.
  • [0100]
    The feedback component of the lessons simply is any number of built-in presentations that provide reinforcing feedback and motivation to the user of system 10. For example, a child could be rewarded periodically with a puzzle, stars, or a painting task. Older children or adults could be rewarded with something at perhaps a higher level such as a text message.
  • [0101]
    [0101]FIG. 2 also shows that an important aspect of the software is the “strategy” for the tasks and for the lesson packages of the course. In the lower right hand corner of FIG. 2, it is shown that either by customized selection, or by default settings programmed into the software, such things as ordered or random presentation of stimuli for each lesson can occur, certain performance criteria can be adjusted for each user, the level of abstraction of stimuli can be adjusted, rate of progression, and the amount of audio visual support for each task can be selected.
  • [0102]
    The strategy therefore can essentially set the initial difficulty of each lesson and then the rate of progression as far as difficulty from then on.
  • [0103]
    In the preferred embodiment, as shown in FIG. 2, software allows recordation and analysis of the entire response profile of the user for each lesson or lesson package. As will be described in more detail later, the reporting not only simply records right or wrong answers, but also codes each answer with a value correlated to the meaning of the learning strategy of the user. It also records reaction time and other criteria, other than simply the right or wrong answer. From this reporting is derived a performance profile which is compared to the performance criteria and imposed strategy. System 10 can then either autonomously (or ask the teacher or professional to) evaluate the performance and select a change in strategy (either more difficult or less difficult) or remain the same. Additionally, as the tasks are proceeding, system 10 autonomously and dynamically can change the difficulty of the tasks based on performance. The change is not necessarily isolated to the stimuli presented, but rather can vary across such subtle matters as changing the amount of time for each task, changing the level of acceptable success or failure rates, providing less or more supplemental information with which to contemplate an answer, or allowing more repetitions of certain tasks.
  • [0104]
    It is to be understood that the system is very flexible in this aspect but provides the advantage of dynamically, on the fly, monitoring a user's progress and then adjusting one or more of these sometimes subtle criteria to in turn adjust presentation of the tasks and allow the user to not only go at his/her own speed, but to discover and explore and to find his/her own best learning strategies.
  • [0105]
    [0105]FIG. 4A shows the basic flow of the program, including initialization and how the computer sets up tasks. FIG. 3A shows the basic method of “DO TASK” from FIG. 4A. FIG. 4C shows how performance is quantified to raise or lower next lesson difficulty; while FIG. 4D does this for next task.
  • [0106]
    F. Training Task Displays
  • [0107]
    FIGS. 4A-4C provide examples of the type of display that would appear on the user's screen during a training task. In FIG. 4A, the basic template for a screen display task is shown. It is important to understand that in the preferred embodiment, these templates are uniform for all tasks. The left-most column are called “top level” spaces. This is where the stimuli being compared by the user is identified. The boxes to the right of “top level” are called “attributes” and as will be further seen below, basically are features, characteristics, or sub-parts of the top level stimuli. It is important to understand that the attributes may or may not be available for review by the user in certain testing levels. If the testing is more difficult, attributes which would allow one to explore and discover more about a stimuli may not be available to make the task more difficult.
  • [0108]
    As is also indicated at FIG. 4A, the lesson name would be displayed along with the name of the current user. The trial counter segment could be a linear bar having various segments which would represent to the user the number of trials before any successful completion of a task.
  • [0109]
    Therefore, top level presentations relate to a whole stimulus, whereas the attribute sections are a presentation of a whole stimulus or abstractions of the whole stimulus. FIGS. 4B and 4C give concrete examples. For discrimination tasks FIG. 4B shows that in a touch screen situation the first top level stimulus would be presented. The user would then review the bottom top level stimulus when presented and consider whether they are the same (“S”) or different (“D”). If the user believes he/she knows the answer, the S or D would be. Depending on the level of difficulty of the particular lesson, an attribute (in this case the abstraction consisting of the relative length of the word of the top level stimulus is displayed). “Boat” has a very short black bar. “Watch the elephant” has a relatively longer black bar. This helps the user in their discrimination between stimuli.
  • [0110]
    [0110]FIG. 4C shows an identification task. To the right of the question mark would be presented the top level stimuli. To the right of “1” and “2” would be presented the options for matching with the “?” stimulus. Again, attributes could be displayed to assist in the task. The user could be exposed to only attributes at either stimulus or response levels, and/or only whole stimuli at the other level, in order to force synthesis of the parts or analysis of the whole.
  • [0111]
    It is to be understood that the software allows the user to replay either the top level stimuli to encourage exploration of auditory information. The user is never penalized for requesting repetitions prior to selecting an answer. The user can also replay the attribute information and explore the variety of receptional information available before making a selection.
  • [0112]
    G. Word Lists
  • [0113]
    [0113]FIG. 5 shows an example of a word list. The word list would be used for either comparing in discrimination tasks between the opposite words, or using them in identification tasks. In FIG. 5, each left hand column word is a one syllable mixed frequency word. Each right hand column word is a three syllable mixed frequency word. This word list would therefore be available for use by lessons which would contrast one versus three syllable words with similar frequency characteristics.
  • [0114]
    As can be appreciated, a wide variety of word lists are possible. At the end of this description are provided a number of examples of different types of word lists.
  • [0115]
    H. Different Attributes
  • [0116]
    [0116]FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate the different types of attributes available for certain top level stimuli. In FIG. 6A the top attribute is a non-speech attribute which indicates that the top level auditory stimuli in this instance is a frog croak and not a word. Such an attribute again would help the user in identifying and memorizing frog croak as a non-speech sound.
  • [0117]
    The second display indicates relative length of the phrase by use of a black bar. The third display shows as an attribute the syllables and each word of the phrase. The fourth display shows each syllable and the stress one would place when speaking each syllable.
  • [0118]
    [0118]FIG. 6B from top to the bottom shows what are called segmented attributes. For example, the words are included in separate boxes and a picture is associated with the descriptive word “elephant”. Alternatively the different words are in separate boxes with syllables represented by bars that can be called up by the user to explore and investigate before answering. Thus can be seen there are even clues that can be programmed in for investigation by the user.
  • [0119]
    [0119]FIGS. 7 and 8A through 8F specifically shows AV levels for discrimination tasks. Those for identification tasks are similar.
  • [0120]
    I. Strategy
  • [0121]
    [0121]FIG. 9 provides a screen display for the various strategy types that can be selected by teacher or professional, or which can be built into default settings in the software. The user's progression or regression through a series of tasks and lessons is determined by his/her own performance and how that interacts with the general strategy selected for that user initially. As can be seen in FIG. 9, the strategy types are comprised of four elements namely (1) initial presentation (can be either “B” in which “both” stimulus and responses are displayed or “T” in which “target-only” initial presentations are displayed); (2) audio/visual set (either “A” which is auditory level only or “V” which includes visual and auditory levels); (3) type of word group (either same word group or different word group); and (4) rate of progression/regression (fast, medium, or slow).
  • [0122]
    J. Preview
  • [0123]
    [0123]FIG. 10 simply shows a screen display whereby samples of stimuli to be included in the following training tasks are shown to the user. Full auditory/visual support is provided and the user can request as many repetitions as desired. It is exploratory only and not task related.
  • [0124]
    K. Production Training
  • [0125]
    [0125]FIG. 11 illustrates a production training task as indicated in FIG. 3. It includes three components: Listening, recording, and judging. The user can listen to a prerecorded stimulus just as if he/she were in the perception training tasks. Only one stimulus however serves as the model for production. The user can record and play back the stimulus and contrast it with the model prerecorded stimulus. The clinician or user can make a perceptual judgment about each of the user's productions by selecting one of five stars following each production. To advance to the next trial the clinician can select either “next” or “O.K.”. Next represents an unacceptable production and “O.K.” an acceptable production. Stars are shown for “O.K.” and “balloons” for “next”. The trial counter corresponds to the number of trials set and the user defaults. Stars will appear for “O.K.” response.
  • [0126]
    The production training simply allows the user to practice vocalization of words or sounds, in this case, and to allow a teacher to evaluate such vocalizations.
  • [0127]
    L. Feedback
  • [0128]
    As previously mentioned, FIGS. 12A and 12B show two specific types of what are basically rewards that can be programmed into the software. In the preferred embodiment the feedback options are tied into the success performance of the user in the task. For each successful or correct answer on the first try, the user would receive some sort of an indication in the trial counter box at the bottom of the screen. Then periodically the feedback display would appear. Based on the number of stars in the trial counter box, the puzzle feedback of FIG. 12A for example would break up a picture into the number of puzzle pieces which correspond to the number of stars received by the user. The user can then try to complete the puzzle using the number of pieces he/she has achieved. The number of pieces may or may not be selected to correspond to the number of first try correct answers, however. Such a puzzle is intended to try to provide motivation to the user to get as many first time correct answers as possible.
  • [0129]
    In FIG. 12B, a similar feedback is provided. The user is allowed to use different colors to paint the picture. The amount of time the user can spend painting and how frequently this occurs can be specified in each users file.
  • [0130]
    M. Initial Selection Options
  • [0131]
    FIGS. 13-19 show screen displays according to the preferred embodiment of the present invention which relate to initial selections for a user related to what level and strategy of tasking is indicated for the user. In FIG. 13, for example, the teacher or professional is presented with a series of YES or NO questions related to the indicted level of speech perception for the particular user. Depending on these answers, the teacher or professional is directed to other selection screens.
  • [0132]
    For example, regarding pattern perception, if the user is a very young child with a hearing deficiency, he/she may not be able to differentiate between speech and non-speech. If so, lessons and tasks within the lessons would have to start at a very basic level. If the child could differentiate accordingly, he/she may be able to start at a slightly higher level of lessons and tasks.
  • [0133]
    FIGS. 14A-14D show similar type questionnaires which-further break down the questions regarding pattern, word, syllable, and perception; again further trying to identify the potential beginning level of tasks for the user.
  • [0134]
    [0134]FIG. 15 merely asks which task mode (discrimination or identification), is desired.
  • [0135]
    [0135]FIG. 16 requests selection of strategy for moving through lessons. The strategy is made by selecting one choice from each of the categories. For example, TVSMED would be “Target only” on initial presentation, “Visual O.K.” if user can not perform the auditory only information, “Same group” for the tasks, and “MEDium rate” of progression.
  • [0136]
    [0136]FIG. 17 shows the selection of the level for AV support, as previously described regarding FIG. 7.
  • [0137]
    [0137]FIG. 18 then asks which of the specific tasks between pretest, preview, training tasks, production tasks, and posttest tasks are desired.
  • [0138]
    Finally, FIG. 19 allows default settings to be made for each user relating to feedback, tasks, and libraries for AV settings.
  • [0139]
    It can therefore be seen that a wide variety of flexibility is given to both customize or individualize training for each individual, as well as present different learning strategies for each individual.
  • [0140]
    N. Operation
  • [0141]
    The basic components and concepts of system 10 have been provided above. An example of an operation of system 10 will now be set forth.
  • [0142]
    By referring to FIGS. 2, 3, and 20A-20L, initiation and preparation for operation of system 10 can be seen. Initially a user file must be created for each person using system 10. The operator would access the editor in the software by selecting EDITOR from a menu manager (see FIG. 20A). A series of editor menus will appear (FIG. 20B) Key F4 should be selected to add a user. As shown in FIG. 20C, one could copy the user profile for an existing user or by so indicating create a new user profile.
  • [0143]
    Certain basic information is then entered including user name (FIG. 20D in the preferred embodiment up to eight characters long). Thereafter (FIG. 20E) certain information is then requested. In this Fig., feedback defaults are shown. These can be changed by moving the cursor to those values pressing back space and entering new values or by pressing a space bar to toggle between available settings.
  • [0144]
    Next the user default screen should be configured (see FIG. 20F). The entries to the questions presented in the user default screen can be answered based on a previously described options that are available for each user. When completed, this user default screen will be preserved for each of the lessons that are built for that user.
  • [0145]
    Thereafter, a lesson plan is created (see FIG. 20G). This lesson screen can be completed either by (1) selecting existing lesson packages by pressing F5, (2) selecting existing lessons from the lesson library by pressing F2, or by (3) entering new lesson components for task mode, word list, attribute, strategy and starting AV level. Thus up to 15 lessons can be selected-and can be either selected by default or customization. As shown in FIG. 20H, if answered YES, the screen of FIG. 20I, for example, would appear which would produce default settings specific to the user and not the existing lesson defaults.
  • [0146]
    [0146]FIG. 20J shows an example of how one would customize a word list.
  • [0147]
    [0147]FIG. 20K shows how one would select a strategy. Again, strategy defines a rate of advancement and direction of movement through specified lessons.
  • [0148]
    Finally, FIG. 20L, an attribute set can be brought up on the screen and selected for a specific lesson. Only one attribute type per lesson can be chosen.
  • [0149]
    Other selections would then be made available for customization or default selection:
  • [0150]
    Starting A/V level: This option specifies the A/V level setting for displaying the stimulus during the training task.
  • [0151]
    Preview: This YES/NO option controls whether the user is given a preview of the stimuli prior to the training task. This option may be used to insure the stimuli are in the user's vocabulary before entering the task.
  • [0152]
    Training: This YES/NO option controls whether the user engages in the perception training tasks.
  • [0153]
    Task Pass Percent: Determines the percent correct needed to pass to next training task. Default value is 75%.
  • [0154]
    Pretest: This YES/NO option controls whether users are given a pretest before receiving training. Pretest value can be compared with training values and posttest values to document changes.
  • [0155]
    Posttest: This YES/NO option controls whether the users are given the posttest on completion of training for a lesson.
  • [0156]
    Reserve Testing Group: This YES/NO option is relevant only if the pretesting and/or posttest option is set to YES and controls whether content used during testing is or is not used during training.
  • [0157]
    Pretest Judgment: This YES/NO option is relevant only if pretest is selected. It controls whether a score obtained on pretest is used to place the user in a training series. The next two options “advance criteria” and “enter criteria” are used to set values for entering a training series based on the pretest score.
  • [0158]
    Advance Percentage: This option is relevant only if pretest is selected. The value entered determines when a user advances to the next lesson level. For example, if the value were set to 85% and the user obtained that score or better, the user would advance to the next lesson level for pretest rather than enter the training series.
  • [0159]
    Enter Percent: Relevant only if pretest is set to YES. The value entered sets the lowest acceptable limit for entering a lesson series. If the user can not obtain this entry score he/she will be moved back to a less difficult lesson level.
  • [0160]
    Production: A five choice option controls whether the user will be placed in a production task and if so when the production task will be sequenced in the training. Options include “none”, “pretest”, “posttest”, “pre/posttest”, and “group based”. If “group based” is selected the production task would be given each time the user moves into a new contrast group.
  • [0161]
    Production A/V Level: This option specifies the A/V level setting for displaying the stimulus during the production task.
  • [0162]
    Method of Grouping Contrasts From Word Lists: This option controls the way in which groups or stimuli are chosen and contrasts are paired in a lesson. There are four ways of grouping and presentation. A contrast ALWAYS involves a stimulus item from each set. Stimuli within a set are never contrasted. The four choices illustrated below are preceded by an explanation of the terms used.
  • [0163]
    Training Contrasts: This option specifies a number of contrasts to be presented within a training task.
  • [0164]
    Reps/Training Contrasts: Option specifies a number of times each contrast is repeated within a training task. The total number of trials presented per task can be determine by multiplying the number of training contrasts with the repetitions per contrast. The total number within a task can not exceed twenty.
  • [0165]
    Enter the number at the cursor. The backspace or delete keys can be used to erase the current value.
  • [0166]
    (Trials =): The number of total trials will appear after training contrasts and repetitions per training contrast have been specified. This value is dynamically derived by multiplying the two contrasts and repetitions. To change this value, one or both of the two preceding parameters must be changed.
  • [0167]
    Test Contrasts: This option specifies the number of contrasts to be presented within a pretest and/or posttest task.
  • [0168]
    Enter the number at the cursor. The backspace or delete keys can be used to erase the current value.
  • [0169]
    Reps/Test Contrast: This option specifies the number of times each contrast is repeated within a pretest and/or posttest task. The total number of trials presented per task can be determined by multiplying the number of training contrasts with the repetitions per contrast. The total number of trials within a task cannot exceed 20.
  • [0170]
    Enter the number at the cursor. The backspace or delete keys can be used to erase the current value.
  • [0171]
    Trials =): The number of total trials will appear after test contracts and repetitions per test contrast have been specified. This value is dynamically derived by multiplying the contrasts and repetitions.
  • [0172]
    Enter the number at the cursor. The backspace and delete keys can be used to erase the current value.
  • [0173]
    Number of Screen Choices: This option specifies the number of answers available during a task. Either a two-choice or four-choice option is available.
  • [0174]
    Select either “2” or “4” by pressing the space bar.
  • [0175]
    Retries per trial: This option specifies the number of retries or chances the user has to select the correct answer before moving to the next contrast.
  • [0176]
    Enter the number at the cursor. The backspace or delete keys can be used to erase the current value.
  • [0177]
    Use Text: This option specifies whether text will be displayed during the task.
  • [0178]
    Select “Yes” or “No” by pressing the space bar.
  • [0179]
    Site Group: This optional feature specifies the library number of a special library established for specific site purposes.
  • [0180]
    Enter the number at this cursor. The backspace or delete keys can be used to erase the current value.
  • [0181]
    Picture Group: This option specifies which picture libraries should be used to display visual information. The choices are “Standard” “SEE 2”, and “Oral”. “Standard” refers to illustrated pictures. “SEE2” refers to Signing Exact English sign language and “Oral” refers to presentation of mouth postures. Only one picture group can be chosen per lesson.
  • [0182]
    Select the choice by pressing the space bar.
  • [0183]
    Audio Group: Standard English is the only audio group currently available.
  • [0184]
    Audio Overlay Name: This option allows background noise to be integrated into the audio signal. The default option is to leave the choice blank and have no overlay signal.
  • [0185]
    Select the overlay name by pressing F2.
  • [0186]
    Audio Overlay Level: This option controls the level of noise integrated into the audio signal. The value entered can range from 1 to 100, soft to loud.
  • [0187]
    Enter the number at the cursor. The backspace or delete keys can be used to erase the current value.
  • [0188]
    Once all of this is set up, the user can go into the lessons. Depending on what has been selected pretesting can be done to determine the position the student should start within the lessons. Once training starts, stimuli are presented according to the settings regarding A/V support, attributes, initial presentation, etc., and the user proceeds by answering, exploring, or discovering as previously discussed. Software constantly monitors the progress of the user and will adjust to his/her performance.
  • [0189]
    0. Appendices
  • [0190]
    By referring to FIGS. 21A-21J, different types of displays and contrast types are shown. Appendix A includes listings of the available lesson packages with one specific example of a lesson package for each of those types of contrasts.
  • [0191]
    It can be seen that wide variety of difficulty is possible.
  • [0192]
    Appendix B presents a printout of the menus for software to allow better understanding of the configuration of the software.
  • [0193]
    Appendix C sets forth examples of rules regarding coding of stimuli.
  • [0194]
    It is to be understood that this information is submitted in an attempt to disclose one way in which can be realized. The specific software code can be derived from disclosure of this preferred embodiment and is not essential to understanding of the invention. Substantial portion of one example of programming can be found at U.S. copyright registration TX529,929, registered Jul. 27, 1992 to Breakthrough, Inc., and is incorporated by reference herein.
  • [0195]
    It is to be appreciated that the invention can take many forms and embodiments. True essence and spirit of this invention are defined in the appended claims, and it is not intended that the embodiment of the invention presented herein should limit the scope thereof.
    Speech and Nonspeech
    N Lesson Packages
    Lesson Package: N-SCREEN N1
    1. NLU1-1 long uninterrupted v. 1 syl N1
    2. NSUE-1 short uninterrupted v. 5 syl sent N1
    3. NLUSI-1 long uninterrupted v. short interrupted N1
    4. NSUSU-1 short uninterruped v. short uninterrupted N2
    Lesson Package: NONSPCH-1 N3
    1. NLU1-1 long uninterrupted v. 1 syl N3
    2. NLU1-2 long uninterrupted v. 1 syl N3
    3. NLI1-1 long uninterrupted v. 1 syl N3
    4. NLI1-2 long uninterrupted v. 1 syl N4
    5. NSU1-1 short uninterrupted v. 1 syl N4
    6. NSU1-2 short uninterrupted v. 1 syl N4
    7. NSI1-1 short uninterrupted v. 1 syl N5
    8. NSI1-2 short uninterrupted v. 1 syl N5
    Lesson Package: NONSPCH-2 N7
    1. NSUE-1 short uninterrupted v. 5 syl sent N7
    2. NSIE-1 short interrupted v. 5 syl sent N7
    3. NLUE-1 long uninterrupted v. 5 syl sent N7
    4. NLIE-1 long interrupted v. 5 syl sent N8
    5. NSUC-1 short uninterrupted v. 3 syl sent N8
    6. NSIC-1 short interrupted v. 3 syl sent N8
    7. NLUC-1 long uninterrupted v. 3 syl sent N9
    8. NLIC-1 long uninterrupted v. 3 syl sent N9
    Lesson Package: NONSPCH-3 N11
    1. NLUSI-1 long uninterrupted v. short interrupted N11
    2. NLUSU-1 long uninterrupted v. short uninterrupted N11
    3. NLISU-1 long interrupted v. short uninterrupted N11
    4. NLISI-1 long interrupted v. short interrupted N12
    Speech and Nonspeech Lessons
    Attribute: Nonspeech/Speech
    Pattern Perception
    Lesson Package: N-SCREEN
    NLU1-1
    long uninterrupted v. 1 syl
    mountain-stream cake
    train-horn knife
    birds-chirping moon
    door-creaking kite
    laughter mop
    motorcycle grape
    music page
    pouring bowl
    NSUE-1
    short uninterrupted v. 5 syl sent
    pop-pouring Get the newspaper
    plane See my family
    mixer Watch the butterfly
    cannon-1shot Get the parachute
    slidewhistle See my eyelashes
    sneeze Watch the sunglasses
    rollercoster Wear the sunglasses
    hairdryer Get the radio
    NLUSI-1
    long uninterrupted v. short interrupted
    mountain-stream bell
    thunder glass-breaking
    door-creaking goats
    tapwater knocking
    train-horn dog-panting
    music parking meter
    traffic firecrackers
    baby-crying cloth-ripping
    Length
    L Lesson Packages
    Lesson Package: L-SCREEN L1
    1. LLU1-1 long uninterrupted v. 1 syl L1
    2. LSUE-1 short uninterrupted v. 5 syl sent L1
    3. L1E-1 1 syl v. 5 syl sent L1
    4. L13-1 1 syl v. 3 syl L2
    5. LBE-1 2 syl phrase v. 5 syl sent L2
    6. LDE-3 4 syl sent v. 5 syl sent L2
    Lesson Package: LENGTH-1 L3
    1. LLU1-1 long uninterrupted v. 1 syl L3
    2. LLU1-2 long uninterrupted v. 1 syl L3
    3. LLU1-3 long uninterrupted v. 1 syl L3
    4. LLI1-1 long interrupted v. 1 syl L4
    5. LLI1-2 long interrupted v. 1 syl L4
    6. LLI1-3 long interrupted v. 1 syl L4
    7. LSU1-1 short uninterrupted v. 1 syl L5
    8. LSU1-2 short uninterrupted v. 1 syl L5
    9. LSU1-3 short uninterrupted v. 1 syl L5
    10. LSI1-1 short interrupted v. 1 syl L6
    11. LSI1-2 short interrupted v. 1 syl L6
    12. LSI1-3 short interrupted v. 1 syl L6
    Lesson Package: LENGTH-2 L7
    1. LSUE-1 short uninterrupted v. 5 syl sent L7
    2. LSIE-1 short interrupted v. 5 syl sent L7
    3. LLUE-1 long uninterrupted v. 5 syl sent L7
    4. LLIE-1 long interrupted v. 5 syl sent L8
    5. LSUC-1 short uninterrupted v. syl sent L8
    6. LSIC-1 short interrupted v. 3 syl sent L8
    7. LLUC-1 long uninterrupted v. 3 syl sent L9
    8. LLIC-1 long interrupted v. 3 syl sent L9
    Length Lessons
    Attribute Duration
    Pattern Perception
    Lesson Package: L-SCREEN
    LLU1-1
    long uninterrupted v. 1 syl
    thunder comb
    birds-chirping eyes
    motorcycle night
    siren leg
    music hat
    baby-crying broom
    train-horn house
    traffic sew
    LSUE-1
    short uninterrupted v. 5 syl sent
    mixer See my eyelashes
    handsaw Watch the elephant
    plane See the magician
    cannon-1shot Eat the potato
    zipper Wear the sunglasses
    car-starting See my typewriter
    hairdryer Buy the tricycle
    pop-pouring I want lemonade
    L1E-1
    1 syl v. 5 syl sent
    bath See my furniture
    shoe Watch the elephant
    draw Eat the hamburger
    blow Get the umbrella
    hat I want lemonade
    leg I eat spaghetti
    fire Wear the sunglasses
    snow See the restaurant
    Syllable Number
    U Lesson Packages
    Lesson Package: U-SCREEN U1
    1. U1L3H-1 1 syl low freq v. 3 syl high freq U1
    2. U1B3B-1 1 syl mixed freq v. 3 syl mixed freq U1
    3. U1B2B-2 1 syl mixed freq v. 2 syl mixed freq U1
    4. U1H3H-1 1 syl high freq v. 3 syl high freq U2
    5. U1L2L-3 1 syl low freq v. 2 syl low freq U2
    Lesson Package: SYLNUM-1 U3
    1. U1L3H-1 1 syl low freq v. 3 syl high freq U3
    2. U1L3H-2 1 syl low freq v. 3 syl high freq U3
    3. U1H3L-1 1 syl high freq v. 3 syl low freq U3
    4. U1H3L-2 1 syl high freq v. 3 syl low freq U4
    5. U1L2H-1 1 syl low freq v. 2 syl high freq U4
    6. U1L2H-2 1 syl low freq v. 2 syl high freq U4
    7. U1L2H-3 1 syl low freq v. 2 syl high freq U5
    8. U1B3B-1 1 syl mixed freq v. 3 syl mixed freq U5
    9. U1B3B-2 1 syl mixed freq v. 3 syl mixed freq U5
    10. U1H2L-1 1 syl high freq v. 2 syl low freq U6
    11. U1H2L-2 1 sly high freq v. 2 syl low freq U6
    12. U1H2L-3 1 syl high freq v. 2 syl low freq U6
    13. U1B2B-1 1 syl mixed freq v. 2 syl mixed freq U7
    14. U1B2B-2 1 syl mixed freq v. 2 syl mixed freq U7
    Lesson Package: SYLNUM-2 U9
    1. U1H3H-1 1 syl high freq v. 3 syl high freq U9
    2. U1H3H-2 1 syl high freq v. 3 syl high freq U9
    3. U1L3L-1 1 syl low freq v. 3 syl low freq U9
    4. U1L3L-2 1 syl low freq v. 3 syl low freq U10
    5. U1H2H-1 1 syl high freq v. 2 syl high freq U10
    6. U1H2H-2 1 syl high freq v. 2 syl high freq U10
    7. U1H2H-3 1 syl high freq v. 2 syl high freq U11
    8. U1L2L-1 1 syl low freq v. 2 syl low freq U11
    9. U1L2L-2 1 syl low freq v. 2 syl low freq U11
    10. U1L2L-3 1 syl low freq v. 2 syl low freq U12
    Syllable Number Lessons
    Attribute: Number of Syllables
    Pattern Perception
    Lesson Package: U-SCREEN
    U1L3H-1
    1 syl low freq v. 3 syl high freq
    robe wastebasket
    bear parachute
    drum saxophone
    nose grasshopper
    lamb applesauce
    mad spaghetti
    red butterscotch
    green octopus
    U1B3B-1
    1 syl mixed freq v. 3 syl mixed freq
    shave overalls
    toad ladybug
    juice tablespoon
    snail restaurant
    tree waterski
    hill moccasin
    web icicle
    flea pineapple
    U1B2B-2
    1 syl mixed freq v. 2 syl mixed freq
    wood button
    ring ostrich
    brick honey
    seed wreath
    glass hammer
    drip lemon
    skin needle
    gum radish
    Stress Pattern
    T Lesson Packages
    Lesson Package: T-SCREEN T1
    1. T1E-1 1 syl v. 5 syl sent T1
    2. T2E-1 2 syl v. 5 syl sent T1
    3. T3E-1 3 syl v. 5 syl sent T1
    4. T13-1 1 syl v. 3 syl T2
    5. TBE-1 2 syl phrase v. 5 syl sent T2
    6. TDE-3 4 syl sent v. 5 syl sent T2
    Lesson Package: STRESS-1 T3
    1. T1E-1 1 syl v. 5 syl sent T3
    2. T1E-2 1 syl v. 5 syl sent T3
    3. T1E-3 1 syl v. 5 syl sent T3
    4. T1D-1 1 syl v. 4 syl sent T4
    5. T1D-2 1 syl v. 4 syl sent T4
    6. T1D-3 1 syl v. 4 syl sent T4
    7. T1C-1 1 syl v. 3 syl sent T5
    8. T1C-2 1 syl v. 3 syl sent T5
    9. T1C-3 1 syl v. 3 syl sent T5
    10. T1B-1 1 syl v. 2 syl phrase T6
    11. T1B-2 1 syl v. 2 syl phrase T6
    12. T1B-3 1 syl v. 2 syl phrase T6
    Lesson Package: STRESS-2 T7
    1. T2E-1 2 syl v. 5 syl sent T7
    2. T2E-2 2 syl v. 5 syl sent T7
    3. T2E-3 2 syl v. 5 syl sent T7
    4. T2D-1 2 syl v. 4 syl sent T8
    5. T2D-2 2 syl v. 4 syl sent T8
    6. T2D-3 2 syl v. 4 syl sent T8
    7. T2C-1 2 syl v. 3 syl sent T9
    8. T2C-2 2 syl v. 3 syl sent T9
    9. T2C-3 2 syl v. 3 syl sent T9
    Stress Lessons
    Attribute: Stress Pattern
    Pattern Perception
    Lesson Package: T-SCREEN
    T1E-1
    1 syl v. 5 syl sent
    small Get the radio
    laugh Find the dogcatcher
    drive See the bakery
    web Buy the tricycle
    swing Wear the sunglasses
    cane I like bologna
    queen Get the eraser
    game Eat the banana
    T2E-1
    2 syl v. 5 syl sent
    angel Get the magazine
    zebra I like karate
    beaver See my handlebars
    water Watch the centipede
    castle Wear the suspenders
    dipper I want lemonade
    tiger See my limousine
    T3E-1
    3 syl v. 5 syl sent
    butterfly Get the envelope
    icicle See my chariot
    sandpaper I like celery
    fingernail See the pyramid
    ladybug Wear the suspenders
    jewelry Get the umbrella
    overalls Watch the buffalo
    radio See the Eskimo
    Mixed Sentence
    M Lesson Packages
    Lesson Package: M-SCREEN M1
    1. M1E-1 1 syl v. 5 syl sent M1
    2. M2E-1 2 syl v. 5 syl sent M1
    3. M3E-1 3 syl v. 5 syl sent M1
    4. MCE-1 3 syl sent v. 5 syl sent M2
    5. MDE-1 4 syl sent v. 5 syl sent M2
    Lesson Package: MIXSEN-1 M3
    1. M1E-1 1 syl v. 5 syl sent M3
    2. M1E-2 1 syl v. 5 syl sent M3
    3. M1D-1 1 syl v. 4 syl sent M3
    4. M1D-2 1 syl v. 4 syl sent M4
    5. M1C-1 1 syl v. 3 syl sent M4
    6. M1C-2 1 syl v. 3 syl sent M4
    7. M1B-1 1 syl v. 2 syl phrase M5
    8. M1B-2 1 syl v. 2 syl phrase M5
    9. M1B-3 1 syl v. 2 syl phrase M5
    10. M1B-4 1 syl v. 2 syl phrase M6
    11. M1B-5 1 syl v. 2 syl phrase M6
    Lesson Package: MIXSEN-2 M7
    1. M2E-1 2 syl v. 5 syl sent M7
    2. M2E-2 2 syl v. 5 syl sent M7
    3. M2D-1 2 syl v. 4 syl sent M7
    4. M2D-2 2 syl v. 4 syl sent M8
    5. M2C-1 2 syl v. 3 syl sent M8
    6. M2C-2 2 syl v. 3 syl sent M8
    7. M2B-1 2 syl v. 2 syl phrase M9
    8. M2B-2 2 syl v. 2 syl phrase M9
    9. M2B-3 2 syl v. 2 syl phrase M9
    10. M2B-4 2 syl v. 2 syl phrase M10
    11. M2B-5 2 syl v. 2 syl phrase M10
    Mixed Words and Sentences Lessons
    Attribute Word 1,2,3
    Words in Sentences
    Lesson Package: M-SCREEN
    M1E-1
    1 syl v. 5 syl sent
    goat I like peppermint
    hug Watch the buffalo
    white Get the umbrella
    leaf See my piano
    nut Watch the butterfly
    head See the bakery
    dream Eat the hamburger
    cat Pet the kangaroo
    M2E-1
    2 syl v. 5 syl sent
    puppet Wear the jewlery
    teacher Get the newspaper
    beaver Watch the cardinal
    saddle See the factory
    giraffe See the restaurant
    city Eat the hamburger
    finger Watch the gorilla
    zipper See the library
    M3E-1
    3 syl v. 5 syl sent
    furniture I like karate
    sunflower Watch the somersault
    oxygen See my firecracker
    cereal Watch the woodpecker
    dynamite Get the feather
    mechanic See my limousine
    laudromat Watch the centipede
    buttonhole See the volcano
    Different Sentence
    D Lesson Packages
    Lesson Package: D-SCREEN D1
    1. DL11-1 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl D1
    2. DL22-1 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl D1
    3. DL33-5 last wd, 3 syl v. 3 syl D1
    4. DLV-1 last wd, vowel v. vowel D2
    5. DLI-1 last wd, init con v. init con D2
    6. DLF-3 last wd, final con v. final con D2
    Lesson Package: DIFSEN-1 D3
    1. DL11-1 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl D3
    2. DL11-2 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl D3
    3. DL11-3 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl D3
    4. DL11-4 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl D4
    5. DL11-5 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl D4
    6. DL11-6 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl D4
    7. DL11-7 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl D5
    8. DL11-8 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl D5
    9. DL11-9 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl D5
    10. DL11-10 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl D6
    Lesson Package: DIFSEN-2 D7
    1. DL22-1 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl D7
    2. DL22-2 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl D7
    3. DL22-3 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl D7
    4. DL22-4 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl D8
    5. DL22-5 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl D8
    6. DL33-1 last wd, 3 syl v. 3 syl D8
    7. DL33-2 last wd, 3 syl v. 3 syl D9
    8. DL33-3 last wd, 3 syl v. 3 syl D9
    9. DL33-4 last wd, 3 syl v. 3 syl D9
    10. DL33-5 last wd, 3 syl v. 3 syl D10
    Different Sentences Lessons
    Attribute: Word 1, 2, 3
    Words in Sentences
    Lesson Package: D-SCREEN
    DL11-1
    last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl
    I can tie It is new
    See my wrist Watch the flame
    See the knee I can sew
    He is last You like pink
    I want tea You can mow
    See the ice Get the cone
    See the jaw I like pie
    It is strong Watch my eyes
    DL22-1
    last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl
    I am afraid It is rotten
    Pet the zebra See my guitar
    I can juggle See my cabin
    Wear the helmet It is winter
    Eat the olive It is summer
    I want honey See my rabbit
    Eat the biscuit See my valentine
    Get the sandwich It is purple
    DL33-5
    last wd, 3 syl v. 3 syl
    Eat the potato See my valentine
    Watch the cardinal Get the radio
    Get the eraser See my submarine
    I eat licorice Wear the sunglasses
    Get the telephone Move his limousine
    Watch the woodpecker See the opposite
    I want lemonade See the engineer
    Wear the galoshes Get the hula-hoop
    Same Sentence
    S Lesson Packages
    Lesson Package: S-SCREEN S1
    1. SL13-1 last wd, 1 syl v. 3 syl S1
    2. SL11-1 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl S1
    3. SL22-1 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl S1
    4. SL33-1 last wd, 3 syl v. 3 syl S2
    5. SLV-1 last wd, vowel v. vowel S2
    6. SLF-1 last wd, final con v. final con S2
    Lesson Package: SAMSEN-1 S3
    1. SL13-1 last wd, 1 syl v. 3 syl S3
    2. SL13-2 last wd, 1 syl v. 3 syl S3
    3. SL13-3 last wd, 1 syl v. 3 syl S3
    4. SL13-4 last wd, 1 syl v. 3 syl S4
    5. SL13-5 last wd, 1 syl v. 3 syl S4
    Lesson Package: SAMSEN-2 S5
    1. SL11-1 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl S5
    2. SL11-2 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl S5
    3. SL11-3 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl S5
    4. SL11-4 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl S6
    5. SL11-5 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl S6
    6. SL11-6 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl S6
    7. SL11-7 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl S7
    8. SL11-8 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl S7
    9. SL11-9 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl S7
    10. SL11-10 last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl S8
    Lesson Package: SAMSEN-3 S9
    1. SL22-1 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl S9
    2. SL22-2 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl S9
    3. SL22-3 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl S9
    4. SL22-4 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl S10
    5. SL22-5 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl S10
    6. SL33-1 last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl S10
    Same Sentences Lessons
    Attribute: Word 1, 2, 3
    Words in Sentences
    Lesson Package: S-SCREEN
    SL13-1
    last wd, 1 syl v. 3 syl
    Eat the bun Eat the hamburger
    Eat the nut Eat the banana
    Find the rope Find the autograph
    Find the cave Find the triangle
    Watch the moose Watch the elephant
    Watch the boat Watch the butterfly
    See the man See the hospital
    See the house See the library
    SL11-1
    last wd, 1 syl v. 1 syl
    See the jaw See the ice
    See the stone See the globe
    Watch my eyes Watch my twin
    Watch my snake Watch my knee
    See my wrist See my jaw
    See my plate See my spoon
    It is new It is ice
    It is green It is flat
    SL22-1
    last wd, 2 syl v. 2 syl
    Get the arrow Get the ladder
    Get the fossil Get the teacher
    I can button I can juggle
    I can vacuum I can zigzag
    Eat the biscuit Eat the cherry
    Eat the olive Eat the sandwich
    See the pedal See the mummy
    See the harpoon See the jungle
    Syllables in Words
    Y Lesson Packages
    Lesson Package: Y-SCREEN Y1
    1. Y1L3H-1 1 syl, low freq v. 3 syl, high freq Y1
    2. Y1L3L-1 1 syl, low freq v. 3 syl, low freq Y1
    3. Y1H3H-1 1 syl, high freq v. 3 syl, high freq Y1
    4. Y1H1L-1 1 syl, high freq v. 1 syl, low freq Y2
    5. Y1L1L-1 1 syl, low freq v. 1 syl, low freq Y2
    6. Y1L1L-1 1 syl, low freq v. 1 syl, low freq Y2
    Lesson Package: SYL123-1 Y3
    1. Y1L3H-1 1 syl, low freq v. 3 syl, high freq Y3
    2. Y1L3H-2 1 syl, low freq v. 3 syl, high freq Y3
    3. Y1H3L-1 1 syl, high freq v. 3 syl, low freq Y3
    4. Y1H3L-2 1 syl, high freq v. 3 syl, low freq Y4
    5. Y1H2L-1 1 syl, high freq v. 2 syl, low freq Y4
    6. Y1H2L-2 1 syl, high freq v. 2 syl, low freq Y4
    7. Y1H2L-3 1 syl, high freq v. 2 syl, low freq Y5
    8. Y1H2L-4 1 syl, high freq v. 2 syl, low freq Y5
    9. Y1L2H-1 1 syl, low freq v. 2 syl, high freq Y5
    10. Y1L2H-2 1 syl, low freq v. 2 syl, high freq Y6
    11. Y1L2H-3 1 syl, low freq v. 2 syl, high freq Y6
    12. Y2H3L-1 2 syl, high freq v. 3 syl, low freq Y6
    13. Y2H3L-2 2 syl, high freq v. 3 syl, low freq Y7
    14. Y2L3H-1 2 syl, low freq v. 3 syl, high freq Y7
    15. Y2L3H-2 2 syl, low freq v. 3 syl, high freq Y7
    Lesson Package: SYL123-2 Y9
    1. Y1B3B-1 1 syl, mixed freq v. 3 syl, mixed freq Y9
    2. Y1B3B-2 1 syl, mixed freq v. 3 syl, mixed freq Y9
    3. Y1B2B-1 1 syl, mixed freq v. 2 syl, mixed freq Y9
    4. Y1B2B-2 1 syl, mixed freq v. 2 syl, mixed freq Y10
    5. Y2B3B-1 2 syl, mixed freq v. 3 syl, mixed freq Y10
    6. Y2B3B-2 2 syl, mixed freq v. 3 syl, mixed freq Y10
    Syllables in Words Lessons
    Attribute: Syllable 1, 2, 3
    Syllables in Words
    Lesson Package: Y-SCREEN
    Y1L3H-1
    1 syl, low freq v. 3 syl, high freq
    robe wastebasket
    bear parachute
    drum saxophone
    nose grasshopper
    lamb applesauce
    mad spaghetti
    red butterscotch
    green octopus
    Y1L3L-1
    1 syl, low freq v. 3 syl, low freq
    ball banana
    drive ambulance
    jar bulldozer
    bowl calendar
    loud valentine
    mud elephant
    run violin
    zoo ladybug
    Y1H3H-1
    1 syl, high freq v. 3 syl, high freq
    cake wastebasket
    ice applesauce
    sleep hospital
    feet dishwasher
    peep tricycle
    key parachute
    sit potato
    lake spaghetti
    Consonants in Words
    C Lesson Packages
    Lesson Package: C-SCREEN C1
    1. CIV-1 init con, voiced v. voiceless C1
    2. CIM-1 init con, manner v. manner C1
    3. CIP-1 init con, place v. place C1
    4. CFV-1 final con, voiced v. voiceless C2
    5. CFM-1 final con, manner v. manner C2
    6. CFP-2 final con, place v. place C2
    Lesson Package: CONSON-1 C3
    1. CIV-1 init con, voiced v. voiceless C3
    2. CIM-1 init con, manner v. manner C3
    3. CIM-2 init con, manner v. manner C3
    4. CIM-3 init con, manner v. manner C4
    5. CIP-1 init con, place v. place C4
    6. CIP-2 init con, place v. place C4
    7. CIP-3 init con, place v. place C5
    8. CIP-4 init con, place v. place C5
    9. CIP-5 init con, place v. place C6
    10. CIP-6 init con, place v. place C6
    Lesson Package: CONSON-2 C7
    1. CFV-1 final con, voiced v. voiceless C7
    2. CFM-1 final con, manner v. manner C7
    3. CFM-2 final con, manner v. manner C7
    4. CFM-3 final con, manner v. manner C8
    5. CFP-1 final con, place v. place C8
    6. CFP-2 final con, place v. place C8
    7. CFP-3 final con, place v. place C9
    8. CFP-4 final con, place v. place C9
    Consonants in Words Lessons
    Attribute: Phoneme 1, 2, 3
    Features in Words
    Lesson Package: C-SCREEN
    CIV-1
    init con, voiced v. voiceless
    bale pail
    dime time
    van fan
    zip sip
    vase face
    bat pat
    beak peek
    dip tip
    CIM-1
    init con, manner v. manner
    mad bad
    mail bale
    mat bat
    meat beet
    mole bowl
    mud bud
    mug bug
    moat boat
    CIP-1
    init con, place v. place
    meat neat
    mice nice
    moon noon
    map nap
    ball doll
    big dig
    boat goat
    bun gun
    Vowel
    V Lesson Packages
    Lesson Package: V-SCREEN V1
    1. VHBDMF-1 high back vowel v. mid front dipthong V1
    2. VHFDMC-1 high front vowel v. mid central dipthong V1
    3. VHBDLF-1 high back vowel v. low front dipthong V1
    4. VHBVHF-7 high back vowel v. high front vowel V2
    5. VLBDMF-1 low back vowel v. mid front vowel V2
    6. VHBVHB-1 high back vowel v. high back vowel V2
    Lesson Package: VOWEL-1 V3
    1. VHBDMF-1 high back vowel v. mid front dipthong V3
    2. VHBDMF-2 high back vowel v. mid front dipthong V3
    3. VHFDMB-1 high back vowel v. mid back dipthong V3
    4. VHFDMB-2 high back vowel v. mid back dipthong V4
    5. VHBDMC-1 high back vowel v. mid central dipthong V4
    6. VHBVMC-1 high back vowel v. mid central vowel V4
    7. VHFDMC-1 high front vowel v. mid central dipthong V5
    8. VHFDMC-2 high front vowel v. mid central dipthong V5
    9. VHFDMF-1 high front vowel v. mid front dipthong V5
    10. VHFDMF-2 high front vowel v. mid front dipthong V6
    11. VHBDMB-1 high front vowel v. mid back dipthong V6
    12. VHBDMB-2 high front vowel v. mid back dipthong V6
    Lesson Package: VOWEL-2 V7
    1. VHBDLF-1 high back vowel v. low front dipthong V7
    2. VHBDLF-2 high back vowel v. low front dipthong V7
    3. VHFVLB-1 high front vowel v. low back vowel V7
    4. VHFVLB-2 high front vowel v. low back vowel V8
    5. VHFVLB-3 high front vowel v. low back vowel V8
    6. VHBVHF-1 high back vowel v. high front vowel V8
    7. VHBVHF-2 high back vowel v. high front vowel V9
    8. VHBVHF-3 high back vowel v. high front vowel V9
    9. VHBVHF-4 high back vowel v. high front vowel V9
    10. VHBVHF-5 high back vowel v. high front vowel V10
    11. VHBVHF-6 high back vowel v. high front vowel V10
    12. VHBVHF-7 high back vowel v. high front vowel V10
    Vowels in Lessons
    Attribute: Phoneme 1, 2, 3
    Features in Words
    Lesson Package: V-SCREEN
    VHBDMF-1
    high back vowel v. mid front dipthong
    food rain
    boot cake
    moon day
    juice wake
    zoo cage
    goose rake
    groom break
    pool plane
    VHFDMC-1
    high front vowel v. mid central dipthong
    green white
    sneeze cry
    feet night
    teeth eyes
    leaf knife
    cheese bike
    read dive
    wheel kite
    VHBDLF-1
    high back vowel v. low front dipthong
    goose cat
    pool bath
    shoe hat
    blue black
    food bat
    glue man
    moon sad
    broom laugh
  • [0196]
    [0196]
    ATTRIBUTE PRESENTATIONS
    Phoneme 1 the first phoneme of the first syllable of the word
    Phoneme 2 the second phoneme of the first syllable of the word
    Phoneme 3 the third phoneme of the first syllable of the word
    Syllable 1 the first syllable of the word, or the first syllable
    of the first word in a phrase/sentence
    Syllable 2 the second syllable of the word, or the second syllable
    of the first word in a phrase/sentence
    Syllable 3 the third syllable of the word, or the third syllable
    of the first word in a phrase/sentence
    Word 1 the first word in a word/phrase or sentence
    Word 2 the second word in a word/phrase or sentence
    Word 3 the third word in a word/phrase or sentence
    Synonym a word or phrase with the same meaning
    Antonym a word or phrase with the opposite meaning
    Speech/Non a descriptor showing whether the stimuli is
    speech or an environmental sound
    Durantion this display shows the length of the stimuli, it is
    derived from the number of phonemes and/or the number
    of environmental descriptors in a stimuli
    Syllable # total number of in a word/sentence
    taken from the phonetic text
    Stress Pat taken from syllabic stress information in the
    phonetic text
    {circumflex over ( )} represents primary stress
    {circumflex over (  )} represents secondary stress
    {circumflex over (   )} represents tertiary stress
    Sematic a language based category related to the meaning of
    the words
  • [0197]
    [0197]
    Audio Library Editor
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    1 ALB 1862254 10/06/92  4:32P
    2 ALB 1889447 10/07/92 12:04P
    F3 Create library
    Create an Audio Library
    Which Audio Library?
    G) eneric
    L) anguage
    S) ite
    Create an Audio Library
    Please select the Audio library name.
    Path: I:\ITS\LIBS\GENERIC
    Filename: *.ALB
    F4 Add/edit menu
    Add/Edit Menu
    F2 Add entry
    F3 Export entry
    F6 Delete entry
    F7 Examine entry
    F8 Rename entry
    F10 Exit to previous
    Select files from the specified library for
    each of these functions by selecting and
    tagging from the library
    F5 Set group for library
    Mark this library as belonging to a group
    Library Group: 0
    F7 Examine entries
    F8 Print library
    Print Picture lib to printer or file
    Do you want the output to go to a file?
    (Y/N)?
    Print Picture lib to printer or file
    Please enter an output file name.
    Path:
    Filename:
    F8 Save libary
    Close Picture library
    Please select a filename to write the
    library to.
    Path:
    Filename:
  • [0198]
    [0198]
    Picture Library Editor
    Main Menu
    F2 Support libraries menu
    F3 Create/edit users
    F4 Lesson components menu
    F10 Exit editor
    Support Libraries Menu
    F2 Create/edit an audio library
    F3 Create/edit a picture library
    F4 Create/edit a stimuli library
    F10 Exit to previous menu
    Picture Library Editor
    F2 Load library
    F3 Create library
    F4 Add/edit menu
    F5 Set group for library
    F7 Examibe entries
    F8 Print library
    F9 Save library
    F10 Exit to previous
    F2 Load library
    Open an Picture Library
    Which Picture directory?
    G) eneric
    L) anguage
    S) ite
    Open an Picture Library
    Please select the library to load.
    Path: I:\ITS\LIBS\GENERIC
    Filename: *.PLB
    Open an Picture Library
    1 PLB 670050 03/06/92 4:32P
    2 PLB 894407 03/07/92 12:04P
    F3 Create library
    Create a Picture Library
    Which Picture directory?
    G) eneric
    L) anguage
    S) ite
    Create an Picture Library
    Please select the Picture library name
    Path: I:\ITS\LIBS\GENERIC
    Filename: *.PLB
    F4 Add/edit menu
    Add/Edit Menu
    F2 Add entry
    F3 Export entry
    F6 Delete entry
    F7 Examine entries
    F8 Rename entry
    F10 Exit to previous
    Select files from the specified library for
    each of these functions by selecting and
    tagging from the library
    F7 Export carriers via list
    Export a carrier list
    @EATTHEBISCUIT
    @EATTHEBREAD
    @EATTHECHERRY
    @EATTHEFRUIT
    Export a carrier list
    Please enter an output file name.
    Path:
    Filename:
    F5 Set group for library
    Mark this library as belonging to a group.
    Library Group: 0
    F7 Examine entries
    List Stimuli library
    @EATTHEBISCUIT (Can INS to view entry)
    @EATTHEBREAD
    @EATTHECHERRY
    @EATTHEFRUIT
    F8 Print library
    Print Stimuli lib to printer or file
    Do you want the output to go to a file? (Y/N)?
    Print Stimuli lib to printer or file
    Please enter an output file name.
    Path:
    Filename:
    F9 Save library
    Close Stimuli library
    Please select a filename to write the library to.
    Path:
    Filename:
    F2 Add entries via list
    Insert entries from a text file
    Please select the name list to use.
    Path:
    Filename:
    Insert entries from a text file
    1%250 CA 4567 10/13/92 12:22A
    1& CS 1156 12/22/91 10:02P
    1 CS 6689 06/12/92 07:11P
    F3 Add complex via list
    Insert complex entries from a text file
    Please select the name list to use.
    Path:
    Filename:
    Insert entries from a text file
    1%250 CA 4567 10/13/92 12:22A
    1& CS 1156 12/22/91 10:02P
    1 CS 6689 06/12/92 07:11P
    F4 Add carriers via list
    Insert carrier entries from a text file
    Please select the name list to use.
    Path:
    Filename:
    Insert carrier entries from a text file
    1%250 CA 4567 10/13/92 12:22A
    1& CS 1156 12/22/91 10:02P
    1 CS 6689 06/12/92 07:11P
    F5 Export entry list
    Export an entry list
    BAY
    BEE
    BLACK
    BLEED
    Export an entry list
    Please enter an output file name.
    Path:
    Filename:
    F6 Export complex list
    Export a complex list
    &BEEHIVE
    &BIGBEAR
    &BIGBOX
    &BIGBULL
    Export a complex list
    Please enter an output file name.
    Path:
    Filename:
    F5 Edit entry
    Edit a Stimuli entry
    @EATTHEBEET
    @EATTHEBREAD
    @EATTHEFRUIT
    @EATTHEGRAPE
    Edit a carrier entry
    Carrier entry: @EATTHEBREAD
    Please select the carrier audio entry
    Audio: &EATTHEBREAD
    Picture: BREAD
    Element 1: EAT
    Element 2: THE
    Element 3: BREAD
    Element 4:
    Element 5:
    Element 6:
    Element 7:
    Element 8:
    Element 9:
    Element 10:
    F6 Delete entry
    Delete a Stimuli entry
    @EATTHEBEET
    @EATTHEBREAD
    @EATTHEFRUIT
    @EATTHEGRAPE
    F7 Examine entries
    List Stimuli library
    @EATTHEBEET (Press INS to review entry)
    @EATTHEBREAD
    @EATTHEFRUIT
    @EATTHEGRAPE
    F8 Rename entries
    Rename a Stimuli entry
    @EATTHEBEET
    @EATTHEBREAD
    @EATTHEFRUIT
    @EATTHEGRAPE
    Rename a Stimuli entry
    Old entry name: @EATTHEBREAD
    New name of entry: @EATTHECRUST
    F9 List load/save
    List Load/Save Menu
    F2 Add entries via list
    F3 Add complex via list
    F4 Add carrier entry via list
    F5 Export entry list
    F6 Export complex list
    F7 Export carriers via list
    F10 Exit to previous
    F4 Add/edit menu
    Add/Edit Menu
    F2 Add entry
    F3 Add compex audio
    F4 Add carrier entry
    F5 Edit entry
    F6 Delete entry
    F7 Examine entries
    F8 Rename entry
    F9 List load/save
    F10 Exit to previous
    F2 Add entry
    Add an entry
    Name of entry:
    Add an entry
    Entry: BEET
    Please select an audio entry.
    Audio:
    Picture:
    Text:
    Phonetic Text:
    English Text:
    F3 Add complex audio
    Add a complex audio entry
    Name of entry: &
    Add a complex audio entry
    Name of entry: &EATTHEBEET
    Please select an element one entry.
    Element 1:
    Element 2:
    Element 3:
    Element 4:
    Element 5:
    Element 6:
    Element 7:
    Element 8:
    Element 9:
    Element 10:
    Element 11:
    Element 12:
    F4 Add a carrier entry
    Add a carrier entry
    Name of entry: @
    Add a carrier entry
    Carrier entry: @EATTHEBEET
    Please select the carrier audio entry.
    Element 1:
    Element 2:
    Element 3:
    Element 4:
    Element 5:
    Element 6:
    Element 7:
    Element 8:
    Element 9:
    Element 10:
  • [0199]
    [0199]
    Stimuli Library
    Main Menu
    F2 Support libraries menu
    F3 Create/edit users
    F4 Lesson components menu
    F10 Exit editor
    Support Libraries Menu
    F2 Create/edit an audio library
    F3 Create/edit a picture library
    F4 Create/edit a stimuli library
    F10 Exit to previous menu
    Stimuli Library Editor
    F2 Load library
    F3 Create library
    F4 Add/edit menu
    F5 Set group for library
    F7 Examine entries
    F8 Print library
    F9 Save library
    F10 Exit to previous
    F2 Load library
    Open a Stimuli Library
    Which Stimuli directory?
    G) eneric
    L) anguage
    S) ite
    Open a Stimuli Library
    Please select the stimuli library to load.
    Path: I:\ITS\LIBS\GENERIC
    Filename: *.SLB
    Open a Stimuli Library
    1%250 SLB 30928 12/02/92 4:32P
    1& SLB 45998 11/23/92 12:04P
    F3 Create library
    Create a Stimuli library
    Which Stimuli directory?
    G) eneric
    L) anguage
    S) ite
    Create a Stimuli Library
    Please select the stimuli library name.
    Path: I:\ITS\LIBS\GENERIC
    Filename: *.SLB
    F5 Set group for library
    Mark this library as belonging to a group.
    Library Group: 0
    F7 Examine entries
    F8 Print library
    Print Audio lib to printer or file
    Do you want the output to go to
    a file? (Y/N)?
    Print Audio lib to printer or file
    Please enter an output file name.
    Path:
    Filename:
    F9 Save library
    Close Audio library
    Please select a filename to write the
    library to.
    Path:
    Filename:
  • [0200]
    [0200]
    Lesson Components Editor
    Main Menu
    F2 Support libraries menu
    F3 Create/edit users
    F4 Lesson components menu
    F10 Exit editor
    Lesson Components Menu
    F2 Create/edit EV levels
    F3 Create/edit AV level sets
    F4 Create/edit attributes sets
    F5 Create/edit strategies
    F6 Create/edit lessons
    F7 Create/edit leddon packages
    F8 Create/edit wordlists
    F10 Exit to previous menu
    F2-AV level Editor
    F2 Create AV level file
    F3 Select AV level file
    F4 Discrimination AV levels
    F5 Identification AV levels
    F10 Exit to previous
    F2 Create AV level file
    AV level Editor
    Please enter the name of the new file.
    Path:
    Filename:
    F3 Select AV level file
    AV level Editor
    (Menu listing)
    4 Discrimination AV levels
    Discrimination AV levels
    F4 Add AV level
    F5 Edit AV level
    F6 Delete AV level
    F7 List AV levels
    F10 Exit to previous
    F4 Add AV level
    Do you want to copy and existing Av level? (Y/N)?
    Edit discrimnination task parameters
    Responses Yes Yes Yes Yes
    Show picture None None None None
    Audio Always Always Always Always
    Text On demand None None None
    F5 Edit AV level
    Edit AV level
    (Menu listing)
    Edit discriminating task parameters
    AV level:
    Responses Yes Yes Yes Yes
    Show picture None None None None
    Audo Always Always Always Always
    Text On demand None None None
    F6 Delete AV level
    (Menu listing)
    F7 List AV levels
    (Menu listing)
    F5 Identification AV levels
    Identification AV levels
    F4 Add AV level
    F5 Edit AV level
    F6 Delete AV level
    F7 List AV levels
    F10 Exit to previous
    F4 Add AV level
    Do you want to copy and existing EV level? (Y/N)?
    Edit matching task parameters
    STIMULI Yes Yes Yes Yes
    Stimuli picture None None None None
    Stimuli audio Always Always Always Always
    RESPONSES Yes Yes Yes Yes
    Response picture None None None None
    Respinse audio Always Always Always Always
    Response text On demand None None None
    F5 Edit AV level
    Edit AV level
    (Menu listing)
    Edit identification task parameters
    AV level: 1
    Edit matching task parameters
    STIMULI Yes Yes Yes Yes
    Stimuli picture None None None None
    Stimuli audio Always Always Always Always
    Stimuli text On demand None None None
    RESPONSES Yes Yes Yes Yes
    Response picture None None None None
    Response audio Always Always Always Always
    Response text On demand None None None
    F6 Delete AV level
    (Menu listing)
    F7 List AV levels
    (Menu listing)
    F3-AV level set Editor
    F2 Create AV level set file
    D3 Select AV level set file
    F4 Discrimination AV level sets
    F5 Identification AV level sets
    F10 Exit to previous
    F2 Create AV level set file
    AV level Editor
    Please enter the name of the new file.
    Path:
    Filename:
    F3 Select AV level set file
    AV level Editor
    (Menu listing)
    F4 Discrimination AV level sets
    Discrimination AV level sets
    F4 Add AV level set
    F5 Edit AV level set
    F6 Delete AV level set
    F7 List AV level sets
    F10 Exit to previous
    F4 Add AV level set
    Do you want to copy and existing AV level set
    (Y/N)?
    Least difficult AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    Most difficult AV level:
    F5 Edit AV level set
    Edit AV level set
    Name Description
    AV level set:
    Least difficult AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    Most difficult level:
    F6 Delete AV level set
    Name Description
    F7 List AV level sets
    Name Description
    F5 Idensitifcation AV level sets
    Identification AV level sets
    F4 Add AV level set
    F5 Edit AV level set
    F6 Delete AV level set
    F7 List AV level sets
    F10 Exit to previous
    F4 Add AV level set
    Do you want to copy and existing Av level set?
    (Y/N)?
    Least difficult AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    AV level:
    Most difficult level:
    F5 Edit AV level set
    Edit AV level set
    Name Description
    F6 Delete AV level set
    Name Description
    F7 List AV level sets
    Name Description
    F4-Create/edit attribute sets
    F2 Create attribute set file
    D3 Select attribute set file
    F4 Add attribute set
    F5 Edit attribute set
    F6 Delete attribute set
    F7 List Attribute set
    F10 Exit to previous
    F2 Attribute set editor
    Enter the name of the new file
    Path:
    Filename:
    F3 Select attribute set file
    F4 Add attribute set
    Window 1 attibute:
    Window 2 attribute:
    Window 3 attribute:
    Window 4 attribute:
    F5 Edit attribute set
    Length Length
    Nonspeech Nonspeech
    Phoneme Phoneme
    Stress Stress
    Syl123 Syllable 123
    Sylinsent Syllabales in sentences
    Sylnum Syllable number
    Word 123 Word 123
    . . .
    F5-Create/edit strategies
    F2 Create strategy file
    F3 Select strategy file
    F4 Discrimination strategies
    F5 Identification strategies
    F10 Exit to previous
    F2 Stragey editor
    Enter the name of the new file
    Path:
    Filename:
    F3 Select strategy file
    Listing of existing files
    F4 Discrimination strategies
    F4 Add strategy
    F5 Edit strategy
    F6 Delete strategy
    F7 List strategies
    F10 Exit to previous
    F4 Add a discrimination strategy
    Lesson AVL Set:
    Maximum Groups to Use:
    Starting Group:
    Action on Task Success:
    Action on Task Failure:
    AV level of Next group on test
     success relative to starting AV
     level:
    AV level of Next group on test
     failure relative to starting AV
     level:
    Task Failures to Previous lesson:
    Task Success to next lesson:
    Failure Criterion:
    Success Criterion:
    F5 Edit Strategy
    Name Description
    F6 Delete Strategy
    Name Description
    F7 List Strategies
    Name Description
    F5 Identification strategies
    F4 Add strategy
    F5 Edit strategy
    F6 Delete strategy
    F7 List strategies
    F10 Exit to previous
    F4 Add an identification strategy
    Lesson AVL Set:
    Maximum Groups to Use:
    Starting Group:
    Action on Task Success:
    Action on Task Failure:
    AV Level of Next Group on test
     success relative to starting AV
     level:
    AV level of Next group on test
     failure relative to starting AV
     level:
    Task Failures to Previous lesson:
    Task Success to next lesson:
    Failure Criterion:
    Success Criterion:
    F5 Edit Strategy
    Name Description
    F6 Delete Strategy
    Name Description
    F7 List Strategies
    Name Description
    F6-Create/edit lessons
    F2 Create lesson file
    F3 Select lesson file
    F4 Add lesson
    F5 Edit lesson
    F6 Delete lesson
    F7 List lessons
    F10 Exit to previous
    F2 Leeson Editor
    Enter the name of the new file
    Path:
    Filename:
    F3 Select lesson (Select from menu options)
    F4 Add lesson (See user default screen)
    F5 Edit lesson
    Name Description (Select/tag and edit)
    F6 Delete lesson
    Name Description (Select/tag and delete)
    F7 List lesson
    Name Description (Menu listing)
    F7-Create/edit lesson packages
    F2 Create lesson package file
    F3 Select lesson package file
    F4 Add lesson package
    F5 Edit lesson package
    F6 Delete lesson package
    F7 List lesson packages
    F10 Exit to previous
    F2 Lesson Editor
    Enter the name of the new file
    Path:
    Filename:
    F3 Lesson Package (Select from menu options)
    F4 Add lesson package
    Lesson 01:
    Lesson 02:
    Lesson 03:
    Lesson 04:
    Lesson 05:
    Lesson 06:
    Lesson 07:
    Lesson 08:
    Lesson 09:
    Lesson 10:
    Lesson 11:
    Lesson 12:
    Lesson 13:
    Lesson 14:
    Lesson 15:
    F5 Edit lesson package
    Name Description listed (Select from menu)
    F6 Delete lesson package
    Name Descitpion (Select/tag and delete)
    F7 List lesson package
    Name Description (Menu listing)
    F8/Create/edit wordlists
    Edit Wordlist
    Title:
    Set 1:     Set 2:
    Set 3:     Set 4:
    Contrast Set 1 Contrast Set 2 Contrast Set 3 Contrast Set 4
    (Load wordlists by pressin F5;
    Pull from libraries by pressing F2;
    Select libraries by pressing F3;)
    User Editor
    Main Menu
    F2 Support libraries menu
    F3 Create/edit users
    F4 Lesson components menu
    F10 Exit editor
    User editor
    F2 Create user file
    F3 Select user file
    F4 Add user
    F5 Edit user
    F6 Delete user
    F7 View users
    F10 Exit to menu
    F2 Create user file
    Please enter the name of the new file.
    Path:
    Filename:
    F3 Select user file
    Select user file
    PRESCHOOL
    KINDER-1
    1ST-GRADE
    STADARD
    F4 Add user
    Edit a user
    Do you want to copy an existing User (Y/N)?
    User ID:
    Udit a user
    User ID:
    Name:
    Birthdate: 01/01/00
    Group:
    Output device:
    Report Dir:
    Current Lesson: User Defaults: Lessons:
    Feedback: Tasks to Feedback:
    Puzzle Feedback Before Painting: Painting Time Allowed in
    Seconds:
    Ant Try OK: Magic:
    F5 Edit a User
    F6 Delete a User
    ABBY
    ALICE
    BRYCE
    DANIEL
    Delete user
    Are you sure you want to delete XX (Y/N)?
    F7 View users
    List users
    ABBY
    BRYCE
    DANIEL
  • [0201]
    [0201]
    User Editor
    Main Menu
    F2 Support libraries menu
    F3 Create/edit users
    F4 Lesson components menu
    F10 Exit editor
    User editor
    F2 Create user file
    F3 Select user file
    F4 Add user
    F5 Edit user
    F6 Delete user
    F7 View users
    F10 Exit to menu
    F2 Create user file
    Please enter the name of the new file.
    Path:
    Filename:
    F3 Select user file
    Select user file
    PRESCHOOL
    KINDER-1
    1ST-GRADE
    STANDARD
    F4 Add user
    Edit a user
    Do you want to copy an existing User (Y/N)?
    User ID:
    Edit a user
    User ID:
    Name:
    Birthdate: 01/01/00
    Group:
    Output device:
    Report Dir:
    Current Lesson: User Defaults: Lessons:
    Feedback: Tasks to Feedback:
    Puzzle Feedback Before Painting: Painting Time
    Allowed in Seconds:
    Any Try OK: Magic:
    F5 Edit a User
    F6 Delete user
    ABBY
    ALICE
    BRYCE
    DANIEL
    Delete user
    Are you sure you want to delete XX (Y/N)?
    F7 View users
    List users
    ABBY
    BRYCE
    DANIEL
    Phonetic transcription
    English spelling
    Rules (speech)
    1. Phonemes separated by
    2. Consonant blends connected
    3. Syllables indicated by +
    4. Stress indicated by ^ (primary) and ^ ^ secondary
    5. Words are separated by spaces
    6. Duration derived from digitized signal
    Rules (environmental)
    1. Continuous is represented by CCCC-
    2. Discontinous is represented by DDD-
    3. Begins with *
  • [0202]
    We will create a 1 syllable word with consonant-vowel-consonant pattern as our first example. Our word will be ‘cat’. The screen will appear like this.
    Add an entry
    Entry: CAT <enter>
    Audio: CAT ---created by automatic defaults
    Picture: CAT ---created by automatic defaults
    Text: cat ---created by automatic defaults
    Phonetic Text: k_ae_t
    English Text: c_a_t
    Attributes: <hit enter here to display attributes>
    Edit attributes
    Audio Picture Text
    Phoneme 1 PHO-K PHO-K c
    Phoneme 2 PHO-AE PHO-AE a
    Phoneme 3 PHO-T PHO-T t
    Syllable 1 CAT PHO-C cat
    Syllable 2
    Syllable 3
    Word 1 CAT CAT cat
    Word 2
    Word 3
    Synonym
    Antonym
    Speech/Non CAT
    Duration CAT
    Syllable # CAT
    Stress Pat CAT
    Semantic Cat
    Now a multi-syllabic word: ‘elephant’.
    Add an entry
    Entry: elephant <enter>
    Audio: ELEPHANT ---created by automatic defaults
    Picture: ELEPHANT ---created by automatic defaults
    Text: elephant ---created by automatic defaults
    Phonetic Text: ^ e_l + u + f_u_n_t
    English Text: e_l + e + ph_a_n_t
    Attributes: <hit enter here to displpay attributes>
    Edit attributes
    Audio Picture Text
    Phoneme 1 PHO-E PHO-E e
    Phoneme 2 PHO-L PHO-L l
    Phoneme 3
    Syllable 1 E_L PHO-E el
    Syllable 2 PHO-U PHO-U e
    Syllable 3 F_U_N_T PHO-F phant
    Word 1 ELEPHANT ELEPHANT elephant
    Word 2
    Word 3
    Synonym
    Antonym
    Speech/Non ELEPHANT
    Duration ELEPHANT
    Syllable # ELEPHANT
    Stress Pat ELEPHANT
    Semantic Cat
    Now a three word sentence: ‘Pet the koala.’.
    ***we have set the default to show a syllabic/word descriptor for the
    toplevel pic. The text default we are showing is set to show the target
    word text.
    Add an entry
    Entry: PETTHEKOALA <enter>
    Audio: PETTHEKOALA -created by automatice defaults
    Picture: CP333 -edited to show descriptor picture
    Text: -- koala -edited to show only target word text
    Phonetic Text: p_e_t thv_u k_oh + ^ ah_l + u
    English Text: p_e_t th_e k_o + a_l + a
    Attributes: <hit enter here to display attributes>
    Edit attributes
    Audio Picture Text
    Phoneme 1 PHO-P PHO-P p
    Phoneme 2 PHO-E PHO-E e
    Phoneme 3 PHO-T PHO-T t
    Syllable 1 P_E_T PHO-P pet
    Syllable 2
    Syllable 3
    Word 1 PET PET Pet
    Word 2 THE THE the
    Word 3 KOALA KOALA koala
    Synonym
    Antonym
    Speech/Non PETTHEKOALA
    Duration PETTHEKOALA
    Syllable # PETTHEKOALA
    Stress Pat PETTHEKOALA
    Semantic Cat
    # the following are examples of complex audio entries. Note across the
    examples the silence encoding variations. ALSO IF THESE ENTRIES
    WERE IN THE SAME LIBRARY THEY WOULD NEED DIFFEREN-
    TIAL NAMES.
    &EATTHE- EAT THE BISCUIT
    BISCU
    &EATTHE- EAT THE CHERRY
    CHERR
    &EATTHE- EAT SIL_25 THE SIL_25 BISCUIT
    BISCU
    &EATTHE- EAT SIL_25 THE SIL_25 CHERRY
    CHERR
    &EATTHE- EAT SIL_25 THE SIL_1000 BISCUIT
    BISCU
    &EATTHE- EAT SIL_25 THE SIL_1000 CHERRY
    CHERR
    &EATTHE- EATTHE SIL_1000 BISCUIT (note this only uses 2
    BISCU
    &EATTHE- EATTHE SIL_1000 CHERRY sounds and 1 silence)
    CHERR
    You will find through experimentation the silence variability can help to
    emphasize and/or de-emphasize parts of or total stimuli.
    STI-LIST.DOC
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7052277 *Dec 14, 2001May 30, 2006Kellman A.C.T. Services, Inc.System and method for adaptive learning
US7108512 *Oct 2, 2002Sep 19, 2006Lg Electronics Inc.Learning data base building method and video apparatus with learning function by using the learning data base and learning function control method therefor
US7818164Aug 21, 2006Oct 19, 2010K12 Inc.Method and system for teaching a foreign language
US7848919 *May 18, 2006Dec 7, 2010Kuo-Ping YangMethod and system of editing a language communication sheet
US7869988Nov 3, 2006Jan 11, 2011K12 Inc.Group foreign language teaching system and method
US8464152Oct 31, 2007Jun 11, 2013Karen A. McKirchyMethod and apparatus for providing instructional help, at multiple levels of sophistication, in a learning application
US8491311 *Sep 29, 2003Jul 23, 2013Mind Research InstituteSystem and method for analysis and feedback of student performance
US8568144 *May 8, 2006Oct 29, 2013Altis Avante Corp.Comprehension instruction system and method
US8613019Nov 8, 2011Dec 17, 2013Intel CorporationProviding a viewer incentive with video content
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Classifications
U.S. Classification434/332, 434/322
International ClassificationG06K9/00, G09B7/02
Cooperative ClassificationG09B7/02
European ClassificationG09B7/02