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Publication numberUS20010053983 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/880,973
Publication dateDec 20, 2001
Filing dateJun 14, 2001
Priority dateJul 25, 1998
Also published asUS6311162, US7254550, US20020040328, US20070276560
Publication number09880973, 880973, US 2001/0053983 A1, US 2001/053983 A1, US 20010053983 A1, US 20010053983A1, US 2001053983 A1, US 2001053983A1, US-A1-20010053983, US-A1-2001053983, US2001/0053983A1, US2001/053983A1, US20010053983 A1, US20010053983A1, US2001053983 A1, US2001053983A1
InventorsErnst Reichwein, Joseph White
Original AssigneeReichwein Ernst F., White Joseph G.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Interactive symptomatic recording system and methods
US 20010053983 A1
Abstract
An interactive computerized system and process for querying a customer regarding identification for both customer and equipment, such as an automobile, information, as well as problems related to such equipment and desired repairs and maintenance for the equipment, then compiling and processing the acquired information and thereafter preparing and printing work orders for the customer, the service advisor and the mechanics.
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Claims(17)
Now, having described our invention, what we claim is:
1. An interactive system for obtaining equipment information, symptoms and service requests from a customer and developing mechanics' work orders for equipment, comprising:
interactive input, display and storage means for querying said customer, receiving inputs and storing the provided information;
central processing unit means for ordering the successive presentation of appropriate queries on said display means;
compiling means programmed to utilize Boolean logic compilation steps to summarize inputs received from said customer and to develop said work orders; and printing means to print work orders for both said customer and said mechanics.
2. An interactive system for obtaining vehicle information, symptoms and service requests from a customer and developing mechanics' work orders for equipment, comprising:
interactive input, display and storage means for querying said customer, receiving inputs and storing the provided information;
central processing unit means for ordering the successive presentation of appropriate queries on said display means;
compiling means to summarize inputs received from said customer and to develop said work orders; and printing means to print work orders for both said customer and said mechanics.
3. An interactive system for obtaining automobile information, symptoms and service requests from a customer and developing mechanics' work orders for said automobile, comprising:
interactive input, display and storage means for querying said customer, receiving inputs and storing the provided information;
central processing unit means for ordering the successive presentation of appropriate queries on said display means;
compiling means programmed to utilize Boolean logic compilation steps to summarize inputs received from said customer and to develop said work orders; and printing means to print work orders for both said customer and said mechanics.
4. An interactive system for obtaining automobile information, symptoms and service requests from a customer and developing mechanics' work orders for equipment, comprising:
interactive input, display and storage means for querying said customer, receiving inputs and storing the provided information;
central processing unit means for ordering the successive presentation of appropriate queries on said display means;
compiling means to summarize inputs received from said customer and to develop said work orders; and printing means to print work orders for both said customer and said mechanics.
5. The systems of claims 1, 2, 3 or 4 which further comprise input and display means for said mechanic to check and input the status of service or repair work on said equipment, vehicles, or automobiles.
6. The systems of claims 1, 2, 3 or 4 which further comprise means for transmitting work order data and completion data to an accounting subsystem for calculation of a bill.
7. The systems of claims 1, 2, 3 or 4 which further comprise a data bank of customers, equipment, vehicles or cars to be serviced and to receive and maintain the status of service jobs.
8. The systems of claims 1, 2, 3 or 4 which further comprise interactive communications means to originate and receive calls to and from said customers regarding the status of service or repair jobs.
9. The system of claims 1, 2, 3 or 4 which further comprise interactive communications means to order repair parts from internal or external sources.
10. The system of claims 1, 2, 3 or 4 wherein interactive computer monitor screens identify relevant portions of the equipment, vehicles, or automobiles, their locations therein, and the location and nature of problems relating to the service and repair of the equipment, vehicles or automobiles.
11. The system of
claim 9
wherein said portions of vehicles comprise engines, transmissions, and two or more drives, heating and air conditioning, brakes, steering and suspension, power accessories and electrical systems.
12. The system of claims 1, 2, 3 or 4 wherein said input means comprise touch-active computer monitor screens and keyboards.
13. The system of claims 1, 2, 3 or 4 which further comprise a database of scheduled and unscheduled periodic maintenance tasks linked to pertinent query screens by hypertext.
14. An interactive process of receiving automobile repair and maintenance customer inputs and developing work orders therefrom, comprising the steps of
querying the customer and receiving inputs regarding the customer and the automobile ID via preprogrammed computer input/output means;
querying said customer regarding maintenance and/or repairs needed via said computer input/output means and programmed sets of questions regarding specified automobile systems;
utilizing Boolean logic steps to compile the requested services and communicating, printing work orders, apprising the customer and automobile mechanics of the needed services and/or repairs.
14. An interactive process of receiving equipment repair and maintenance customer inputs and developing work orders, comprising the steps of
querying the customer and receiving inputs regarding the customer and the equipment ID via preprogrammed computer input/output means;
querying said customer regarding maintenance and/or repairs needed Via said computer input/output means and programmed sets of questions regarding the specified equipment systems;
utilizing Boolean logic steps to compile the requested services and communicating, printing work orders, apprising the customer and equipment mechanics of the needed services and/or repairs.
15. An interactive process of receiving vehicle repair and maintenance customer inputs and developing work orders, comprising the steps of
querying the customer and receiving inputs regarding the customer and the vehicle ID via preprogrammed computer input/output means;
querying said customer regarding maintenance and/or repairs needed via said computer input/output means and programmed sets of questions regarding specified vehicle systems; and
compiling the requested services and repairs and printing work orders, apprising the customer and vehicle mechanics of the needed services and/or repairs.
16. All inventions taught herein.
Description
FIELD OF INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates generally to interactive computerized systems and methods for obtaining and processing information. More particularly, the present invention pertains to an interactive system and method for receiving information regarding a customer, the equipment, such as an automobile, a tractor and/or trailer, a fork lift, cherry picker or front loader, and the service or repairs it needs, and the processing of this information to generate work and parts orders for the customer, parts. Supplier(s) and mechanic. The invention further pertains to the optional transmission of work completion data to accounting and/or quality control subsystems. While the invention is usable for servicing a variety of equipment, it will be primarily described here in terms of automobiles because the description of this example addresses most, if hot all, of the problems relative to a large repair shop for such equipment.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] Dropping off equipment at a dealership or repair shop for service can be a time-consuming and frustrating activity. Even though such organizations may open as early as 7 a.m. and stay open until 6 p.m., or so to accept equipment for service, these hours are not always long enough to accommodate all customers. Consequently, some customers find it necessary to drop their equipment off during the hours the service centers are closed. With automobiles, for example, the driver usually leaves their keys in an envelope upon which they write the observed problems and request service. Appliances would be put into a cubicle, which locks on closure after the owner has filled out a problem description. In such instances, the complete situation is not always communicated effectively. Even when the repair shop is open, the customer may need to wait quite some time to provide the necessary information to a service manager or other representative, creating further delays. This process is improved using the modern computer technology of this invention.

[0003] The present invention provides an interactive, user-friendly-diagnostic system for the driver or other equipment deliverer. The customer can answer basic Menu-driven queries and/or prompts and the system will prepare and transmit to the repair center a preliminary diagnostic report such as hard starting in the cold—never happened before. The system is particularly useful for employment outside the normal operating hours of the repair facility.

[0004] Representative of the art is;

[0005] U.S. Pat. No. 5,214,582, issued to Gray, teaches interactive diagnostic systems and methods for automotive vehicles of the type having networks Of sensors and actuators for sensing and actuating various functions in the vehicle and onboard computers for monitoring sensors and controlling the actuators. An external computer is used to control selected actuators independent of the onboard computer and for simulating operation of selected sensors. At the same time, the electronic data entering and exiting the onboard computer is monitored and analyzed by the external computer for trouble shooting purposes.

[0006] U.S. Pat. No. 5,513,107, issued to Gormley of Ford Motor Co., teaches methods and apparatus for controlling operating subsystems of motor vehicles. Diagnostic and maintenance services for the vehicles are provided by monitoring various operating subsystems connected to a vehicle controller and recording diagnostic data. Such data can be periodically communicated to a service center which determines the service(s) needed and communicates there conclusions back to the vehicle controller where it is displayed to the vehicle operator.

[0007] U.S. Pat. No. 5,557,268, issued to Hughes et al. of Exxon, teaches an automatic vehicle recognition and customer automobile diagnostic system. Each vehicle includes a transponder that transmits an rf code so that vehicle diagnostic measurements made upon entry to the service facility can be associated with the specific vehicle and displayed to the customer in their service area.

[0008] U.S. Pat. No. 5,058,044 issued to Stewart et al., teaches a system for automatically identifying vehicles assimilating data from the identified vehicle, correlating the data with predetermined data and providing a statement of account for a transaction involving the vehicle. A service record for the vehicle is prepared by the system for use in connection with such transactions. Data for the service record is provided primarily by onboard sensors, but may be augmented by data submitted via an onboard keyboard.

[0009] U.S. Pat. No. 4,602,127, issued to Neely et al., teaches a vehicle diagnostic system comprising a portable communications control station and a remote data processing station. A portable communications controller is connected to a vehicle data terminal to obtain data from the vehicle's onboard computer.

[0010] U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,975,847 and 5,065,023, both issued to Abe et al., teach motor vehicle diagnosis systems.

[0011] U.S. Pat. No. 5,541,840, issued to Gurne et al. of Chrysler Corporation, teaches a hand-held automotive diagnostic service tool which can operate with a master station to monitor, display, and process vehicle data and diagnose fault conditions. Service manual pages can be displayed and parts ordered on-line.

[0012] U.S. Pat. No. 5,533,093 teaches an automated troubleshooting mechanism incorporated into portable test and communications equipment for telephone lines. Work order manager software is employed.

[0013] U.S. Pat. No. 4,916,441 teaches a hand-held pocket terminal having a display screen and bar code reader for use in conjunction with patient medical care.

[0014] Various aspects of interactive CRT touch panel displays are taught by U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,449,186 (to Kelly et al.), 5,404,443 (to Hirata), 5,488,575 (to Danielson et al.), 5,499,707 (to Steury) 1 5,537,315 (to Mitcham) and 5,539,429 (to Yano et al.). Such touch panels have been found useful in facilitating communications in a variety of customer service contexts.

[0015] The Super Advisor System marketed by Automatic Data Processing, Inc., of Hoffman Estates, Ill., USA, allows Service advisors to use a hand-held, wireless pen pad computer system to select or decline maintenance items displayed on the computer's screen and to describe vehicular problems via a series of checklists and multiple-choice questions. The system also provides customer appointment management, etc., using Microsoft Windows®.

[0016] One aspect of the present equipment service invention is to provide an efficient system and process for obtaining, recording and utilizing appropriate information about a vehicle and its required service from a customer.

[0017] Another aspect of the invention is to provide a system for obtaining such information without the need for the presence of a representative of the repair shop.

[0018] Yet another aspect of the invention is to provide a complete, concise, and readable repair/service order for the mechanic, parts suppliers, and customer.

[0019] These and other objectives are fulfilled by preprogrammed interactive computer systems for obtaining vehicle information, symptoms and requests from a customer, and developing work and parts orders. The system includes:

[0020] interactive input, display, computing and storage mechanisms for querying the customer, receiving inputs of information, and storing the provided information;

[0021] preprogrammed central computer processing unit(s) for ordering successive presentations of appropriate queries for the customer via the display means;

[0022] a compiler to summarize the inputs received and process the summary to generate a work and/or parts order; and at least one printer to print the work order for both the customer and mechanic, billing records, and reminders to the vehicle service and other personnel for future services.

[0023] Optionally, an input mechanism can be provided to transmit data upon completion of the work to an accounting module or subsystem to facilitate preparation of the hill and notification of the customer by the accounting department. Such data can also be transmitted to a quality control subsystem.

[0024] Further input and display mechanisms are provided for the mechanic to check and provide status information about the automobile's current service program. A data bank is provided to receive and maintain current status information on work assignments being performed for customers and cars. Interactive communication units are provided to originate and receive calls to and from customers regarding the status of the work assignments on their cars. Interactive communication units are also provided to initiate and execute orders for service, supplies, and parts from dealer stock or external providers.

[0025] Other components of the system include interactive computer monitor screens which identify relevant portions of the vehicle, the locations therein, and symptoms. Input mechanisms for the system include touch-activating monitor screens and keyboards. A database of scheduled and unscheduled periodic maintenance tasks for various types of vehicles serviced can be linked to the pertinent query screens. This database information can be provided at a distance by use of the Internet or locally through computer memory. Programmed query sets include the categories of engine/drivability, noise/vibrations, transmission, 2 and 4-wheel or more drive, heater/AC, brakes, steering/suspension, power accessories/electrical, and miscellaneous other services.

[0026] Further, an interactive computerized process is provided for receiving customer inputs for developing work orders for automobile repair and maintenance. This is accomplished by steps including!

[0027] querying the customer and receiving inputs regarding the customer and automobile ID via computer input and output systems using Programmed sets of questions regarding specified vehicle systems and categories regarding the maintenance and/or repairs;

[0028] selecting the services which are requested and/or needed, including investigative work;

[0029] printing, storing and displaying work orders including the provided customer and vehicle ID and assigned services for both the customer and the assigned mechanics; and

[0030] printing reminders for use by the equipment owner or equipment service personnel relative to prior history, dates or usage mileposts requiring further service or bar-coded information for future reference.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0031] Like reference characters designate corresponding parts in the several views.

[0032]FIG. 1 provides a block diagram of the system, as it would be used at a typical automobile dealership or repair shop.

[0033]FIG. 2 is a master flow sheet illustrating the organization and operation of the system.

[0034]FIG. 3 illustrates a “customer service process” of using the system.

[0035] FIGS. 4-11 are queries for each of the subcategories of FIG. 2.

[0036]FIG. 4 is a flow sheet for the category 1, “Engine Drivability”, problems.

[0037]FIG. 5 is a flow sheet for the category 2, “Noises/Vibrations”, problems.

[0038]FIG. 6 is a typical flow sheet for the category 3, “Automatic/Manual/4 Wheel Drive”, problems.

[0039]FIG. 7 is a flow sheet for category 4, “Heating/AC”, problems.

[0040]FIG. 8 is a flow sheet for category 5, “Brakes”, problems.

[0041]FIG. 9 is a flow sheet for category 6, “Steering/suspension”, problems.

[0042]FIG. 10 is a flow sheet for category 7, “Power Accessories/Electrical”, problems.

[0043]FIG. 11 is a flow sheet for the category 8, “Other Services”.

[0044] FIGS. 12-21R are illustrative of computer screens useful for obtaining the information needed under categories 1-8.

[0045]FIGS. 12A to 12G illustrate selected computer monitor screens for “Introductory Information.”

[0046]FIG. 13 illustrates a computer monitor screen for the selection of pertinent categories.

[0047]FIGS. 14A to 14D illustrate computer monitor screens for the “subcategory 1” program.

[0048]FIGS. 15A to 15E illustrate computer monitor screens for the “subcategory 2” program.

[0049]FIGS. 16A to 16E illustrate selected computer monitor screens for the “subcategory 3” program.

[0050]FIGS. 17A to 17E illustrate selected computer monitor screens for the “subcategory 4” program.

[0051]FIGS. 18A to 18D illustrate selected computer monitor screens for the “subcategory 5” program.

[0052]FIGS. 19A to 19D illustrate selected computer monitor screens for the “subcategory 6” program.

[0053]FIGS. 20A to 20F illustrate selected computer monitor screens for the “subcategory 7” program.

[0054]FIGS. 21A to 21S illustrate selected computer screens for the “subcategory 8” program.

[0055]FIGS. 22A to 22C illustrate selected computer screens for the “Additional Services” program.

[0056]FIG. 23 illustrates a computer screen for addressing “Additional Problems.”

[0057]FIG. 24 illustrates a screen for “Unscheduled Services.”

[0058] FIGS. 25A-26B illustrates screens asking for a review the “Repair Order.”

[0059]FIG. 26 illustrates an “Estimated Repair Costs” screen.

[0060]FIG. 27 illustrates a “Designation of the Service Advisor and Cost Estimate” screen.

[0061]FIG. 28 illustrates a screen authorizing the repair work and acknowledges the criteria under which the repair is to be done.

[0062]FIG. 29 is illustrative of a screen providing instructions for the deposition of keys into a lockbox.

[0063]FIG. 30 illustrates a screen allowing a designation of whether the customer wishes to “Wait, Drop off the Car, or obtain a Loaner.”

[0064]FIGS. 31A and 31B illustrate screens relating to the acceptance of the finished repair order.

[0065]FIG. 32 depicts the representative print-out of “Repair Order.”

[0066]FIG. 33 is a portion of a typical flowsheet for the repair of other vehicles and equipment.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0067]FIGS. 1 and 2 provide an overview of the systems and methods of the invention. FIG. 1 is a system overview of the invention. A customer brings an automobile to the repair center where customer interacts with customer interview terminal screen 10. This console can include a portable personal computer or, at least, a freestanding terminal serving a master computer. It comprises input means and interactive display means, preferably a touch-active CRT screen such as disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,449,186; 5,404,443; 5,488,575; 5,499,707; 5,537,315 and 5,539,429 incorporated herein by reference. Such touch-active screens preferably incorporate audio output means, as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,449,186. The system is designed so that the hardware and software cooperate to provide convenient means for the customer to provide the necessary information. Preferably, most information will be provided via the touch-active screen in response to a menu-driven series of queries or prompts, Some of the input information (i.e., vehicle and customer ID, credit card payment information, and the like) can be provided by inserting to the card reader 20 a credit card, or other identity card issued by the repair center to minimize effort on the part of the customer and errors as well. Such cards can be used to unlock and provide access to the console and other input devices to minimize vandalism or other unauthorized activities, Alternatively, systems can be used which automatically sense the vehicle's ID and/or the condition of the vehicle systems 40, see e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 5,058,044. To augment the preferred touch-active screens, a standard or simplified alphanumeric keyboard 30 can be provided, and optionally provisions can be made for the customer to dictate into the input system using devices such as the voice-activated system disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,586,037.

[0068] In addition to the Customer's direct input of ID data, observed symptoms, and requests at this intake transaction, customer may be assisted by a service advisor or other representative of the repair center. Such representatives may enter information at the console 10, and/or use a hand-held device such as disclosed above. Optionally, readings may be taken from the vehicle's onboard computer 50 at this point using d hand-held unit or other computerized monitor. In this way, the error codes from the onboard computer can be read, analyzed, and considered in writing up the service order. This will normally be available only if the customer is willing to wait and there is a repair center representative available to take the readings unless an automatic sensor system is used as in U.S. Pat. No. 5,557,268. A service advisor may introduce information into the system via console 10, either during the customer's intake transaction or thereafter. Preferably, the service advisor will employ a hand-held unit incorporating the functions of console 10.

[0069] The console displays menus, queries, prompts and input/output data on the CRT screen, and upon command or completion of the transaction prints out materials via printer 40 for the customer's use,

[0070] The information inputs all enter a central processing unit (CPU) 70 component of a computer where they are analyzed and correlated. The system may query the customer further to develop the input information fully before closing the transaction. When the initial information is obtained, the system prepares a service order if the needed service and/or repairs are clear. If more information is needed to determine the Service required, the system can print out and display a proposed service order containing queries for the mechanic and/or service advisor to analyze. The service mission is subject to change after readings have been taken from the vehicle's onboard computer.

[0071] A finished service order will be transmitted to mechanic via printer 90 and/or console, which displays the order on a CRT screen. Using similar input means to those described for console 10, the mechanic can submit information to modify the service order, query the service advisor as to what work is approved, and advise the system when the job is completed or delayed. Such inputs will be transmitted to CPU 70 which stores and processes them, Events including job completion or delay are transmitted via suitable communications media, such as the telephone, facsimile, or e-mail, to the customer using customer notification programs. Additionally, in the process of the job, the CPU can be used to optionally identify and order materials, spare parts and the like for the service using ordering program.

[0072]FIG. 2 is a master flow sheet illustrating the operation of the computerized process outlined in FIG. 1. To initiate the intake process, the customer approaches terminal 100. Information input can be by scanner, e.g., FIGS. 12A and 12B, or other means, e.g., a typewriter. Preferably, the information is generally input by use of a touch screen. Where a numeric input is needed, a keypad will appear, e.g., 12A and 12B. Where alphabetic and numeric information is needed, an alphanumeric keypad will appear, e.g., 12C. Specific information is input into the computer of a preferred hand-held unit by stylus pressure on a square, e.g., FIG. 13E; a dot, e.g., 13F, a circle, e.g., 13G. Basic ID, and, where selected, credit card information can be provided via an ID card reader 105 and/or submitted via touch-active screen or keyboard. The information provided appears on display 110 which provides correction prompts or queries. For example, if the current vehicle mileage and phone contact information are not provided initially, they can be submitted upon request as at 115 and 120. When the necessary intake information is provided, the display shifts to the main menu 125 which offers multiple choices as well as a “Help” function. In FIG. 2, the main menu categories include the Engine/drivability (1), Noise/vibrations (2), Automatic/manual/4-wheel Drive Transmission (3), Heater/AC (4), Brakes (5), Steering/suspension (6) Power accessories/electrical (7), and Other services (8) subcategories. These categories are supplemented (See FIG. 32) for vehicles more complex than automobiles, e.g., a Peterbilt truck, and vehicle-based equipment, e.g., a cherry picker and a front loader. Each of these menu choices leads to subroutines containing multiple menu choices to guide the customer through an interrogation process which will identify the problems to be corrected and/or routine services to be performed. Exemplary flow diagrams for these subcategories are provided in subsequent figures discussed below. Upon completion of any of the subroutines 1 through 8, the display shifts to a “General Questions” subroutine 130 which queries the customer as to how often the problem occurs and similar questions. After responding to these queries, the customer is queried as to whether there are additional vehicle problems 135; if “yes”, the program reverts to the main menu for further choices. Selection of the “other services” menu 140 provides options for choosing various maintenance services as well as a “Help” option which refers the customer to the service advisor as shown at 145.

[0073] Upon completion of the interrogation via the categorical subroutines, the customer is automatically transferred to “Additional Services” subroutine 150, which offers further choices discussed below for routine service operations and the like. When the customer has finished with this subroutine, customer is transferred to an additional services menu 150 which offers additional service options. Once the customer exits this menu, customer is transferred to subroutine 155 which uses Boolean and other processing logic to provide a compilation of the symptoms and requested service items and displays the compilation along with a menu of additional accessories or services which can be purchased. Following this, subroutine 160 provides a cost estimate of any requested maintenance services, and subroutine 165 provides a cost estimate of repair costs and pickup time. The repair/work order is presented by subroutine 170, and the customer's electronic signature is captured. On signature of the repair order, instructions for leaving the key(s) in a secure depository are shown at 173. Subroutine 175 then queries whether the customer will wait for the vehicle, drop it off, or request a loaner vehicle. This subroutine also queries the customer's requests with regard to the disposition of the used parts. Finally, the finished repair estimate is displayed and printed out for both the customer, service advisor and the mechanic at 180.

[0074]FIG. 3 illustrates a customer's interaction with the system. As in FIG. 2, a customer interacts with blocks 300, 305, 310, 315, 320, and is transferred to main menu 325. Category 1 Engine/drivability is selected by the customer at 330 and menus are presented as in FIG. 4. The customer is exposed to a succession of computer monitor screens in the course of selecting from the menu, as illustrated in FIGS. 12A to 12G. As shown in FIG. 3, the customer selects the “Symptoms when starting category at 335, and thereafter is called upon to describe the symptoms at 340 and when they occur at 345. After the selection of the latter, the system transfers to the “General questions”, subroutine 350. After this question is answered, the system transfers to the “Additional vehicle problems”, subroutine 355. In this case, the customer selects “NO”, and is transferred to the “additional services” menu 360. Since the customer chooses no additional services, the system analyzes the symptoms and any requested maintenance services at 365 and presents the customer with a menu of additional merchandise and services which can be purchased. Subroutine 370 presents the customer with the estimated maintenance costs (if any), and subroutine 375 presents a statement of estimated repair costs and pickup time. The system then captures the customer's signature 380, queries as to whether customer will wait or drop off the vehicle 385 with the repair organization, whether a loaner is required, and whether parts are to be returned as shown in block 385. Finally, the finished repair order is displayed and printed for both customer and mechanic at 390.

[0075]FIG. 4 illustrates the operation of the “Engine/drivability” menu (category 1). The customer is initially presented with a choice as to describing symptoms which occur when starting or driving, or “Other symptoms”. Given any of these three choices, the customer is asked to describe the nature of the symptoms, then queried to describe when the symptoms occur. Optionally, inputs from the service computer can be provided at this point to provide further information on the nature of the symptoms and when they occur. After these questions are answered, the subroutine transitions to a “General Questions” subroutine to describe ‘how often the symptoms occur. From General Questions, the customer selects whether or not there are Additional Vehicle Problems. If none, customer proceeds to Additional Services; if “yes” is answered, customer is returned to the Main Menu to make another choice,

[0076]FIG. 5 illustrates the menu choices for “Noise/vibrations” (Category 2). The initial menu allows the customer to select noises or vibrations alone or a combination of both, Whatever the choice, the customer will be queried as to what the nature of the symptoms are, when they occur and where the symptom occurs. Input from the service computer can be provided to assist in the analysis. Finally, the customer is queried as to “how often” the symptoms occur. At this point, the computer advances to “Additional Vehicles Problems” 135.

[0077]FIG. 6. Illustrates menu choices for a “Automatic/manual/4-wheel drive” transmission check (Category 3). The initial menu requires selection as to automatic or manual transmissions or the 4-wheel drive. Once a selection is made, the customer is queried as to the nature of the symptoms and when they occur. These questions answered, the customer is queried as to how often the symptoms occur. After all these questions are answered for a subcategory, the customer is queried as to whether there are problems in another subcategory. If not, the system moves to the closing sequence. If the customer indicates that there are problems in another subcategory, (e.g., problems with the 4-wheel drive in addition to the transmission), the computer returns to the main menu 125 for another selection.

[0078]FIG. 7 illustrates the operation of the menu for “Heating/Air Conditioning” (Category 4). The initial menu selections are for symptoms of heating, air conditioning or automatic temperature control. Once a subcategory is selected, the customer is again called upon to describe the nature of the symptoms and when they occur. These questions answered, the system transitions to “General Questions” including how often the symptoms occur. After these questions are answered, the customer is called upon to declare whether there are additional problems in other subcategories. If not, the closing sequence is actuated. If so, customer is returned to the menu 125 to make another selection.

[0079]FIG. 8 illustrates the menu choices for “Brakes” (Category 5). The initial menu selections are for conventional brakes, anti-lock brake systems, or combinations of both. As in the other categories, the customer is called upon to describe the nature of the symptoms, when they occur, and how often they occur before returning to the main menu or going through the closing sequence.

[0080]FIG. 9 illustrates the menu choices for “Steering/Suspension” (Category 6). The initial menu choices are for steering or suspension problems, and after making a selection, the customer is called upon to describe the nature of the symptoms, when they occur, and how often they occur, After these questions are answered, the customer is queried whether there are any symptoms in the other subcategory (e.g., suspension in addition to steering). It not, customer is returned to the main menu or passed through the closing sequence.

[0081]FIG. 10 illustrates the menu choices for “Power Accessories/Electrical” (Category 7). The initial menu choices are for electrically operated components and power accessories, and once a selection is made, the customer is queried as to the nature of the symptoms, when they occur, and where they occur. Once these questions are answered, the customer is queried as to how often the symptoms occur. Upon completion of these questions, the customer is queried as to whether symptoms exist in another subcategory. If not, the customer is returned to the main menu or to the closing sequence.

[0082]FIG. 11 illustrates the menu operation for “Other” problems (Category 8), The initial menu choices are scheduled and unscheduled maintenance, i.e. maintenance which is conducted at predetermined total mileage figures or at periodic mileage/time intervals. Once selections are made for any required maintenance in these subcategories, the system queries the customer regarding “Additional Vehicle Problems”. Subcategories 3 and 4 provide menu choices regarding problems with the vehicle exterior and interior. Having selected one of these subcategories, the customer is queried as to the nature of the symptoms, when they occur, and where they occur before being asked general questions including how often they occur. When queries and answers for each subcategory are completed, the customer is queried as to whether problems/symptoms exist in other subcategories. If so, customer is returned to the main menu for another selection or progresses through closing sequence. Subcategory 5 covers special orders or parts and recall notice items. Subcategory 6 deals with new or used-car problems. In subcategory 7, “General Symptoms”, the customer is again called upon to describe the nature of the symptoms, when they occur, and where they occur then how often the symptoms occur.

[0083]FIGS. 12A and 12B illustrate computer screens which relate to information obtained by optic, magnetic or rf (including microwave) scanning. FIGS. 12C-12D illustrate screens which enable the customer to input personal information. FIGS. 12E and 12F are illustrative of screens enabling the customer to input “Mileage” by pressing a “change” designator to bring up a numeric keypad. FIG. 12G similarly enables the customer to enter a telephone number for contact during the period the car is in the shop. An illustrative keypad screen is omitted.

[0084]FIG. 13 illustrates screens for the selection of one or more repair categories. Category 1, “Engine/Drivability” has been selected as indicated by the outline around that category.

[0085]FIGS. 14A to 14E illustrate computer monitor screens for the “Category 1” program. FIG. 14A identifies the category and asks for the selection of “Symptoms.” FIG. 14B illustrates a screen for “Symptoms when starting.” FIG. 14C illustrates the screen for “When do you notice it”, i.e., the questions about the nature and frequency of the symptoms. FIG. 14D illustrates the screen querying the customer regarding “Symptoms when driving”.

[0086]FIGS. 15A to 15E illustrate selected computer monitor screens for “Noises and Vibrations”, the Category 2, program. FIG. 15A illustrates a computer screen representing the selection of the “Noise or Vibration” category, including selections for noises and/or vibrations. FIG. 15B illustrates a screen representing the selection of the “Noise information” subcategory. FIG. 15C illustrates the screen presenting the query “Where is it coming from?” via a diagram. FIG. 15D illustrates a screen querying “When does it happen” containing generic questions pertaining to noises and/or vibrations. FIG. 15E illustrates the screen requiring the selection of vibrational categories. “Shudder” has been selected.

[0087]FIGS. 16A to 16E illustrate selected computer monitor screens for a Category 3, “Automatic/Manual/4 Wheel Drive Transmission” program.

[0088]FIG. 16A illustrates the computer screen for the category of “Transmission” information, offering choices for automatic or manual transmissions or an exemplary 4-wheel drive. FIG. 16B illustrates the screen for the “Automatic transmission” subcategory offering choices as to types of symptoms observed. FIG. 16C illustrates the screen for the “Manual transmission” subcategory, offering choices of various symptoms observed. FIG. 16D illustrates a screen for “4-wheel drive transmissions” subcategory offering choices as to various symptoms observed. FIG. 16E illustrates a screen querying ‘When does it happen”, with a set of generic questions applicable to any of the subcategories.

[0089]FIGS. 17A to 17E illustrate selected computer monitor screens for the category 4, “Heater/AC” program. FIG. 17A illustrates the computer screen for defining the Heating or Air Conditioning problem. FIG. 17B illustrates a screen for the ‘Heating” category. FIG. 17C illustrates a screen for the “Air Conditioning” category. FIG. 17D illustrates a screen for the automatic temperature control system. FIG. 17E illustrates a screen providing questions as to “When does it happen.”

[0090]FIGS. 18A to 18D illustrate selected computer monitor screens for the category 5 “Brakes” program. FIG. 18A illustrates a computer screen for defining the particular brake system. FIG. 18B illustrates a screen for defining the problem with a conventional braking system. FIG. 18C illustrates a screen for defining problems with regard to an anti-lock braking system. FIG. 18D illustrates a screen querying “When does it happen.”

[0091]FIGS. 19A to 19D illustrate selected computer monitor screens for the category 6, “Steering and Suspension” program. FIG. 19A illustrates a computer screen for defining whether the problem relates to steering or suspension. FIG. 19B illustrates the screen for the “Steering information” subcategory including questions regarding various symptoms observed with regard to the steering. FIG. 19C illustrates the screen for the “suspension” subcategory, including questions regarding various symptoms observed. FIG. 19D illustrates the screen for “When does it happen” including questions regarding the operating modes and speed when either steering or suspension symptoms occur.

[0092]FIGS. 20A to 20F illustrate selected computer monitor screens for the “Electrical” program. FIG. 20A illustrates a computer screen offering choices of problems connected with “electrically operated components” or “power accessories”. FIG. 20B illustrates a screen which includes questions regarding the specific components requiring service. FIG. 20C illustrates a screen including questions regarding “Power accessories” where the symptoms are observed. FIG. 20D illustrates a screen for narrowing the search terms. FIG. 20E illustrates the screen for “When does it happen”. FIG. 20F illustrates a screen for identifying the area where the problem is located.

[0093]FIGS. 21A to 21L1 illustrate selected computer screens for the “Other services” program. FIG. 21A illustrates a screen for “Other services available” offering menu choices for scheduled and unscheduled maintenance, vehicle exterior and interior, special order parts and recall notices, new- or used-car internal and general symptoms. FIG. 21B illustrates a screen for “Unscheduled maintenance” and FIG. 21C illustrates a screen for “Vehicle exterior” subcategory including questions regarding the area(s) in which the problem is occurring. FIG. 21D provides problem location selections. FIG. 21E illustrates a screen requesting information on the problem description. The FIG. 21F illustrates a screen for locating a problem on the vehicle exterior via a diagram. FIG. 21G illustrates a computer screen for the ‘Vehicle interior” subcategory, including questions regarding the area where the problem is occurring. FIG. 21H illustrates a screen for the “Problem location” subcategory of ‘Vehicle interior lighting”. FIG. 21I is illustrative of a screen for locating problems via a diagram. FIG. 21J illustrates a screen for describing the problem in the vehicle interior. FIG. 21K illustrates a screen for information regarding a special order or recall notice. FIG. 21L illustrates the screen for a “new car” or “used car” internal repair order. FIGS. 21M-21S illustrate screens for identifying things the customer sees, hears, smells and feels under the “help” category 140 of FIG. 2 and asks “When” and “Where.”

[0094]FIGS. 22A to 22D illustrate selected computer screens for “General Questions, Other Symptoms and Return Problems.”

[0095]FIG. 23A illustrates an “Additional problems” screen.

[0096]FIG. 24 illustrates a screen for selecting “Unscheduled services” and includes prices for those services.

[0097]FIGS. 25A and 25B are screens requesting that the customer review the previously input material.

[0098]FIGS. 26 and 27 illustrate screens for providing an estimate of cost and pickup time.

[0099]FIG. 28 illustrates a screen for acknowledgment and capture of customer signature. This corresponds to block 170 on FIG. 2.

[0100]FIG. 29 illustrates a screen instructing the customer to deposit the vehicle keys in an appropriate lockbox.

[0101]FIG. 30 illustrates a screen for selection of “wait”, “drop off”, or a “loaner.”

[0102]FIGS. 31A and 31B illustrate “Repair order acceptance” screens. This corresponds to block 180 of FIG. 2.

[0103]FIG. 32 illustrates the “Repair order generated” screen including the captured customer signature.

[0104]FIG. 33 illustrates the additional categories 9 and 10 of a Master Flow Sheet extending FIG. 2 for various types of vehicular equipment.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0105] Various combinations of commercially available computer hardware can be used to assemble the systems of the invention. Computer support can range from a single personal computer or microcomputer to a master computer with multiple terminals. Portable or hand-held terminals or computers can be used to facilitate the collection and transmission of data. The computer support mechanisms preferably include a central processing unit, at least one compiler, data storage devices including disk drives and the like, at least one monitor with display screen, a modem, an interactive media device and input/output mechanisms. The computer system is configured, as required, by the particular programs to be run with capacities and rates suitable to provide reasonable response times.

[0106] Input mechanisms can include conventional keyboards and/or keypads, interactive touch screens, and screens with icons responsive to a “mouse”, optical and magnetic readers, and data input ports. Preferably the input mechanisms include touch-active display screens as discussed in detail below. Such screens permit interaction between a user and the computer in response to the user's touching the screen with an object such as a finger or a pointing device. As disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,537,315, such pointing devices can include a light pen, sonic pen, voltage pencil, stick, or wand. Other input mechanisms to the system, if not directly to the computer, will include conventional credit card readers for receiving data about the customer and/or vehicle to be serviced, plus payment information such as credit card numbers. One suitable credit card reader is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,449,186, column 1. Optionally, the input mechanisms can include a voice-activated system, such as a digitized voice recognition system for receiving user input, such as those pioneered by Dragon Systems, Inc., San Rafael, Calif.

[0107] The computer support mechanisms preferably include at least one hand-held or portable terminal which permits data to be input to the system vial a keypad or keyboard or equivalent device. This will permit a service advisor and/or mechanic to receive and input data conveniently from the vehicle. Such terminals have become commonly available and can be designed or purchased and modified to interface with the system. A representative example of such terminals is found in U.S. Pat. No. 5,468,575.

[0108] Since most contemporary automotive vehicles include onboard computers which receive information from sensors, control various systems via actuators, and record various failures of equipment, input mechanisms for the system should include mechanisms for reading and analyzing data from such onboard computers. Any suitable mechanism can be used which allows such data to be read, analyzed, and input to the computer of the system. One example is the “hand-held automotive diagnostic service tool”, of U.S. Pat. No. 5,541,840, which is incorporated herein by reference. As disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,602,127, many modern vehicles include mechanisms for obtaining direct access to the data of such onboard computers on a real-time basis. Inputs to the system can also be provided by automatic vehicle recognition and diagnostic systems such as those disclosed in U.S. Pat. No, 5,557,268.

[0109] Output mechanisms can include display mechanisms, such as the CRT display screens of computer monitors, printers, and program-actuated facsimile, credit checking devices, and/or telephone devices. The printer(s) can be any suitable unit(s) selected from commercially available models such as laser or ink jet printers.

[0110] Computer programs or software subsystems or modules are used to carry out various tasks for which the systems are employed. Many of these subsystems can be obtained or modified from existing commercial programs. In any case, the required programs can readily be provided by those of ordinary skill in the art in view of the teachings herein. For instance, accounting and billing programs are readily available and can be obtained or modified to provide a statement of account for services performed. Programs for receiving and analyzing the data stored in vehicle onboard computers are also available. However, the most important part of the diagnostic process will still generally be the analysis by the mechanic and/or service manager of the information provided by such programs and the vehicle driver. Service order-writing programs are generally available; see, e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 5,058,044,

[0111] Programs to generate and/or access a service record for the vehicle(s) serviced are also available. Technical library or database programs can be used to provide access to scheduled and unscheduled maintenance operations, service and parts manuals for the mechanic as well as the customer. Programs for identifying and ordering parts are also available. However, such programs will generally be tailored or prepared especially for users of the particular systems of the invention.

[0112] The figures provide an exemplary mechanism for obtaining the vehicle driver's input. They do not include a listing of all possible options with respect to automobiles. The additional categories 9 for “Mechanical” and 10 for “Hydraulic or Pneumatic” systems will include the “What”, “Where”, and “When” questions of the previous categories and will provide feedback subroutines necessary to handle vehicles other than automobiles and mechanical equipment for grading, lifting, moving, etc., various items and/or products.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification705/7.13, 705/305
International ClassificationG06Q10/00
Cooperative ClassificationG06Q10/06311, G07C2205/02, G06Q10/0875, G07C5/085, G06Q10/06, G06Q40/12, G06Q10/063114, G07C5/008, G06Q10/20
European ClassificationG06Q10/06, G06Q10/06311, G06Q10/20, G06Q10/06311D, G07C5/00T, G06Q40/10, G06Q10/0875
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 9, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: REICHWEIN-WHITE ENTERPRISES, INC., COLORADO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:REICHWEIN, ERNST F.;WHITE, JOSEPH G.;REEL/FRAME:013560/0342
Effective date: 20021201