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Publication numberUS2001381 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 14, 1935
Filing dateAug 29, 1934
Priority dateAug 29, 1934
Publication numberUS 2001381 A, US 2001381A, US-A-2001381, US2001381 A, US2001381A
InventorsDavison Charles Herbert
Original AssigneeDavison Charles Herbert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Construction of rugs of pile fabrics
US 2001381 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

c. H. DAVISON 2,001,381

CONSTRUGTION OF RUGS OF PILE FABRICS Filed Aug 29, 1934 MINI/NV l/VVENTfl/Z CHARLES Hzzaser DA v/smv,

Wgtf' 2,001,381 cons'rauc'rron crimes or rnnranmcs Charles Herbert Davison, Princeton, N. J.

Application August 29,

7 Claims.

invention may be employed with particular advantage in connection with Axminster rugs andcarpets, it is not limited'to such embodiments but is applicable to pile fabrics of any kind.

It is the present trade practice to charge $1.27% per yard for binding the cut edge of an Axm inster fabric by a method and means which are standard practice in the trade and which consist in allowing one and one-half inches extra length of the fabric at any edge which is to be bound, plucking the pile tufts from that inch and a half length and the full width of the fabric, binding the cut edge by the use of a sewing machine which overcasts the cut edge to an extent of about one-half inch with a coarse thread in stitches. resembling those used for forming buttonholes then bending the plucked portion of the fabric backing backward upon and parallel with the face of the fabric opposite to the tufts; and hemming it to the body of the fabric by a line of machine stitches intermediate of the width of the over-casting. Obviously such a method of procedure is wasteful of the pile material of the fabric and laborious and consequently costly. Moreov r, the edge of a fabric thus finished does not lie flatupon a plane surface but is upheld by the thick portion there-. of turiied under and, consequently, such raised edge of the fabric .is subjected to greater wear than the body of the fabric and becomes threadbare.

invention to not only minimize the waste, labor and cost of binding a cut edge of a pile fabric butalso to permit the cut edge, when bound, to lie flat upon a plane surface and thus avoid the extraordinary wear incident to, the. ordinary construction aforesaid. L

As hereinafter described, it is characteristic of my invention that binding warps of the fabric,

' which are extended beyond the body ofthe fabric for only about one-half inch,'are bent backward upon the face 'of the fabric opposite to the pile so as to tightly bind in the fabric the wefts adjoining the cut edge, and are tightly secured on the back of the fabric by an elastic cement and covered by a flat band of thin tough material, for instance, a closely woven textile tape about one inch wide, which is also secured to the back of the fabric parallel with the plane" of the latter by an elastic cement with one edge Therefore, it is the object and ta of my 1934, Serial No. 741,978

of said band coextensive with the bights of said bent back binding warps, that the fabric thus bound will-lie flat upon a plane surface.

My invention includes the various novel fea-' tures of construction, arrangement, and method of procedure hereinafter more definitely speci- I Fig. I is an elevation of a portion of the longitudinal edge of an Axminister pile fabric having the cut edge thereof which is at the right in said figure bound in accordance with my invention.

II is an inverted plan view of an Axminster pile fabric designed to be severed transversely at intervals throughout its length to form rugs to be bound in accordancewith this invention, showing the binding warps securing the backing wefts, with the wefts omitted for a space of one inch between adjoining sections of the pil structure to afford the desired extension of the binding warps when the fabric is severed between'said sections. t.

Fig. III is a longitudinal edge view of the section shown at the left of Fig. II and with the binding warps extending from the backing.

Fig. IV is a perspective view of the back of the fabric indicated in Fig. III with the extended binding warps bent back upon. the face of the fabrieopposite to the pile and secured by elastic cement.

Fig. V is a perspective view of the back of the fabric shown in Fig. I with the binding in accordance with this invention completed.

Referring to Fig. I the backing l of the fabric has the pile tufts 2 looped therein only to the region 4, where the binding warp threads 8 are bent backward to the extent indicated at 9 and are covered by the thin tough binding band Hi, the right hand edge ofwhich is coextensive with the bights'of said warps 8 and the construction is such that the fabric thus bound will lie substantially flat upon a plane surface.

As indicated in Fig. II, arranged in pairs in laterally spaced relation to bind the three seriesof backing wefts l2, l3, and I4. Said wefts II are not visible from the the binding wai ps 8 are 7 V n back of 'the fabric but are held upon the front are severed transversely with respect to the provided portions of the fabric. 'Such sections.

fabric along the line l6 leaving the binding warps 8 projecting about one-half inch from the edge of the backing I, as indicated in Figs. HI and 1V. Thereupon, a coating l8, of elastic adhesive is applied to the backing l upon the face opposite to the pile 2 and saidnormally extending ends of the warps 8 are bent backward and pressed upon the backing i, as indicated at 19 in Fig. IV, so as to tightly secure them in position to securely bind the end wefts in the backing I.

Thereupon, a second coating 20 of the elastic adhesive is applied over the bent back ends 'ofthe warps 8 and of such extent as to secure the fiat binding band when the latter is pressed thereon, as indicated in Fig. V. I also prefer to apply a third coating 2| of said adhesive upon the bent bights of said warps 8 and the edge of said band ID, as indicated in Fig. V, to further secure the same together.

Although any suitable adhesive may be employed in the manner above specified, I have found it convenient to employ a mixture of approximately three parts of what is known to the trade as filler paste to wit, a paste formed of flour of grain such as rye boiled in .water, mixed with approximately one part of not desire to limit myself to the precise details of construction, arrangement or method of procedure above set forth, as it is obvious that various modifications may be made therein without departing from the essential features of my invention, as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. The method of forming rugs of Axminister pile fabric which consists in weaving said fabric with successive areas thereof provided with pile, and with spaces between said areas devoid of pile; the adjoining areas being connected solely by binding warps; severing'said fabric intermediate of said spaces devoid of pile; bending back the severed ends of the binding elements upon the back of the fabric opposite to the pile and securing said ends by elastic adhesive so that the end wefts of the fabric are thus bound in the fabric; and covering said bent back ends with a flat band of tough material extending along said edge coextensive with the bights of the bent back binding warps and secured by said adhesive.

2., An Axminster pile fabric rug structure including three series of backing wefts, two series bights engaged with one series of said wefts;

wherein ends of the binder warps are extended beyond a transverse edge of the fab ric and bent back beneath it under said wefts, and parallel with" said warps; a coat-- ing of' elastic adhesive on the back of said fabric securing said. warp ends thereto; a second coating of elastic adhesive covering said binder warp ends; and a flat band of' tough material extending along said edge, at the back of the fabric, parallel with said wefts, covering said warp ends and secured by said adhesive.

3. An Axminster pile fabric rug structure including three series of backing wefts, two series of binder warps interwoven with all of said wefts, and pile warps forming tufts having their bights engaged with one series of said wefts; wherein ends of the binder warps are extended beyond a transverse edge of the fabric and bent back beneath it under said wefts, and parallel with said warps; a coating of elastic adhesive on the back of said fabric securing said warp ends thereto; a second coating of elastic adhesive covering said binder warp ends; and'a fiat band of tough material extending along said edge, at the back of the fabric, parallel with said wefts, covering said warp ends and secured by said adhesive; and a third coating of elastic adhesive on the bights of said bent warp ends and adjoining edge of said band.

4. A structure as in claim 2, wherein the elastic adhesive includes the dried residue of liquefied rubber.

5. A structure as in claim 2, wherein the elastic adhesive includes the dried residue of liquefied rubber mixed with the dried residue of an aqueous paste of grain flour.

6. A structure as in claim 2, wherein the band is a closely woven textile tape having selvages at its opposite longitudinal edges.

7. The method of forming rugs of pile fabric which consists in weaving said fabric with successive areas thereof provided with pile, and with spaces between said areas devoid of pile; the adjoining areas being connected solely by binding warps; severing said fabric intermediate of said spaces devoid .of pile; bending back the severed ends of the binding-warps upon the back of the fabric opposite to the pile and securing said. ends by adhesive so that the end wefts of the fabric are thus bound in the fabric; and covering said bent-back ends with a flat band of tough material extending along said edge, and secured by said adhesive. M

CHARLES HERBERT Dawson.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2675337 *Nov 2, 1949Apr 13, 1954British CelaneseMethod of producing an improved pile fabric
US5389421 *Dec 23, 1992Feb 14, 1995Pearlman; PhilipFringed wilton-type carpet and method of making the same
US5568964 *Jul 10, 1992Oct 29, 1996Lumitex, Inc.Fiber optic light emitting panel assemblies and methods of making such panel assemblies
WO1994001716A1 *Jul 8, 1993Jan 20, 1994Lumitex IncFiber optic light emitting panel assemblies and methods of making such panel assemblies
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/88, 156/88, 28/159, 156/216, 428/95, 524/915, 524/925, 524/52, 156/72, 428/92, 156/148
International ClassificationA47G27/02, D03D27/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S524/925, D03D27/00, Y10S524/915, D03D2700/60, A47G27/0268
European ClassificationD03D27/00, A47G27/02R6