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Publication numberUS2001625 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 14, 1935
Filing dateFeb 23, 1935
Priority dateSep 17, 1934
Publication numberUS 2001625 A, US 2001625A, US-A-2001625, US2001625 A, US2001625A
InventorsHeinrich Muller
Original AssigneeHeinrich Muller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wheeled toy
US 2001625 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 14, 1935. j

H. MULLER WHEELED TOY Filed Feb. 23, 1935 2 Sheets-Sheer. 1

[/7 149/7 for:

May 14, 1935. H. MULLER 2,001,625 WHEELED TOY I Filed Feb. 23, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented May 14, 1935 UNITED STATES PATNT OFFICE Application February 28, 1985, Serial No.

In Germany September 17, 1934 14 Claims.

This invention relates to wheeled toys which travel on a pair of wheels, of which one is driven by a clock-work and the other loosely rotatable, and which comprise a turning wheel provided in front of said pair of wheels and positioned transversely with respect thereto, and a supporting finger or arm adapted to slide on the running surface and to form an oblique guide-surface,

said supporting finger or arm sliding during travel of the toy on the running surface and lifting the toy so that said turning wheel is likewise lifted .from the running surface and consequently without effecting any, turning motion as long as said supporting finger is in full contact with the running surface and supported thereby, while said supporting finger or arm will come into action to initiate a turning or swinging motion of the toy, whenever said supporting finger slides off said surface, or comes into only a loose contact therewith.

Wheeled toys of the aforementioned construction and mode of operation, as known, are generally equipped with a loosely rotatable front turning wheel retarding or looking the forward travel of the toy as soon as said supporting finger comes out of full contact with the running surface and whenever said turning wheel comes in proper contact with the latter.

This locking action of the turning wheel in connection with the continued operation of the clock-work now has the eifect that the driven running wheel will laterally turn and swing the toy round the opposite loose running wheel, causing the toy to positively move in another direction of travel, in which case the supporting finger again comes into full sliding contact with the running surface to lift the front part of the toy, therewith likewise lifting the turning wheel oi the running surface, thus securing further travel of the toy in the new direction of motion.

This known construction of wheeled toy suificiently provides for the desired effect in case of toys having a relatively slow motion of travel but generally fails to operate in toys having'a relatively rapid motion of travel, because the turning wheel in the latter case during being lowered to come in working contact with the running surface does not at once find suificient adhesion on said surface in order to lock the forward motion of the toy when travelling at relatively high speed; the turning wheel will therefore slide on the running surface without exerting the desired effect. A further disadvantage will be encountered which consists therein that smoothly polished or varnished running (Cl. 4H8) surfaces, such as plates of are likely to be injured by due to the sliding motion of thereon. 1

My'present invention now is designed to obvi- 5 ate these disadvantages and to render it possible to use a mechanism for laterally turning or swinging the toy also in case of quickly moving toys, such as for instance automobile-toys, wheeled animal-toys in the form of a mouse or the like; by my invention that is attained essentially by making the aforementioned transverse running wheel from rubber, leather or similar material offering a soft surface or byat least equipping said running wheel with a rim or running tire made of such a material.

By so constructing the running wheel the effect will be attained that .on the one hand the forward motion of the toy will be safely retarded, whenever the lowering motion of the toy-body 20 takes place and on the other hand the aforementioned formation of scratches or scores on the running surface will be avoided.

By further causing the turning wheel to be positively rotated by the clock-work according 25 to this invention the result will be that the lateral turning or swinging motion imparted to the toy will be more readily effected by action of acceleration so that the toy will relatively rapidly assume the new direction of motion imparted thereto by the action of said turning wheel ,in spite of its own rapid forward motion.

The turning and swinging motion imparted to the toy may further be accelerated and favorably affected by arranging the turning wheel somewhat obliquely with respect to the longitudinal axis of the toy so that the running zone of said wheel will be obliquely positioned indirection from the driven running wheel to the loosely rotating running wheel.

In every case the running and turning motion, and in particular the entire operation of the running and turning mechanism, may be surprisingly improved by action of the aforementioned supporting finger byimparting to the toy at its rear part a surplus weight ensuring a small tilting moment round the running wheels towards the rear with the effect that said supporting finger will be only slightly contacting with the running surface.

In the accompanying drawings which form part of this specification I have represented my new wheeled toy in various modes of construction and modifications, the several figures showing a wheeled toy in the form of an automobile or in 55 tables and the like, scratches or scores the running wheels ance may be given to the toy.

. ing a modified form of turning on Fig. 10 with the In the drawings Figs. 1 and 2 show my novel toy in form of an automobile-toy in longitudinal section and in a bottom-view, respectively, Figs. 3, 4 and 5 show my new toy likewise in the form of an automobile-toy, Fig. 3 being a longitudinal section, Fig. 4 a bottom-view and Fig. 5 a sideview of the same, Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section through another form of construction of my new toy in the form of the figure of a mouse embodyor swinging mechfurther modificaanism, Figs. '7, 8 and 9 show a tion of the novel toy having likewise the form of a mouse, the clock-workcomprising a turning mechanism in the form of a turning wheel which is mounted obliquely in the body of the toy and in positive driving connection with said clockwork, Fig. 7 being a side-view partly broken away, Fig. 8 a bottom-view and Fig. 9 a frontview of the toy, Figs. 10 and 11 again show my novel toy in the form of an automobile-toy having a clock-work and turning mechanism similar to the constructions shown in Figs. 7,8 and 9, Fig. 10 being a side-view partly broken away showing in particular the driving and turning mechanism and Fig. 12 a front-view of the toy shown in Fig. 10, and Fig. 11 a top-view taken casing removed. Referring more particularly to the drawings, the toy comprises a casing I! or flu which may be of any desired conformation, a spring-driven clock-work I mounted in said casing, the driven shaft of said clock-work having one running or driving wheel 2 fast thereon, a loosely rotatable running wheel 3, and atransversely positioned turning wheel 4 arranged in front of said pair of wheels 2 and I, said running wheel consisting of rubber, leather, or a similar material ofiering a soft or'adhe'ring surface, or being at least provided with a terial.

My new toy is furthermore equipped at its front part with a supporting finger or supporting surface I of specific conformation to effect an oblique start of the toy. This finger or surface acts as a support for the body of the toy at the front end thereof and is directed more orless transversely to the longitudinal direction of the toy, thus constituting an oblique starting surface ascending in a direction effecting in cooperation with said transverse turning wheel the desired turning or swinging motion to be imparted to the toy, the undermost point of said supporting finger or surface being positioned atv the side of the running wheel which is driven by the clock-work.

The toy will thus rest on the rimning surface in known manner at three points of support, viz. the two running wheels and the supporting finger'or surface I while the transverse turning wheel 4 will be lifted offthe running surface, whenever said supporting finger or surface 5 is .fully contacting with the plane of the running surface and-supported thereby.

The running wheels 2 and 3 are preferably likewise equipped with a rubber rim or tire; in special cases it will also be sufiicient to equip only the driven running wheel 2 with such a rim -or tire.

In the form of construction of the toy as shown in- Figs. 1 and 2 the springdriven clock-work i serves as a carrier for the loosely rotatable small turning wheel I and is mounted in a rear ex- MW was. as

rim or tire made of such a matension of the toy-bodyin such a manner that the wheels 2 and fat the toy-body which is of the form of an automobile are approximately in the same position as in an actual large. automobile. The spring-casing of the clock-work is positioned atthe rear end of said rear extension of the toy-body so that the clock-work will simultaneously serve as a counter-poise or compensating weightfor the front half of the toy-body which consequently is only in a relatively loose sliding contact with the running surface by the intermediary of said supporting finger or surface 5.

The front part of the toy-body is further equipped in addition to said supporting fingeror surface 5 with a pair of supplementary front wheels 8 and 9 mountedvertically displaceable within slotted bearings i4, permitting said wheels to yield in upward direction with respect to the toy-body whenever the toy is lowered at its front end.

Said supporting finger or surface 5 may be made in the form of a transverse ledge, but may also ascend in oblique direction towards the side and towards the rear as indicated in a dotted line in Fig. 1.

In case the toy-vehicle is crossing the margin of the running surface at an acute angle thereto, it may happen that the fixed driv-lng wheel 2 slides off the running surface. In order to cause the toy-vehicle in thiscase to return unto the running surface, one or more driving wheels in, ii of the clock-work or a likewise driven special wheel which is additionally provided for this purpose may be so mounted in the clock-work that said wheels or wheel project downwardly as far as closely to the running surface to come in contact with the latter as soon as the running wheel 2 comes out of full contact therewith.

By reason of the lateral position of these driving wheels i0, ll which serve as auxiliary driving wheels with respect to the longitudinal axis of the turning wheel 4, said driving wheels H), II being also on the side of the driven running wheel 2, will effect the lateral turning of the toy-vehicle, the supporting arm 5 now again ascending the running surface. The supporting arm 5 as shown in the drawings is fastened to the bumper of the automobile-toy, but may also be mounted at any other place on the front part of the toy-body. v

The supporting finger 5 is preferably mounted underneath the body of the toy in a manner to be not visible, when looking upon the toy from above, either vertically or obliquely, in order not to impair the appearance of the toy or the enjoy- 'ment of playing.

jecting toward below to constitute a standing and r driving support, whenever the wheel 2 should slide off the running surface. The front wheels 8 and 9 are mounted movable in slotted bearings If in the toy-body and the rear wheels i5 are simulated as indicated in Fig. 5 by wheel-like members mounted on the wall of the toy-body, said members covering up in lateral direction the driving wheel which projects from the clock-work towards below.

If the running wheels 2 and I of the toy. are mounted in the rear of the toy-body, or if the clock-work is so mounted that the driving-spring is positioned at the forward end thereof so that the toy will thus be given a surplus weight in its front part, the increase of pressure exerted by the supporting finger or surface 5 on the running surface can easily be counter-acted. if a weighted extension is provided at the rear end of the toybody which extension may have the form of an automobile trunk, of a reserve wheel or the like as shown in Figs. 3 and 5.

In all constructions hereinabove described the transverse turning wheel 4 is mounted freely rotatable and positioned in the central plane of the toy-body. The construction shown in Fig. 6 is a modified form of toy representing a mouse in which construction the driven turning wheel 4a is arranged not at the center of the clock work, but laterally thereof, said turning wheel rotating in a direction opposite to that of the running wheel 2a on the other side of the clockwork, said latter wheel being supplemented in its action by the idle counter-wheel 3a positioned at the side of said small turning wheel 4a.

Owing to the opposite direction of rotation of the driven wheel 2a and of the turning wheel 4a a rapid swinging or turning motion of the toy will be safely attained, as soon as the turning wheel comes into proper working contact with the running surface. The surplus .of weight which may eventually arise in a toy-vehicle of the form of a mouse at the front part thereof may be -counter-acted in a simple manner by making the tail |3a of the mouse of a heavy material, for instance of lead, so that an equalization of load may also be attained at the rear end of the toy-body. similarly to the equalization of load in the toy-automobile shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 5 due to the trunk or reserve wheel II at the rear end of the toy-body.

By properly arranging and adjusting the loose running wheel 3a a definite direction of motion may be given to the toy, in spite of the fact that it is driven only at one side and in spite of the supporting arm 5 sliding on the running surface.

According to Figs. 7, 8 and 9 in which the body of the toy represents a mouse, the clock-work i is so mounted in the casing i2a that the spring is positioned in the rear of the clock-work to form itself the rear weight which serves to avoid an excessively strong contact of the front supporting finger 5 with the running surface, said supporting finger being constructed in the present case as an oblique nose. The transverse turning wheel 4 is positively driven by way of the set of gear-wheels 20 and I9 and is obliquely positioned, both, with respect to the longitudinal as well as the lateral direction of the toy-body, so that the running zone of said wheel 4 ascends obliquely from the driven wheel 2 to the opposite loose wheel 3. The process of turning will thus be performed more rapidly, and more particularly within a rel- I atively small circular arc.

The one driving wheel ll of the clock-work may project towards below so that said wheel Ii and therewith the toy will be supported on the running surface, again causing the toy to return unto the running surface by action of rotation of said wheel Ii, whenever the driven wheel of the toy should move beyond said running surface.

The constructions shown in Figs. 10, 11 and 12 comprise essentially the same construction of the clock-work and its mode of mounting it with- 'in the body of' the toy.

In the construction shown in Figs. 10, 11 and 12 the clock-work i together with the turning wheel 4 which is mounted therein obliquely in two directions as well as the downwardly pro- Jecting driving wheel I I is mounted on a baseplate 24 covered up by the casing i2, the supporting finger 5 having the form of a transversely and obliquely ascending mould pressed into the base-plate of the toy-body that is integral with said base-plate.

The base-plate 24 as may be seen particularly from Fig. 11 may further be equipped at its front part with simulated front wheels l5 which, however, during motion of the toy do not act as they are lifted off the running surface. The turning wheel 4 which is mounted obliquely in two directions is rotated by the clock-work likewise by way of the set of gear-wheels l9 and 20 and the rear load constituted by the clock-work will have the effect that the front supporting finger 5 having the form of a mould as described will be sliding along the running surface with but a small pressure thereon.

Mounting the turning wheel obliquely in two directions is preferable but not necessary.

I claim:

1. A wheeled toy having the form of an automobile, animal or the like, comprising a toy-body, a clock-work mounted therein, a pair of running wheels mounted on said toy-body, at least one of said running wheels being in driving connection with said clock-work. a turning wheel arranged in front of said running wheels positioned transversely with respect thereto and in driving connection with said clock-work, and a supporting finger with an obliquely ascendingsurface adapted to form a support for said toy-body and to lift said turning wheel off the running surface, said running wheel being made from rubber, leather or similar soft material adapted to provide sufficient adhesion to the running surface or at least being provided with a rim or tire made of such material.

2. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, in which toy the turning wheel is in positive driving connection with the clock-work by a set of gearwheels.

3. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, in which toy a set of gear-wheels is interposed between the clock-work and the running wheel, whereby the latter is in positive driving connection with said clock-work, said turning wheel being mounted on a shaft which is directed obliquely downward in longitudinal direction of said toy.

4. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, in which toy a set of gear-wheels is interposed between the clock-work and the running wheel, whereby the latter is in positive driving connection with said clock-work, said turning wheel being mounted on a shaft which is directed obliquely, both in longitudinal as well as in transverse direction of the toy.

5. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, in which toy the clock-work is mounted in the rearof the toy-body to act as a counter-poise for the front part thereof for causing said supporting finger to be only in loose sliding contact with the running surface.

6. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, in which toy at least the driven running wheel is provided with a tire of rubber, leather or other soft material.

(ill

7. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, in which toy the clock-work is mounted in the rear of the toy-body to act as a counter-poise for the front part thereof to cause said supporting finger to be only in loose sliding contact with the running surface, said clock-work being positioned with its spring farthest in the rear of said oybody.

8. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, said turning wheel being positioned at the side of a driven running wheel and projecting with its outermost rim as far as closely to the running surface, thus forming a turning support for said toy, whenever said driven running wheel moves beyond said running surface.

9. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, said toy including means forweighting the rear part of the toy-body, said means being provided at the outside of the toy and having the form of a trunk, reserve-wheel or the like in case of an automobiletoy, and having the form of a weighted tail in case of a mouse-toy.

10. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, in which toy the supporting finger is positioned transversely to the axis of the toy-body and of a conformation obliquely ascending in the sense of the direction of the turning motion to be imparted to the toy.

11. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, in which toy the turning wheel is positively geared with said clock-work to rotate with a peripheral velocity which is equal to that of the driven wheel.

12. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, said toy having the form of an automobile and com-- prising members simulating the front and rearwheels thereof, said members being attached to.

the under surface of the toy-body or the casing thereof.

13. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, in which toy the turning wheel is mounted laterally ot the clock-work opposite to the driven running wheel and geared with the clock-work to rotate in opposite direction to the running wheel to impart to the toy a lateral turning motion by action of the opposite direction of rotation of said two wheels, whenever said front supporting finger comes out of full contact with the nmning mace and said turning wheel into contact there- 14. A wheeled toy as specified by claim 1, in which toy the supporting finger is covered up by the upper part of the toy-body, so as to be concealed from view when looking unto the toy from above in vertical or oblique direction.

- HEINRICH MULLER

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2461672 *Dec 11, 1946Feb 15, 1949Alojzy AdamczykMotor propelled toy vehicle
US2606402 *Dec 2, 1948Aug 12, 1952Karl FuchsAutomatically steerable toy vehicle
US2820323 *Sep 9, 1955Jan 21, 1958Reiser RudolfForward running intermittently swinging toy figure
US2881561 *Jan 14, 1957Apr 14, 1959Raze Douglas DPower and steering unit
US4300308 *Apr 23, 1980Nov 17, 1981Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc.Toy vehicle capable of traveling on both its top and bottom surfaces
US8066544Apr 8, 2010Nov 29, 2011Hedeen International, LlcToy apparatus and environment therefor
US20110151745 *Jun 23, 2011Hedeen International, LlcToy apparatus and environment therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/290
International ClassificationA63H11/00, A63H11/10
Cooperative ClassificationA63H11/10
European ClassificationA63H11/10