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Publication numberUS2001709 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1935
Filing dateFeb 27, 1932
Priority dateFeb 27, 1932
Publication numberUS 2001709 A, US 2001709A, US-A-2001709, US2001709 A, US2001709A
InventorsGlenn Davidson
Original AssigneeGlenn Davidson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cigarette mouthpiece or the like
US 2001709 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2l, 1935. G. DAVIDSON CIGARETTE MOUTHPIECE OR THE LIKE Filed Feb. 27, 1932 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 May 21, 1935. G. DAVIDSON CIGARETTE MOUTHPIECE OR THE LIKE Filed Feb'. 27, 1932 3 sheets-sheet 2 May 21, 1935. G. DAVIDSON CIGARETTE MOUTHPIECE 0R THE LIKE 3 Sheefcs-Sheet 3 Filed Feb. 27, 1932 IN VEN-" n R AH'YS Patented May 2l, 1935l UNITED STATES PATENT oFFlcE cream-:Tra MoUTnrmcn on 'rim una Glenn navman, Bloomington, m. Apputauon February 21, 193e, sex-n1 No. 595,509

15 claim; (ci rs1-sz) 7 This invention relates to smokers mouthpieces,

especially cigarette mouthpieces of the type comprising a plug or insert within that end of the cigarette which is received in the mouth, and te the method of and apparatus for making such mouthpieces, the present application being a continuation, in part and with respect to common subject matter, of a prior application iiled February 11, 1930, Serial No. 427,511.

Such mouthpieces or inserts have been used to some extent for preventing the tobacco from coming into direct contact with the mouth, for avoiding the waste oftobacco otherwise contained in the end of the cigarette which is thrown away, and, more particularly, and when composed of fire resistant material, for the purpose of preventing the smoldering of the discarded end and consequent danger of iire. While the desirability of such devices is recognized, particularly for the purpose last referred to, they have not come into general use, partly because as heretofore devised their manufacture has involved considerable trouble and expense, adding materially to the cost of the cigarette, and partly because they have resulted in changes in the characteristics of the conventional cigarette to which the public has become accustomed.

'I'he present invention has for one object to provide a mouthpiece or insert of this general character which can be produced in quantities and incorporated with the cigarettes during the manufacture of the latter by commercially practicable methods without adding to the cost of thecigarettes, and which will permit the cigarette to draw naturally and will, when inserted between i the lips of the user, be substantially indistinguishable to the senses from the ordinary cigarette to which the smoker has become accustomed. Another object of the invention is to provide a continuous process or method by which such mouthpieces can be produced at negligible expense, and which is of such a nature as to permit a wide variation in the characteristics of the mouthpieces produced in accordance with the demands of the trade. A further object of the invention is to provide suitable mechanism by which such process or method can be readily practiced.

The foregoing and other objects of the invention will best be understood from the following description of certain embodiments thereof and the methods of and apparatus for producing the same, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings. It will be recognized, however, that the 'i particular constructions and operations described and shown have been chosen for purposes of exemplliication merely, and that the invention, as defined by the claims hereunto appended, may be otherwise embodied and practiced without departure from the spirit and scope thereof. 5

In said drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view, partly broken away, of a cigarette embodying the invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of they mouthpiece or insert shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the filler for the insert shown in Fig.- 2, showing the same before being compressed and enclosed by its wrapper.

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic side elevation, and

Fig'. 5 is a diagrammatic perspective view, part- 15 ly broken away, illustrating the method of and apparatus for producing the filler shown in Fig.

3 and assembling the same with its wrapper as lshown in Fig. 2.

Figs. 6, 7 and 8 are views similar to Fig. 2 illustrating variations of the invention.

Figs. 9 and 10 are views corresponding to Figs. 2 and 5, respectively, illustrating another variation.

Figs. 11 and 12 are similar further variation.

Fig. 13 is a sectional perspective view illustrating a modification of the folding rolls shown in Fig. 5 to adapt them for use with crepe paper.

Figs. 14, 15 and 16 are views, corresponding respectively to Figs. 2, 4 and 5, illustrating a still further variation.

Fig. 17 is a perspective viewshowing a modiiied folding means.

In Fig. 1 is shown a cigarette having the usual 35 wrapper I5 and tobaco-iiller I6 and also having at one end within the Wrapper I5 a plug or insert Il.

In Fig. 2, the plug or insert I1 comprises a cylindrical wrapper I8, preferably of paper, enclosing 4o a ller I9 in the form of a strip of paper or other equivalent material folded upon itself alternately in opposite directions, the folds being of progressively decreasing width from the center toward the opposite ends or rather the lateral edges of said illler and being so graduated that, when compressed to the extent shown, the perimeter of the filler will assume the cylindrical form of the wrapper, each i'old constituting a substantially complete chord of the cross section of the plug and engaging said wrapper at both lateral edges.

In Fig. 6 is shown a illler |90 which is substantially like the filler I9 above described with the exception that certain of the folds are somewhat views illustrating a 25 sof narrower than the width required to constitute a complete chord of the circle in order to provide distinct air passages 23, thereby permitting a greater number of folds and a more firm and compact insert. If" desired the air passages 2l may be defined by tubular extensions 230 formed on the adjacent folds of the filler |96, as shown in Fig. 7, by making said adjacent folds of a sufflciently excess length.

In Fig. 8 is shown filler.y III, which is similar to ller' I9 in Fig. 2 except that the folds are rounded instead of being sharply creased. Buch an insert can be made as flrm and compact as those shown in Figs. 6 and '1, the rounded folds providing a multiplicity of small longitudinal air passages as well as adding distinctly lto the resiliency of the insert.

The filler I9 in Fig. 2, |80 inFlg. 6, III inFlg. 8, and |95 in Fig. 'I can, in accordance with the present invention, be easily and cheaply produced by a simple, continuous process from a web of material of indefinite length without any rolling or analogous operations on the individual fillers. Thus, as shown in Fig. 4, a web of paper 20 drawn from a roll I I or other source may, if desired, be slightly dampened, may be passed longitudinally between properly corrugated,

rollers 2 I, which may have axial recesses or passages 22 for the reception of suitable heating velements or for the circulation of a suitable heating medium. In the case of filler I9 in Fig. 2, the cooperating corrugations of the rollers 2| are so formed and proportioned as to produce longitudi-A nal folds of widths so graduated transversely of the web 20, that when said web is subsequently cut transversely to form the individual fillers, as hereinafter explained, the folds of said individual fillers will be of less width adjacent the ends or rather'the lateral edges thereof than at the center, as above described. It isv believed that the modification ofthe rollers 2| needed to produce the necessary folds to form ller |90 in Fig. 6, ISI in Fig. 8, and |95 in Fig. 'l will be obvious without further description or illustration. The folds of said web may be compressed into the desired form by passingthe folded web, after the latter leaves the rollers 2|, between converging guides 23, as shown most clearly in Fig. 5, and the wrapper I8 then placed therearound and secured by means of a suitable adhesive in substantially the same way that the paper wrappers are placed around the tobacco in forming the cigarettes themselves. If desired, the wrapper may be formed of threads or narrow strips of paper or other material woven around the filler, or the wrapper may be spirally wound around the filler and fastened with adhesive. The mechanical means for accomplishing these various methods of wrapping are well known. If desired, feed rollers 21 may ,be employed to assist in drawing the folded web through the guides 23 and feeding the work forwardly. 'I'he resulting cylindrical stock, generally indicated at 26, in Figs. ,4 and 5, may then be cut transversely, as indicated at III, to the desired lengths which may thereafter be incorporated with tobacco to form the cigarettes, as shown in Fig. l, in any suitable or preferred manner.

In Figs. 9 and 10 is illustrated a variation of the general folding plan above described and shown in the preceding figures. 'Ihe rollers 2|2 for folding the web to lforxn the filler |92 shown in these gures are so corrugated as to form a plurality of groups of folds, said folds being of different yvidths. being correspondingly and symmetof supply, and which rically arranged in the several groups. and being preferably alternately sharp and rounded as indicated at 33 and 34 respectively. The guide 232 is so constructed as to bend the folded web into circular form in cross section with the sharp folds 33 directed inwardly toward the center and the rounded folds 34 disposed at the periphery. Said guide 232 is of complete' tubular form and may be provided with interior guiding flns 36 to assist in the even disposition of the folds.

.In Figs. 11 and 12 is illustrated a'. somewhatsimilar folding plan wherein the rollers 2I3 are so corrugated that the two lateral halves of the web are each folded substantially as in the form of the invention shown in Fig. 8, these two halves being then folded upon one another about the longitudinal median line 36 of the web by the tubular guide 233 to form a filler |83 of the configuration shown. The tubular n desired, also be provided with a guiding similar to the fins 36 shown in Fig. 10.

In all of the embodiments and modes of practicing the invention above described, the web of guide 233 may, if y material is folded longitudinally in accordance with some definite plan before being gathered and compressed laterally into cylindrical form, fold ing rollers being shown in each instance although it will be obvious that at least some of the plans of folding can be equally well accomplished by drawing the web through fixed guides of suitable form. Such a construction is shown in Fig. 17, in which the fixed guides are indicated at I2Iv.

If desired, the paper of which the fillers are, formed may be creped, in which case it is desirable that the folding rollers be such as to avoid compressing the paper in the direction of its thickness and thereby destroying the creping. In Fig. 13 is shown a pair of rollers 2I0 whose corrugations are cut away, as indicated at 3|, to avoid compressing the paperbetween the lines of fold and a're rounded at their edges, as shown at 32, to provide rounded folds as in the form of filler illustrated in Fig. 8. i

Definite folding can, however, be entirely omitted in the case of certain materials, as for example crepe paper. Such paper, while relatively sti and substantially inelastic in one direction, that is to say, the direction in which the crinkles or rugations extend, is extremely flexible and elastic, in fact substantially plastic, in the direction transverse of the rugations and may be readily shaped into the desired form without definite folding. Thus, for example, as shown in Figs. 14 to 16, a web 204 of crepe paper having its rugations disposed longitudinally may be drawn from the roll II by the feed rolls 21 or equivalent feeding means through a tubular funnel-shaped guide 234 so as to cause the same to be gathered into more or less haphazard convolutions to form a filler |94. Such a flller can be made of any desired density in accordance with the weight of paper and width of web employed. This mode of practicing the invention, while particularly applicable to crepe paper, is not to be understood as necessarily limited thereto, as there are undoubtedly other materials which are capable of being successfully handled in substantially the same way. y

Preferably the paper or other material constituting or treated as to be re resistant or self-extinguishing, and is suitably sized. In addition, the material may be treated by coating or, in the case of soft sized paper, saturating the same with an infusion made from tobacco, tobacco stems,V cocoa,

the above described llers is so constituted aow cinnamon, menthol or other flavoring materials.

At all events, it will be understood that, by employing a suitable quality of paper or other material, and a suitable number of folds (l. e. proper width of web stock to form the filler) and folding longitudinally, that is longitudinally of the mouthpiece, the insert may be made to have substantially the same firmness and to impose substantially the same resistance to the passage of air as the tobacco which it replaces, so that it will feel to the mouth substantially like an ordinary cigarette and will draw with substantially the same freedom or afford a draft substantially no greater than that of a corresponding portion of tobacco ller which is replaced thereby.

It will be seen that the type of ller described above is such as readily lends itself to modifica.- tion in these respects, since the character of the paper or other material and the number of folds can be varied Within wide limits to vary the firmness of the mouthpiece or the drawing qualities thereof without any substantial change in general design, For example, by using a comparatively soft paper, the feeling of an ordinary untipped cigarette can be duplicated, while by using relatively stiff, hard-sized paper, the feeling of a gold or cork tipped cigarette can be duplicated. If desired, the filler may be formed from a relatively soft web and the wrapper from a stiffer material.

It will be seen that an essential principle of the method constituting an important feature of the invention above described resides in the provision of a continuous process for forming an indefinite length of mouthpiece stock, from which the desired lengths can be out, which process, in its broadest aspect, consists in feeding a web of suitable material and of indefinite length longitudinally while gathering or compressing the same laterally into substantially cylindrical form, either with or without definite preliminary folding. The process lends itself to considerable variation of choice of materials and in the particular plan of folding, Where such is employed, in order to provide mouthpieces of any desired characteristics.

The process is an extremely simple one and by its practice cigarettes having mouthpieces of the desired characteristics may be produced at no substantial increase in cost beyond that of the stock employed, which is more than offset by the saving in tobacco replaced.

It will be understood that the inserts or plugs may be incorporated with the cigarettes in any suitable way by substituting them at the proper points for the tobacco in the ordinary operation of manufacturing cigarettes.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A mouthpiece for cigarettes and the like, comprising a tobacco replacing ller imposing a resistance to the passage of the smoke substantially equal to that of a corresponding portion of replaced tobacco and being formed of material laid in folds longitudinally, such folds varying in width.

2. A mouthpiece for cigarettes and the like, comprising a tobacco-replacing filler mass offering substantially no less resistance to the passage of smoke than the replaced portion of tobacco filler and being formed of material folded longitudinally and compressed together to leave small channels for the passage of smoke in the longitudinal direction such folds varying in width.

3. A cigarette having at one end within the wrapper an insert affording a draft substantially no greater than that through a corresponding portion of tobacco filler replaced thereby and comprising material folded longitudinally and compressed together to leave small channels for the passage of smoke in the longitudinal direction.

4. A cigarette having at one end .Within the wrapper an insert affording a draft substantially no greater than that through a corresponding portion of tobacco filler replaced thereby and comprising material folded longitudinally and held compressed together by an independent Wrapper element to leave small channels for the passage of smoke in the longitudinal direction.

5. A cigarette having at one end Within the wrapper an insert including a. strip of material folded upon itself alternately in opposite directions, -the lateral folds of the strip being of less width than those at the center.

6. A cigarette having at one end within the wrapper an insert including a strip of relatively stiff, fire-resistant material folded upon itself alternately in opposite directions, the lateral folds of the strip being of less width than those at the center.

7. A cigarette having at one end within the Wrapper an insert including a. strip of material folded upon itself alternately in opposite direc tions, the folds being of progressively decreasing width from the center toward the opposite edges of the strip.

8. A cigarette having at one end within the wrapper an insert affording a draft substantially no greater than that through a corresponding portion of tobacco ller replaced thereby and comprising relatively thin crinkled paper folded longitudinally and held compressed together by an independent wrapper element to leave small channels for the passage of smoke in the longitudinal direction.

9. A cigarette having at one end within the wrapper an insert including a strip of material folded upon itself alternately inA opposite directions, each of the folds constituting a complete chord of the cross-section of the insert.

10. A mouthpiece for cigarettes and the like, including "a strip of material folded upon itself alternately in opposite directions and enclosed in a substantially cylindrical Wrapper, both lateral edges of each of said folds engaging said wrapper.

11. A mouthpiece for cigarettes and the like, including a filler in the form of a strip of material folded upon itself alternately in opposite directions, and a substantially cylindrical wrapper enclosing said i'lller, the lateral folds of the strip being of less width than those at the center.

12. A mouthpiece for cigarettes and the like, including a filler in the form of a strip of relatively stiff, non-absorbent fire-resistant material folded upon itself alternately in opposite directions, and a substantially cylindrical wrapper enclosingsaid filler, the lateral folds of the strip being of less width than those at the center.

13. A mouthpiece for cigarettes and the like, including a filler in the form of a strip of material folded upon itself alternately in opposite directions, and a substantially cylindrical wrapper enclosing said filler, the folds being of progressively decreasing width from the center toward the opposite edges of the strip.

14. An intermediate product in the manufacture of cigarettes and the like, comprising a mouthpiece rod having a continuous filler of material; folded longitudinally and compressed together to impose a resistance to the passage of smoke substantially equal to that of a tobacco cigarette and adapted to be cut into a relatively indefinite number of mouthpieces.

15. An intermediate product in the manufacture of cigarettes and the like, comprising a mouthpiece rod having a continuous illler of relatively indenite length of one piece' material, folded longitudinally and compressedy together to impose a resistance to the passage of smoke substantially equal to that of a tobacco cigarette and adapted to be cut into a relatively indefinite number of mouthpieces.

GLENN DAVIDSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3144024 *Apr 11, 1960Aug 11, 1964Darby Food CorpImpregnated filter means for tobacco articles
US3150668 *Feb 12, 1960Sep 29, 1964LassiterCigarette
US3161557 *Apr 28, 1955Dec 15, 1964Muller Paul AApparatus for making an endless filter string for cigarette filter plugs
US3205791 *May 22, 1963Sep 14, 1965Brown & Williamson TobaccoMouthpieces for cigarettes
US3290704 *Feb 12, 1965Dec 13, 1966United Felt CompanyPillow and method of making same
US3396733 *Mar 23, 1966Aug 13, 1968Lorillard Co PCigarette tip
US3966912 *Aug 1, 1975Jun 29, 1976Rothmans Of Pall Mall (Australia) LimitedMethod of preparing tobacco smoke filter
US4252591 *May 2, 1979Feb 24, 1981Pall CorporationCorrugating apparatus and process
US4531341 *Jul 16, 1982Jul 30, 1985Enviro-Spray Systems IncorporatedCan stuffer and method
US4611457 *Mar 20, 1985Sep 16, 1986Enviro-Spray Systems IncorporatedCan stuffer and method
US4807809 *Feb 12, 1988Feb 28, 1989R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyRod making apparatus for smoking article manufacture
US4881358 *Jul 9, 1984Nov 21, 1989Shampoo Sponge International B.V.Method of packaging articles of a compressible material
US4889143 *May 14, 1986Dec 26, 1989R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette rods and filters containing strands provided from sheet-like materials
US4903714 *Aug 25, 1987Feb 27, 1990R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanySmoking article with improved mouthend piece
US5025814 *May 12, 1987Jun 25, 1991R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette filters containing strands of tobacco-containing materials
US5044381 *Apr 2, 1990Sep 3, 1991Thomas Annie RClosed cigarette filter
US5076295 *Sep 29, 1989Dec 31, 1991R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette filter
US5105834 *Nov 6, 1990Apr 21, 1992R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette and cigarette filter element therefor
US5246017 *Jun 5, 1992Sep 21, 1993R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette and cigarette filter element therefor
US5396909 *Dec 16, 1993Mar 14, 1995R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanySmoking article filter
US7963899Jul 13, 2001Jun 21, 2011The Proctor & Gamble CompanyContinuous in-line pleating apparatus and process
US20120302416 *Aug 9, 2012Nov 29, 2012R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyMethod of forming a rod for use in the manufacture of cigarette filters
DE1176039B *Apr 4, 1962Aug 13, 1964Tabak & Ind MaschVorrichtung zum Strangformen einer Filter-materialbahn
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/361, 493/45, 493/433, 264/287, 156/462, 156/294, 53/451, 53/429, 156/227, 493/50, 156/204, 53/520
International ClassificationA24D3/00, A24D3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA24D3/0245
European ClassificationA24D3/02F5