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Publication numberUS20020007590 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/747,336
Publication dateJan 24, 2002
Filing dateDec 21, 2000
Priority dateJun 15, 1999
Also published asUS6725599, US20030182857
Publication number09747336, 747336, US 2002/0007590 A1, US 2002/007590 A1, US 20020007590 A1, US 20020007590A1, US 2002007590 A1, US 2002007590A1, US-A1-20020007590, US-A1-2002007590, US2002/0007590A1, US2002/007590A1, US20020007590 A1, US20020007590A1, US2002007590 A1, US2002007590A1
InventorsPerry Just
Original AssigneePerry Just
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plant container liners
US 20020007590 A1
Abstract
A liner (80) for a plant container includes one or more sheets of partially compressed, dried or at least substantially dry, reconstitutible sphagnum moss. The liner (80) is formed into a 3-dimensional shape having a top opening and one or more walls extending in an upstanding configuration towards the opening, the walls having a body and top edges 86 defined along the top opening. The top edges 86 are compressed to a lesser degree than the body of the walls. A blank (84) for forming the liner (80) and a method of forming the liner or the blank (84) is also disclosed.
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Claims(65)
What is claimed is:
1. A liner for a plant container including one or more sheets of partially compressed, dried or at least substantially dry, reconstitutible sphagnum moss formed into a 3-dimensional shape having a top opening and one or more walls extending in an upstanding configuration towards the opening, the walls having a body and top edges defined along the top opening wherein the top edges are compressed to a lesser degree than the body of the walls.
2. The liner as claimed in claim 1 made from a blank comprising a base portion with a unitary arcuate wall portion, the arcuate wall portion being adapted to fold around the base portion to form a continuous wall with overlapping side edges, the one or more walls of the liner being defined by the unitary arcuate wall portion.
3. The liner as claimed in claim 2 wherein the overlapping side edges of the arcuate wall portion are not compressed to the same degree as the body of the wall portion.
4. The liner as claimed in claim 2 wherein the base portion has a peripheral edge and a body portion, the peripheral edge not being compressed to the same degree as the body portion.
5. The liner as claimed in claim 1 being partially reconstituted.
6. The liner as claimed in claim 5 wherein the exterior is partially reconstituted with a liquid which comprises substantially water and the interior of the body of the one or more walls is substantially unreconstituted.
7. The liner as claimed in claim 6 wherein the reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 113 to 331 g/m2 of the exterior surface of the liner.
8. The liner as claimed in claim 6 wherein the reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 113-173 g/M2 of the exterior surface of the liner and the liner is packaged to minimise dehydration.
9. The liner as claimed in claim 6 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 241-331 g/m2 of the exterior surface of the liner.
10. The liner as claimed in claim 9 made from loose sphagnum moss having a pre-compression density of approximately 925 g/m2 of the area of the one ore more sheets making up the liner.
11. The liner as claimed in claim 10 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid of about 286 g/m2 of the exterior surface of the liner.
12. The liner as claimed in claim 6 further including a stiffening insert against the interior of the body of the one or more walls.
13. The liner as claimed in claim 12 wherein the stiffening insert is comprised of cardboard to protect the body of the one or more walls of the liner.
14. The liner as claimed in claim 10 further including a stiffening insert against the interior of the body of the one or more walls.
15. The liner as claimed in claim 14 wherein the stiffening insert is comprised of cardboard to protect the body of the one or more walls of the liner.
16. The liner as claimed in claim 1 made from a blank comprising a base portion with a unitary arcuate wall portion, the arcuate wall portion being adapted to fold around the base portion to form a continuous wall with overlapping side edges such that the one or more walls of the liner is defined by the unitary arcuate wall portion and wherein the overlapping side edges of the arcuate wall portion are compressed to a lesser degree than the body of the walls, the exterior of the liner being partially reconstituted with a liquid comprising substantially water and the interior of the body of the one or more walls being substantially unreconstituted, the liner further including a stiffening insert against the interior of the body of the one or more walls with a gap being provided in the insert where the side edges of the arcuate wall portion overlap.
17. The liner as claimed in claim 16 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in range 241-331 g/m2 of the exterior surface of the liner.
18. The liner as claimed in claim 17 made from loose sphagnum moss having a pre-compression density of approximately 925 g/m2 of the area of the one or more sheets making up the liner.
19. The liner as claimed in claim 1 wherein the liner is received in a plant container in the form of a wire basket.
20. The liner as claimed in claim 19 wherein the top edges of the liner extend beyond the top of the basket.
21. The liner as claimed in claim 16 wherein the liner is received in a plant container in the form of a wire basket.
22. The liner as claimed in claim 21 wherein the top edges of the liner extend beyond the top of the basket.
23. A blank configured to form a liner for a plant container, the blank comprising one or more sheets of partially compressed, dried or at least substantially dry sphagnum moss configured such that when the sheets are formed into a 3-dimensional form of the liner, the liner has a top opening and one or more walls extending in an upstanding configuration towards the opening, with the walls having a body and top edges defined along the top opening wherein the edges of the blank corresponding to the top edges in the 3-dimensional form of the liner are compressed to a lesser degree than the part of the blank corresponding to the body of the walls.
24. The blank as claimed in claim 23 comprising a base portion with a unitary arcuate wall portion, the arcuate wall portion being adapted to fold around the base portion to form a continuous wall with overlapping side edges, the continuous wall defining the one or more walls of the 3-dimensional form of the liner.
25. The blank as claimed in claim 24 wherein the side edges of the arcuate wall portion which overlap in the 3-dimensional form of the liner are not compressed to the same degree as the part of the blank corresponding to the body of the walls.
26. The blank as claimed in claim 24 wherein the base portion has a peripheral edge and a body portion and the peripheral edge is not compressed to the same degree as the body portion.
27. The blank as claimed in claim 23 being partially reconstituted.
28. The blank as claimed in claim 27 wherein a first side of the blank corresponding to the exterior of the 3-dimensional form of the liner is partially reconstituted with a liquid comprising substantially water and the other side corresponding to the interior of the body of the one or more walls in the 3-dimensional form of the liner is substantially unreconstituted.
29. The blank as claimed in claim 28 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved by using an amount of liquid in the range of 113 to 331 g/m2 of the surface of said first side of the blank.
30. The blank as claimed in claim 29 wherein the reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 113-173 g/m2 of the surface of the first side of the blank and the blank is packaged to minimise dehydration.
31. The blank as claimed in claim 29 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 241-331 g/m2 of the surface of the first side of the blank.
32. The blank as claimed in claim 31 made from loose sphagnum moss having a pre-compression density of approximately 925 g/m2 of the area of the one ore more sheets making up the blank.
33. The blank as claimed in claim 32 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid of about 286 g/m2 of the surface of the first side of the blank.
34. A mould for use in forming the liner as claimed in claim 1 wherein the liner is formed from a blank and the mould comprises a female mould part and a male mould part wherein the male mould part is shaped to achieve the lesser degree of compression along the edges of the blank corresponding to the top edges of the 3 dimensional liner.
35. The mould as claimed in claim 34 wherein the male mould part is smaller than the female mould part in order that the top edges of the blank corresponding to the top edges in the finished blank are substantially uncompressed by the mould.
36. A method of forming the liner as claimed in claim 1 including:
compressing loose sphagnum moss in a mould to form a blank wherein the mould comprises a female mould part and a male mould part, the male mould part being shaped to achieve the lesser degree of compression along the edges of the blank corresponding to the top edges of the 3 dimensional liner; and
folding the blank into the 3-dimensional shape of the liner.
37. The method as claimed in claim 36 wherein the male mould part is smaller than the female mould part in order that the top edges of the blank corresponding to the top edges in the 3-dimensional liner are substantially uncompressed by the mould.
38. The method as claimed in claim 36 further including partially reconstituting with a liquid comprising substantially water, the side of the blank corresponding to the exterior in the 3-dimensional form of the liner.
39. The method as claimed in claim 36 further including partially reconstituting with a liquid comprising substantially water, the exterior of the formed 3-dimensional liner.
40. The method as claimed in claim 39 wherein the interior of the body of the one or more walls is substantially unreconstituted.
41. The method as claimed in claim 38 wherein the reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 113 to 331 g/m2 of the said side of the blank.
42. The method as claimed in claim 39 wherein the reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 113 to 331 g/m2 of the exterior surface of the liner.
43. The method as claimed in claim 41 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 241-331 g/m2 of the said side of the blank.
44. The method as claimed in claim 42 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 241-331 g/m2 of the exterior surface of the liner.
45. The method as claimed in claim 43 wherein the loose sphagnum moss has a density of approximately 925 g/m2 of the area of the blank.
46. The method as claimed in claim 44 wherein the loose sphagnum moss has a density of approximately 925 g/m2 of the area of the blank.
47. The method as claimed in claim 36 further including inserting a stiffening insert against the interior of the body of the one or more walls of the 3-dimensional form of the liner.
48. A method of forming the blank as claimed in claim 23 including:
compressing loose sphagnum moss in a mould to form the blank wherein the mould comprises a female mould part and a male mould part, the male mould part being shaped to achieve the lesser degree of compression along the edges of the blank corresponding to the top edges of the 3 dimensional liner.
49. The method as claimed in claim 48 wherein the male mould part is smaller than the female mould part in order that the edges of the blank corresponding to the top edges in the 3-dimensional liner are substantially uncompressed by the mould.
50. The method as claimed in claim 49 further including partially reconstituting with a liquid comprising substantially water, the side of the blank corresponding to the exterior in the 3-dimensional form of the liner.
51. The method as claimed in claim 50 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 113 to 331 g/m2 of said side of the blank.
52. The method as claimed in claim 51 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 241-331 g/m2 of the said side of the blank.
53. The method as claimed in claim 43 wherein the loose sphagnum moss has a density of approximately 925 g/m2 of the area of the blank.
54. A combination plant container and liner wherein the liner comprises one or more sheets of dried or at least substantially dry, reconstitutible sphagnum moss, at least part of which is compressed, the liner being partially reconstituted on the exterior and supported by the plant container, the combination further including a stiffening insert.
55. The combination plant container and liner as claimed in claim 54 wherein the liner is in the form having a base and one or more walls extending upwardly from the base wherein the majority of the interior of the one or more walls is substantially unreconstituted.
56. The combination plant container and liner as claimed in claim 54 wherein the reconstitution is achieved using a liquid comprising substantially water, the amount being in the range 113 g/m2 to 331 g/m2 of the exterior surface of the liner.
57. The combination plant container and liner as claimed in claim 56 wherein the reconstitution is achieved using an amount of liquid in the range of 113 -173 g/m2 of the exterior surface of the liner and the combination is packaged to minimise dehydration.
58. The combination plant container and liner as claimed in claim 56 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved by an amount of liquid in the range of 241-331 g/m2 of the exterior surface of the liner.
59. The combination plant container and liner as claimed in claim 58 made from loose sphagnum moss having a pre-compression density of approximately 925 g/m2 per area of the sheets making up the liner.
60. The combination plant container and liner as claimed in claim 59 wherein the partial reconstitution is achieved using at about 286 g/m2 of the exterior surface of the liner.
61. The combination plant container and liner as claimed in claim 54 wherein the stiffening insert is comprised of cardboard.
62. A liner for a plant container including one or more sheets of partially compressed, dried or at least substantially dry, reconstitutible sphagnum moss formed into a 3-dimensional shape having one or more walls extending in an upstanding configuration wherein the liner is partially reconstituted on at least the exterior of the or each wall such that in the or each wall, the ratio of the thickness of the partially reconstituted moss to the thickness of unreconstituted moss is in the range 7:10 to 7:25.
63. The liner as claimed in claim 62 wherein the range is 7:15 to 7:25.
64. The liner as claimed in claim 63 wherein the overall thickness of the liner prior to reconstitution is 3 to 8 mm.
65. The liner as claimed in claim 64 wherein the overall thickness of the liner prior to reconstitution 4 to 7 mm.
Description

[0001] This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. application Ser. No. 09/372,291, filed Aug. 11, 1999 which for purposes of disclosure is incorporated herein by specific reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] This invention relates to plant container liners or blanks therefore. In particular, although not exclusively, the invention relates to sphagnum moss liners for plant containers such as hanging baskets, especially those baskets in the form of skeletal containers.

BACKGROUND TO THE INVENTION

[0003] Because of its unique water retaining properties, and pleasant appearance as a natural plant substance, sphagnum moss has traditionally been a favoured material for use in conjunction with floral arrangements and related horticultural activities.

[0004] Traditionally, sphagnum moss has been sold mostly in a dried state but sometimes in a wet state, but generally in a natural loose form in which each filament of the moss plant is separate and distinguishable.

[0005] In recent decades, a new technology has developed in the sphagnum moss industry. This is the use of pressure to compress the loose moss in a press into compact sheet form. These sheets are of various thickness, usually from 2 or 3 mm to about 7 mm. They are somewhat like cardboard in flexibility and look somewhat like particle board in texture.

[0006] In its traditional loose form, sphagnum moss has always been associated with hanging baskets. One reason for this is its particular ability to absorb and retain water up to and exceeding 20 times its own weight. Another is its natural and aesthetically pleasing appearance.

[0007] The most common traditional method of using sphagnum moss to line hanging baskets is to place some loose moss in the bottom of a wire hanging basket, then cover the moss with a little potting mix. After this the basket is gradually filled, firstly by building up the outer layer of sphagnum moss around the outside of the basket and secondly by holding it in place with a little more soil and potting mix. This process is repeated several times until the lining of sphagnum moss reaches right to the upper rim of the hanging basket.

[0008] This is obviously a very labour intensive task. For this reason it has mostly been performed at home by the enthusiastic gardener, and by staff in some garden centres. In this form, hanging baskets with a layer of sphagnum moss directly inside the wire basket can be made available only when they are filed with soil and potting mix, because it is the soil and potting mix which holds the outer lining of loose filaments of moss in place.

[0009] It is evident that there is an extremely limited scope for selling sphagnum moss lined hanging baskets in this form. The labour content in filling them is very high. In addition the basket would need to be regularly watered to keep the potting mix and the sphagnum moss moist.

[0010] For these reasons, sphagnum lined hanging baskets filled in this way would normally have to be made and sold in the same garden centre. Such articles could not be manufactured on a large scale using technology and production machinery and then transported in bulk nationally and internationally to many retail outlets. Consequently only very small numbers of such sphagnum lined baskets are made up in this way.

[0011] One company in USA has taken a step forward in this regard and created a sphagnum moss lined hanging basket which can much more readily be transported in cartons as freight, or even posted in the mail, which makes them much more marketable than the previously mentioned type. In these, filaments of loose dry sphagnum moss are fixed onto the outside of the basket with very fine filament or wire. This means that no soil or potting mix is needed to hold the sphagnum moss in place.

[0012] However, the process of sewing the filaments or moss onto the outside of the basket is very time consuming and keeps this type of moss lining within the category of a hand crafted item. As such, this type of liner will always be relatively expensive, limited in numbers, and therefore a speciality item.

[0013] One New Zealand company also markets a compressed sphagnum moss product formed as a blank shaped like a Maltese cross. When placed inside a hanging basket, the edges fold up and contour to the shape of the basket. A disadvantage of a liner in this form is that initially at least, the liner does not conform satisfactorily to the shape of the curved hanging basket.

[0014] Common features of known compact sphagnum liners are:

[0015] 1 They are both presented to the public in flat, one dimensional form.

[0016] 2 Both must be placed inside a hanging basket before they can assume and retain the three dimensional shape of the basket.

[0017] 3 Both are in untreated compacted sheet form and bear little resemblance to sphagnum moss.

[0018] 4 Both have to be assembled by the purchaser according to instructions supplied.

[0019] Extensive market research conducted on our behalf concerning basket liners made up of flat sections of compacted sphagnum moss shows that unless there has been a considerable amount of prior instruction and education, a large proportion of the general public and the gardening public are not aware that:

[0020] such flat shaped pieces of compacted sphagnum moss are in fact basket liners:

[0021] such a smooth surfaced, cardboard-like substance is in fact sphagnum moss.

[0022] In addition, the public needs instruction as to how such objects should be assembled into their end form as basket liners. In particular, a great deal of care and attention is required to manipulate the blanks to enable them to fit the containers. If the dry compacted sphagnum moss liners are bent to suit the contour of the containers, this leads to cracking. A comparison would be like trying to mould a sheet of balsa wood to fit into a bucket. The cracking results in breaking of the moss fibres themselves. This reduces the fibre length of the moss and the moss in and around the cracks may be of insufficient strength to effectively bind and hold the liner together once filled with soil. This can lead to unattractive holes in the moss with consequent loss of soil through the holes. Accordingly, it is necessary to gently wet the sheets of compressed sphagnum moss before manipulating it into the plant containers. Furthermore, the customer ought to take care with the manner in which the water is applied to the liners. If the temperature of the water is too high ie in excess of 25 C. or the pressure to great, the user can easily blow a hole in the liner. Consequently, the degree of care required to manipulate the prior art liners may be viewed as very high, perhaps leading to wastage or excessive difficulty by the end user.

[0023] Consequently, expensive and extensive advertising and promotional material, and special training of shop sales persons at every point of sale has been necessary to combat the fact that many people do not know:

[0024] what such objects are and what they are for;

[0025] what they are made of;

[0026] how they are to be assembled.

[0027] In spite of all this instruction, which does increase the price unnecessarily, many people still pass them by because they do not know what they are, and do not realise how they make up into a basket liner.

[0028] As a result, these liners have been observed in sales outlets being progressively moved into obscure positions of display where they gather dust.

[0029] It is an object of the present invention to provide a plant container liner or a blank therefor, which will address at least some of the foregoing problems or at least provide the public with a useful choice over liners/blanks at present available.

STATEMENTS OF THE INVENTION

[0030] In accordance with a first aspect of the present invention there is provided a liner for a plant container including one or more sheets of partially compressed, dried or at least substantially dry, reconstitutible sphagnum moss formed into a 3-dimensional shape having a top opening and one or more walls extending in an upstanding configuration towards the opening, the walls having a body and top edges defined along the top opening wherein the top edges are compressed to a lesser degree than the body of the walls.

[0031] In accordance with a second aspect of the present invention there is provided A blank configured to form a liner for a plant container, the blank comprising one or more sheets of partially compressed, dried or at least substantially dry sphagnum moss configured such that when the sheets are formed into a 3-dimensional form of the liner, the liner has a top opening and one or more walls extending in an upstanding configuration towards the opening, with the walls having a body and top edges defined along the top opening wherein the edges of the blank corresponding to the top edges in the 3-dimensional form of the liner are compressed to a lesser degree than the part of the blank corresponding to the body of the walls.

[0032] Each of the blanks to form the liner may be compressed in an individual mould having a female mould part and a male mould part. The male mould part may be shaped to achieve a lesser degree of compression along the edges of the blank corresponding to the top opening of the liner. In a most preferred form, the male mould part may be smaller than the female mould part so that the edges of the blank corresponding to the top opening are substantially uncompressed in the finished blank. The male mould part may be further reduced in size to create additional edges of the blank which are substantially uncompressed. In a most preferred form of the invention, the shape of the blank comprises a base portion with a unitary arcuate wall portion, the arcuate portion being adapted to fold around the base portion to form a continuous wall in the 3-dimensional form of the liner. The overlapping edges of the arcuate wall portion may also be not compressed to the same degree as the body of the liner. Additionally, the peripheral edge of the base portion may also be not compressed to the same degree as the body of the liner.

[0033] To further enhance the appearance of the liner or blank, the liner or blank may be partially reconstituted. Preferably, only one side is partially reconstituted. In the 3-dimensional form of the liner, preferably the outer side is partially reconstituted. The degree of reconstitution may be in the range of 113 g/m2 to 331 g/m2. Where the degree of partial reconstitution is in the lower range ie 113-173 g/m2 then the liner or blank may be enclosed in a sealed package to prevent dehydration. It will be appreciated that a high level of partial reconstitution could weaken the structural integrity of the 3-dimensional form of the liner. Where the partial reconstitution is in the higher part of the range ie 241-331 g/m2, preferably 286 g/m2, a greater density of moss may be used compared to the low level partially reconstituted liner or blank. In a preferred embodiment, the density of moss prior to compaction and reconstitution is approximately 925 g/m2 in the high level partially reconstituted liner or blank. By way of comparison, the density of moss prior to compaction and partial reconstitution in the low level partially reconstituted liner or blank is about 869 g/m2. Additionally, it is important to note that while there is partial reconstitution of the exterior of the liner, the interior of the liner is unreconstituted and thus retains sufficient stiffness such that the walls of the liner are self-supporting. The high level partially reconstituted liner is also supported by a stiffness insert on the inside. This may be achieved by a cardboard insert which protects the body of the liner or at least the body of the wall portion of the liner. A gap may be provided in the cardboard insert where the edges of the arcuate wall portion overlap. Nevertheless the stiffening insert is not essential for the walls of the liner to be self-supporting.

[0034] The high level partially reconstituted liner is received in a plant container. The preferred form is a wire basket. This produces a finished product which is readily marketable. The liner and basket combination may be such that the liner is oversized for the basket thereby exposing the uncompressed top edges of the liner. This enhances the appearance of the liner. Nevertheless, the basket is not required for the walls of the liner to be self-supporting.

[0035] In accordance with a third aspect of the present invention there is provided a combination plant container and liner wherein the liner comprises one or more sheets of dried or at least substantially dry, reconstitutible sphagnum moss, at least part of which is compressed, the liner being partially reconstituted on the exterior and supported by the plant container, the combination further including a stiffening insert.

[0036] The combination plant container and liner may include any of the features described above in connection with the first and second aspects of the invention. In particular, the exterior of the sphagnum moss may be partially reconstituted to a higher degree in the range of 241 to 332 g/m2. The preferred level of reconstitution is 286 g/m2. A fairly high level of moss density provides the structural integrity to prevent the liners from disintegrating. Additionally, the plant container supports the liner and furthermore, the stiffening insert adds to the structural integrity.

[0037] The plant container may be configured to reveal a large amount of the surface area of the exterior of the sphagnum moss liner. In a most preferred form the plant container is a wire basket.

[0038] The stiffening insert is preferably a sheet of card either of cardboard or plastic. Preferably the card is water resistant. The insert suitably conforms to at least a portion of the interior contour of the liner. In a most preferred form of the invention, the liner is comprised of a base portion and a unitary arcuate wall portion adapted to form a continuous wall around the base portion. In this form, the liner may have top edges which are compressed to a lesser degree and overlapping edges which are also compressed to a lesser degree than the body of the liner. In this form of the invention, the insert may cover only the body of the liner exposing the top edges and the overlapping edges. The stiffening insert protects the interior unreconstituted walls of the fully formed liner against being wetted before use. Any water falling on the stiffening insert will flow towards the base which is least likely to collapse on account of becoming wet.

[0039] In accordance with a fourth aspect of the invention, there is provided a liner for a plant container including one or more sheets of partially compressed, dried or at least substantially dry, reconstitutable sphagnum moss formed into a 3-dimensional shape having one or more walls extending in an upstanding configuration wherein the liner is partially reconstituted on at least the exterior of the or each wall such that in the or each wall, the ratio of the thickness of the partially reconstituted moss to the thickness of unreconstituted moss is in the range 7:10 to 7:25.

[0040] This range ensures that despite the weakening effect of the reconstitution, the remaining unreconstituted moss afford sufficient strength to the liner. More preferably, the range is 7:15 to 7:25. The overall thickness prior to reconstitution is 3 to 8 mm or more preferably 4 to 7 mm. The liner may be secured into its 3-dimensional form eg by staples, prior to inserting it into a supporting plant container such as a wire basket. A stiffening insert is also optionally provided to provide additional support to the side wall of the liner.

[0041] Any of the blanks or liners according to the foregoing aspects may incorporate a layer of water resistant material into the liner or blank.

[0042] It would be desirable for the layer of water resistant material to be sandwiched within the sphagnum moss but towards the outer surface of the liner because for visual impact, concealment of the water resistant layer by a layer of sphagnum moss is desirable. This can be achieved by initially laying a thin layer of the sphagnum moss, then the water resistant layer and finally the major amount of sphagnum moss to be compressed.

[0043] It is also intended that a wide range of materials may be utilised to form the water resistant or water impervious layer. In a simple form the layer can be provided by a mat of cellulous material such as a suitable grade of paper which may or may not have surface coatings. Suitable surface coatings where provided can facilitate adhesion to the sphagnum moss and increase the water retentive characteristics of the layer.

[0044] A suitable plastic sheet may replace the sheet of cellulous material with the surface of the sheet being treated to facilitate adhesion to the sphagnum moss if desired. Aluminium foil is another desirable alternative.

[0045] In a yet further modification, the water resistant layer can be provided by treating a section of the sphagnum moss with a suitable chemical mixture so that upon heat and pressure, or pressure alone, a layer of the sphagnum moss sheet will assume characteristics resisting water penetration. For example, a plastics compound which at ambient temperatures would be in liquid form could be sprayed onto the sphagnum moss and which when subjected to heat and pressure, or pressure alone forms the required water resistant layer.

[0046] It is also possible within the ambit of the present invention to provide a liner which has different water retentive characteristics. For example, in the base section and a lower part of the wall there could be a water resistant layer but in the upper section of the wall the water resistant layer may not be included.

[0047] As mentioned above, each blank is generally of a form including a circular base section and a unitary arcuate wall section extending around the circular base. In this way, the wall section defines a continuous wall around the circular base in the assembled form of the liner. In one form of such a blank the base section may be integrally formed with the wall section along a part of the periphery of the base, allowing the remainder of the wall section to be folded about the remainder of periphery of the base. The blank may be secured in the three dimensional form by overlapping extension areas of the base and/or the wall section and by joining together the ends of the wall section by fastening means such as staples passing through the overlapped extension areas.

[0048] In an alternative form of the invention, the blank may be configured to include: a substantially semi-circular base section having a substantially semi-circular edge; and one or more wall sections adapted to fold about the arcuate or semi-circular edge of the base section to form with the base section, a surrounding wall in the 3 dimensional form of the liner wherein at least one of the wall sections is integrally formed with the base section along a part of the semi-circular edge of the base section and is adapted to follow the contour of the semi-circular edge of the base section in the 3 dimensional form of the liner.

[0049] It will be appreciated that a liner of this form will be appropriate for use in a wall mounted hanging basket. The parts of the blank corresponding to the upper edges of the surrounding wall in the 3-dimensional form of the liner may be not compressed to the same degree as the body of the blank.

[0050] As discussed, an appropriately shaped mould may be used to form each of the blanks. Mould loading devices may be utilised to load a predetermined quantity of moss into the recesses of the moulds.

[0051] Alternatively, the sphagnum moss may be compressed into the form of a larger sheet so that a number of blanks may be cut from the sheet and each blank folded to form a three dimensional liner.

[0052] The blanks or liners described in the foregoing aspects may be comprised of moss which is preferably pre-dried to around 18 to 20 percent moisture by weight prior to compaction into sheets. In a preferred form of the invention, the moss is compressed without any additional heat being applied. However, in countries (eg Australia) which exclude the import of any moss other than that which is certifiably free of viable seed, the moisture content of the sphagnum moss prior to the compaction may be greater to generate steam during hot-pressing to sterilise the moss. See for example New Zealand Patent Specification 314613/314825, Australian Patent Specification 6037/98 or Chile Patent Specification 1790-98, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. However, where possible, the cold-press method is preferred because it is believed that hot-pressing slows the rate at which the compressed sphagnum moss can be reconstituted.

[0053] For transportation it is clearly desirable to ensure that the three dimensional form of the liners are able to be nested one within the other to minimise the transportation space required in sending the liners to the point of sale outlets.

[0054] The partial reconstitution is preferably effected prior to assembling the blank to the three dimensional form since this imparts a degree of flexibility to the blanks enabling them to be manipulated into the 3-dimensional form of the liners. This may be achieved by spraying the liner with a suitable liquid such as water. Further water may be added once the liner has been inserted into the plant container. The liquid might be coloured (eg green) to contribute a pleasing aesthetic effect to the liner. In a most preferred form of the invention, the partial reconstitution is effected to the whole exterior of the liner.

[0055] As mentioned above, where a lower level of partial reconstitution is effected, it may be necessary to package the 3-dimensional liners to prevent dehydration. The method may involve: enveloping a single liner (with our without supporting container) or a plurality of nested liners with shrink wrapping material such that the shrink wrapping material extends into the interior of the or the top liner, weighting the shrink wrapping material with a weight placed in the interior of the or the top liner; and heat treating the shrink wrapping material to conform to the shape of the liner.

[0056] The invention consists in the foregoing and also envisages construction of which the following give examples only.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0057] One preferred form of the invention and modifications thereof will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

[0058]FIG. 1 illustrates filaments of natural sphagnum moss product as harvested;

[0059]FIG. 2 illustrates the principle of reconstitution of a sheet of compressed sphagnum moss;

[0060]FIG. 3 is a bottom perspective view of a mould loading device according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

[0061]FIG. 4 is a top perspective view of the mould loading device illustrated in FIG. 3;

[0062]FIG. 5 is a bottom perspective view with the mould loading device in operation;

[0063]FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a negative mould plate;

[0064]FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional detail of the negative mould plate illustrated in FIG. 6;

[0065]FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional detail of the mould plate illustrated in FIG. 6;

[0066]FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the negative mould plate of FIG. 6 illustrating the alignment of a cooperable positive mould member;

[0067]FIG. 10 is a perspective/partial cross-sectional view of the positive mould member shown in FIG. 9;

[0068]FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional detail of the positive mould member illustrated in FIG. 10;

[0069]FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional detail of the positive mould member illustrated in FIG. 10;

[0070]FIG. 13 is a blank of compressed sphagnum moss which may be used to assemble a plant container liner;

[0071]FIG. 14 is a top view of the three dimensional form of the liner assembled from the blank in FIG. 13;

[0072]FIG. 15a is a side perspective view of the three dimensional liner shown in FIG. 14;

[0073]FIG. 15b is a perspective view of the three dimensional liner shown in FIG. 15 with the surface of the exterior of the liner partially reconstituted;

[0074]FIG. 16a is a plan view of a modified form of the negative mould plate together with a modified form of a female mould plate inserted into the recess of the negative mould plate;

[0075]FIG. 16b is a plan view of a blank of compressed sphagnum moss made from the mould of FIG. 16a;

[0076]FIG. 16c is the blank of FIG. 16a with additional indicia;

[0077]FIG. 16d is a perspective view of two finished baskets, each incorporating a blank shown in FIG. 16b;

[0078]FIG. 16e is a diagrammatic illustration of the partial reconstitution of an outer layer of the liner or blank of FIG. 16d.

[0079]FIG. 17 illustrates the liner of FIG. 16 including a plastic shrink wrapping;

[0080]FIG. 18 is a perspective view of three liners, nested into a stack and bound by plastic shrink wrapping;

[0081]FIG. 19 is a perspective view of the liner of FIG. 16 installed in a conventional hanging basket assembly;

[0082]FIG. 20 is a blank of compressed sphagnum moss which may be used to assemble a modified plant container liner;

[0083]FIG. 21 is a top view of the three dimensional liner formed from the blank illustrated in FIG. 20;

[0084]FIG. 22 is a front perspective view of the liner in FIG. 21;

[0085]FIG. 23 is a view of a wall blank of compressed sphagnum moss and a separate base blank;

[0086]FIG. 24 shows a top view of the three dimensional liner formed from the component parts as illustrated in FIG. 23;

[0087]FIG. 25 is a front view of the liner illustrated in FIG. 24;

[0088]FIG. 26 is a view of a blank for a compressed sphagnum moss liner according to another preferred embodiment of the invention;

[0089]FIG. 27 is an inside view of the liner assembled from the blank of FIG. 26;

[0090]FIG. 28 is a front view of the liner of FIG. 27;

[0091]FIG. 29 is a further detailed view of the blank shown in FIG. 26;

[0092]FIG. 30 is a view of a further preferred form of a blank, similar to that shown in FIG. 26;

[0093]FIG. 31 is a section through a plant container liner manufactured according to an aspect of the present invention; and

[0094]FIG. 32 is a section through an alternative plant container liner.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

[0095]FIG. 1 shows filaments of harvested sphagnum moss 100. The sphagnum moss 100 is used primarily in the present invention for its water retentive property which is up to 20 times its own weight in water. The sphagnum moss 100 is also used for its aesthetic value in hanging basket arrangements. The sphagnum moss is harvested from a natural and renewable source.

[0096] Initially, some of the excess water may be removed from the freshly harvested sphagnum moss 100 through the use of a centrifuge or calender rolls. The sphagnum moss 100 is then dried either in a kiln or with natural sunlight. Preferably, the sphagnum moss 100 is dried in a kiln with a continuous conveyor (not shown), the speed of which is controllable. Suitably, an automatic feeding system (not shown) that deposits the moss onto the kiln's continuous conveyor is also provided. The kiln is in the form of a tunnel and operates to circulate heated air which is generated from hot water heat exchangers operating at a temperature as high as 140 C. The moss is gradually dried as it travels through the kiln.

[0097] After drying, the moss may be left in piles to cool and reabsorb some moisture from the atmosphere. Alternatively, additional moisture may be added to the moss through the use of pressurised water misting nozzles. The optimum moisture content of the moss prior to pressing is 18 to 20 percent by weight although a range of 3 to 17 percent by weight is commonly used. It is considered that anything in the range of 2 to 20 percent by weight will work.

[0098] When an appropriate moisture content has been reached, the sphagnum moss can be compressed into sheets 102 as illustrated in FIG. 2. The sphagnum moss sheet 102 has the ability to absorb a significant quantity of water 104 and reconstitute into its substantially original state. The sheet 102 illustrated in FIG. 2 is included to provide the reader with an appreciation of the ability of sphagnum moss to reconstitute from a compressed, substantially dried state to its substantially original state. Prior to reconstitution, the sheet 102 may be cut into one or more blanks, each of which may then be assembled to form a three dimensional liner. However, in the most preferred form of the invention to be explained by the following text, the sphagnum moss is compressed directly into the form of individual blanks each of which, when assembled forms a three dimensional liner of the form illustrated in FIG. 15a or alternatively FIG. 16b. FIG. 9 illustrates the general form of the mould used to form each of the blanks of FIG. 15a. The mould includes a negative mould plate 600 having a number of mould recesses 602 and positive mould members of a shape complimentary to that of the recesses. Accordingly, a mould loading device 300 (FIG. 3) is used to load sphagnum moss into the mould recesses 602.

[0099] The mould loading device 300 comprises a filling box 302 generally conforming to the shape of the mould recess 602 to be filled. The filling box 302 shown in FIG. 3 includes a base 304 and side walls 306 but is open at the top as illustrated in FIG. 4. The base 304 includes finger slots, the reason for which will be explained.

[0100] The mould loading device 300 further includes a handle portion 308 conforming only approximately to the shape of the filling box 302. Dependent from the handle portion 308 are four dowels 310 (only three of which are shown). These dowels 310 are fixed to the handle portion 308 at spaced locations but extend slidingly through apertures provided in the base 304 of the filling box 302. As can be seen in FIG. 5, the dowels 310 are attached to a false bottom 316 which is complimentary in shape to the base of the filling box. The false bottom 316 is slidable within the filling box 302 and is controlled by the handle portion. In FIG. 3, the handle portion has been pulled out as far as possible so that the false bottom 316 engages against the inside of base 304. In this configuration, the spring loaded latch 318 has a pin which extends into an aperture provided in centre dowel 310. This holds the false bottom 316 in position against the inside of base 304 during filling and tipping.

[0101] In use, the moss loading device is oriented in FIG. 4 with the handle portion 308 fully extended and the latch in position in the dowel 310. Sphagnum moss 100 is inserted into the open end of the filling box 302. Once filled, the mould loading device is weighed on electronic scales to ensure that an appropriate quantity of moss has been inserted into the filling box. Once filled to a satisfactory level, the mould loading device 300 is brought to the negative mould plate 600 (FIG. 6, FIG. 9 or FIG. 16a) and the loading device is deftly flipped over so that the opening is in register with the mould recesses 602 of the mould plate 600. To ensure adequate removal of the contents of the mould loading device 300, the latch 318 is released to allow the user to push handle portion 308 towards the base 304. The handle portion 308 is configured to enable the user to use both hands to extend around respective parts of the handle portion 308 with the users fingers inserted through the finger slots 305. Squeezing together of the portion of the base between the finger slots 305 and the handle portion 308 ensures full ejection of the sphagnum moss 100 from the filling box 302 into the mould cavity 602. Depending on the size of the filling box 302 and the predetermined correct weight of the moss in the filling box, the thickness of the moss deposited into each mould recess will be approximately 60 to 85 mm.

[0102] The negative mould plate 600 illustrated in FIG. 6 has a regular array of mould recesses 602 shaped so that the blanks produced thereby will conform to those illustrated in FIG. 13, to enable the assembly of the three dimensional liner illustrated in FIG. 15, with little if any wastage of sphagnum moss material. The negative mould plate 600 of FIG. 16a has a mould recess 602 shaped to produce the blanks as per FIG. 16b.

[0103] The negative mould plate 600 is primarily constructed of a high density PVC foam material 700 sold under the trade mark KLEGECELL. The high density foam material 700 is sandwiched between two sheets of plywood 702, 704. The sheet 702 forms the upper surface of the mould and the sheet 704 defines the lower periphery of the high density foam material 700. A further sheet of plywood 706 is disposed to define the base of the negative mould plate 600.

[0104] The high density PVC foam material 700 is of the type commonly used in the construction of surfboards, sailboards and in general boat and yacht construction. Suitably the high density foam material should be both light and strong. The choice of plywood for the sheet 702, 704, 706 has been made because plywood is able to withstand the high pressures applied to it during the pressing process (500-3500 psi) (3.448-24.133 MPa).

[0105] All of the layers in the negative mould sheet 600, apart from the base layer 706 are cut to remove portions in the shape of the blanks to be formed by the mould recesses 602. Each of the layers 700, 702, 704 is provided with the cut outs in register with each other so that when the layers are stacked one on top of each other, the layers will define the mould recesses 602. Only the base layer of plywood 706 remains in tact and thereby defines the base of the mould recesses 602. The depth of the mould recesses can range between 35 and 90 mm depending on the application. The layers are glued together to form a laminate. The surface of the foam layer 700 defining the working surface of the mould recess 706 is provided with a fibreglass coating 800 to protect the working surface of the foam layer 700 from abrasion during pressing. The fibreglass coating 800 may include polyester, vinyl ester or epoxy resins and chop strand matt as is known to those skilled in the art of fibreglass.

[0106] The positive mould members 900 illustrated in FIGS. 9 to 12 are comprised of four sheets of plywood including a top sheet 910 of 7 mm plywood, a base sheet 920 of 12 mm plywood and two inner sheets 930, 940 of 12 mm plywood. The inner sheets of plywood 930, 940 are machined with a plurality of fairly evenly spaced apertures 950 which serves to reduce the weight of the positive mould member 900. The layers of plywood 910, 920, 930, 940 are glued together to form a laminate.

[0107] The shape of each positive mould member 900 (excluding positive mould member 901 illustrated in FIG. 16a) is complimentary to the shape of each mould recess 602, except that the positive mould member 900 is smaller than the mould recess 602 so that a gap of between 2 and 3 mm is provided between the sides of the positive mould member 900 and the side wall of the mould recess 602 when the positive mould member 900 is inserted into the mould recess 602. Additionally, the positive mould members 900 are formed so as to be 5 to 10 mm thicker than the depth of the mould recesses 602. In this way, when the full pressure of the press bears on the positive moulds, no pressure will be exerted onto the top surface of the negative moulds. In view of the foam material, pressure on the negative mould plate 600 might cause it to be crushed.

[0108] In use, the mould recesses 602 of the negative mould plate 600 are filled in turn with sphagnum moss using the mould loading device 300. When all of the mould recesses 602 have been loaded with sphagnum moss, each of the positive moulds 900 is inserted into a respective mould recess 602. The assembly of the negative mould plates 600 and the positive mould members 900 is thus ready for insertion between the platens of a platen press (not shown). The press may be of a conventional type with the assembly of the mould plate 600 and mould members 900 being carried or conveyed to the press and inserted between the platens thereof, prior to the platens being brought together to compress the sphagnum moss within each of the mould recesses 602. The pressure for pressing the moss range is between 500 psi and 3800 psi (3.448-26.201 MPa) for a time ranging between 10 seconds and 3 minutes. The combination of pressure and time is such that the thickness of the blanks produced is between 2.5 and 4 mm and yet still able to reconstitute with the addition of water. This degree of compression provides the blank with sufficient rigidity to enable the walls of the assembled three dimensional liner to be self supporting. It is considered that a compressed thickness of between 1 mm and 6 mm for the stated pre-compression thickness of moss should also provide sufficient rigidity for the walls to be self-supporting.

[0109] In an alternative type press (not shown) the lower platen may be provided in the form of a table slidable into and out of the press. In this embodiment, the positive mould members are affixed to the upper platen of the press and the negative mould plate is affixed to the lower platen of the press. When the lower platen is moved into position inside the press, the mould recesses and the positive mould members are in precise alignment. With this arrangement, the negative mould plate 600 may be conveniently accessed for loading and unloading by sliding the table out of the press. In another alternative form of the press, the upper platen may be tiltable to provide increased access to the negative mould plate 600.

[0110] As illustrated in FIG. 13, the blank 1 which will be formed using the mould assembly of negative mould plate 600 and positive mould plate 900 has an arcuate wall section 2 and a circular base integrally formed with the wall section. An extension 4 at one end of the wall section 2 provides for an overlap to occur between the joining wall sections when folded about the base 3. Connecting staples 9 pass through the overlapped sections to retain the wall section of the liner assembled in the three dimensional form as illustrated in FIG. 14.

[0111] The extension 5 beyond the perimeter of the base 3 indicated in dotted outline in FIG. 13 and the tab 7 can be folded up during assembly to overlap the lower periphery of the wall 2 and an attaching staple 10 passing through the tab 7 and wall of the blank will complete the assembly of the three dimensional liner 11 illustrated in FIGS. 14 and 15.

[0112] Other forms of fastening are also considered within the scope of the present invention. The compressed sphagnum moss liner 11 has the appearance of cardboard and consequently is not easily recognisable to the purchasing public as a sphagnum moss liner. To bring the surface of the sphagnum moss liners to resemble their original natural state, a fine mist of water is sprayed onto the exterior side of the blank only, prior to assembly using an atomised fluid spray. The amount of water is about 113-173 g/m2, preferably 143 g/m2. The temperature of the water is also controlled within a range of 15-25 C. This serves to at least partially reconstitute the surface layer of the blank 1 on one side. The blank 1 is then assembled into the three dimensional form of the liner 11 optionally through the use of the connecting staples 9 in the manner illustrated in FIGS. 14 and 15a. The assembled liner will resemble that illustrated in FIG. 15b with the surface layer 11 a of the exterior of the blank 11 reconstituted as illustrated. The degree of reconstitution enables the liner to be pliable to the extent that it is able to be folded and unfolded with minimal or no degradation of the fibre integrity and yet enables the walls of the liners to be sufficiently rigid as to be self-supporting. To prevent drying out, the liners are enclosed in a sealed package as discussed in connection with FIG. 17.

[0113] Following stapling, the liners 11 have appropriate product information and advertising sheets placed in or over the liners 11 in such a manner that they contour to the curved surfaces of the liners 11.

[0114]FIG. 17 illustrates the liner 11 enclosed within a bag 11 b of shrink wrap plastic. The bag is sealed in a circular shape around the top of the liner 11, 10 to 100 mm from the top edge with a purpose built circular sealing machine. This provides a surplus of plastic which fits down inside the liner 11 against the sides and the bottom. The plastic is held in position against the sides and bottom of the liner 11 with a wire frame weighted with 1.5 kg of weights. The wire frame conforms to the inner contour of the liner 11. As the wire frame (not shown) is inserted into the liner 11, the plastic is held against the sides and bottom of the liner. Holes punched into the plastic prior to sealing enable air trapped inside the bag to escape when the wire frame is inserted into the liner. The liner 11 with the sealed bag and the weighted wire frame is passed through a shrink oven akin to a conveyor bread oven. The liner 11 and accompanying wrap is then allowed to cool, after which the weighted wire frame is removed. The result is that the plastic still lies snug against the interior and the bottom of the liner and not stretched tightly across the top of the liner 11 as would occur in conventional shrink wrapping.

[0115] The use of a circular bag with a circular sealer eliminates bunching of the plastic on the outside of the liner which would occur with the use of a square bag. Additionally, with three liners nested together and shrink wrapped as a pack of three, the shrink wrapping process has the additional benefit of compacting the liners more tightly together than prior to wrapping. This enables more three-packs to fit into a cardboard carton than a single shrink wrapped package.

[0116] The intended use of the liner is illustrated in FIG. 19. As shown, the liner 11 is inserted into a conventional hanging basket assembly 11 d. Once the liner 11 is inserted into the basket, it may be fully reconstituted by having water poured over or by being soaked in water for a matter of minutes, to enable full reconstitution to occur.

[0117] It will be appreciated that depending upon the shape of the blank, various liner shapes can be created. Generally, it is desirable that the shape is one which can allow nesting of similar shaped liners. Such nesting configurations are employed where the assembly step is performed at a site remote from the point of sale.

[0118] The foregoing generally describes the construction, assembly and packing for retail sale of a 3 dimensional liner which is not considered within the scope of the present invention but is described for illustrative purposes. It will be appreciated that flat or folded blanks may also be packaged for retail sale and this will lead to savings in transport costs. In particular, the blanks may be partially reconstituted on one side with sufficient liquid (eg 113-173 g/m2) to impart sufficient flexibility enabling them to be folded with minimal degradation of the fibres. The blanks may then be enclosed in a sealed package to prevent drying out.

[0119]FIG. 16b illustrates liners which are the subject of the present invention. The liners 80 are received in wire baskets 82 which support the 3-dimensional form of the liners 80. The liners are formed from blanks 84, the form of which are illustrated in FIGS. 16b and 16 c. The blanks 84 are in the form of a generally circular base portion and a unitary arcuate wall portion which is connected to the base portion. The unitary arcuate wall portion has a semi-circular edge BHIC which in the 3-dimensional form of the liner forms the top edge of the liner. The outer edges of the arcuate wall portion BD and EC meet or overlap in the assembled liner.

[0120] The blank 84 is formed from a mould, the form of which is illustrated in FIG. 16a. The mould includes a mould plate 600 in which there is provided a mould recess 602 corresponding to the shape of the finished blank 84. The mould recess 602 receives the male mould member 901. It can be seen that the male mould member 901 is appreciably smaller than the mould recess 602. In particular, along edges BHIC a gap of up to 50 mm is provided. Furthermore, along edges BD and EC, a gap of a similar order of magnitude is provided. Edges DF and GE only have a gap of a few millimeters. Along the edge of the circular base portion FAG a gap is also provided. The sphagnum moss is loaded into the mould recess 602 in a similar manner and the sphagnum moss is compressed in a similar fashion as described in connection with FIGS. 3 to 12. The main difference is that the sphagnum moss will not be compressed along the edges where the mould leaves a gap. This renders the finished blank 84 with fluffy, substantially uncompressed edges BHIC, BD, EC and FAG as illustrated in FIG. 16c. This fluffy edge increases the flat width of the liner across parts where the fluffy edge occurs. In particular this means that in the flat state, when compared to the liner of FIG. 13, the liner of FIG. 16c is wider at DB, FH, GI and EC. Further, the fluffy liner is longer from edge DB around to edge EC. Further, the circular base portion FAG protrudes out further from the unitary arcuate portion of the blank 84. The filaments of moss which form the fluffy edges are partly free and partly held by being caught in the compressed walls of the liner.

[0121] The blank 84 is then sprayed with water, generally twice as much as the type of blank illustrated in FIG. 13. About 286 g/m2 is sprayed onto the side of the blank which in use forms the exterior of the liner. The other side which forms the interior of the liner is unreconstituted. The water is sprayed using an atomised fluid spray to produce a fine mist. The water is sprayed evenly over the surface of the blank and the water is maintained between a temperature of 15-25 C. This partial reconstitution of the exterior of the liner makes the surface look less like a compacted sheet of sphagnum moss which resembles flat cardboard and more like natural 3-dimensional sphagnum moss.

[0122] Once the blank has been sprayed with water on one side it is stapled together prior to being inserted into the wire framed basket 82. Alternatively, a smaller amount of water may be first sprayed to impart sufficient flexibility to the blank enabling it to be shaped to the form of the basket 82. Then, the remaining amount of water may be sprayed onto the exterior of the liner. FIG. 16e diagrammatically illustrates the reconstitution of the exterior of the liner or blank. The left hand side is indicative of the thickness of the sphagnum moss sheet prior to spraying whereas the right hand side of the figure is indicative of the reconstitution of the exterior of the liner or blank. The thickness prior to partial reconstitution is approximately 5 mm. The ratio of the thickness of the partially reconstituted moss to the thickness of the unreconstituted moss is approximately 7:19. Overall, the moisture content of the liner is between 13% and 30% by weight or more preferably 14 to 26% by weight. Another more specific range is between 19 and 24% by weight.

[0123] The liner basket combinations are thus ready for market but in order to survive the rigours of handling on the way to the point of sale, it is important that the liners have sufficient structural integrity to minimise damage and avoid loss of the sphagnum moss. This is an issue because of the increased amount of water added to the sphagnum moss liners compared to their counterparts illustrated in FIG. 13 which are generally stiffer. The blanks 84 incorporate a greater amount of moss than the blanks illustrated in FIG. 13. The density of the moss in the blanks 84 prior to compaction and prior to partial reconstitution is 925 g/m2 whereas the density of moss in the self-supporting liners illustrated in FIGS. 13-15 a is 869 g/m2, prior to compaction and partial reconstitution. This additional moss allows for a greater width of the liner enhancing the effect of the fluffy edges. Additionally, a greater thickness on the sides and the base of the liner will give the liner the necessary structural strength to withstand handling on its way to market. Additionally, the use of an increased amount of moss will give the purchaser the impression of a higher quality product than is the case with the liners illustrated in FIGS. 13-15 a.

[0124] Additionally, the liner is supported by a cardboard insert 86 which follows the contour of the body of the unitary arcuate wall of the liner 80. The cardboard insert protects the unreconstituted compressed interior surface of the liner, exposing the fluffy edge BHIC at the top of the liner. Additionally, the cardboard insert does not extend around the entire periphery but leaves a gap at the overlapping edges BD and EC. Since these edges are substantially uncompressed, a fluffy vertical strip of moss can be seen which enhances the visual appearance of the liner. Some of this moss may fall down into the base of the liner which only serves to further enhance the impression of a large quantity of sphagnum moss to provide a nurturing environment for the proposed plant. The fluffy edge of the base portion FAG is also another attractive feature. Additionally, a vertical fluffy strip is provided on the outside of the liner at the overlap or meeting of the edges BD and EC. The fluffy edges convey to the purchaser that the product is in fact sphagnum moss and not merely compressed cardboard. The impression of the upper edge BHIC is enhanced by the fact that the liner is somewhat oversized for the basket in which it is received so that the top edge protrudes above the top of the basket 82. Ties may be used to hold the cardboard insert or the liner to the basket.

[0125] The additional density of moss, the support from the wire basket and the cardboard insert 86 enables the liner to be reconstituted to a greater amount than an unsupported liner of the type illustrated in FIGS. 13 to 15 a. Due to the above process the liner is now so constructed with a sufficient structural integrity and yet a sufficient level of reconstitution that it does not require sealing in a water tight package. Accordingly, it is believed that the liner basket combination 80 can survive several months of travel plus time for distribution and sale without requiring sealing in a watertight package. The combination thus obviates the need for watertight packaging which is normally used on the one hand to keep water in to keep the moss pliable or on the otherhand to keep water out to protect against damage. The liner can thus also survive accidental wetting before sale. Furthermore, the absence of shrink wrapping enables the customer to see the fluffy sphagnum moss more easily.

[0126] It will be appreciated that the liner has already been shaped to conform to the basket and thus pre-softening by wetting is not required to fit the liner to the basket. Moreover, such is the degree of reconstitution of the liners that further watering and softening is not required before soil is added and the plant potted and watered. The greater density of moss used contributes to a more robust liner. Thus the combination of a greater density of moss, the fitting arcuate blank shape and the reconstituted level of moss provide a liner product which is robust and requires no careful watering and manipulation by the customer prior to use.

[0127] The following description and FIGS. 20 to 32 describe further modified forms of blanks and liners. While these are described to be of the type which would be self-supporting in their 3-dimensional assembled form, these forms of blanks and liners can also incorporate the features of the present invention. That is, the blanks and liners may have upper edges which are substantially uncompressed in comparison to the body of the blanks or liners. Furthermore, the blanks or liners can be reconstituted on the exterior to a greater amount with the consequent need for support from a plant container and a cardboard insert.

[0128] An illustration of one possible modified blank and liner formed therefrom is illustrated in FIGS. 20 to 22 of the accompanying drawings. In FIG. 20 the blank 12 of compressed sphagnum moss is provided with a side wall section 13 and an integral base section 14. The shape is designed to create a three dimensional liner which, when assembled is, suitable for a plant container supported against a surface such as a wall. The overlap section 15 allows the joining ends of the wall section to be connected and the extension section 16 with tab 17 is upturned to join by way of staples 18, 19, the base in a manner similar to that previously described in connection with FIGS. 13 to 15. Optionally, the exterior of the liner 20 is then sprayed with water.

[0129] A further modification of the present invention allowing a liner to be assembled from a base and wall section is illustrated in FIGS. 23 to 25 of the drawings. A wall blank 21 of compressed sphagnum moss is provided together with a separate base member 22 having a lip 23. An overlap section 24 allows for the joining ends of the wall using staples 25. The lip 23 is upturned and then connected to the lower end of the wall with staples 26 thereby completing the three dimensional liner 27 as illustrated in FIGS. 24 and 25. The wall section 21 is shown with a scalloped upper periphery that is also produced as a scalloped finish in the assembled liner 27. Optionally, the exterior of the liner is then sprayed with water to partially reconstitute the outer surface layer.

[0130] It will be appreciated from the above description of the method of manufacture that from an outward appearance it is not easy to distinguish between a liner that has been formed to incorporate a water retentive barrier within the compressed sphagnum moss and one which does not have such a barrier. Establishing a distinctive peripheral edge such as the scalloped edge 28 could be used to provide a visual distinction indicating to a user that the liner has a water retentive barrier.

[0131] According to another embodiment of the invention, the blank 30 illustrated in FIG. 26 is assembled to form a liner 32 for inserting into a wall mounted hanging basket or container (not shown) of the kind which has a planar semi-circular back section for mounting against a supporting wall surface and a curved front wall section, generally conforming to the surface of a quarter sphere. Such baskets or containers have an open top for insertion of the plant.

[0132] The blank 30 is of integral construction, having a back section 34, a first front section 36 and a second front section 38. The back section 34 is substantially semi-circular in shape and is connected to the second front section at a central portion of its curved periphery. On the remainder of its curved periphery on either side of the central connected portion, the back section 34 is provided with overlap sections 40, 42. These overlap sections are folded at approximately right angles to the back section 34 to overlap with the rear edges 43, 44 of the second front section 38. Optionally, these overlap sections 40, 42 could be clipped to assist with joining to the rear edges 43, 44 of the second front section 38.

[0133] The first and second front sections 36, 38 are shaped so that when assembled together they will approximately conform to the shape of the surface of a quarter sphere. The two divisions between the first and second front sections 36, 38 are thus in the manner of darts commonly employed in the construction of garments. At each of the two divisions between the first and second front section 36, 38 are overlap sections 46, 48. These overlap sections 46, 48 overlap respective adjacent edges of the first front section 36 in the assembled configuration of the liner 32. The overlap sections 46, 48 could be clipped to assist the assembly process.

[0134]FIG. 29 illustrates a further detailed view of the blank of FIG. 26. If the rear edges 43, 44 of the second front section 38 were to be curved around to follow the corresponding periphery of the back section 34, as indicated by the phantom lines, then point 50 on the second front section 38 would correspond to point 52 on the back section 34. Instead, the shape of the blank is such that the second front section 38 is extended as shown in FIG. 29 so that point 54 meets with point 52 on the back section. The rear edges 43, 44 of the second front section 38 must therefore be gathered or drawn inwards and/or the overlap sections 40, 42 stretched to achieve the specified fit. This is required to achieved the desired spherical fullness to the assembled liner. The overlap sections 40, 42 are stapled near to the rear edges of the second front section 38.

[0135] Similarly, point 58 on the first front section 36 would normally meet with point 57 on the second front section 38. Instead, point 58 meets with point 59. The forward edges of the second front section 38 must therefore be gathered and/or the adjacent edges of the first front section 36 stretched to achieve the required fit and accordingly obtain the desired fullness for the assembled liner 32. The joins are secured by staples.

[0136] On assembly, the overlap portions 46, 48 of the first front section 36 are joined to the second front section followed by the joining of the back section 34 to the second front section 38. Staples are used to secure the joins and hold the liner in the assembled configuration.

[0137] It will be appreciated that the blank illustrated in FIGS. 26 and 29 need not be of integral construction and could be constructed of two or more parts. For example, the back section 34 could be formed as a discrete component of the liner with appropriate joining tabs provided on either the back section or the second front section. Additionally, the first and second front sections 36, 36 could also be discrete.

[0138] Once the liner, in whatever form, has been assembled into a three dimensional form, the treatment of the outer surface of such a complete liner with moisture to a sufficient degree allowing the reconstitution of the outer section of the sphagnum moss gives an enhanced visual appearance making it easily possible for a prospective customer to recognise the liner as having been formed from sphagnum moss. It is desirable to ensure treatment allows only the required partial reconstitution of the liner and of course this step can be more easily controlled using the form of the invention where there is a water resistant layer.

[0139] The incorporation of a water resistant layer into a plant container liner is illustrated in FIGS. 31 and 32. The liner is formed from a sheet 61 which may be primary comprised of dried plant material in layers 4 and 5 such as coconut fibre or sphagnum moss. Where moss is used, preferably the moss has the moisture content reduced so that it can be compressed into a sheet form. The moisture level has not been reduced to a degree that the moss itself has an unacceptable brittleness or inability to reconstitute.

[0140] The sheet 61 has incorporated towards one surface a layer of water resistant or water impervious material 62. In one form this barrier can be provided by a layer of paper 63 or suitable plastics material with one or both surfaces, if required, treated to facilitate adhesion to the sphagnum moss when compressed.

[0141] Desirably a thin layer of sphagnum moss 64 is placed in a mould, the barrier placed in position and the remaining mat 65 of sphagnum moss placed over the barrier 62 prior to compression. Thus, once compressed, the sheet of sphagnum moss has an outward appearance of a normal compressed sheet of sphagnum moss but has a water resistant barrier 62 towards one surface thereof.

[0142] In FIG. 32 the barrier is provided by treating a layer of the moss with a suitable substance. The first layer 4 of moss fibrous plant material placed in the mould may be treated by spraying a thermo setting plastic material. Any curable plastic mixture could be applied depending upon whether the sheet was to be hot or cold pressed.

[0143] Where the sheet is a liner for a plant container, the sheet can be formed using the moulds described in connection with FIGS. 3 to 12. Alternatively, the sheet may be formed using a roll press with the prepared bed of sphagnum moss passing through one or a series of rollers to form the desired compaction of the sphagnum moss. Where it is desirable for the end use of the material to be laid over a large surface, the more continuous form of compressing would be an advantage with the completed product delivered in rolls which could be easily handled when covering larger surface areas.

[0144] One such application of the invention would be to provide an undersurface for a lawn in arid or semi-arid conditions with the water resistant or substantially impervious layer provided in the sheet. The sheet according to the present invention will retain moisture allowing an even watering of an area, for example, of lawn with the application of a subterranean watering system using the drip feed technique. The result achieved in the present invention provides an evenness of moisture over the area of lawn and this can be contrasted with an area of lawn on an untreated bed of sphagnum moss where the moisture pattern throughout the watered area is uneven. This is because the barrier in the sheet according to the present invention operates to restrict movement of water allowing the moss to become saturated. It is recognised that sphagnum moss presents a desirable environment for root growth.

[0145] Hot and cold pressing creates different reconstitution characteristics in a compressed sphagnum moss sheet. Hot pressing establishes a longer reconstitution time whereas with cold pressing reconstitution occurs much more rapidly. When the liner 11 as illustrated in FIG. 16 is folded into the basket and the moss reconstitutes, the expansion caused by reconstitution and the forces generated through that expansion tend to compress the joints thereby restricting the amount of moisture which will be lost through these joints. While the openings allow for appropriate drainage to avoid stagnation problems they do restrict the amount of moisture which is able to penetrate to the outer surface of the compressed sphagnum moss sheet. This means that the visual appearance of the liner is retained and does not visually deteriorate as with conventional sphagnum moss liners. In conventional liners, moisture in the outer surface of the moss causes a green algae growth giving a visually less pleasant appearance.

[0146] One of the greatest causes for moisture loss from the hanging basket is the evaporation surface created by the outer surface of a conventional liner. This evaporation is accentuated in any conditions where there is a draft or movement of air but with the present invention because of the water resistant barrier, such evaporation is minimised thereby retaining moisture within the hanging basket.

[0147] With the significant reduction of water loss it is not necessary for the hanging baskets to be watered as regularly to retain optimum growing conditions. With conventional basket liners and untreated sphagnum moss liners it is frequently necessary to water the plants at least daily and sometimes more than once a day depending upon ambient conditions to preserve a healthy environment for the plant. With the present invention the watering programme can be modified and while conditions will determine the required maintenance, much greater gaps between watering are possible.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6722081 *Nov 30, 1999Apr 20, 2004The Christian Church Community TrustPlant container liners
US7877930Jun 18, 2009Feb 1, 2011Aspen West Partners, LlcMethods and systems of porous receptacles
Classifications
U.S. Classification47/65.7
International ClassificationA47G7/08, A01G9/02, B32B9/02, B32B3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB32B9/02, A01G9/026, B32B3/02, A47G7/085
European ClassificationA47G7/08S, A01G9/02D, B32B9/02, B32B3/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 30, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: CHRISTIAN CHURCH COMMUNITY TRUST, THE, NEW ZEALAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:JUST, PERRY;REEL/FRAME:011646/0066
Effective date: 20010320