Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20020018614 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/799,954
Publication dateFeb 14, 2002
Filing dateMar 6, 2001
Priority dateJul 31, 2000
Also published asCA2416270A1, CA2416270C, EP1305663A1, EP1305663A4, US6363182, US6650804, US20020057864, WO2002010824A1
Publication number09799954, 799954, US 2002/0018614 A1, US 2002/018614 A1, US 20020018614 A1, US 20020018614A1, US 2002018614 A1, US 2002018614A1, US-A1-20020018614, US-A1-2002018614, US2002/0018614A1, US2002/018614A1, US20020018614 A1, US20020018614A1, US2002018614 A1, US2002018614A1
InventorsJames Mills, Philip Lin, Roger Holmstrom
Original AssigneeMills James D., Lin Philip J., Holmstrom Roger P.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Optical switch for reciprocal traffic
US 20020018614 A1
Abstract
A reduced component optical switch module includes a plurality of ports wherein each port includes an optical input and an optical output. A plurality of switchable deflectors in combination with a plurality of non-switchable deflectors can be used to establish transmission paths between pairs of ports to support traffic reciprocity. In one embodiment, the ports and switchable elements are configured so as to provide substantially constantly transmission paths within the respective module. In another embodiment, additional deflector elements can be provided to implement loop-back functionality at one or more of the ports.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(43)
What is claimed:
1. A non-blocking optical switch comprising:
a plurality of ports wherein each port has an optical input for receipt of an incident beam and an optical output from which a switched beam can exit;
a plurality of multi-state switchable beam deflecting elements wherein the elements exhibit a deflecting condition and a non-deflecting condition and wherein a transmission path is establishable between first and second ports in a selected direction and between the same two ports in an opposite direction and wherein the path is established in at least one of a waveguide, free space and optical fiber.
2. A switch as in claim 1 which includes a plurality of deflecting only elements for bounding in part a transmission path associated with each of the ports.
3. A switch as in claim 2 wherein transmission paths are bounded in part by at least a multi-state element and a deflecting only element.
4. A switch as in claim 1 wherein at least some of the ports have an associated deflecting only element.
5. A switch as in claim 4 wherein some of the ports have one or more associated multi-state deflecting elements.
6. A switch as in claim 1 which includes at least first and second pairs of ports with each pair configured so as to have at least one transmission path having substantially a common predetermined length.
7. A switch as in claim 2 wherein at least selected of the deflecting only elements define a transmission path back to a respective port.
8. A switch as in claim 7 wherein the selected elements reflect an incident light beam back to the respective port along the transmission path.
9. A switch as in claim 1 wherein the number of multi-state elements is on the order of one-half the difference of the number of ports squared minus one.
10. A switch as in claim 1 wherein at least some of the multi-state elements comprise switchable mirrors.
11. A switch as in claim 1 wherein the ports are staggered relative to one another and wherein selected pairs of ports exhibit a common path length.
12. A switch as in claim 1 wherein the ports are staggered relative to one another and including at least one optical reversing element associated with at least one of the ports for providing a bidirectional transmission path to and from the respective port.
13. A switch as in claim 12 wherein selected pairs of ports exhibit a common path length and wherein a length of the bidirectional path is substantially the same as the common path length.
14. A switch as in claim 1 which includes control circuits for switching the multi-state elements.
15. A switch as in claim 1 wherein the multi-state elements comprise at least one of switchable reflectors, optical bubbles and holographic gratings.
16. A switch as in claim 15 wherein the switchable reflectors include movable mirrors.
17. A switch as in claim 15 wherein the switchable reflectors each include a mirror and a mechanically switching element movable relative to the mirror.
18. A switch as in claim 1 wherein the multi-state elements are selected from a class which includes switchable mirrors and solid state beam deflectors.
19. A switch as in claim I which includes at least one multi-state element and one deflecting only element in each possible path in the switch.
20. A switch as in claim 1 which has N inputs and wherein the plurality of switchable deflecting elements comprises [N*(N−1)/2 ]−1 elements.
21. A switch as in claim 20 wherein the deflecting elements are configured so as to provide transmission paths having substantially a common predetermined length.
22. A switch as in claim 20 wherein some of the transmission paths comprise a loop-back function.
23. A switch as in claim 20 which comprises N outputs co-located with the N inputs.
24. A switch as in claim 23 wherein some of the transmission paths comprise a loop-back function.
25. An optical switch comprising:
a plurality of bidirectional optical ports coupled to a switching region;
a plurality of fixed reflectors and switchable deflectors arranged within the region to support reciprocal traffic with respect to selected pairs of ports wherein the number of switchable deflectors comprises [N*(N-1)/2]-1 for N ports..
26. An optical switch as in claim 25 wherein the ports are configured, relative to the switching region, such that selected pairs of ports exhibit communications paths in the region which have substantially a common path length.
27. An optical switch as in claim 25 wherein some of the ports have an associated fixed deflector to implement a loopback function at the selected ports.
28. An optical switch as in claim 25 wherein the switchable deflectors are selected from a class which includes electromechanical switching elements and solid state switching elements.
29. An optical switch as in claim 28 wherein the region is bounded by a housing which carries the ports and wherein control circuitry is coupled to the switchable deflectors.
30. A method of switching optical signals to and from a plurality of bidirectional ports comprising:
injecting input signals from a pair of ports into a switching region;
arranging in the region switchable optical deflectors on the order of one-half the square of the number of ports in the plurality; and
deflecting the input signals, using a common path, to become output signals for the other of the ports in the pair using at least some of the deflectors.
31. A method as in claim 30 wherein each path is associated with a respective pair of ports.
32. A method as in claim 31 wherein each path is associated with a respective pair of ports.
33. A method as in claim 30 which includes providing a loop-back function for some of the ports.
34. A method as in claim 30 which includes coupling incoming optical signals to respective of the ports.
35. A method as in claim 30 which includes establishing a plurality of communication paths using the optical deflectors.
36. A method as in claim 35 which includes configuring the ports and the deflectors such that the paths exhibit substantially a common length.
37. A method as in claim 35 wherein the deflectors are configures to comprise [N*(N-1)/2]-l for N ports.
38. A modular optical switch which includes a plurality of substantially identical switch modules for reciprocal traffic wherein each module is non-blocking and includes:
a plurality of ports wherein each port can receive an incident beam and can emit a switched beam;
a plurality of multi-state beam deflecting elements wherein the elements exhibit a deflecting condition and a non-deflecting condition and wherein a transmission path is establishable between first and second ports in a selected direction and between the same two ports in an opposite direction.
39. A switch as in claim 38 which has a first, multi-module stage wherein a plurality of ports therein support reciprocal traffic and wherein each module provides a selected switching function; and
a second stage which comprises the plurality of switch modules wherein each of the switch modules is interconnected with members of the first stage.
40. A switch as in claim 39 wherein the plurality of beam deflecting elements for an N-port module comprises [N*(N-1)/2]-1.
41. A switch as in claim 39 wherein pairs of ports of the switch modules are configured to have a common optical transmission length within the respective module.
42. A switch as in claim 3 8 wherein the elements are selected from a class which includes optical deflecting bubbles, holographic gratings, solid state deflectors, and movable deflectors.
43. A switch as in claim 38 wherein intra-module beam transmission paths comprise at least one of free space, optical fibers and waveguides.
Description

[0001] The benefit of the earlier filing date of Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/221,796, filed Jul. 31, 2000 is hereby claimed.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The invention pertains to optical switches. More particularly, the invention pertains to such switches having reduced numbers of switchable transmission path defining elements.

Background of the Invention

[0003] Known forms of switched optical communication systems incorporate fiberoptics as a medium for communicating messages carried by modulated beams of radiant energy. Such messages at times need to be switched between optical fibers. One known form of optical switch is a crossbar switch.

[0004] Known optomechanical crossbar switches use moving mirrors to create connections between inputs and outputs. Various mechanisms can be used to switch or move the mirrors or otherwise to cause them to be actuated and to be in a state to create a connection.

[0005]FIG. 1 illustrates a known optical crossbar switch module 10 having four inputs and four outputs. Such switch modules receive a plurality of modulated light beams to be switched at input ports such as ports 12-1, 12-2, 12-3, 12-4 ... 12N. Switched light beams exit module 10 at output ports 14-1, 14-2,... 14-N.

[0006] The rectangles inside module 10 represent mirrors. The gray rectangle 16 is a fixed mirror. The dashed rectangles 20 a-20 k are non-actuated mirrors. Non-actuated mirrors permit beams to pass without sustantial deflection. The black rectangles 22 a-22 d are actuated mirrors. Actuated mirrors substantially deflect incident beams.

[0007] In the example of FIG. 1, input ports 12-1, 12-2, 12-3, and 12-4 are coupled to output ports 14-2, 14-3, 14-4, and 14-1, respectively. Actuating the appropriate correct set of mirrors enables the switch to make all connection permutations.

[0008] Lenses, such as lens 19 a, at the inputs and outputs of switch module 10 keep the light beams collimated while traversing the free space inside the optical switch. Fibers provide inputs to and transmit outputs from the switch 10 and they are precisely aligned to the collimating lenses. The number of switchable mirrors required in this architecture is N2−1.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] A reduced component non-blocking optical switch, or switch module, which supports all traffic that qualifies as reciprocal traffic, includes a plurality of optical ports. Each port has an optical input and optical output associated therewith. The ports couple incident communication beams, such as incident light beams, into a switching region within the switch. Transmission paths established within the switch support reciprocal traffic. Transmission paths can include free space, optical fibers or waveguides.

[0010] In one embodiment, a plurality of fixed mirrors or deflectors is positioned substantially diagonally within the switch at optical cross points. The fixed deflectors are located at cross points in the switch where the transmission paths exhibit 90 angles and are oriented at 45 relative to the transmission paths. Other cross points within the switch are occupied by switchable deflectors or mirrors which can be switched to complete respective paths. By combining both fixed and switchable deflector elements, transmission paths can be established between selected pairs of ports thereby supporting the reciprocal traffic.

[0011] In another aspect, the ports can be staggered relative to the deflectors so that the path lengths between pairs of ports are substantially constant. In yet another embodiment, some or all of the fixed deflectors can be replaced with combinations of a switchable deflector and a fixed path reversing deflector, such as a V-shaped mirror, to provide loop-back functionality for selected of the ports.

[0012] In yet another aspect, deflectors can be implemented as fixed or movable mirrors, or alternately instead of movable mirrors, fixed mirrors with movable mechanical optical deflectors. Solid state deflectors can be used as an alternate.

[0013] In one aspect, deflectors can be implemented as optical bubbles using internal reflections or holographic gratings.

[0014] Switch modules in accordance herewith can be combined in various configurations to implement multi-stage switches. In one embodiment, nonblocking multi-stage switches can be implemented using, in part, multiple switch modules in accordance herewith to facilitate reciprocal traffic.

[0015] Numerous other advantages and features of the present invention will become readily apparent from the following detailed description of the invention and the embodiments thereof, from the claims and from the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0016]FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating a prior art crossbar switch;

[0017]FIG. 2 is a diagram illustrating a reduced component switch in accordance with the present invention;

[0018]FIG. 3 is a diagram illustrating an alternate configuration of the switch of FIG. 2;

[0019]FIG. 4 is a diagram illustrating yet another configuration of the switch of FIG. 2; and

[0020]FIG. 5 is a multi-stage switch which incorporates switch modules in accordance herewith.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0021] While this invention is susceptible of embodiment in many different forms, there are shown in the drawing and will be described herein in detail specific embodiments thereof with the understanding that the present disclosure is to be considered as an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the specific embodiments illustrated.

[0022] In telecommunication applications, a condition called traffic reciprocity often exists. Traffic reciprocity is defined as the condition where input B is connected to output A whenever input A is connected to output B.

[0023] The exemplary connections illustrated in FIG. 1 do not correspond to reciprocal traffic. Specifically, input 1 is connected to output 2 whereas input 2 is not connected to output 1 as required by the definition of reciprocal traffic.

[0024] Because the module 10 supports all traffic connections (both reciprocal and non-reciprocal), it provides greater flexibility than is required in applications where traffic reciprocity exists. The price of this flexibility is the requirement to have N2−1 switchable deflectors or mirrors for an NN switch.

[0025] By exploiting the presence of traffic reciprocity, an exemplary 44 (N=4) switch module 1Oa as in FIG. 2, described below exhibits reduced switch complexity as compared to the crossbar switch of FIG. 1. Switch module 1Oa includes input/output ports 28-1, -2, -3... -N. Each port is coupled to at least one source medium, such as an input optical fiber and at least one destination medium, an output fiber.

[0026] It will be understood that module 1Oa could be operated under the control of control circuits 1Oa- 1. These control circuits could be part of a larger communications system without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. It will also be understood that multiple reciprocal-traffic switches, such as module 1Oa, can be included in larger single or multiple stage switches.

[0027] When reciprocity exists, the inputs and outputs can be co-located and paired as illustrated in FIG. 2. It will also be understood that each input/output port, such as 28-i, can be coupled to an input optical fiber and an output optical fibre. Alternately, a single coupled fiber could be used to carry bidirectional traffic.

[0028] For an NN switch, the gray rectangles 30 a, b, c ... N denote fixed deflectors or mirrors. They always deflect an incident beam. Black rectangles 32a, b denote actuated deflectors or mirrors and dashed rectangles 34 a, b, c denote non-actuated deflectors or mirrors. Deflectors 32 a,b and 34 a, b, c are all switchable between states.

[0029]FIG. 2 illustrates an example where port 28-1 is coupled optically to port 28-4 and port 28-2 is coupled optically to port 28-3. The forward path and the reverse path of the reciprocal traffic are deflected off the same deflectors or mirrors.

[0030] Assume a pair of reciprocal connections is to be made between input number A and number B where A<B. Then the two deflectors used for this pair of paths are the fixed deflector or mirror in row A and the actuated deflector or mirror in row B in column A.

[0031] Although FIG. 2 illustrates a 44 switch 1Oa, this architecture can be extended to an NxN switch module. The required number of switchable deflectors or mirrors is [N*(N−1)/2 ]−1. This is about half as many as those used by the crossbar module 10.

[0032] An improvement can be made to the switch 1Oa using staggered input and output ports 38-1, -2, -3... -N as illustrated by switch lOb, FIG. 3. In FIG. 2, the path lengths of the paths are of unequal length. Path lengths are directly related to the amount of loss an optical signal incurs. The loss is due to the divergence of the light. The light diverges even in the presence of good collimating lenses. Therefore, it is desirable to make all path lengths equal, regardless of connection, in order to reduce the variability in insertion loss.

[0033] Switch lOb, FIG. 3 provides equal path lengths. In FIG. 3, fixed and switchable deflectors are represented using the same conventions as used in FIG. 2. Deflectors 40 a, b, c, d are fixed. Remaining deflectors 42 a, b, c, d, e are switchable.

[0034] As illustrated in FIG. 3, ports 38-1 and 38-3 are coupled together, and ports 38-2 and 38-4 are coupled together. These respective path lengths are of substantially the same length. Pairs of staggered input and output ports create equal length light paths, for example the connection between ports A and B where A<B. The deflectors used are the fixed deflectors on row A and the actuated deflector or mirror on row B. The fixed deflector or mirror is N units away from the input to port A. The actuated deflector or mirror is N−B+A units away from an input to port B. The distance between the two deflectors or mirrors is B−A. Therefore, the total length, in free space, of the light path is N+(N−B+A) +(B−A) =2N which, is independent of the particular choice of A and B.

[0035] In another embodiment, switch 1Oc, FIG. 4, can be modified to include a loop-back function. Loop-back is present when an input at a port is to be coupled with the corresponding output at the same port. .

[0036] Adding a fixed deflector, such as a V-shaped mirror at the end of each row, such as deflectors 50 a, b, c, d, provides a loop-back function. Deflectors 52 a, b, c . . . i are switchable. In this embodiment, the constant path length property of module 1Ob is almost preserved with the exception that loop-back paths are slightly longer.

[0037] As illustrated in FIG. 4, ports 48-1 and 48-4 are coupled together. Port 48-2 is looped-back on itself. Port 48-3 is unused.

[0038] The number of switchable deflectors or mirrors for an NN switch as in FIG. 4 is [N(N+1)/2]−1. This is slightly larger than the number used by the switch 1Oa of FIG. 2 without loop-back. However, it is still approximately one/half the number required by the switch 10.

[0039] There are a variety of possible physical implementations. The deflectors or mirrors can move in and out of position by using either a sliding or tilting mechanism. They could be non-moving multi-state solid state deflectors. The input and output fibers should be rested on V-grooves for better alignment with the collimating lenses. The lenses, deflectors or mirrors, and v-grooves may all be part of a MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) platform. It will be understood that the details of implementation of the various deflectors or mirrors are not limitations of the present invention.

[0040] Switch configurations, such as 1Oa, 1Ob and 1Oc can be used as building blocks to create larger multi-stage switches for reciprocal traffic. FIG. 5 illustrates an exemplary multi-stage switch 60 of a known type as disclosed in published PCT application WO 00/14583, assigned to the assignee hereof.

[0041] As illustrated in FIG. 5, the switch 60 employs two groups of switching modules 62 and 64. The first group of modules 62 includes a plurality of (L,2L−1)-way modules 1−M. The (L,2L−1)-way modules 62 can be implemented in a variety of ways, as would be understood by those of skill in the art and are not a limitation of the present invention. The second group of modules 64 includes a plurality of M-way reciprocal switching modules 1−2L 311. The M-way modules 64 can be implemented in accordance with the principles of any of the modules described above in connection with FIGS. 2-4.

[0042] The modules 62 are connected to the modules 64 so the externally disposed I/O ports 66 handle reciprocal traffic in a non-blocking fashion. To this end, the modules are interconnected by optical fibers as illustrated in the exemplary switch 60 of FIG. 5. It will be understood that a variety of switch architectures using modules 1Oa, 1Ob, 1Oc, could be implemented in multi-stage switches to support reciprocal switch traffic without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

[0043] From the foregoing, it will be observed that numerous variations and modifications may be effected without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. It is to be understood that no limitation with respect to the specific apparatus illustrated herein is intended or should be inferred. It is, of course, intended to cover by the appended claims all such modifications as fall within the scope of the claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8266321 *Jun 12, 2007Sep 11, 2012Cloudsoft Corporation LimitedSelf-managed distributed mediation networks
US8307112Jul 30, 2004Nov 6, 2012Cloudsoft Corporation LimitedMediated information flow
US20080016198 *Jun 12, 2007Jan 17, 2008Enigmatec CorporationSelf-managed distributed mediation networks
US20120209980 *Apr 26, 2012Aug 16, 2012Cloudsoft Corporation LimitedSelf-managed distributed mediation networks
Classifications
U.S. Classification385/17
International ClassificationG02B6/35, H04Q11/00
Cooperative ClassificationH04Q2011/0039, H04Q2011/0024, G02B6/3512, H04Q2011/003, H04Q2011/0058, G02B6/3542, H04Q11/0005, H04Q2011/0056, G02B6/3546
European ClassificationH04Q11/00P2, G02B6/35N2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 6, 2013ASAssignment
Owner name: CERBERUS BUSINESS FINANCE, LLC, AS COLLATERAL AGEN
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:TELLABS OPERATIONS, INC.;TELLABS RESTON, LLC (FORMERLY KNOWN AS TELLABS RESTON, INC.);WICHORUS, LLC (FORMERLY KNOWN AS WICHORUS, INC.);REEL/FRAME:031768/0155
Effective date: 20131203
Aug 28, 2013FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
Apr 22, 2009FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
May 12, 2005FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Apr 25, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: TELLABS OPERATIONS, INC., ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MILLS, JAMES D.;LIN, PHILIP J.;HOLMSTROM, ROGER P.;REEL/FRAME:011745/0090;SIGNING DATES FROM 20010226 TO 20010302
Owner name: TELLABS OPERATIONS, INC. 4951 INDIANA AVENUE LISLE
Owner name: TELLABS OPERATIONS, INC. 4951 INDIANA AVENUELISLE,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MILLS, JAMES D. /AR;REEL/FRAME:011745/0090;SIGNING DATESFROM 20010226 TO 20010302