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Publication numberUS20020020403 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/923,380
Publication dateFeb 21, 2002
Filing dateAug 8, 2001
Priority dateAug 9, 2000
Publication number09923380, 923380, US 2002/0020403 A1, US 2002/020403 A1, US 20020020403 A1, US 20020020403A1, US 2002020403 A1, US 2002020403A1, US-A1-20020020403, US-A1-2002020403, US2002/0020403A1, US2002/020403A1, US20020020403 A1, US20020020403A1, US2002020403 A1, US2002020403A1
InventorsWilliam Troubridge
Original AssigneeTroubridge William C.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Recoil energy dissipation system for archery equipment
US 20020020403 A1
Abstract
A bow, preferably a crossbow, is provided herein. The bow is provided with a recoil energy dissipation system. When applied to a crossbow, the crossbow comprises a stock member including a barrel at a forward portion thereof, the barrel being configured for supporting an arrow for firing of the crossbow. A riser block assembly is provided at a forward end of the barrel, the riser block assembly supporting first and second bow limbs extending outwardly, the first and second bow limbs carrying a bowstring between the outward tips thereof, and extending transversely to the barrel. The stock member further has a trigger mechanism associated therewith selectively to hold and release the bowstring from a cocked position in which the bowstring is drawn in a direction away from the first and second bow limbs to tension the bow limbs. The recoil energy dissipation mechanism includes an associated flexible attachment arm which is secured at one end to the riser block assembly and which extends from the riser block assembly to each bow limb, and an energy-absorbing member which is secured to each flexible arm and is in contact with an associated bow limb, thereby to reduce vibrations and noise without sacrificing significant projectile velocity.
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Claims(22)
1. A recoil energy dissipation system for an archery device, said archery device including a pair of bow limbs having a central grip and the ends of which are connected by a bow string, said energy dissipation system including an associated flexible arm extending from the central grip to each bow limb and an energy-absorbing member secured to each said flexible arm and in contact with said associated bow arm, thereby to reduce vibrations and noise without sacrificing projectile velocity.
2. The recoil energy dissipation system according to claim 1, wherein each said energy-absorbing member is in contact with an associated said bow limb at an area where said bow limb is subject to significant displacement during shooting.
3. A crossbow having a recoil energy dissipation mechanism, said crossbow comprising:
a stock member including a barrel at a forward portion thereof, said barrel being configured for supporting an arrow for firing of said crossbow;
a riser block assembly at a forward end of said barrel, said riser block assembly supporting first and second bow limbs extending outwardly, said first and second bow limbs carrying a bowstring between the outward tips thereof, and extending transversely to said barrel;
said stock member further having a trigger mechanism associated therewith selectively to hold and release said bowstring from a cocked position in which said bowstring is drawn in a direction away from said first and second bow limbs to tension said bow limbs; and
a recoil energy dissipation mechanism comprising an associated flexible attachment arm which is secured at one end to said riser block assembly and which extends from said riser block assembly to each said bow limb, and an energy-absorbing member which is secured to each said flexible attachment arm and is in contact with an associated said limb, thereby to reduce vibrations and noise without sacrificing significant projectile velocity.
4. The crossbow having a recoil energy dissipation system as claimed in claim 3, wherein each said energy-absorbing member is in contact with an associated said bow limb at an area where said bow limb is subject to significant displacement during shooting.
5. A crossbow having a recoil energy dissipation mechanism, said crossbow comprising:
a stock member including a barrel at a forward portion thereof, said barrel being configured for supporting an arrow for firing of said crossbow;
a riser block assembly at a forward end of said barrel, said riser block assembly supporting first and second bow limbs extending outwardly, said first and second bow limbs carrying a bowstring between the outward tips thereof, and extending transversely to said barrel;
said stock member further having a trigger mechanism associated therewith selectively to hold and release said bowstring from a cocked position in which said bowstring is drawn in a direction away from said first and second bow limbs to tension said bow limbs; and
a recoil energy dissipation mechanism comprising a primary system and a secondary system,
said primary system being constituted by an associated flexible attachment arm which is secured at one end to said riser block assembly and which extends from said riser block assembly to each said bow limb, and a first energy-absorbing member which is secured to each said flexible attachment arm and is in contact with an associated bow limb, thereby to reduce vibrations and noise without sacrificing significant projectile velocity; and
said secondary system being constituted by a second block of an energy-absorbing material which is secured between each said flexible arm and each associated said riser block assembly at a position between the secured end of each said flexible arm and each said first energy-absorbing system.
6. The crossbow having the recoil energy dissipation mechanism according to claim 5, wherein said energy-absorbing member being in contact with an associated said bow limb at an area where said bow limb is subject to significant displacement during shooting.
7. The archery device according to claim 1, including an auxiliary energy dissipation system, said auxiliary energy dissipation system comprising:
a rod extending perpendicular to the free end of an associated said flexible arm; and
counterweights extending laterally from said rod, an associated said counterweight being secured to an associated side of said rod by an associated auxiliary energy-absorbing member.
8. The archery device according to claim 3, including an auxiliary energy dissipation system, said auxiliary energy dissipation system comprising:
a rod extending perpendicular to the free end of an associated said flexible arm; and
counterweights extending laterally from said rod, an associated said counterweight being secured to an associated side of said rod by an associated auxiliary energy-absorbing member.
9. A crossbow having a recoil energy dissipation mechanic, said crossbow comprising:
a stock member including a barrel at a forward portion thereof, said barrel being configured for supporting an arrow for firing of said crossbow;
a riser block assembly at a forward end of said barrel, said riser block assembly supporting first and second bow limbs extending outwardly, said first and second bow limbs carrying a bowstring between the outward tips thereof, and extending transversely to said barrel;
said stock member further having a trigger mechanism associated therewith selectively to hold and release said bowstring from a cocked position in which said bowstring is drawn in a direction away from said first and second bow limbs to tension said bow limbs;
a recoil energy dissipation mechanism comprising a primary system and an auxiliary system;
said primary system being constituted by an associated flexible attachment arm which is secured at one end to said riser block assembly and which extends from said riser block assembly to each said bow limb, and an energy-absorbing member which is secured to each said flexible arm and is in contact with an associated said limb, thereby to reduce vibrations and noise without sacrificing significant projectile velocity; and
said auxiliary energy dissipation mechanism being constituted by a rod extending perpendicular to the free end of an associated said flexible arm, and counterweights extending laterally from said rod, an associated said counterweight being secured to an associated side of said rod by an associated auxiliary energy-absorbing member.
10. The recoil energy dissipation system according to claim 9, wherein each said energy-absorbing member is in contact with an associated said bow limb at an area where said bow limb is subject to significant displacement during shooting.
11. A cross bow having a recoil energy dissipation mechanism, said crossbow comprising:
a stock member including a barrel at a forward portion thereof, said barrel being configured for supporting an arrow for firing of said crossbow;
a riser block assembly at a forward end of said barrel, said riser block assembly supporting first and second bow limbs extending outwardly, said first and second bow limbs carrying a bowstring between the outward tips thereof, and extending transversely to said barrel;
said stock member further having a trigger mechanism associated therewith to selectively hold and release said bowstring from a cocked position in which said bowstring is drawn in a direction away from said first and second bow limbs to tension said bow limbs;
a recoil energy dissipation mechanism comprising a primary system, a secondary system and an auxiliary system;
said primary system constituted by an associated flexible attachment arm which is secured at one end to said riser block assembly and which extends from said riser block assembly to each said bow limb, and a first energy-absorbing member which is secured to said flexible arm and which is in contact with an associated bow limb, thereby to reduce vibrations and noise without sacrificing significant projectile velocity;
said secondary system being constituted by a second block of an energy absorbing material which is secured between each said flexible attachment arm and each said riser block assembly at a position between the secured end of said flexible attachment arm and each said first energy-absorbing system; and
said auxiliary energy dissipation mechanism being constituted by a rod extending perpendicular to the free end of an associated said flexible attachment arm, and counterweights extending laterally from said rod, each said counterweight being secured to an associated side of said rod by an associated auxiliary energy-absorbing member.
12. The recoil energy dissipation system according to claim 11, wherein each said energy-absorbing member is in contact with an associated said bow limb at an area where said bow limb is subject to significant displacement during shooting.
13. The bow of claim 1, wherein said energy absorbing material is a polyurethane.
14. The crossbow of claim 3, wherein said energy absorbing material is a polyurethane.
15. The crossbow of claim 5, wherein said energy absorbing material is a polyurethane.
16. The crossbow of claim 9, wherein said energy absorbing material is a polyurethane.
17. The crossbow of claim 11, wherein said energy absorbing material is a polyurethane.
18. The bow of claim 1, wherein said flexible arm is formed of aluminum.
19. The crossbow of claim 3, wherein said flexible arm is formed of aluminum.
20. The crossbow of claim 5, wherein said flexible arm is formed of aluminum.
21. The crossbow of claim 9, wherein said flexible arm is formed of aluminum.
22. The crossbow of claim 11, wherein said flexible arm is formed of aluminum.
Description
RELATED INVENTION

[0001] This application is a continuation-in-part of provisional application Serial No. 60/223,996, filed Aug. 9, 2000.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] 1. FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0003] The present invention relates to archery equipment, including crossbows. In particular, it relates to improving performance of archery equipment and especially crossbows, by absorbing recoil energy (i.e., vibrations and noise) without sacrificing projectile velocity.

[0004] 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART

[0005] Archery bows are available in a variety of forms. Long bows, recurve bows, compound bows and other bows are all basically intended to propel an arrow through the flecture of limbs that transfer the stored energy through such flecture to the arrow through a bow string. A recurve bow may incorporate a rigid handle section to which an opposing pair of flexible limbs are secured in a manner unique to recurve bows and familiar to those in the archery industry. Similarly, a compound bow is provided with a rigid handle portion to which flexible limbs are secured; long bows and similar types of archery bows are usually constructed with the handle and limbs formed in a unitary structure without a discernibly separate handle portion or limbs. Other archery bows are those wherein the limbs are separable from the handle. Compound bows differ from most bows in that they include wheels or cams attached at the free ends of the limbs to obtain a mechanical advantage in bending the bow. Typically, two eccentrics are used, with lacing wound from an anchor at one end of a first limb to the eccentric at the end of the other limb, to the eccentric at the first end, then back to an anchor at the other end. The middle span between the eccentrics contain the serving or region for receiving the nock of the arrow. Lacing can refer to a single piece bowstring or a three piece line comprising two end cables connected by a central stretch between the wheels which forms the bowstring.

[0006] Crossbows were developed to assist the user in holding the bowstring in the drawn position and relieve the tension applied to arms of the user when holding the bowstring in the drawn position while sighting a target. In a crossbow, a longitudinally-extending main beam, commonly called the stock member, includes a trigger mechanism which holds the crossbow bowstring in the drawn position, allowing the user to sight a target without manually holding and maintaining the draw weight. This allows the stiffness of the bow limbs to be increased significantly. Modern crossbows can have bowstring pull weights of 150 pounds or more.

[0007] Crossbows conventionally include an elongated barrel of wood, metal or composite composition that essentially forms a mounting base for the remainder of the crossbow hardware. A pair of resilient limbs of wood or composite composition project in opposite directions from one end of the barrel, with the free ends of the limbs being joined by a bowstring cable. A support is provided on the upper surface of the barrel for holding a bolt. A trigger mechanism is carried by the barrel for engaging and holding the bowstring cable in the drawn or cocked position, and for selectively releasing the cable so as to propel the bolt from the bow. The crossbow operates in the following general manner. A stirrup on the crossbow is placed against the ground and the foot of the shooter is placed within the stirrup. The shooter then draws the bowstring cable against the force of the bow limbs storing energy in the bow limbs. When the bowstring cable is fully drawn, it is held in position by the crossbow trigger mechanism. The bolt is placed on a guide in the crossbow in proximity to the cocked bowstring cable. When the shooter actuates the trigger mechanism, the bowstring cable is released and the energy stored in the bow limbs propels the bolt from the crossbow.

[0008] The control of leftover energy which results from the firing of an archery device in the form of vibration and noise have, in the past, centered around hydraulic or mechanical dampening devices which were attached to the non-working portion of the bows and which acted independently of the limbs. One known means of controlling recoil forces which attached to, and acted upon, the working portion of the limbs was Simms Vibration Laboratories' LIMB SAVERS™ which used energy absorbing materials, but which reduced arrow velocity somewhat.

[0009] Noise reduction had also been accomplished by the use of string silencers. However such string silencers did not have an effect on vibration and they reduced projectile velocity. The problem with archery equipment, namely, the leftover energy resulting from the firing of archery equipment, is analogous to that which existed in the recoil of firearms. Such problem was solved, for example, in the following U.S. patents:

[0010] U.S. Pat. No. 5,410,833, patented May 2, 1995, by D. R. Paterson which provided a recoil absorbing firearm stock butt portion which was interconnected to a stock grip portion by a compressible strut.

[0011] U.S. Pat. No. 5,519,957, patented May 28, 1996, by L. Iannetta, which provided a gun stock recoil mechanism in which the butt end of the stock and barrel end were interconnected by a movable cheek piece.

[0012] U.S. Pat. No. 5,979,098, patented Nov. 9, 1999, by J. P. Griggs, which provided a recoil absorber and redirector mechanism for a gun stock in which the butt end of the stock included two members which were normally biassed to align, but which moved laterally of each other under recoil.

[0013] There are also many patents which are alleged to solve the problem of noise and vibration resulting from the above-described leftover energy resultant from the use of an archery bow. Among those patents are the following U.S. patents:

[0014] U.S. Pat. No. 4,080,951, patented Mar. 28, 1978, to E. W. Bateman III, which provided an archery bow string silencer in the form of fibrous material secured to a flexible support which was connected to the bow string.

[0015] U.S. Pat. No. 4,570,608, patented Feb. 18, 1986, by E. W. Masterfield, which provided an archery bow stabilizer and vibration damper in the form of an energy dissipating rod which was fixed to, and projected from, a stud which was rigidly embedded in the archery bow.

[0016] U.S. Pat. No. 4,893,606, patented Jan. 16, 1990, by F. W. Sisko, which provided a vibration damper in the form of an internal, flow-limiting structure and high density fluid inertial mass which projected from the handle of the bow.

[0017] U.S. Pat. No. 5,016,602, patented May 21, 1991, by R. S. Mizek, which provided a bow stabilizer to reduce recoil, shock and vibration forces and noise. This was in the form of a hollow body which was partially filled with granular solids, and which projected from the handle of the bow.

[0018] U.S. Pat. No. 5,016,604, patented May 21, 1991, by V. J. Tilby, which provided a string silencer for an archery bow in the form of a double-faced fleece polyester fabric.

[0019] U.S. Pat. No. 5,285,767, patented Feb. 15, 1994, by R. Padilla, which provided an archery shock absorption device in the form of a flexible connection, (i.e., an elastomeric member) of selected resilience in the structural path between the handle riser of an archery bow and the sighting element of the archery bow.

[0020] U.S. Pat. No. 5,411,009, patented May 2, 1995, to M. P. Thompson et al, which provided an apparatus for eliminating noise and vibration in the form of a fluid-filled tube which was mounted horizontally to the bow, body and an energy dissipating rod which was fixed to, and projected from, a stud which was rigidly embedded in the archery bow.

[0021] U.S. Pat. No. 5,452,704, patented Sep. 26, 1995, by D. W. Winebarger, which provided a device for dampening bowstring vibration in the form of arms normally sprung to a closed position, the arms being faced with cushioning material to embrace the undrawn bowstring.

[0022] U.S. Pat. No. 5,517,979, patented May 21, 1996, by R. A. Closson, which provided a stock absorber device for a bow which was mounted on the bow. The device included a mount which was movable by expansion or compression of a spring in response to the shock generated by the bow.

[0023] U.S. Pat. No. 5,553,596, patented Sep. 10, 1996, by W. J. Bednar, which provided a crossbow having a vibration damping mechanism which generally comprised a stock member including a barrel at a forward portion thereof, with the barrel used to support an arrow for firing of the crossbow. A riser block assembly was mounted at a forward end of the barrel, with the riser block assembly supporting first and second bow limbs which extended outward from the riser block assembly. The first and second bow limbs carried a bowstring between the outward tips thereof, and the bowstring extended transversely to the barrel. The crossbow further included a trigger mechanism with the trigger mechanism used selectively to hold and release the bowstring from a cocked position. In the cocked position, the bowstring was drawn in a direction away from the first and second bow limbs to tension the bow limbs. The vibration damping mechanism was disposed to interface at a location between the bow limbs and the stock, e.g., between the riser block assembly and the barrel or bow limb supports. In this way, vibrations transmitted from the bow limbs upon activation of the trigger mechanism to release the bowstring were said to be damped to minimize vibrations transmitted through the barrel or stock. The vibration damping mechanism was said to result in significant noise reduction upon firing of the crossbow.

[0024] Examples of such vibration damping devices of this patent included a bushing member which was configured to form a substantially-complete interface between a riser block assembly and the barrel. The bushing member was formed of a compressible material, providing a resilient interface between the riser block assembly and the barrel, with vibrations generated in the riser block assembly upon firing of the crossbow being damped by the bushing member. The bushing member was preferably made of NYLOTRON™ The bushing was disposed between a riser block assembly and barrel, the bushing including a mating structure for mating with the barrel, the mating structure engaging at least a portion of the barrel substantially to insulate it from vibrations generated with the riser block assembly.

[0025] U.S. Pat. No. 5,595,168, patented Jan. 21, 1997, by T. G. Martin, which provided a damping apparatus including a semi-solid substance which was attached to an archery bow. Examples of such semi-solid substance included a gel, a urethane or a rubber.

[0026] U.S. Pat. No. 5,772,541, patented Jun. 30, 1998, by J. Buiatti, which provided a vibration damping device for a hand-held implement, e.g., a baseball bat, an archery bow or a hammer. The device included a chamber having a low modular, viscoelastic elastomer member freely movable in the chamber. The chamber was attached to the hand held implement. The vibration damping device can be attached to the bow knobs of an archery bow.

[0027] U.S. Pat. No. 6,257,220, patented Jul. 10, 2001, by M. A. McPherson et al, which provided a damping device for an archery bow. The damping device included a counterweight which was molded to a resilient member which was mounted in the handle, the riser, or the limbs of the bow.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION AIMS OF THE INVENTION

[0028] In spite of the above alleged solutions to the problem, there is still a need for a damping device to be incorporated into a bow to absorb excess energy, thereby reducing hard shock, noise and bow vibration.

[0029] Accordingly, it is a first object of the present invention to provide a novel archery silencer.

[0030] A second object of this invention is to provide improved vibration damping for archery bows, without significantly reducing projectile velocity.

[0031] A third object of this invention is to provide an improved device that reduces recoil, shock, vibration and noise that results when an arrow is discharged from an archery bow, without significantly reducing arrow velocity.

[0032] A fourth object of this invention is to provide a crossbow which dampens vibrations generated from the crossbow limbs upon firing, particularly vibrations which would be transmitted to the barrel and other portions of the crossbow held by the user, without significantly reducing arrow velocity.

[0033] A fifth object of this invention is to provide an improved such device for quickly dampening unwanted vibrations in a crossbow to minimize the transmission thereof to the hands of the user, without significantly reducing projectile velocity.

[0034] A sixth object of this invention is to provide an improved such device that can be attached easily to an archery bow, especially, a crossbow.

[0035] A seventh object of this invention is to provide an improved such device which is simple in construction and is easy to manufacture and use.

STATEMENT OF INVENTION

[0036] The present invention provides a recoil energy dissipation system for an archery device including a pair of bow limbs having a central grip and the ends of which are connected by a bow string. The recoil energy dissipation system includes a respective flexible arm extending from the central grip to each bow limb and an energy-absorbing member secured to each flexible arm and in contact with the associated bow arm. The energy-absorbing member is preferably in contact with an associated bow limb at an area where the bow limb is subject to significant displacement during shooting, thereby to reduce vibrations and noise without sacrificing projectile velocity.

[0037] The present invention also provides a crossbow having a recoil energy dissipation mechanism. The crossbow includes a stock member including a barrel at a forward portion thereof, the barrel being configured for supporting an arrow for firing of the crossbow. A riser block assembly is provided at a forward end of the barrel, the riser block assembly supporting first and second bow limbs extending outwardly, the first and second bow limbs carrying a bowstring between the outward tips thereof, and extending transversely to the barrel. The stock member further includes a trigger mechanism associated therewith selectively to hold and release the bowstring from a cocked position, in which the bowstring is drawn in a direction away from the first and second bow limbs to tension the bow limbs. A recoil energy dissipation mechanism is provided. The recoil energy dissipation mechanism includes a respective flexible arm secured at one end to the riser block assembly and extending from the riser to each bow limb. An energy-absorbing member is secured to each flexible arm and is in contact with an associated limb. Preferably, the energy-absorbing member is in contact with an associated bow limb at an area where the bow limb is subject to significant displacement during shooting, thereby to reduce vibrations and noise without sacrificing significant projectile velocity.

[0038] The present invention also provides a crossbow having a recoil energy dissipation mechanism. The crossbow includes a stock member including a barrel at a forward portion thereof, the barrel being configured for supporting an arrow for firing of the crossbow. A riser block assembly is provided at a forward end of the barrel, the riser block assembly supporting first and second bow limbs extending outwardly, the first and second bow limbs carrying a bowstring between the outward tips thereof, and extending transversely to the barrel. The stock member further has a trigger mechanism associated therewith selectively to hold and release the bowstring from a cocked position, in which the bowstring is drawn in a direction away from the first and second bow limbs to tension the bow limbs. A recoil energy dissipation mechanism is provided comprising a primary system and a secondary system. The primary system is constituted by an associated flexible arm which is secured at one end to the riser block assembly and which extends from the riser block assembly to each bow limb, and a first energy-absorbing member which is secured to each flexible arm and is in contact with an associated bow limb. Preferably, the energy-absorbing member is in contact with an associated bow limb at an area where the bow limb is subject to significant displacement during shooting, thereby to reduce vibrations and noise without sacrificing significant projectile velocity. The secondary system is constituted by a second block of an energy absorbing material which is secured between each associated flexible arm and the riser block assembly at a position between the secured end of the associated flexible arm and the first energy-absorbing system.

[0039] The present invention also provides a crossbow having a recoil energy dissipation mechanism. The crossbow includes a stock member including a barrel at a forward portion thereof, the barrel being configured for supporting an arrow for firing of the crossbow. A riser block assembly is provided at a forward end of the barrel, the riser block assembly supporting first and second bow limbs extending outwardly, the first and second bow limbs carrying a bowstring between the outward tips thereof, and extending transversely to the barrel. The stock member further has a trigger mechanism associated therewith selectively to hold and release the bowstring from a cocked position in which the bowstring is drawn in a direction away from the first and second bow limbs to tension the bow limbs. The crossbow also includes a recoil energy dissipation mechanism comprising a primary system and an auxiliary system. The primary system is constituted by an associated flexible arm secured at one end to the riser block assembly and extending from the riser to each bow limb, and an energy-absorbing member which is secured to each flexible arm and is in contact with an associated limb. Preferably, the energy-absorbing member is in contact with an associated bow limb at an area where the bow limb is subject to significant deflection during shooting, thereby to reduce vibrations and noise without sacrificing significant projectile velocity. The auxiliary energy dissipation mechanism is constituted by a rod extending perpendicular to the free end of an associated flexible arm, and counterweights extending laterally from the rod, an associated counterweight being secured to each side of the rod by an associated auxiliary energy-absorbing member.

[0040] The present invention also provides a crossbow having a recoil energy dissipation mechanism. The crossbow includes a stock member including a barrel at a forward portion thereof, the barrel being configured for supporting an arrow for firing of the crossbow. A riser block assembly is provided at a forward end of the barrel, the riser block assembly supporting first and second bow limbs extending outwardly, the first and second bow limbs carrying a bowstring between the outward tips thereof, and extending transversely to the barrel. The stock member further has a trigger mechanism associated therewith selectively to hold and release the bowstring from a cocked position in which the bowstring is drawn in a direction away from the first and second bow limbs to tension the bow limbs. The crossbow also includes a recoil energy dissipation mechanism comprising a primary system, a secondary system and an auxiliary system. The primary system is constituted by an associated flexible arm which is secured at one end to the riser block assembly, and extends from the riser block assembly to each bow limb, and a first energy-absorbing member which is secured to each flexible arm and is in contact with an associated bow limb. The energy-absorbing member preferably is in contact with an associated bow limb at an area where the bow limb is subject to significant deflection during shooting, thereby to reduce vibrations and noise without sacrificing significant projectile velocity. The secondary system is constituted by a second block of an energy-absorbing material which is secured between each associated flexible arm and the riser block assembly at a position between the secured end of the flexible arm and the first energy-absorbing system. The auxiliary system is constituted by a rod extending perpendicular to the free end of an associated the flexible arm, and counterweights extending laterally from the rod, a counterweight being secured to each side of the rod by an associated auxiliary energy-absorbing member.

OTHER FEATURES OF THE INVENTION

[0041] By a first feature of this invention, the energy absorbing system includes an auxiliary energy dissipation mechanism including a rod extending perpendicular to the free end of an associated the flexible arm, and a counterweight extending laterally from each side of the rod, the counterweight being secured to the rod by an associated auxiliary energy-absorbing member.

[0042] By a second feature of this invention, the energy absorbing material is an elastomeric polymer, e.g., a polyurethane, e.g., SORBOTHANE™ or NAVCOM™.

[0043] By a third feature of this invention, the flexible arm is formed from aluminum, or spring steel, or from a high density polyethylene, or from a high density polypropylene or from LEXAN™ or from fiberglass-reinforced nylon.

GENERALIZED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0044] The recoil energy dissipation system of this invention is comprised of an arm or arms in which a pad of an energy-absorbing material of appropriate thickness or another energy absorbing device, is in contact with the front of the limbs in such a way that the forward momentum of the limbs upon firing the bow, causes them to impact with the energy or energy-absorbing device. The series of reverberations which follows this initial contact are quickly stabilized, thus reducing noise, cycle time, and vibrations without significantly reducing projectile velocity. Further absorption is possible by the addition of additional flexible devices to the pad positioning arms to augment the dampening effects of the energy absorbing materials.

[0045] The pad positioning arm or arms can be either attached directly to the limbs or risers of the bow, or, in the case of crossbows, may be attached to the stock.

[0046] The present invention has been shown drastically to reduce both noise and vibration without any significant loss of velocity.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0047] In the accompanying drawings,

[0048]FIG. 1 is a partial plan view, near the center line of the bow of an archery device, to which the recoil energy dissipation system of one embodiment of the invention has been applied;

[0049]FIG. 2 is a partial plan view, near the center line of the crossbow, of a crossbow to which the recoil energy dissipation system of a second embodiment of the invention has been applied;

[0050]FIG. 3 is a partial plan view, near the center line of the crossbow, of a crossbow to which the recoil energy dissipation system of a third embodiment of the invention has been applied.

[0051]FIG. 4 is a partial schematic view of an auxiliary recoil energy dissipation device which can be applied to the embodiments shown in FIG. 1, FIG. 2 and FIG. 3;

[0052]FIG. 5 is a partial plan view, near the center line of the crossbow, of a crossbow to which the recoil energy dissipation system of a third embodiment of the invention including a plan view of an auxiliary energy dissipation device as depicted in FIG. 4, has been applied; and

[0053]FIG. 6 is an isometric view of a crossbow to which a recoil energy dissipation system of this invention has been applied.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS DESCRIPTION OF FIG. 1

[0054] As seen in FIG. 1, this embodiment of the invention is applied to a conventional archery bow 10, only a small portion of which is shown. The archery bow, as is conventional, includes a pair of bow limbs, only one of which 12 is shown, which are separated by a conventional hand grip 14. The ends of the bow limbs are joined by a bow string (not seen).

[0055] A flexible attachment arm 16, which may be formed of aluminum, spring steel, high density polyethylene, high density polypropylene, fiberglass-reinforced nylon or LEXAN™ is secured, by means of screw 18, to the hand grip 14.

[0056] The free end 20 of the flexible arm 16 is provided with a block of an energy-absorbing member 22, which is secured thereto by means of a screw 24 and a rigid spacer 26.

[0057] As seen in FIG. 1, one face 28 of the energy-absorbing member 22 is in contact with the bow limb 12 when the bow limb 12 is at rest, but the bow limb 12 moves away from the energy-absorbing member 22 when the bow is drawn.

[0058] The energy absorbing pad is a deformable material with the capacity to absorb vibrations. The energy-absorbing material may be an elastomeric polymer, e.g., a polyurethane, e.g., SORBOTHANE™ or NAVCOM™. Alternatively, it may consist of a very shallow cylinder which is attached to the arm. The cylinder may be filled with any suitable fluid.

[0059] Thus, it is seen that the energy-absorbing member 22 is rigidly fixed to the flexible attachment arm 16 in such a way that the limb 12 is in contact with the energy-absorbing member 22 when at rest, but is not in contact with the energy-absorbing member 22 when drawn (shown in broken lines).

[0060] The length of the attachment arm 16 and the attachment of the energy-absorbing member 22 thereto is such that the energy-absorbing member 22 is preferably in contact with the bow limb 12 at an area where the bow limb 12 is subjected to significant displacement during shooting. In this way vibration and noise are significantly reduced, without sacrificing significant projectile velocity.

DESCRIPTION OF FIG. 2

[0061] As seen in FIG. 2, this embodiment of the invention is applied to a crossbow 50, only a small portion of which is shown. The crossbow, as is conventional, includes a pair of bow limbs, only one of which 52 is shown which are separated by, and is secured to, a conventional riser 54. The ends of the bow limbs are joined by a bow string (not seen). The central stirrup 55 is also partly shown.

[0062] A flexible attachment arm 56 which may be formed of aluminum, spring steel, high density polyethylene, high density polypropylene, fiberglass-reinforced nylon or LEXAN™, is secured, by means of screw 58 to the riser 54.

[0063] The free end 60 of the flexible attachment arm 56 is provided with a block of an energy-absorbing member 62, which is secured thereto by means of a screw 64 and a rigid spacer 66.

[0064] As seen in FIG. 2, one face 68 of energy-absorbing member 62 is in contact with the bow limb 52 when the limb 52 is at rest, but the bow limb 52 moves away from the energy-absorbing member 62 when the bow is drawn.

[0065] The energy absorbing member 62 is a deformable material with the capacity to absorb vibrations. The energy-absorbing material may be an elastomeric polymer, e.g., a polyurethane, e.g., SORBOTHANE™ or NAVCOM™. Alternatively, it may consist of a very shallow cylinder which is attached to the arm. The cylinder may be filled with any suitable fluid.

[0066] Thus, it is seen that the energy-absorbing member 62 is rigidly fixed to the flexible attachment arm 56 in such a way that the bow limb 52 is in contact with the energy-absorbing member 62 when at rest, but is not in contact with the energy-absorbing member 62 when drawn (shown in broken lines).

[0067] The length of the attachment arm 56 and the attachment of the energy-absorbing member 62 thereto is such that the energy-absorbing member 62 is preferably in contact with the bow limb 52 at an area where the bow limb 52 is subjected to significant displacement during shooting. In this way vibrations and noise are significantly reduced, without sacrificing significant projectile velocity.

DESCRIPTION OF FIG. 3

[0068] As seen in FIG. 3, this embodiment of the invention is applied to a crossbow 70, only a small portion of which is shown. The crossbow, as is conventional, includes a pair of bow limbs, only one of which 72 is shown, which are separated by, and secured to, a conventional riser 74. The ends of the bow limbs are joined by a bow string (not seen). The central stirrup 75 is also partly shown.

[0069] A flexible attachment arm 76 which may be formed of aluminum, spring steel, high density polyethylene, high density polypropylene, fiberglass-reinforced nylon or LEXAN™ is secured, by means of screw 78 to the riser 74.

[0070] The free end 80 of the flexible attachment arm 76 is provided with a block of a primary energy-absorbing member 82, which is secured thereto by means of a screw 84 and a rigid spacer 86.

[0071] As seen in FIG. 3, one face 88 of energy-absorbing member 62 is in contact with the bow limb 72 when the limb 72 is at rest, but the bow limb 72 moves away from the energy-absorbing member 82 when the bow is drawn.

[0072] The primary energy absorbing pad 82 is a deformable material with the capacity to absorb vibrations. The energy-absorbing material may be an elastomeric polymer, e.g., a polyurethane, e.g., SORBOTHANE™ or NAVCOM™. Alternatively, it may consist of a very shallow cylinder which is attached to the arm. The cylinder may be filled with any suitable fluid.

[0073] Further shock absorption can be gained by the provision of a secondary energy-absorbing member. This is achieved by the addition of appropriate energy absorbing material or other energy-absorbing device under the flexible attachment arm 76 by use of a secondary mounting system. Thus, a secondary energy-absorbing material 90 is secured to each of the bow limbs between the secured end of each attachment arm 76 and each primary energy-absorbing material 82 by means of screw 92. This securement may be to the bow limb 72 itself, or to the bow limb 72 at the area of the riser 74.

[0074] Thus, it is seen that the primary energy-absorbing member 82 is rigidly fixed to each flexible attachment arm 76 in such a way that the limb 62 is in contact with the energy-absorbing member 82 when at rest, but is not in contact when drawn (shown in broken lines).

[0075] The length of the attachment arm 76 and the attachment of the primary energy-absorbing member 82 thereto is preferably such that each the energy-absorbing member 82 is in contact with each bow limb 72 at an area where each bow limb 72 is subjected to significant displacement during shooting. In this way vibrations and noise are significantly reduced, without sacrificing significant projectile velocity.

DESCRIPTION OF FIG. 4

[0076] Even further sound and vibration absorption to the embodiments shown in FIG. 1, FIG. 2 or FIG. 3 may be gained by the use of an additional arm which is perpendicular to the flexible attachment arm near the primary energy absorption pad. Thus, as seen in FIG. 4, an additional arm 100 is perpendicular to the end 20, 60, 80 of attachment arm 16, 56, 72. Counterweights, namely left-hand counterweight 102 and right hand counterweight 103, are secured to left and right hand sides respectively of arm 100 through the intermediary of a stem of additional left hand energy-absorbing material 104 and right hand energy-absorbing material 105, respectively.

DESCRIPTION OF FIG. 5

[0077]FIG. 5 shows the combination of the further sound and vibration absorption embodiment of FIG. 4 to the embodiment of FIG. 3. Consequently, since the description is believed to be self explanatory, no additional description is provided herein.

DESCRIPTION OF FIG. 6

[0078]FIG. 6 shows a crossbow 600, including a stock 602 and a trigger mechanism 604. The riser 606 is attached to the forward end of the stock 602 and is provided with a stirrup 608. The recoil and energy dissipation system of embodiments of the present invention is shown as attachment arms 610, 611, primary energy-absorbing blocks 612, 613 and secondary energy-absorbing materials 614, 615. An arrow 616 is shown in the cocked position, with the bow string 618 secured by the trigger mechanism 604.

CONCLUSION

[0079] From the foregoing description, one skilled in the art can easily ascertain the essential characteristics of this invention, and without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, can make various changes and modifications of the invention to adapt it to various usages and conditions. Consequently, such changes and modifications are properly, equitably, and “intended” to be, within the full range of equivalence of the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6889462 *Sep 5, 2003May 10, 2005Robert M. BayerHarmonic stabilizer system for rifle barrel and a rifle equipped therewith
US7438070Jan 11, 2006Oct 21, 2008Mancini Ralph JArchery bow having improved design to absorb shock and reduce vibration
US7708000May 19, 2008May 4, 2010Mancini Ralph JArchery bow having improved design to absorb shock reduce vibration
US7793645 *Oct 11, 2005Sep 14, 2010Hoyt Archery, Inc.Vibration dampening apparatus
US7938108 *May 3, 2007May 10, 2011Sergey Olegovich PopovReverse crossbow
US8225778Sep 8, 2010Jul 24, 2012Hoyt Archery, Inc.Vibration dampening apparatus
US8991375Mar 15, 2013Mar 31, 2015Mcp Ip, LlcCrossbow cabling arrangement
US20120298087 *May 25, 2012Nov 29, 2012Mcp Ip, LlcBullpup crossbow
Classifications
U.S. Classification124/89, 124/25
International ClassificationF41B5/12, F41B5/20
Cooperative ClassificationF41B5/1426, F41B5/12
European ClassificationF41B5/14D6, F41B5/12