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Publication numberUS20020021241 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/875,066
Publication dateFeb 21, 2002
Filing dateJun 5, 2001
Priority dateSep 18, 1998
Also published asUS6268824, US6456233, US6674399, US20030085839
Publication number09875066, 875066, US 2002/0021241 A1, US 2002/021241 A1, US 20020021241 A1, US 20020021241A1, US 2002021241 A1, US 2002021241A1, US-A1-20020021241, US-A1-2002021241, US2002/0021241A1, US2002/021241A1, US20020021241 A1, US20020021241A1, US2002021241 A1, US2002021241A1
InventorsMark Zhodzishky, Victor Veitsel, Michail Vorobiev, Javad Ashjaee
Original AssigneeZhodzishky Mark Isaakovich, Veitsel Victor Abramovich, Vorobiev Michail Y., Javad Ashjaee
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Methods and apparatuses of positioning a mobile user in a system of satellite differential navigation
US 20020021241 A1
Abstract
Satellites of the GPS and GLONASS navigation systems broadcast code signals which are modulated onto respective carrier signals, and which are received by two receivers on Earth. The first receiver is situated at a point with known coordinates. The results of its measurements are transmitted to a user at a second receiver through a connection link, the user being interested in knowing his or her positioning. The second receiver is similar to the first receiver and it receives the signals of the same satellites. By processing data from the measurements of code delays and carrier phase shifts in the satellite signals received by two receivers, the methods and apparatuses of the inventions of the present application determine the location of the user with high precision and make the time indications of receiver clocks more accurate and exact.
In the first invention, the measurements of two receivers are related to a common time moment by extrapolating measurement data that has arrived through the connection link with a delay. This common time moment is defined by the user. An extrapolating unit examines the measurements to find and discard measurements with abnormal errors. The unit then generates extrapolated measurement data (e.g., predictions) for the common time based upon the most reliable data.
In the second invention, cycle slips in the phase-lock loops (PLLs) of the receivers, which may be caused by blockage of direct signals from the satellites, strong interference signals, and reflections, are detected and corrected in a multi-loop nonlinear tracking system.
In the third invention, the procedure of resolution of phase measurement ambiguities comprises the preliminary estimation of floating ambiguities by a recurrent (e.g., iterative) procedure including the simultaneous processing of code and phase measurements for all satellites for each processing time interval, and the gradual improvement of the result as the information is accumulated. After the resolution of ambiguity, the user coordinates are estimated with centimeter accuracy on the basis of phase measurements on the carrier frequency.
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Claims(94)
What is claimed is:
1. A method of extrapolating the value of a navigation parameter (e.g., φB k or γB k) from a global positioning satellite as measured by a base receiver, said navigation parameter being transmitted to a rover receiver over a communication link in a sequence of consecutively provided frames, each frame comprising the measured value of the navigation parameter made for a specific time moment tk as designated by a clock in the base receiver, the start of each frame occurring at a time interval Tk from the start of the previous frame, the navigation parameter being extrapolated according to an extrapolation form comprising a constant, plus one or more terms which are a function of time, and one or more corresponding scaling parameters for scaling the terms, the values of said constant and scaling parameters being generated by said method, said method comprising the steps of:
(a) transmitting in each frame a measured value of the navigation parameter, a representation of the specific time moment tk as designated by a clock in the base receiver at which the value was measured, and a weight factor Kk representative of the estimated quality of measured value of said frame;
(b) measuring the signal-to-noise ratio of the communication link during the time each frame is received by the rover;
(c) storing a plurality Mr of the most recent consecutive frames in a memory of the rover, and further storing for each stored frame an indication representative of the signal-to-noise ratio of the communication link during the receipt of the corresponding stored frame;
(d) generating a quality indication associated with each stored frame of whether the measured value of a frame is satisfactory or unsatisfactory, said quality indication being generated as satisfactory unless one or more unsatisfactory conditions occurs, said quality indication being generated as unsatisfactory when the signal-to-noise ratio of the communication link falls below a first threshold value during the reception of the frame;
(e) selecting, after each frame is received and stored, a subset of a number ns of the most recent frames from said set Mr of stored frames which have satisfactory quality indications;
(f) computing the values of the constant and scaling parameters of the extrapolation form from at least one selected subset of ns frames by an application of a least squares method which accounts for the weighting factors; and
(g) generating an extrapolated value of the navigation parameter frame from the extrapolation form for one or more time moments occurring after the time moment of the last received frame.
2. A method according to claim 1 wherein said step (d) comprises the step of generating said quality indication as unsatisfactory when the weight factor Kk of the frame falls below a second threshold value during the reception of the frame.
3. A method according to claim 1 wherein said step (a) comprises the step of encoding each transmitted frame with error detecting information;
wherein said step (c) comprises the step of decoding the frames to detect transmission errors; and
wherein said step (d) comprises the step of generating the quality indication of a frame as being unsatisfactory if said decoding step detects an error in said frame.
4. A method according to claim 1 wherein said step (a) comprises the step of encoding each transmitted frame with error detecting and correcting information;
wherein said step (c) comprises the step of decoding the frames to correct transmission errors and to detect transmission errors which cannot be corrected; and
wherein said step (d) comprises the step of generating the quality indication of a frame as being unsatisfactory if said decoding step detects an error in said frame which cannot be corrected.
5. A method according to claim 1 wherein said step (e) generates a first alarm signal (NO BASE MEASUREMENTS) when the number of stored frames having satisfactory indications is less than ns; and
wherein said step (f) is performed after each frame is received and after step (e) is performed unless said first alarm signal has been generated.
6. A method according to claim 1 wherein said navigation parameter comprises the total phase φB k of a satellite carrier phase measured in the base receiver.
7. A method according to claim 1 wherein said navigation parameter comprises the pseudo-range γB k of a satellite measured in the base receiver.
8. A method according to claim 1, wherein said extrapolation form comprises a polynomial of degree np in time t, and wherein ns>np.
9. A method according to claim 8 wherein np=2, wherein ns≧3, wherein 3≦Mr≦5, and wherein said time interval Tk is between 0.5 seconds and 2 seconds.
10. A method of detecting and correcting cycle slips in the phase measurements of a plurality n of satellite carrier signals (m=1 . . . n) made by a first navigation receiver (B) and a second navigation receiver (R), each of the navigation receivers tracking each satellite carrier signal with a phase lock loop, each phase lock loop capable of locking onto the satellite carrier signal at a plurality of separate points of steady balance which are spaced apart from one another by an respective interval αm of phase, a cycle slip being an unplanned transition from one point of steady balance to another, said method including the steps of:
(a) generating, for a plurality of sequential and discrete moments i of time, a plurality n of phase signals φl,m B (m=1 . . . n) representative of the phases of the satellite carrier signals as received by the first navigation receiver;
(b) generating, for each discrete time moment i, a plurality n of phase signals φhd l,mR (M=1 . . . n) representative of the phases of the satellite carrier signals as received by the second navigation receiver;
(c) receiving, for each discrete time moment i, a plurality n of distances Di,m B(m=1 . . . n) between the satellites and the first receiver, a plurality n of distances Dl,m R(m=1 . . . n) between the satellites and the second receiver;
(d) generating, for each discrete time moment i, a plurality n of single-difference residual signals Δφ{overscore (i,m)}(m=1 . . . n) in the form of:
Δφi,m=(φ i,m Bφi,m R)−1/λm ]D i,m B −D i,m R],
 where λm is the wavelength of the corresponding satellite carrier signal;
(e) generating, for each discrete time moment i, a first estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,S of a selected residual signal Δφl,S corresponding to a selected satellite carrier signal S (S being in the group of m=1 . . . n) as a function of the residual signals Δφi,m(m=1 . . . n);
(f) generating, for each discrete time moment i, a first mismatch signal δφi,S as a difference between the selected residual signal Δφl,S and the estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}l,S for it:
δφi,S=Δφi,S−Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,S; and
(g) generating, for each discrete time moment i, a first correction signal φl,S C in relation to the first mismatch signal δφi,S according to the form:
φi,S CS round(δφl,SS),
 where round(*) is the operation of rounding the quantity δφl,SS to the nearest integer.
11. A method according to claim 10 further comprising the step of:
(h) generating, for one or more of the discrete time moments i, a first corrected residual signal Δφi,S C as a difference of the first single-difference residual signal Δφl,S and the first correction signal φi,S C: Δφi,S C=Δφi,S−φi,S C.
12. A method according to claim 11 wherein a baseline vector (x,y,z) relates the position of one receiver to the position of the other receiver, wherein each receiver has a time clock for referencing its measurements and wherein any difference between the time clocks may be represented by an offset q, and wherein said step (e) of generating the first estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,S of the selected residual signal Δφi,S comprises the steps of:
(i) generating, for each discrete time moment i, an additional estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}l,m for each of the other residual signals Δφi,m (m≠S);
(j) generating, for each discrete time moment i, an additional mismatch signal δφi,m for each of the other residual signals Δφi,m(m≠S), the additional mismatch signal δφi,m being generated as a difference between each additional residual signal Δφl,m and its corresponding estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}l,m:
δφi,m=Δφi,m−Δ{circumflex over (φ)}l,m(m≠S);
(k) generating, for each discrete time moment i, an additional correction signal φl,m C (m≠S) for each of the other residual signals Δφi,m (m≠S) in the form:
φi,m Cm round(δφi,mm)(m≠S),
 where round(*) is the operation of rounding the quantity δφl,mm to the nearest integer;
(l) generating, for each discrete time moment i, a corrected mismatch signal ψl,m (m≠S) for each of the other residual signals Δφl,m (m≠S) as a difference of the corresponding additional mismatch δφl,m (m≠S) and the corresponding additional correction φlm C (m≠S):
ψl,m=δφl,m−φi,m C (m≠S);
(m) generating for each discrete time moment i, a plurality of bias signals (Ax φ, Ay φ, Az φ) representing biases in the coordinates of the base line vector (x, y, z) and a bias signal (Aq φ) representing a bias in the time clock offset q, said bias signals being generated in relation to the corrected mismatch signals ψl,m(m≠S);
(n) generating, for each discrete time moment i, a plurality of respective estimate signals (Vx, Vy, Vz, Vq) for the bias signals (Ax φ, Ay φ, Az φ, Aq φ) by filtering each bias signal;
(o) generating, for each discrete time moment i, a plurality of projected estimates Vp,i,m (m=1 . . . n) by multiplying a geometric Jacobian matrix Hi φ with a vector Vdi of the estimate signals (Vx, Vy, Vz, Vq), three columns of matrix Hi φ comprising the directional cosines between one of the receivers and the satellites and a fourth column of matrix Hi φ comprising the unit vector, one of the projected estimates Vp,i,S corresponding to the selected residual signal Δφi,S and each of the remaining projected estimates Vp,i,m (m≠S) corresponding a respective one of the other residual signals Δφi,m(m≠S); and
(p) integrating the projected estimate Vp,i,S corresponding to the selected residual signal Δφi,S with respect to time to generate the first estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,S; and
wherein said step (i) of generating the additional estimates Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m comprises the step of integrating the remaining projected estimates with respect to time Vp,l,m (m≠S).
13. A method according to claim 12 wherein the corrected mismatch signals ψlm (m≠S) may be grouped as a vector ψi of mismatch signals;
wherein said step (m) of generating the plurality of bias signals (Ax φ, Ay φ, Az φ, Aq φ) comprises the step of multiplying a geometric pseudo-inverse matrix Gi φ of matrix Hi φ with the vector ψi of mismatch signals, the resulting product of which comprises the plurality of bias signals (Ax φ, Ay φ, Az φ, Aq φ).
14. A method according to claim 13 wherein Gi φ is generated in the form:
G i φ=[(H i φ)T(R i φ)−1(H i φ)]−1(H i φ)T(R i φ)−1,
where matrix Ri φ is a covariance observation matrix having diagonal elements which are representative of the combined measurement accuracy of the satellite signals made by both receivers, one diagonal element corresponding to the measurement accuracy of the first satellite carrier signal and each remaining diagonal element corresponding to the measurement accuracy of one of the additional satellite carrier signals.
15. A method according to claim 13 further comprising the step of:
(q) generating, for each discrete time moment i, a corrected mismatch signal ψl,S for the selected residual-signal Δφi,S as a difference of the first mismatch signal δφi,S and the first correction signal φi,S C:
ψi,S=δφi,S−φi,S C; and
(r) adding the corrected mismatch signal ψi,S as a component to the vector ψi of mismatch signals.
16. A method according to claim 12 wherein the phase lock loops comprise a common circuit topology such that the intervals αm(m=1 . . . n) are the same for all of the satellite carrier signals.
17. A method according to claim 11 wherein step (a) comprises the step of generating the phase signals φl,m (m=1 . . . n) which are measured at the first navigation receiver by extrapolation at the second navigation receiver from measured values which are transmitted from the first navigation receiver to the second navigation receiver through a communication link.
18. A method according to claim 15 wherein the plurality of discrete time moments i are spaced from one another by a time interval T1 which is in the range of 5 ms to 10 ms:
wherein the phase lock loops comprise a common circuit topology such that αm=0.5 cycles (m=1 . . . n);
wherein said steps (a)-(r) are performed for each discrete time moment i before being performed for the next time moment i+1;
wherein the processing steps included by steps (e)-(g), (i)-(r) form a common tracking system which conveys each bias signal (Ax φ, Ay φ, Az φ, Aq φ) through a feedback loop formed by the processing steps included by steps (e)-(g), (i)-(r),
wherein the frequency response of each feedback loop has a bandwidth of between 15 Hz and 25 Hz; and
wherein said step (n) of filtering each bias signal comprises the step of filtering each bias signal with a filter having a frequency transfer function of the form:
K d ( p ) = K1 + K2 p + K3 p 2 ,
where p is the Laplacian operator.
19. A method according to claim 11 wherein said steps (a)-(h) are performed while the plurality of discrete time moments are occurring.
20. A method according to claim 11 wherein each of the first and second navigation receivers are stationary, wherein the plurality of discrete time moments occur over a first period of time, wherein steps (a) and (b) are performed while the plurality of discrete time moments are occurring, wherein steps (a) and (b) further comprise respective steps for recording the phase signals φl,m B(m=1 . . . n) and φi,m R(m=1 . . . n), and wherein said steps (c)-(h) are preformed during a second period time which follows said first period of time.
21. A method according to claim 15 wherein each of the first and second navigation receivers is stationary, wherein the plurality of discrete time moments occur over a first period of time, wherein steps (a) and (b) are performed while the plurality of discrete time moments are occurring, wherein steps (a) and (b) further comprise respective steps for recording the phase signals φl,m B(m=1 . . . n) and φl,m R(m=1 . . . n), and wherein said steps (c)-(r) are preformed during a second period time which follows said first period of time.
22. A method according to claim 21 wherein the plurality of discrete time moments i are spaced from one another by a time interval TI which is in the range of 0.05 seconds to 1 second;
wherein the phase lock loops comprise a common circuit topology such that αm=0.5 cycles (m=1 . . . n);
wherein said steps (a)-(r) are performed for each discrete time moment i before being performed for the next time moment i+1;
wherein the processing steps included by steps (e)-(g), (i)-(r) form a common tracking system which conveys each bias signal (Ax φ, Ay φ, Az φ, Aq φ) through a feedback loop formed by the processing steps included by steps (e)-(g), (i)-(r),
wherein the frequency response of each feedback loop has a bandwidth of between 4 Hz and 0.2 Hz; and
wherein said step (n) of filtering each bias signal comprises the step of filtering each bias signal with a filter having a frequency transfer function of the form:
K d ( p ) = K1 + K2 p ,
where p is the Laplacian operator.
23. A method according to claim 15 further comprising the step of:
(s) generating a first drift correction signal VIn,i,S as a function of the corrected mismatch signal ψi,S for the selected residual signal Δφi,S, the first drift correction signal VIn,i,s for correcting the first estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,S for systematic errors appearing in the selected residual signal Δφl,S; and
wherein said step (p) comprises the step of adding the first drift correction signal VIn,i,S to the projected estimate Vp,l,S corresponding to the first residual signal Δφl,S to form a combined signal, and wherein said step (p) integrates the combined signal.
24. A method according to claim 23 wherein the step of generating a first drift correction signal VIn,i,S comprises the step of periodically sampling the corrected mismatch signal ψi,S for the selected residual signal Δφi,S at a plurality of time moments spaced apart by a time interval ΔTin, and generating the first drift correction signal VIn,i,S in proportion to the sampled corrected mismatch signal ψl,S.
25. A method according to claim 24 wherein the time interval ΔTln is initially set to a value in the range of 0.01 seconds to 5.0 seconds;
wherein the first corrected residual signal Δφi,S C is provided to an ambiguity resolution process which generates an indication when the cycle ambiguity in the carrier phase has been resolved; and
wherein the time interval ΔTin, is set to a value in the range of 60-200 seconds when an indication is generated that the cycle ambiguity has been resolved.
26. A method according to claim 24 wherein the time interval ΔTln is initially set to a value in the range of 0.01 seconds to 5.0 seconds for an initial period of time, and is thereafter set to a value in the range of 60-200 seconds.
27. A method according to claim 23 wherein the step of generating a first drift correction signal VIn,i,S comprises the step of integrating the corrected mismatch signal ψl,S for the selected residual signal Δφl,S with an integrating-type filter having a transfer function of the form (1+K4/p) or of the form (1+K4′/p+K5′/p2), wherein the corrected mismatch signal ψi,S is applied to the input of the integrating-type filter for an initial time period TW and thereafter removed and wherein the first drift correction signal VIn,i,S is provided at the output of the integrating-type filter.
28. A method according to claim 27 wherein the first corrected residual signal Δφi,S C is provided to an ambiguity resolution process which generates an indication when the cycle ambiguity in the carrier phase has been resolved; and
wherein the corrected mismatch signal ψl,S for the selected residual signal Δφl,S is reapplied to the input of the integrating-type filter for another time period TW when an indication is generated that the cycle ambiguity has been resolved, and is thereafter removed.
29. A method according to claim 27 wherein the corrected mismatch signal ψi,S for the selected residual signal Δφi,S is reapplied to the input of the integrating-type filter for another time period TW, and thereafter removed.
30. A method according to claim 27 wherein said steps (a)-(s) are performed for each discrete time moment i before being performed for the next time moment i+1;
wherein the processing steps included by steps (e)-(g), (q), (s) and (p) form an individual feedback loop during the initial time period TW, the loop conveying the first drift correction signal VIn,i,S as a feedback signal through the processing steps included by steps (e)-(g), (q), (s) and (p);
wherein the individual feedback loop has a second order of astaticism (type 2 servo system) during the initial time period TW;
wherein the frequency response of the individual feedback loop has a bandwidth of between 1 Hz and 3 Hz; and
wherein the initial time period TW is between 0.5 seconds and 3 seconds.
31. A method according to claim 27 wherein the corrected mismatch signal ψl,S for the selected residual signal Δφl,S is reapplied to the input of the integrating-type filter for another time period TW, and wherein the time between the first and second applications of the corrected mismatch signal ψl,S is between 10 minutes and 15 minutes.
32. A method according to claim 15 further comprising the steps of:
monitoring the signal quality of the selected satellite carrier signal as received by the first navigation receiver (B) and generating a first alarm signal in an active state when the signal quality falls below a respective selected level;
monitoring the signal quality of selected satellite carrier signal as received by the second navigation receiver (R) and generating a second alarm signal in an active state when the signal quality falls below a respective selected level; and
generating a blocking signal in an active state whenever one or more of said first and second alarm signals are active, or whenever the absolute value of the corrected mismatch ψi,S for the selected residual signal Δφi,S is above a respective threshold Πδ; and
wherein said step (r) comprises the step of removing the corrected mismatch signal ψi,S for the selected residual signal Δφi,S is from the vector ψi of mismatch signals when the blocking signal is generated in an active state; and
wherein said step (m) comprises the step of forming, when the blocking signal is generated in an active state, a reduced matrix Hi φ which has the matrix row corresponding to the first satellite signal removed and thereafter generating a replacement matrix Gi φ from said reduced matrix Hi φ.
33. A method according to claim 32 wherein step (a) comprises the step of transmitting values for the phase signals φi,m B(m=1 . . . n) measured at the first navigation receiver to the second navigation receiver through a communication link; and
wherein the step of generating the blocking signal further comprises the steps of monitoring the signal quality of the communication link and generating the blocking signal in an active state when the quality of the communication link falls below a respective selected level.
34. A method according to claim 24 comprising the steps of:
monitoring the signal quality of the selected satellite carrier signal as received b% the first navigation receiver (B) and generating a first alarm signal in an active state when the signal quality falls below a respective selected level;
monitoring the signal quality of the selected satellite carrier signal as received by the second navigation receiver (R) and generating a second alarm signal in an active state when the signal quality falls below a respective selected level;
generating a blocking signal in an active state whenever one or more of said first and second alarm signals are active, or whenever the absolute value of the corrected mismatch ψi,S corresponding to the selected satellite carrier signal is above a threshold Πδ; and
blocking the sampling of the corrected mismatch signal ψl,S for the selected satellite carrier signal when the blocking signal is generated in an active state.
35. A method according to claim 34 wherein said step (r) further comprises the step of removing the corrected mismatch signal ψl,S for the selected residual signal Δφl,S from the vector ψi of mismatch signals when the blocking signal is generated in an active state; and
said step (m) further comprises the step of forming, when the blocking signal is generated in an active state, a reduced matrix Hi φ which has the matrix row corresponding to the first satellite signal removed and thereafter computing a replacement pseudo-inverse matrix Gi φ from said reduced matrix Hi φ.
36. A method according to claim 32 comprising the step of:
generating the blocking signal in a nonactive state when the absolute value of the corrected mismatch ψl,S for the selected residual signal Δφi,S remains below the threshold Πδ for a time period Td with said first and second alarm signals being nonactive, said time period being greater than the time period TI between consecutive discrete time moments i.
37. A method according to claim 36 wherein the threshold Πδ=1.4 radians and the time period Td=1.0 second.
38. A method according to claim 34 comprising the step of:
generating the blocking signal in a nonactive state when the absolute value of the corrected mismatch ψl,S for the selected residual signal Δφl,S remains below the threshold Πδ for a time period Td with said first and second alarm signals being nonactive, said time period being greater than the time period TI between consecutive discrete time moments i.
39. A method according to claim 38 wherein the threshold Πδ=1.4 radians and the time period Td=1.0 second.
40. A method according to claim 11 further comprising the step of generating an error alarm signal (OBSERVATION MISSING) indicating that the first corrected residual signal Δφi,S C may have errors due to a cycle slip, said step including the steps of generating the error alarm signal in an active state whenever the value of the first correction signal φC l,S changes between consecutive discrete moments of time i, and generating the error alarm signal in a nonactive state when the value of the first correction signal φC l,S remains unchanged for a period T1 of time, said time period T1 being greater than the time period T1 between consecutive-discrete time moments i.
41. A method according to claim 40 further comprising the steps of:
monitoring the signal quality of the selected satellite carrier signal as received by the first navigation receiver (B) and generating a first alarm signal in an active state when the signal quality falls below a respective selected level; and
monitoring the signal quality of first selected satellite carrier signal as received by the second navigation receiver (R) and generating a second alarm signal in an active state when the signal quality falls below a respective selected level; and
wherein the step of generating the error alarm signal further includes the step of generating the error alarm signal in an active state whenever any of the first and second alarm signals are in their active states.
42. A method according to claim 41 wherein the time period T1=1.0 second.
43. A method of floating ambiguity resolution for phase measurements of a plurality n of satellite carrier signals made by a first navigation receiver (B) and a second navigation receiver (R), each satellite carrier signal being transmitted by a satellite and having a wavelength, wherein a baseline vector (x,y,z) relates the position of one receiver to the other receiver, wherein each receiver has a time clock for referencing its measurements and wherein any difference between the time clocks may be represented by an offset q, said method receiving, for a plurality of sequential and discrete moments j, the following inputs:
a vector γj B of a plurality of pseudo-ranges measured by the first navigation receiver (B) and corresponding to the plurality of satellite carrier signals,
a vector γj R of a plurality of pseudo-ranges measured by the second navigation receiver (R) and corresponding to the plurality of satellite carrier signals,
a vector Dj B of a plurality of estimated distances between the satellites and the first navigation receiver (B),
a vector Dj R of a plurality of estimated distances between the satellites and the second navigation receiver (R),
a vector φj B of a plurality of full phase measurements of the satellite carrier signals measured by the first navigation receiver (B),
a vector φj R of a plurality of full phase measurements of the satellite carrier signals measured by the second navigation receiver (R),
a geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ whose matrix elements are representative of the changes in the distances between the satellites and one of the receivers that would be caused by changes in that receiver's position and time clock offset, said method comprising the steps of:
(a) generating, for each discrete time moment j, a vector Δγj of a plurality of range residuals of pseudo-range measurements made by the first and second navigation receivers in the form of:
Δγj=(γj R−γj B)−(D j R −D j B);
(b) generating, for each discrete time moment j, a vector Δφj of a plurality of phase residuals of full phase measurements made by the first and second navigation receivers in the form of:
Δφj=(φj R−φj B)−Λ−1(D j R −D j B),
 where Λ−1 is a diagonal matrix comprising the inverse wavelengths of the satellites;
(c) for each discrete time moment j, representing the errors in the measured pseudo-ranges and distances with a vector [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T of corrections to the baseline vector and the clock offsets of the receivers, and representing the preliminary estimates of the floating ambiguities at each time moment j by a preliminary estimation vector j;
(d) solving, for each discrete time moment j, the following two sets of vector relationships jointly by a least squares method to generate the preliminary estimation vector vector j:
Δφj = j−1 H j γ[Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T and Δγj =H j γ[Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T;
(e) generating, for each discrete time moment j after the initial time moment, a main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j as a weighed summation of the preliminary estimation vector j and the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j−1 generated at the previous time moment (j−1), the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}1 at the initial time moment j=1 being set to an initial vector of values.
44. A method according to claim 43 wherein step (d) comprises the steps of:
(f) grouping the vectors Δγj and Δφj into an observation vector μj=[Δγj, Δφj]T;
(g) representing estimates for the corrections vector [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T and for the preliminary estimation vector j by an estimated state vector j=[Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ, j]T, said estimated state vector j being an estimation of a true state vector Aj of the least squares method;
(h) forming an observation matrix Hj μ from the geometric Jacobian matrix HJ γ, the matrix Λ−1 of inverse wavelengths, the zero matrix 0, and the identity matrix E, in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
H j μ = [ H j γ 0 Λ - 1 H j γ E ] ,
 wherein the two systems of equations are represented as μj=Hj μAj in the least squares method;
(i) generating a phase covariance matrix Rj φ representative of the accuracy of the measurements of the vector of phase residuals Δφj;
(j) generating a pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ representative of the accuracy of the measurements of the vector of pseudo-range residuals Δγj;
(k) generating an observation covariance matrix Rj from the phase covariance matrix Rj φ, the pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ, and the zero matrix 0 in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
R j = [ R j γ 0 0 R j ϕ ] ; and
(l) generating the values of the estimated state vector j according to the form:
to generate the values of the preliminary estimation vector j.
45. A method according to claim 44 wherein the block matrix rows of the observation matrix Hj μ are exchanged, wherein the sub-vectors Δγj and Δφj of the observation vector are exchanged, and wherein the sub-matrices Rj φ and Rj γ of matrix RJ are exchanged.
46. A method according to claim 45 wherein the block columns of the observation matrix Hj μ are exchanged, and wherein the sub-vectors [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T and j of the estimated state vector j are exchanged.
47. A method according to claim 44 wherein the block columns of the observation matrix Hj μ are exchanged, and wherein the sub-vectors [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T and j of the estimated state vector j are exchanged.
48. A method according to claim 44 wherein said method receives, for a plurality of sequential and discrete time moments j, the following inputs:
a plurality of first weight coefficients Kj,l φB, . . . , Kj,m φB, . . . , Kj,n φB representative of the measurement accuracy of the measured phase components of the vector φj B measured by the first navigation receiver,
a plurality of second weight coefficients Kj,l φR, . . . , Kj,m φR, . . . , Kj,n φR representative of the measurement accuracy of the measured phase components of the vector φj R measured by the second navigation receiver,
a plurality of third weight coefficients Kj,l γB, . . . , Kj,m γB, . . . , Kj,n γB representative of the measurement accuracy of the measured pseudo-range components of the vector γj B measured by the first navigation receiver, and
a plurality of fourth weight coefficients Kj,l γR, . . . , Kj,m γR, . . . , Kj,n γR representative of the measurement accuracy of the measured pseudo-range components of the vector γj R measured by the second navigation receiver; and
wherein said step (i) of generating the phase covariance matrix Rj φ comprises the steps of generating a plurality of fifth weight coefficients Kj,l φ, . . . Kj,m φ, . . . Kj,n φ from the plurality of first and second weight coefficients, each fifth weight coefficient Kj,m φ (m=1 to m=n) being generated as a first small number when either of the magnitudes of the corresponding first and second weight coefficients Kj,m φB and Kj,m φR is less than a first threshold value, the magnitude of said first small number being less than the first threshold value, each fifth weight coefficient Kj,m φ (m=1 to m=n) being generated according to the relationship:
(K j,m φ)−1=(K j,m φB )−1+(K j,m φR)−1
 when each of the magnitudes of the first and second weight coefficients Kj,m φB and Kj,m φR is greater than the first threshold value, and wherein the matrix Rj φ is generated in the form:
R j ϕ = [ ( K j , 1 ϕ ) - 1 0 0 0 ( K j , 2 ϕ ) - 1 0 0 0 ( K j , n ϕ ) - 1 ] ; and
wherein said step () of generating the pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ comprises the steps of generating a plurality of sixth weight coefficients Kj,l γ, . . . Kj,m γ, . . . Kj,n γ from the plurality of third and fourth weight coefficients, each sixth weight coefficient Kj,m γ (m=1 to m=n) being generated as a second small number when either of the magnitudes of the corresponding third and fourth weight coefficients KγB j,m and KγR j,m is less than a second threshold value, the magnitude of said second small number being less than the second threshold value, each sixth weight coefficient Kj,m γ (m=1 to m=n) being generated according to the relationship:
(Kγ j,m)−1=(KγB j,m)−1+(KγR j,m)−1  +
when each of the magnitudes of the third and fourth weight coefficients KγB j,m and KγR j,m is greater than the second threshold value, and wherein the matrix Rj γ is generated in the form:
R j γ = [ ( K j , 1 γ ) - 1 0 0 0 ( K j , 2 γ ) - 1 0 0 0 ( K j , n γ ) - 1 ] .
49. A method according to claim 43 wherein said step (e) of generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j comprises the steps of:
(f) generating, at each discrete time moment j, a first ambiguity covariance matrix +E,otlRN j representative of the errors in the preliminary estimation vector j;
(g) generating, at each discrete time moment j, a second ambiguity covariance matrix RN j as an initial value for the initial time moment j=1, and in a form equivalent to:
for each time moment j after the initial time moment j=1;
(h) generating, at each discrete time moment j, a weighting matrix Wj in a form equivalent to
Wj={tilde over (R)}N j({tilde over (R)}+HUNj+RN j−1)−1   ; and (i) generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j as a initial value for the initial time moment j=1, and in a form of:
{circumflex over (N)} j =W j {circumflex over (N)} j−1+(E−W j) j,
 for each discrete time moment j after the initial time moment j=1, wherein E is the identity matrix.
50. A method according to claim 49 wherein the second ambiguity covariance matrix RN j is set to an initial value of RN 1={tilde over (R)}N j for the initial time moment j=1;
51. A method according to claim 49 wherein the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j is assigned a starting value for the initial time moment j=1 of {circumflex over (N)}j=j.
52. A method according to claim 49 wherein the first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j for each discrete time moment j is generated by process which provides an equivalent result as the steps of:
(j) forming an observation matrix Hj μ from the geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ, the matrix Λ−1 of inverse wavelengths, the zero matrix 0, and the identity matrix E in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
H j μ = [ H j γ 0 Λ - 1 H j γ E ] ;
(k) generating a phase covariance matrix Rj φ representative of the measurement accuracy of the phase observation vector μj φ;
(l) generating a pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ representative of the measurement accuracy of the pseudo-range observation vector μj γ;
(m) generating an observation covariance matrix Rj from the phase covariance matrix Rj φ, the pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ, and the zero matrix 0, in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
R j = [ R j γ 0 0 R j ϕ ] ;
(n) generating a third ambiguity covariance matrix j in the form:
j=[(H j μ)T R j −1 H j μ]−1; and
(o) generating the first ambiguity covariance matrix
as the sub-matrix comprising the last n rows and last n columns of the third covariance matrix j.
53. A method according to claim 43 wherein said step (e) of generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j comprises the step of generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j in the form:
j = [ ( H j μ ) T R j - 1 H j μ ] - 1 ; and
for each time moment j after the initial time moment j=1.
54. A method according to claim 53 wherein said method receives an input alarm signal for each satellite carrier signal indicating if any one of the measured phases or psuedo-ranges for the corresponding satellite carrier signal is erroneous, and wherein the components of vectors {circumflex over (N)}j, {circumflex over (N)}j−1 and j corresponding to a satellite carrier signal are removed from the vectors if the alarm signal for the corresponding satellite carrier signal is received.
55. A method according to claim 43 wherein the discrete time moments j are separated from one another by a time interval TJ in the range of 0.1I seconds to 1 second.
56. A method according to claim 49 wherein the discrete time moments j are separated from one another by a time interval TJ in the range of 0.1 seconds to 1 second.
57. A method according to claim 53, wherein the discrete time moments j are separated from one another by a time interval TJ=1 second, and wherein said steps (a) through (e) are performed for a period of time TS which is in the range of 8 seconds to 10 seconds.
58. A method according to claim 43, wherein said step (e) of generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j comprises the step of generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j as an initial value for the initial time moment j=1 and in the form:
N ^ j = j - 1 j N ^ j - 1 + 1 j N ~ j ,
for each time moment j after the initial time moment j=1, and wherein said method further comprising the steps of:
(f) generating, at each discrete time moment j, a first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j representative of the errors in the preliminary estimation vector j;
(g) generating, for each discrete time moment j, a second ambiguity covariance matrix *j with an initial value for the initial time moment j=1, and in a form equivalent to:
N ^ j = j - 1 j N ^ j - 1 + 1 j N ~ j ,
for each time moment j after the initial time moment;
(h) performing steps (a) through (g) for a set of Ks discrete time moments j, and thereafter generating an intermediate estimate vector {circumflex over (N)}*1 of the floating ambiguity at the end of the first set as {circumflex over (N)}*1={circumflex over (N)}Ks, where vector {circumflex over (N)}Ks is the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j at j=Ks, and further generating a third ambiguity covariance matrix
l * = j - 1 j j - 1 * + 1 j R ~ j N
where matrix *Ks is the second ambiguity covariance *j matrix at j=Ks;
(i) repeating step (h) for a plurality of additional iterations k to generate an additional intermediate estimate vector {circumflex over (N)}*k as {circumflex over (N)}*k={circumflex over (N)}Ks at each additional iteration, and further to generate an additional third ambiguity covariance matrix
R k N as R k N = Ks * Ks
at each additional iteration, the index j being reset to a value of j=1 at the start of each additional iteration;
(j) generating, at each iteration k, a fourth ambiguity covariance matrix RNj with an initial value for the first iteration, and in a form equivalent to:
RN k=[({haeck over (R)}N k)−1+(RN k−1)−1]−1   
for each additional iteration of step (j);
(k) generating, at each additional iteration k, a weighting matrix Wk in a form equivalent to
Wk={haeck over (R)}N k({haeck over (R)}N k−1)−1  ; and
(l) generating, at each additional iteration k, a refined main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}k in a form equivalent to:
{circumflex over (N)} k =W k {circumflex over (N)} k−1+(E−W k){circumflex over (N)}* k,
 wherein E is the identity matrix.
59. A method according to claim 58 wherein the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j is assigned a starting value for the initial time moment j=1 of {circumflex over (N)}j=j.
60. A method according to claim 58 wherein the first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j for each discrete time moment j is generated by process which provides an equivalent result as the steps of:
(m) forming an observation matrix Hj μ from the geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ, the matrix Λ−1 of inverse wavelengths, the zero matrix 0, and the identity matrix E in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
H j μ = [ H j γ 0 Λ - 1 H j γ E ] ;
(n) generating a phase covariance matrix Rj φ representative of the measurement accuracy of the phase observation vector μj φ;
(o) generating a pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ representative of the measurement accuracy of the pseudo-range observation vector μj φ;
(r) generating an observation covariance matrix Rj from the phase covariance matrix Rj φ, the pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ, and the zero matrix 0, in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
R j = [ R j γ 0 0 R j ϕ ] ;
(q) generating a fifth ambiguity covariance matrix j in the form:
j=[(H j μ)T R j −1 H j μ]−1; and
(r) generating the first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j as the sub-matrix comprising the last n rows and last n columns of the fifth covariance matrix j.
61. A method according to claim 58 wherein the second ambiguity covariance matrix *j is set to the value of {tilde over (R)}1 N for the initial time moment j=1.
62. A method according to claim 58 wherein the fourth ambiguity covariance matrix RN j is set to the value of RN 1={haeck over (R)} N j
for the first iteration.
63. A method according to claim 58 wherein the discrete time moments j in steps (a) through (g) are separated from one another by a time interval TJ which is between 0.1 seconds and 1 second; and
wherein the iterations k in steps (h) through (1) are separated from one another by a time interval TS which is between 8 seconds and 10 seconds.
64. A method according to claim 48 wherein the measured phases of each component of the phase residual vector Δφj are monitored for the presence of cycle slips;
wherein said method receives an input alarm signal for each component of the phase residual vector Δφj indicating if a cycle slip has occurred in its measured phases; and
wherein said step (i) further comprises the step of generating the fifth weight coefficient Kj,m φ for component of the phase residual vector Δφj as the first small number when the alarm signal for the component is received.
65. A method according to claim 44 further comprising the steps of:
generating, for each discrete time moment j, a set of baseline estimation corrections to the baseline coordinates as the corresponding components of the estimated state vector j; and
correcting, for each discrete time moment j, the vector Dj R of estimated distances between the satellites and the second navigation receiver (R) on the basis of the set of baseline estimation corrections generated at the previous time moment j−1.
66. A method according to claim 65 further comprising the step of:
correcting, for each discrete time moment j, the geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ on the basis of the set of baseline estimation corrections generated at the previous time moment j−1.
67. A method according to claims 43 wherein the first and second receivers arc stationary; and
wherein the same geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ is used for a plurality of discrete time moments j.
68. A method according to claim 43 wherein step (d) comprises the steps of:
(f) grouping the vectors Δγj and Δφj into an observation vector μj=[Δγj, Δφj]Γ;
(g) representing estimates for the corrections vector [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T and for the preliminary estimation vector j by an estimated state vector j=[Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ, j]T, said estimated state vector j being an estimation of a true state vector Aj of the least squares method;
(h) forming an observation matrix Hj μ from the geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ, the matrix Λ−1 of inverse wavelengths, the zero matrix 0, and the identity matrix E, in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
H j μ = [ H j γ 0 Λ - 1 H j γ E ] ,
 wherein the two systems of equations are represented as μj=Hj μAj in the least squares method;
(i) generating a phase covariance matrix Rj φ representative of the accuracy of the measurements of the vector of phase residuals Δφj;
(j) generating a pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ representative of the accuracy of the measurements of the vector of pseudo-range residuals Δγj;
(k) generating an observation covariance matrix Rj from the phase covariance matrix Rj φ, the pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ, and the zero matrix 0 in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
R j = [ R j γ 0 0 R j ϕ ] ; and
(l) generating the values of the estimated state vector j according to the form:
j= [(Hj μ)T Rj −1 Hj μ]−1 (IIj μ)T Rj −1 μj,
(m) generating a preliminary augmented estimation vector {tilde over (B)}j as the components of state vector j which comprise the corrections [Δx, Δy, Δz]T to the base line vector and the preliminary estimation vector j of the floating ambiguities;
(n) generating a main augmented estimation vector {circumflex over (B)}j as a weighed summation of the preliminary augmented estimation vector {tilde over (B)}j and the main augmented estimation vector {circumflex over (B)}j−1 generated at the previous time moment (j−1), the main augmented estimation vector {circumflex over (B)}1 at the initial time moment j=1 being set to an initial vector of values;
(o) generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j as the corresponding floating ambiguity components of the main augmented estimation vector {circumflex over (B)}j.
69. A method according to claim 68 wherein the block matrix rows of the observation matrix Hj μ are exchanged, wherein the sub-vectors Δγj and Δφj of the observation vector μj are exchanged, and wherein the sub-matrices Rj φ and Rj γ of matrix Rj are exchanged.
70. A method according to claim 69 wherein the block columns of the observation matrix Hj μ are exchanged, and wherein the sub-vectors [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T and j of the estimated state vector j are exchanged.
71. A method according to claim 68 wherein the block columns of the observation matrix Hj μ are exchanged, and wherein the sub-vectors [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T and j of the estimated state vector j are exchanged.
72. A method according to claim 68 wherein said step (n) comprises the steps of:
(p) generating, at each discrete time moment j, a first augmented covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j representative of the errors in the preliminary augmented estimation vector {tilde over (B)}j;
(q) generating, at each discrete time moment j, a second augmented covariance matrix RN j as an initial value for the initial time moment j=1, and in a form equivalent to:
RN j=[({tilde over (RN j]−1+(RN j−1)−1]−1  )}
for each time moment j after the initial time moment j=1;
(r) generating, at each discrete time moment j, a weighting matrix Wj in a form equivalent to
Wj={tilde over (R)}N j(+E,RN j+RN j−1)−1  
; and (s) generating the main augmented estimation vector {circumflex over (B)}j as a starting value for the initial time moment j=1, and in a form equivalent to:
{circumflex over (B)} j =W j {circumflex over (B)} j−1+(E−W j){tilde over (B)} j,
 for each discrete time moment j after the initial time moment j=1, wherein E is the identity matrix.
73. A method according to claim 72 wherein the first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j for each discrete time moment j is generated by process which provides an equivalent result as the steps of:
(t) forming an observation matrix Hj μ from the geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ, the matrix Λ−1 of inverse wavelengths, the zero matrix 0, and the identity matrix E in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
H j μ = [ H j γ 0 Λ - 1 H j γ E ] ;
(u) generating a phase covariance matrix Rj φ representative of the measurement accuracy of the phase observation vector μj φ;
(v) generating a pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ representative of the measurement accuracy of the pseudo-range observation vector μj γ;
(w) generating an observation covariance matrix Rj from the phase covariance matrix Rj φ, the pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ, and the zero matrix 0, in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
R j = [ R j γ 0 0 R j ϕ ] ;
(x) generating a third ambiguity covariance matrix j in the form:
j=[(H j μ)T R j −1 H j μ]−1; and
(y) generating the first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j as the sub-matrix comprising the all of the rows and columns of the third covariance matrix j except for the row and column corresponding to the correction for the time offset (cΔτ).
74. A method of floating ambiguity resolution for phase measurements of a plurality n of satellite carrier signals made by a first navigation receiver (B) and a second navigation receiver (R), each satellite carrier signal being transmitted by a satellite and having a wavelength, wherein a baseline vector (x,y,z) relates the position of one receiver to the other receiver, wherein each receiver has a time clock for referencing its measurements and wherein any difference between the time clocks may be represented by an offset q, said method receiving, for a plurality of sequential and discrete moments j, the following inputs:
a vector γj B of a plurality of pseudo-ranges measured by the first navigation receiver (B) and corresponding to the plurality of satellite carrier signals,
a vector γj R of a plurality of pseudo-ranges measured by the second navigation receiver (R) and corresponding to the plurality of satellite carrier signals,
a vector Dj B of a plurality of estimated distances between the satellites and the first navigation receiver (B),
a vector Dj R of a plurality of estimated distances between the satellites and the second navigation receiver (R),
a vector φj B of a plurality of full phase measurements of the satellite carrier signals measured by the first navigation receiver (B),
a vector φj R of a plurality of full phase measurements of the satellite carrier signals measured by the second navigation receiver (R),
a geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ whose matrix elements are representative of the changes in the pseudo-ranges between the satellites and one of the receivers that would be caused by changes in that receiver's position and time clock offset, said method comprising the steps of:
(a) generating, for each discrete time moment j, a pseudo-range observation vector μj γ comprising a plurality of range residuals of pseudo-range measurements made by the first and second navigation receivers in the form of:
μj γ=(γj R−γj B)−(D j R −D j B);
(b) generating, for each discrete time moment j, a phase observation vector μj φ comprising a plurality of phase residuals of full phase measurements made by the first and second navigation receivers in the form of:
μj φ=(φj R−φj B)−Λ−1(D j R −D j B),
 where Λ−1 is a diagonal matrix comprising the inverse wavelengths of the satellites;
(c) representing, for each discrete time moment j, the errors in the measured pseudo-ranges and distances with a vector [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T of corrections to the baseline vector and the clock offsets of the receivers, and representing the preliminary estimates of the floating ambiguities at each time moment j by a preliminary estimation vector j;
(d) solving, for each discrete time moment j, the following vector relationship:
μj γ=Hj γ[Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T
 by a least squares method to generate an estimate vector Aj γ for the corrections vector [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T;
(e) generating, for each discrete time moment j, an estimated phase observation vector {circumflex over (μ)}j φ by multiplying the estimate vector Aj γ by matrices Hj γ and Λ−1 according to the form:
{circumflex over (μ)}j φ−1 H j γ A j γ;
(f) generating, for each discrete time moment j, the preliminary estimation vector j as the difference between the phase observation vector μj φ and the estimated phase observation vector {circumflex over (μ)}j φ according to the form:
jj φ−{circumflex over (μ)}j φ;
(g) generating, for each discrete time moment j after the initial time moment, a main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j as a weighed summation of the preliminary estimation vector j and the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j−1 generated at the previous time moment (j−1), the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}1 at the initial time moment j=1 being set to an initial vector of values.
75. A method according to claim 74 wherein step (d) comprises the steps of:
(h) generating a pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ representative of the accuracy of the pseudo-range observation vector μj γ; and
(i) generating the estimate vector Aj γ according to the form:
γ j=[(Hγ j)T(Rγ j)−1Hγ j]−1(Hγ j)T(Rγ j)−1μγ j  
76. A method according to claim 75 wherein said method receives, for a plurality of the discrete time moments j, the following inputs:
a plurality of first weight coefficients KγB j,l, . . ., KγB j,m, . . ., KγB j,nrepresentative of the measurement accuracy of the measured pseudo-range components of the vector γj B as measured by the first navigation receiver, and
a plurality of second weight coefficients KγR j,l, . . ., KγR j,m, . . ., KγR j,nrepresentative of the measurement accuracy of the measured pseudo-range components of the vector γj R as measured by the second navigation receiver; and
wherein said step (h) of generating the pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ comprises the steps of generating a plurality of third weight coefficients Kj,l γ, . . . Kj,m γ, . . . Kj,n γ from the plurality of first and second weight coefficients, each third weight coefficient Kj,m γ (m=1 to m=n) being generated as a first small number when either of the magnitudes of the corresponding first and second weight coefficients KγB j,mand KγR j,mis less than a first threshold value, the magnitude of said first small number being less than the first threshold value, each third weight coefficient Kj,m γ (m=1 to m=n) being generated according to the relationship:
(Kγ j,m)−1=(KγB j,m)−1+(KγR j,m)−1  
when each of the magnitudes of the first and second weight coefficients KγB j,mand KγR j,m is
greater than the first threshold value, and wherein the matrix Rj γ is generated in the form:
R j γ = [ ( K j , 1 γ ) - 1 0 0 0 ( K j , 2 γ ) - 1 0 0 0 ( K j , n γ ) - 1 ]
77. A method according to claim 74 wherein said step (g) of generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j comprises the steps of:
(h) generating, at each discrete time moment j, a first ambiguity covariance matrix
{tilde over (R)}N j representative of the errors in the preliminary estimation vector j;
(i) generating, at each discrete time moment j, a second ambiguity covariance matrix RN j as an initial value for the initial time moment j=1, and in a form equivalent to:
 for each time moment j after the initial time moment j=1;
(j) generating, at each discrete time moment j, a weighting matrix Wj in a form equivalent to
Wj={tilde over (R)}N j({tilde over (R)}N j+RN j−1)−1  ; and
(k) generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j as a starting value for the initial time moment j=1, and in a form equivalent to:
{circumflex over (N)} j =W j {circumflex over (N)} j−1+(E−W j) j,
 for each discrete time moment j after the initial time moment j=1, wherein E is the identity matrix.
78. A method according to claim 77 wherein the second ambiguity covariance matrix RN j is set to an initial value of RN 1={tilde over (R)}N 1 for the initial time moment j=1;
79. A method according to claim 77 wherein the first ambiguity covariance matrix +E, RN j for each discrete time moment j is generated by process which provides an equivalent result as the steps of:
(l) forming an observation matrix Hj μ from the geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ, the matrix Λ−1 of inverse wavelengths, the zero matrix 0, and the identity matrix E in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
H j μ = [ H j γ 0 Λ - 1 H j γ E ] ;
(m) generating a phase covariance matrix Rj φ representative of the measurement accuracy of the phase observation vector μj φ;
(n) generating a pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ representative of the measurement accuracy of the pseudo-range observation vector μj γ;
(o) generating an observation covariance matrix Rj from the phase covariance matrix Rj φ, the pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ, and the zero matrix 0, in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
R j = [ R j γ 0 0 R j ϕ ] ;
(p) generating a third ambiguity covariance matrix j in the form:
j=[(H j μ)T R j −1 H j μ]−1; and
(q) generating the first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j as the sub-matrix comprising the last n rows and last n columns of the third covariance matrix j.
80. A method according to claim 77 wherein the first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j for each discrete time moment j is generated by the steps of:
(l) generating a phase covariance matrix Rj φ representative of the measurement accuracy of the phase observation vector μj φ;
(m) generating a pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ representative of the measurement accuracy of the pseudo-range observation vector μj γ; and
(n) generating a first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}j N for the preliminary estimation vector j according to the form:
81. A method according to claim 74 wherein said step (g) of generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j comprises the step of generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j in the form:
N ^ j = j - 1 j N ^ j - 1 + 1 j N ~ j ,
for each time moment j after the initial time moment j=1.
82. A method according to claim 74 wherein the discrete time moments j are separated from one another by a time interval TJ which is in the range of 0.1 seconds to 1 second.
83. A method according to claim 77 wherein the discrete time moments j are separated from one another by a time interval TJ which is in the range of 0.1 seconds to 1 second.
84. A method according to claim 81, wherein the discrete time moments j are separated from one another by a time interval TJ=1 second, and wherein said steps (a) through (g) are performed for a period of time TS which is in the range of 8 seconds to 10 seconds.
85. A method according to claim 74 wherein said step (g) of generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j comprises the step of generating the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j in the form:
N ^ j = j - 1 j N ^ j - 1 + 1 j N ~ j ,
for each time moment j after the initial time moment j=1, and wherein said method further comprising the steps of:
(h) generating, at each discrete time moment j, a first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}j N representative of the errors in the preliminary estimation vector j;
(i) generating, for each discrete time moment j, a second ambiguity covariance matrix *j with an initial value for the initial time moment j=1, and in a form equivalent to:
l * = j - 1 j j - 1 * + 1 j R ~ j N
 for each time moment j after the initial time moment;
(j) performing steps (a) through (i) for a set of Ks discrete time moments j, and thereafter generating an intermediate estimate vector {circumflex over (N)}*1 of the floating ambiguity at the end of the first set as {circumflex over (N)}*1={circumflex over (N)}Ks, where vector {circumflex over (N)}Ks is the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j at j=Ks, and further generating a third ambiguity covariance matrix {haeck over (R)}N j
R 1 N as R 1 N = Ks * Ks .
where matrix *Ks is the second ambiguity covariance *j matrix at j=Ks;
(k) repeating step (j) for a plurality of additional iterations k to generate an additional intermediate estimate vector {circumflex over (N)}*k as {circumflex over (N)}*k={circumflex over (N)}Ks at each additional iteration, and further to generate an additional third ambiguity covariance matrix
R k N as R k N = Ks * Ks
 at each additional iteration, the index j being reset to a value of j=1 at the start of each additional iteration;
(l) generating, at each iteration k, a fourth ambiguity covariance matrix RN j with an initial value for the first iteration, and in a form equivalent to:
 for each additional iteration of step (j);
(m) generating, at each additional iteration k, a weighting matrix Wk in a form equivalent to
Wk={haeck over (R)}N k({tilde over (R)}N k+RN k−1)−1  
; and
(n) generating, at each additional iteration k, a refined main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}k in a form equivalent to:
{circumflex over (N)} k =W k {circumflex over (N)} k−1+(E−W k){circumflex over (N)}* k,
wherein E is the identity matrix.
86. A method according to claim 85 wherein the first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j for each discrete time moment j is generated by process which provides an equivalent result as the steps of:
(o) forming an observation matrix Hj μ from the geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ, the matrix Λ−1 of inverse wavelengths, the zero matrix 0, and the identity matrix E in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
H j μ = [ H j γ 0 Λ - 1 H j γ E ] ;
(p) generating a phase covariance matrix Rj φ representative of the measurement accuracy of the phase observation vector μj φ ;
(q) generating a pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ representative of the measurement accuracy of the pseudo-range observation vector μj γ;
(r) generating an observation covariance matrix Rj from the phase covariance matrix Rj φ, the pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ, and the zero matrix 0, in a form comprising four sub-matrices arranged in two rows and two columns:
R j = [ R j γ 0 0 R j ϕ ] ;
(s) generating a fifth ambiguity covariance matrix j in the form:
j=[(H j μ)T R j −1 H j μ]−1; and
(t) generating the first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j as the sub-matrix comprising the last n rows and last n columns of the fifth covariance matrix j.
87. A method according to claim 85 wherein the first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j for each discrete time moment j is generated by the steps of:
(o) generating a phase covariance matrix Rj φ representative of the measurement accuracy of the phase observation vector μj φ;
(p) generating a pseudo-range covariance matrix Rj γ representative of the measurement accuracy of the pseudo-range observation vector μj γ; and
(q) generating a first ambiguity covariance matrix {tilde over (R)}N j for the preliminary estimation vector j according to the form:
88. A method according to claim 85 wherein the second ambiguity covariance matrix *j is set to the value of {tilde over (R)}1 N for the initial time moment j=1.
89. A method according to claim 85 wherein the fourth ambiguity covariance matrix RN j is set to the value of R1 N={haeck over (R)}1 N for the first iteration.
90. A method according to claim 85 wherein the discrete time moments j in steps (a) through (j) are separated from one another by a time interval TJ which is between 0.1 seconds and 1 second; and
wherein the iterations k in steps (k) through (n) are separated from one another by a time interval TS which is between 8 seconds and 10 seconds.
91. A method according to claim 76 wherein the measured phases of each component of the phase observation vector μj φ are monitored for the presence of cycle slips;
wherein said method receives an input alarm signal for each component of the phase observation vector μj φ indicating if a cycle slip has occurred in its measured phases; and
wherein said step (h) further comprises the step of generating the third weight coefficient Kj,m φ for a component of the phase observation vector μj φ as the first small number when the alarm signal for the component is received.
92. A method according to claim 75 further comprising the step of
correcting, for each discrete time moment j, the vector Dj R of estimated distances between the satellites and the second navigation receiver (R) on the basis of the components of estimated state vector Aj−1 γ generated at the previous time moment j−1 which comprise the corrections to the baseline coordinates.
93. A method according to claim 92 further comprising the step of:
correcting, for each discrete time moment j, the geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ on the basis of the components of estimated state vector Aj−1 γ generated at the previous time moment j−1 which comprise the corrections to the baseline coordinates.
94. A method according to claims 74 wherein the first and second receivers are stationary; and
wherein the same geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ is used for a plurality of discrete time moments j.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of priority to U.S. patent application Serial No. 60/100,837, filed Sep. 18, 1998, the contents of which is incorporated herein.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention relates to methods of information processing in satellite navigation systems with differential positioning of a mobile user.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] Satellite navigation systems, such as GPS (USA) and GLONASS (Russia), are intended for high accuracy self-positioning of different users possessing special navigation receivers. A navigation receiver receives and processes radio signals broadcasted by satellites located within line-of-sight distance. The satellite signals comprise carrier signals which are modulated by pseudo-random binary codes, which are then used to measure the delay relative to local reference clock or oscillator. These measurements enable one to determine the so-called pseudo-ranges between the receiver and the satellites. The pseudo-ranges are different from true ranges (distances) between the receiver and the satellites due to variations in the time scales of the satellites and receiver and various noise sources. To produce these time scales, each satellite has its own on-board atomic clock, and the receiver has its own on-board clock, which usually comprises a quartz crystal. If the number of satellites is large enough (more than four), then the measured pseudo-ranges can be processed to determine the user location (e.g., X, Y, and Z coordinates) and to reconcile the variations in the time scales. Finding the user location by this process is often referred to as solving a navigational problem or task.

[0004] The necessity to guarantee the solution of navigational tasks with accuracy better than 10 meters, and the desire to raise the stability and reliability of measurements, have led to the development of the mode of differential navigation ranging, also called differential navigation (DN). In the DN mode, the task of finding the user position is performed relative to a Base station (Base), the coordinates of which are known with the high accuracy and precision. The Base station has a navigation receiver which receives the signals of the satellites and processes them to generate measurements. The results of these measurements enable one to calculate corrections, which are then transmitted to the user that also uses a navigation receiver. By using these corrections, the user obtains the ability to compensate for the major part of the strongly correlated errors in the measured pseudo-ranges, and to substantially improve the accuracy of his or her positioning.

[0005] Usually, the Base station is immobile during measurements. The user may be either immobile or mobile. Later on, we will call such a user the Rover. The location coordinates of a moving Rover are continuously changing, and should be referenced to a time scale.

[0006] Depending on the navigational tasks to be solved, different modes of operation may be used in the DN mode. They differ in the way in which the measurement results are transmitted from the Base to the Rover. In the Post-processing (PP) mode, these results are transmitted as digital recordings and go to the user after all the measurements have been finished. In the PP mode, the user reconstructs his or her location for definite moments in the past.

[0007] Another mode is the Real-Time Processing (RTP) mode, and it provides for the positioning of the Rover receiver just during the measurements. The RTP mode uses a communication link (usually it is a radio communication link), through which all the necessary information is transmitted from the Base to the Rover receiver in digital form.

[0008] Further improvement of accuracy of differential navigation may be reached by supplementing the measurements of the pseudoranges with the measurements of the phases of the satellite carrier signals. If one measures the carrier phase of the signal received from a satellite in the Base receiver and compares it with the carrier phase of the same satellite measured in the Rover receiver, one can obtain measurement accuracy to within several percent of the carrier's wavelength, i.e., to within several centimeters.

[0009] The practical implementation of those advantages, which might be guaranteed by the measurement of the carrier phases, runs into the problem of there being ambiguities in the phase measurements.

[0010] The ambiguities are caused by two factors. First, the difference of distances AD from any satellite to the Base and Rover is usually much greater than the carrier's wavelength A. Therefore, the difference in the phase delays of a carrier signal Δφ=ΔD/λ received by the Base and Rover receivers may substantially exceed one cycle. Second, it is not possible to measure the integer number of cycles in Δφ from the incoming satellite signals; one can only measure the fractional part of Δφ. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the integer part of Δφ, which is called the ambiguity. More precisely, we need to determine the set of all such integer parts for all the satellites being tracked, one integer part for each satellite. One has to determine this set along with other unknown values, which include the Rover's coordinates and the variations in the time scales.

[0011] In a general way, the task of generating highly-accurate navigation measurements is formulated as follows: it is necessary to determine the state vector of a system, with the vector containing ηΣ unknown components. Those include three Rover coordinates (usually along Cartesian axes X, Y, Z) in a given coordinate system (sometimes time derivatives of coordinates are added too); the variations of the time scales which is caused by the phase drift of the local main reference oscillator; and n integer unknown values associated with the ambiguities of the phase measurements of the carrier frequencies. The value of n is determined by the number of different carrier signals being processed, and accordingly coincides with the number of satellite channels actively functioning in the receiver. At least one satellite channel is used for each satellite whose broadcast signals are being received and processed by the receiver. Some satellites broadcast more than one code-modulated carrier signal, such as a GPS satellite which broadcasts a carrier in the L1 frequency band and a carrier in the L2 frequency band. If the receiver processes the carrier signals in both of the L1 and L2 bands, the number of satellite channels (n) increases correspondingly.

[0012] Two sets of navigation parameters are measured by the Base and Rover receivers, respectively, and are used to determine the unknown state vector. Each set of parameters includes the pseudo-range of each satellite to the receiver, and the full (complete) phase of each satellite carrier signal. Each pseudo-range is obtained by measuring the time delay of a code modulation signal of the corresponding satellite. The code modulation signal is tracked by a delay-lock loop (DLL) circuit in each satellite tracking channel. The full phase of a satellite's carrier signal is tracked by a phase-lock-loop (PLL) in the corresponding satellite tracking channel. An observation vector is generated as the collection of the measured navigation parameters for specific (definite) moments of time.

[0013] The relationship between the state vector and the observation vector is defined by a well-known system of navigation equations. Given an observation vector, the system of equations may be solved to find the state vector if the number of equations equals or exceeds the number of unknowns in the state vector. In the latter case, conventional statistical methods are used to solve the system: the least squares method, the method of dynamic Kalman filtering, and various modifications of these methods.

[0014] Practical implementations of these methods in digital form may vary widely. In implementing or developing such a method on a processor, one usually must find a compromise between the accuracy of the results and speed of obtaining results for a given amount of processor capability, while not exceeding a certain amount of loading on the processor.

[0015] The most used general scheme comprises the following steps. The measured values of the pseudo-ranges and full phases at specific (definite) moments of time, along with an indication of the satellites to which these measurements belong to and the time moments of the measurements, are transmitted from the Base to the Rover (such as through the communication link or as recordings). Corresponding values are measured in the Rover receiver. The processing includes the determination of the single differences of the pseudo-ranges and full phases between the Base and Rover measurements for each satellite. The strongly correlated errors are compensated (i.e., substantially cancelled) in the single differences. Then, the residuals of the single differences are calculated by subtraction of calculated values from the measured results. The processing of residuals allows one to linearize the initial system of navigation equations (sometimes several subsequent iterations are necessary for that), which makes possible the use of the well developed body of mathematics for solving systems of linear equations. The components of the state vector, with the n ambiguities included, are found as a result of the solution. But the calculated values of the ambiguities are not necessarily integer numbers, and are often floating point numbers. Because of this, they are called float ambiguities, or floating ambiguities, at this stage of the solution. To find true values of the integer ambiguities one uses the procedure of rounding off the float ambiguity vector to the nearest set of integers. This process is called the ambiguity resolution. Only after the ambiguity resolution has been done is it possible to determine the true values of residuals and then, by solving the system of equation again, to find the coordinate values for the baseline connecting the Base and Rover, and consequently to determine the exact coordinates of Rover and the correction to its clock drift.

[0016] The described general scheme of computations is presented in more detail in the literature on satellite navigation. This presentation is the most complete in English in the book by Bradford W. Parkinson and James J. Spilker Jr., Global Positioning Theory and Applications, Volume 163 of Progress In Astronautics and Aeronautics, published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc, Washington D.C., 1996. In Russian, the most complete presentation is in the book Network Satellite Radionavigating Systems, editor V. S. Shebshaevich, 2nd edition, Publ. House Radio and Communication, Moscow, 1993.

[0017] The particular problems connected to the processing of the navigation information are considered in many articles, manuals and patents. Here we will dwell only on some of these problems which directly concern the subjects of the present inventions.

[0018] The first problem concerns the task of aligning (or synchronizing) the Base and Rover measurements to the same moment of time. This is a necessary condition for good compensation in the single differences of strongly correlated errors which change with time. The task of aligning can be solved by two ways: the first way, which is called the mode of matched observation processing, delays the use of the Rover measurements until the corresponding Base measurements are received. This mode is poorly suited for Rovers in speedy motion, for which the positioning at definite, precisely fixed moments of time is required. The second way, which is called the mode of low latency position processing, extrapolates the Base measurements forward in time up to the moment of reception of the corresponding Rover measurements. This mode is better suited to the task of generating accurate Rover coordinate at time moments which are arbitrarily chosen by a user or an application program at the Rover location.

[0019] In existing systems, different extrapolation methods are used, starting from the elementary linear prediction, which sometimes is sufficient for small prediction times (about several seconds). For longer prediction times (such as between 30 s and 60 s) it is recommended to take into account the statistic characteristics of the processes to be predicted, which mainly depend on the presence of selective access (in the system GPS), and on fluctuations of reference generators on board the satellites and the Base receiver. For such cases, one uses the extrapolation with the help of the Kalman filter. One of the possible variants of such an extrapolation unit is described in the article by J. Neumann, et al., entitled Test Results from a New 2 cm Real Time Kinematics GPS Positioning System, The Proceedings of the 9-th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation (ION GPS-96), 1996, pp. 873-882. The essential difficulty in applying conventional extrapolation methods is that these methods are not designed for the occurrence of large abnormal errors in measurements which are used to base the predictions. The abnormal errors usually occur when the communication link between the Base and Rover operates in an environment having a large number of buildings and other objects which generate a large number of reflected signals. The signal received by moving Rover frequently fades, and the transmitted information is deformed by noise. To guarantee good predictions, it is necessary to analyze the incoming information and to exclude intervals of time containing abnormal errors. One set of methods for such an analysis is proposed as a first invention of this patent application.

[0020] Another problem arising during the solution of a navigation problem using the phase measurements is caused by the possible appearance of cycle slips in the PLL circuits which are tracking the satellite carrier signals. After a cycle slip occurs, the PLL circuit transits to a new point of steady balance, after which it goes on with tracking the satellite carrier signal. As a result of a cycle slip, an abnormal error equal to several integer number of semi-cycles (half-cycles) is introduced into the full phase measurements. Such an error may make computed position coordinates completely worthless. Sometimes it is possible to detect the appearance of a cycle slip by directly observing the rate of change of the full phase. During a cycle slip, this rate usually jumps in value, and this provides an opportunity to detect the slip. In some cases, it is possible to detect a cycle slip from implicit symptoms and signs. For example, a cycle slip is often accompanied with a deep fading of the signal amplitude, and the occurrence of the slip can be detected by detecting the fading of the signal. However, such a method of cycle slip detection does not have sufficient reliability. The characteristics of the slip process, as well as the reasons causing it, are very variable. There exist slow slips where the rate of the phase change differs only slightly from the usual rate of phase change due to the Rover's movement, and correspondingly, the cycle slip often cannot be detected by this symptom. The amplitude fading does not always coincide with the cycle slip appearance either. When measurements from a large number of satellite channels are used, it is possible to identify the channels for which the measurement results strongly differ from predictions made on the basis of data from other channels, and thereby to detect the slip. However, a substantial increase in the volume of calculations might be necessary to determine which set of channels have generated bad measurements. In addition, the sufficient amount of redundancy is often lacking. If the slip is nevertheless detected, it is necessary to make a decision on how to react to the slip. Thus, for example, if the number of active satellite channels is large enough, it is possible to exclude the channel for which the cycle slip is detected from further consideration. One may also act differently: having waited until the completion of the slip, one can resolve the ambiguity of phase measurements anew, with the affected channel included. For that it would be necessary to spend some time during which the generation of highly-accurate coordinates would stop, which is sometimes extremely undesirable.

[0021] The correction for the cycle slip immediately after its completion would be the best solution; but to do so, one has to measure the sign and value of the cycle slip. One of the methods to correct the phase slip was proposed by Isomura in U.S. Pat. No. 5,502,641. The following steps were proposed in that method:

[0022] 1. Recording the time moment at which a satellite carrier signal first disappears, and determining the rate of change in the carrier's full phase during the time period just before the disappearance; this rate of change is called the initial rate of change;

[0023] 2. Recording the time moment at which the satellite carrier signal reappears and determining the rate of change in the carrier's full phase just after the reappearance; this rate of change is called the final rate of change;

[0024] 3. Calculating a predicted value of the full phase at the time moment of its reappearance based on the initial and final values of the rate of change, and on the measured value of the full phase before the signal disappearance;

[0025] 4. Comparing the predicted value with the value of the full phase measured accumulated by the tracking channel at the time of the signal's reappearance. If these values differ by more than a semi-cycle (half-cycle), one may assume that a cycle slip took place and take the corresponding correction.

[0026] We must note the fact that this method would give satisfactory results only in cases when the Rover does not change its velocity during the disappearance of the satellite carrier signal. We also point out that when a satellite signal is blocked from the receiver's antenna, the satellite signal can be reflected off of a nearby object or the ground and reach the antenna by a different path as a reflected signal. If this occurs, cycle slips may occur because of the difference in path lengths, and the Isomura method may not detect the slips because the method may not see the disappearance of the direct satellite signal. A second invention of the present application is directed to apparatuses and methods of cycle-slip detection which are based on a set of specific symptoms of the cycle slip, and therefore have higher reliability for Rover's making fast maneuvers.

[0027] A third problem relating to the solution of a navigation problem using the phase measurements concerns the ambiguity resolution stage. As it was already noted, the first part of this stage comprises the step of obtaining sufficiently accurate estimates of the float ambiguities. Typical computational methods for this task provide for the gradual accumulation of information that depends on the number and locations of the satellites, and correspondingly, the accuracy of estimation of the float ambiguities increases with time due to the smoothing of fluctuations in the measurements, and due to the geometry change in the satellite constellation.

[0028] A substantial number of works have been published that considered computational procedures for obtaining the float ambiguity estimations with sufficient accuracy in the shortest possible time. The computational speed of the processor used imposes the natural limitations here. That is why one tries to lower the loading on the processor, sometimes even to the detriment of accuracy.

[0029] Several of the publications use computations based upon Kalman filtering. The previously-mentioned article by J. B. Neumann, et al., (ION GPS-96) describes a Kalman filter method which simultaneously estimates the coordinates of the baseline and the floating ambiguities. The estimations are generated with delay after the corresponding measurements of the Base station have been received by the Rover. In the article entitled Instant RTK cm with Low Cost GPS+GLONASS C/A Recievers by D. Kozlov and M. Tkachenko, in The Proceedings of the 10-th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation (ION GPS-97), 1997, pp. 1559-1569, a method of generating the Kalman filter that provides the separate smoothing of float ambiguity estimates was considered. Various different methods for improving or simplifying the numerical computations have been proposed in several issued patents. In U.S. Pat. No. 4,812,991 to R. R. Hatch, it was proposed to smooth the code measurements by increments of the phase measurements separately for each satellite. After that smoothing, the baseline vector is estimated by the least squares method which uses the smoothed values of the pseudo-ranges. The method allows one to diminish the processor load substantially as it completely omits the step of ambiguity resolution. But this is achieved at the expense of a substantial decrease in the positioning accuracy. A similar idea of smoothing was used in the U.S. Pat. No. 5,451,964 to B. A. Babu, et al. Here the code measurements smoothing allows one to decrease the search zone for the integer ambiguity vector and, as a result, to reduce the time to find the correct resolution. A third invention of the present application is directed to methods which smooth the floating ambiguity estimates by a recurrent least squares method which is applied simultaneously and jointly to all of the satellite channels. It enables one to accelerate the obtaining of reliable integer ambiguities at an acceptable processor load.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0030] The present application discloses three general invention areas (methods and apparatuses therefor), each of which pertains to the navigation parameters (pseudo-range and full phase) with the object of determining the baseline coordinates in the system of differential satellite navigation with greater and more reliable accuracy. The three inventions are preferably used together, but may be used separately, if desired. As a basis for practicing the inventions, the navigation parameters are measured by a receiver situated at a Base station (also called the reference station), and by a Rover receiver, which is usually mobile. The coordinates of the Base receiver are known exactly. The coordinates of the Rover receiver are estimated relative to Base receiver. The coordinates of the Base receiver are typically transmitted to the Rover through the communication links. However, post-processing of the measurements by the inventions may be performed at a subsequent time, either at the Rover location or the Base location, or another location. The processing processor and the user of navigation information are both typically situated at the Rover receiver. However, this is not necessarily the case if one wishes to use the inventions in a post-processing mode. The first invention relates to the extrapolation of measurements from the Base station, the second invention relates to the detection and correction of cycle slips in the PLL circuits of one or both of the Base and Rover receivers, and the third invention relates to the computation of the floating ambiguity estimates. These inventions enable one to improve the accuracy, reliability and efficacy of the determination of relative position using differential navigation measurements.

[0031] Each of the inventions relates to one of a number of general stages that are used to generate accurate baseline coordinates to the Rover by differential navigation. The three general stages implemented by the three inventions of this application are intermediate stages in the overall process of computing the coordinates of the baseline. The subsequent processing stages comprise the integer ambiguity resolution stage, the stage of computing the baseline coordinates, and the stage of correcting the time scale. These subsequent stages are implemented according to well-known methods described in the literature. A detailed description of these well-known methods in this application is not needed for one of ordinary skill in the art to make and use the present inventions.

[0032] The first invention related to extrapolation takes into account abnormal and anomalous errors in the measurements of the navigation parameters made by the Base receiver and computes the predicted values for the Rover receiver only on the basis of reliable measurements from the Base receiver.

[0033] The second invention related to cycle slip detection and correction is based upon the system of the measurement of cycle mismatch in a multi-loop tracking system which tracks the Rover movement with the signals from several of the visible satellites. The channel where the cycle slip took place is detected from the mismatch value, and the corresponding correction is introduced. The method provides for switching off channels with the abnormal or anomalous errors, which prevents their influence upon the measurement results.

[0034] The third invention related to estimations of the floating ambiguities comprises recurrent procedures which are based upon the joint processing by a least-squares method of the set of code and phase measurements in all satellite channels. The third invention provides the gradual smoothing of errors of those components of the state vector which remain constant, and achieves the necessary accuracy in a relatively short time and at a tolerable processor load.

[0035] Some embodiments of these inventions also employ the joint tracking loops for jointly tracking the phases of the satellite carrier signals which are described in our co-pending patent application Ser. No. 09/330,221, filed Jun. 10, 1999, entitled The Joint Tracking of the Carrier Phases of the Signals Received from Different Satellites, assigned to the assignee of the present application and incorporated herein by reference, and claiming priority to the earlier provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/091,004, filed Jun. 10, 1998, incorporated herein by reference. As a brief summary, the joint tracking loops generate correction signals to many or all of the PPL circuits which account for events which affect the tracking the PLL circuits in a common manner. These are called common events. Such common events include the drift in the receiver's clock and the movement of the receiver's position. When the satellite signal tracked by a PLL circuit is temporarily blocked, the correction signal for that PLL circuit enables the PLL circuit to adjust its phase to account for the phase changes caused by common events that occur during the blockage. As a result, the number of cycle slips that could occur during a blockage of the satellite signal is reduced. While the use of the joint tracking loops provides many benefits, is it not necessary for one to make, use, and practice the inventions disclosed in this application.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0036]FIG. 1 shows a schematic diagram of the registers and the main units of the extrapolation methods and apparatuses according to the first invention of the present application;

[0037]FIG. 2 shows the general block schematic diagram of the cycle-slip detection and correction methods and apparatuses according to the second invention of the present application;

[0038]FIG. 3 shows a graph of the nonlinear characteristic of a first output from the cycle-slip correction unit according to the second invention of the present application;

[0039]FIG. 4 shows a graph of the nonlinear characteristic of a second output of the cycle-slip correction unit according to the second invention of the present application;

[0040]FIG. 5 shows a flow diagram of an exemplary method of generating the blocking signal according to the second invention;

[0041]FIG. 6 is a time graph showing the residual of the single phase difference in the channel No. 8 measured with the simulation model: curve (a) shows the residual without the cycle slip correction (Δφi), and curve (b) shows the residual with the cycle slip correction (Δφi c) according to the second invention;

[0042]FIG. 7 is a time graph showing the residual of the single phase difference in the channel No. 8 on an enlarged scale (the fragment A of the plot in FIG. 6): curve (a) shows the residual without the slip correction (Δφi), and curve (b) shows the residual with the slip correction (Δφi c) according to the second invention;

[0043]FIG. 8 is a time graph showing the residual of the single phase difference in the channel No. 7 determined with the aid of a simulation model: curve (a) ) shows the residual without the slip correction (Δφi), and curve (b)) shows the residual with the slip correction (Δφi c) according to the second invention; and

[0044]FIG. 9 is a time graph showing the form of the cycle slip correction in the channel No. 7 according to the second invention.

[0045]FIGS. 10A and 10B are small signal models of the individual loop of the cycle-slip correction and detection methods and apparatus according to the present invention.

[0046]FIG. 11 is a small signal model of the common loops of the cycle-slip correction and detection methods and apparatus according to the present invention.

[0047]FIG. 12 is a schematic diagram of an exemplary processor for implementing the floating ambiguity resolution according to the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0048] Tutorial on the Structure of the Satellite Signals and Coherent Navigation Receivers.

[0049] Before describing the inventions of the present application, we briefly describe the structure of the satellite signals and of a typical receiver suitable for differential navigation applications.

[0050] Each of the satellites radiates signals in two frequency bands: the L1 band and the L2 band. Two carrier signals are simultaneously transmitted in the L1-band; both carrier signals have the same frequency, but are shifted in phase by π/2 (90). The first L1 carrier signal is modulated by the clear acquisition C/A-code signal and the second L1 carrier signal is modulated by the precision P-code signal. One carrier signal is transmitted in the L2 band, and uses a different frequency than the L1 carrier signals. The L2 carrier signal is modulated by the same P-code signal used to modulate the second L1 carrier signal. These carrier frequencies are between 1 GHz and 2 GHz in value. Each C/A-code signal and P-code signal comprises a repeating sequence of segments, or chips, where each chip is of a predetermined time period (Δ) and has a pre-selected value, which is either +1 or −1. The segment values follow a pseudo-random pattern, and thus the C/A-codes and the P-codes are called pseudo-random code signals, or PR-code signals. Additionally, before each C/A-code signal and P-code signal is modulated onto its respective carrier signal, each code signal is modulated by a low frequency (50 Hz) information signal (so-called information symbols).

[0051] The approximate distance between a satellite and a receiver is equal to the speed of light c multiplied by the transmission time it takes the satellite signal to reach the receiver. This approximate distance is called the pseudorange γ, and it can be corrected for certain errors to find a corrected distance D between the satellite and the receiver. There is a pseudorage between each visible satellite and the receiver. The transmission time from satellite to receiver is measured with the aid of clocks in the receiver and the satellite, and with the aid of several time scales (i.e., timing marks) present within the received satellite signal. The clocks in the satellites and the receiver are set to substantially the same time, but it is assumed that the receiver clock has a time offset τ because the receiver clock is based upon a quartz-crystal whereas each satellite clock is based upon a more accurate atomic reference clock. The receiver has the orbital patterns of the satellites stored in a memory, and it can determine the orbital position of the satellites based on the time of its clock. The receiver reads the timing marks on the satellite's signal, and compares them against it own clock to determine the transmission time from satellite to receiver. The satellite's low-frequency (50 Hz) information signal provides the least precise timing information, the C/A-code signal provides the next most precise timing information, and the P-code signal provides the most precise timing information. The pseudorange is determined from the low-frequency information signal and the C/A-code signal for civilian users and some military users, and is determined from the low-frequency information signal and the P-code signal for most military users. Accurate use of the P-code signal requires knowledge of a certain code signal which is only known to military users. Precision better than that provided by the P-code signal can be obtained by measuring the phase of the satellite carrier signal in a differential navigation mode using two receivers.

[0052] A typical receiver for differential navigation applications has a frequency down-conversion unit and several individual tracking channels of the coherent type. The down-conversion unit provides down-converted versions of the satellite signals to the channels, with the down-converted signals having frequencies generally in the range of 10 MHz to 20 MHz. Each channel tracks a selected one of the satellite signals. Each tracking channel measures the delay of one PR-code signal within the satellite signal (e.g., C/A-code or P-code signal), and also the phase of the down-converter version of the satellite's carrier signal. A typical tracking channel comprises a Delay-Lock Loop (DLL) circuit for tracking the delay of the PR-code, a Phase-Lock Loop (PLL) circuit for tracking the phase of the satellite's carrier signal, and three correlators which generate the input signals for the DLL and PLL circuits. Each correlator multiplies the combined collection of the down-converted satellite signals with a reference carrier signal from the PLL circuit and with a reference code signal from the DLL circuit, and then accumulates (or integrates) the resulting multiplication products over set time intervals ΔTA in an accumulator. At the end of each interval ΔTA, the value held in the accumulator is output as the correlation signal of the correlator, and the contents of the accumulator is reset to zero in preparation for the next accumulation interval. The outputs of the correlators are, therefore, discrete-time signals which are generated at a rate of 1/ΔTA values per second.

[0053] The DLL circuit in each channel generates two or more reference code signals which are different from one another (such as by form and/or by phase shift). Each reference code is based upon the PR-code signal of the satellite being tracked, and each reference code signal has a range of high correlation with the satellite code signal being tracked. Also, for GPS satellite signals, each of the channel's reference code signals has substantially no correlation with the code signals of other satellites. This enables a receiver channel to select and isolate one of the down-converted GPS satellite signals from the collection of down-converted GPS satellite signals provided by the down-convert unit. In the GLN system, the same C/A-code is used, but each satellite has a different carrier frequency, which enables a receiver channel to distinguish the satellites from one another.

[0054] The reference carrier signal from the PLL circuit is coherently generated by a controlled oscillator of the PLL circuit, and its frequency and phase is controlled to correspond to the frequency and phase of the down-converted carrier signal for the satellite being tracked by the channel. We denote the frequency of the reference carrier signal as NCO since the reference carrier frequency is often generated by a numerically-controlled oscillator. The reference carrier signal is in quadrature format (e.g., cos(2πNCOt) and sin(2πNCOl)), and each correlator effectively multiplies the input signal by one of the quadrature components. Each quadrature component of the reference carrier signal may be a sinusoid, a square wave, a triangular wave, or other periodic waveform.

[0055] The first correlator generates the in-phase correlation signal I(iΔTA). It is generated by multiplying the collection of down-converted satellite signals with the in-phase component (e.g., cos(2πNCOt)) of the coherent reference carrier signal, and with a reference code signal that is a scaled replica of the satellite's PR-code signal, and then accumulating the multiplication products as indicated above. The quantity iΔTA represents the discrete time moments at which signal I(iΔTA) is generated. The correlation signal I(iΔTA) is used to demodulate the information symbol present within the satellite signal and to normalize the discriminator outputs generated in the DLL and PLL circuits to make them relatively invariant to changes in the signal strength of the received satellite signal.

[0056] The second correlator of the tracking channel generates the quadrature correlation signal Q(iΔTA). It is generated by multiplying the collection of down-converted satellite signals with a second reference PR-code signal, and with the quadrature component (e.g., sin(2πNCOt)) of the coherent reference carrier signal, and then accumulating the resulting multiplication products as indicated above. The second reference PR-code signal is usually the same as the reference code signal used in the first correlator. The correlation signal Q(iΔTA) is used by the PLL circuit to synchronize the reference carrier signal to the satellite's carrier signal. Correlation signals I(iΔTA) and Q(iΔTA) may be used together to measure the signal strength Z of the satellite carrier: Z2=I2(iΔTA)+Q2(iΔTA).

[0057] The third correlator generates the main correlation signal dI(iΔTA), which is used by the DLL circuit to control the generation of the reference code signals and to synchronize the reference code signal to the satellite's code signal. Signal dI(iΔTA) may be generated by multiplying the collection of down-converted satellite signals with a strobed version of the satellite's PR-code signal, and with the in-phase component (e.g., cos(2πNCOt)) of the coherent reference carrier signal, and then accumulating the resulting multiplication products. A strobed version of the satellite's PR-code signal may comprise a sequence of short strobe-pulses, each pulse corresponding to a boundary (also called end) between two chips of the input PR-code signal where there is a change in the sign of the input PR-code signal, and having a polarity which corresponds that of the later chip.

[0058] The phase-lock loop (PLL) circuit is used to adjust the frequency (NCO) of the reference carrier signal so that its phase follows the phase of the down-converted version of the satellite's carrier signal. The PLL circuit has a carrier-phase discriminator which generates a phase-error signal Ep as a function of the difference between the phase of the down-converted satellite carrier signal and the phase of the reference carrier signal. The phase-error signal Ep may be generated from the correlation signals in any of the following ways:

E p =Q(iΔT A), or   (1A)

E p=arctan[Q(iΔT A)/I(iΔT A)], or   (1B)

E p =Q(iΔT A)/I(iΔT A), or   (1C)

E p =Q(iΔT A)*Sgn[I(iΔT A)], or   (1D)

E p =Q(iΔT A)/Sgn[I(iΔT A)], or   (1E)

E p =Q(iΔT A)*I(iΔT A),   (1F)

[0059] Where arctan(*) is the arctangent function (also called the inverse tangent function), and where Sgn(*) is the sign function, which has an output value of +1 when its input is zero or positive, and an output value or −1 when its input is negative. Each of these forms contains correlation function Q(iΔTA), which is proportional to sin(φ), where φ is the phase difference between the phases of the down-converted satellite signal and the reference carrier signal.

[0060] The phase-error signal Ep from the PLL's discriminator is provided to a loop filter of the PLL circuit which determines the pass band and the servo-system type of the PLL circuit. The output of the PLL filter provides the control signal of the PLL circuit, and is provided to the generator of the reference carrier signal, where it is used to adjust the frequency (NCO) of the reference carrier signal. The PLL circuit adjusts the phase shift φ until the achievement of the condition Ep=0 (i.e., Q=0, sin((φ)=0) and thus aligns the phases of the reference carrier signal with the satellite's carrier signal. This point (Ep=0) is known as the operating point, or the point of steady balance, for the PLL circuit.

[0061] The relationship of the PLL's phase-error signal Ep(φ) and the phase shift φ is substantially linear in a limited range of phase shifts φ nearby the point of steady balance for the PLL circuit, which is Ep=0. When large shifts are present, which can occur under the effect of large noise spikes or other strong disturbances, the PLL circuit can move to another point of steady balance which is an integer number of phase half-cycles away from the previous point of steady balance (n*π, n=1, 2, 3, . . . ). This event is known as the cycle slip effect, and it impedes navigational measurements using the phase of the satellite's carrier signal.

[0062] The above-described satellite signal structure and coherent receiver structure are well known to the art and do not form a part of the present inventions.

[0063] Tutorial on the Navigation Parameters.

[0064] Because of the time offset τ and other error effects, the pseudorange γ between a satellite and a receiver is usually not the actual distance between the satellite and the receiver. By looking at the pseudoranges of four or more satellites, there are well-known methods of estimating the time offset τ of the receiver and of accounting for some of the error effects to generate the computed distance D between the satellites and the receiver. The receiver's position may then be computed. However, because of various sources of noise and the relatively low resolution of the pseudo-random code signal, the true distances (i.e. true ranges), and receiver's position coordinates will not be exactly known, and will ha, C errors.

[0065] In theory, more precise values for the receiver's position and clock offset could be obtained by measuring the number of carrier cycles that occur between each satellite and the receiver. The phase of the carrier of the satellite signal as transmitted by a satellite can be expressed as: ϕ S ( t ) = Φ 0 S + 0 t f S t = Φ 0 S + f S t ( 2 )

[0066] where Φ0 S is an initial phase value, S is the satellite carrier frequency, and t is the satellite's time. Because the satellite carrier frequency is generated from a very precise time base, we may assume that S is a constant and not time dependent, and we may replace the above integral with St, as we have shown in the second line in the above equation. The phase of this signal when it reaches the receiver's antenna over the range distance D(t) is denoted as φS A(t), and its value would be: ϕ A S ( t ) = ϕ S ( t - D ( t ) / c - τ ATM ( t ) ) = Φ 0 S + f S ( t - D ( t ) / c - τ ATM ( t ) ) = Φ 0 S + f S t - f S D ( t ) / c - f S τ ATM ( t ) , ( 3 )

[0067] where c is the speed of light, and where τATM(t) is a delay due to anomalous atmospheric effects which occur mostly in the upper atmosphere. The number of cycles SτATM(t) due to the atmospheric effects cannot be predicted or determined to within an accuracy of 1 carrier cycle by a stand-alone receiver (i.e., cannot be determined by absolute positioning). Therefore, one cannot reach the full potential accuracy of the carrier frequency in a stand-alone receiver configuration. However, the carrier phase can be very useful in a differential GPS mode where the phase of the satellite is measured at a rover station and a base station. φS A,R(t) and φS A,B(t) respectively, and then subtracted from one another. Over the short baseline between the rover and base stations, the atmospheric delay τATM(t) in both of these phases is equal for practical purposes, and the difference in phases is:

φS A,R(t)−φS A,B(t)=S D R(t)/c− S D B(t)/c.   (4)

[0068] Notice that the terms Φ0 S and St have also been cancelled from the difference. Presuming that the wave fronts of the satellite carrier signal are nearly planar by the time they reach the base and rover stations (because the satellites are at least 22.5 km away), and assuming that a wave front of the satellite carrier reaches one of the antennas first (either rover or base), the above difference is the number of additional wave fronts that the satellite carrier must travel before it reaches the second antenna (either base or rover). Given the angle between the base-rover baseline vector and the line-of-sight vector to the satellite from either of the stations, one can determine by trigonometry the number of carrier cycles that would lie along the baseline.

[0069] However, the task of measuring carrier phase is not as easy at it appears. In practice, we must use non-ideal receivers to measure the phases φS A,R(t) and φS A,B(t), with each receiver having a different clock offset with respect to the GPS time, and with each receiver having phase errors occurring during the measurement process. In addition, at the present time, it is not practical to individually count the carrier cycles as they are received by the receiver's antenna since the frequency of the carrier signal is over 1 GHz. However, the PLL loop can easily track the Doppler-shift frequency D of the carrier signal, which is in the kHz range. With a few assumptions, the phases φS A,R(t) and φS A,B(t) can be related to their respective Doppler-shift frequencies. As is known in the art, the satellite transmits at a fixed frequency of S, but the relative motion between the satellite and receiver causes the frequency seen by the receiver to be slightly shifted from the value of S by the Doppler frequency D. We may write the frequency seen by the receiver's antenna as S+D, where D has a positive value when the distance between the satellite and receiver's antenna is shrinking, and a negative value when the distance is increasing. Each receiver can then assume that the received phase is proportional to the predictable amount of St, minus the amount Dt due to the Doppler-shift. The Doppler amount Dt is subtracted from St because the Doppler frequency increases as the distance between the satellite and receiver's antenna decreases. The predictable amount St will be the same for each receiver, but the Doppler frequencies will usually be different.

[0070] As previously mentioned, the reference oscillator (e.g., NCO) of the PLL circuit tracks the frequency of a selected one of the down-converted satellite signals. As a result, it inherently tracks the Doppler-shift frequency of the satellite's carrier signal. Before being provided to the PLL circuit, the carrier signal is down-converted from the GHz range by a local oscillator having a frequency L. The frequency seen by the PLL circuit is (S+D)−l, which can be rearranged as: (SL)+D. The quantity (SL) is known as the pedestal frequency p, which is typically around 10 MHz to 20 MHz. The PLL's reference oscillator tracks the down-converted frequency of p+D. We would like to integrate the frequency of the reference oscillator to obtain a phase observable which is proportional to −Dt. Starting at a time moment Tp when the PLL circuit initially locks onto the down-converted satellite signal, with the time moment Tp being measured by the receiver's clock, we will generate a phase observable φi(Ti) at discrete time moments Ti of the receiver's clock T as follows:

φi(T i)=p,nom(T i −T p)−φiNCO(T i)   (5)

[0071] where p,nom is the nominal value of the pedestal frequency, and where φiNCO(Ti) is the phase (integrated frequency) of the PLL's reference oscillator (e.g., NCO). The time moments Tl are spaced apart from each other by a time interval ΔTi, as measured by the receiver's clock, and may be express as Ti=iΔTi, where i is an integer. φi(Ti) is in units of cycles, and is proportional to the negative of the integrated Doppler-shift frequency. This is because φiNCO(Ti) is proportional to the quantity (p+D)(Ti−Tp).

[0072] We will now like to relate the change in phase of the satellite signal φS A(ti) as received by the receiver's antenna to the change in phase of φiNCO(Ti), but neglecting the atmospheric delay τATM(ti) since this delay will be canceled out when we take the difference between receivers. To do this, let use assume a hypothetical situation where the satellite is not in orbit, but is placed adjacent to the receiver's antenna with zero distance between them. We will first account for the time offsets between the clocks of the receiver and satellite, and then we will separate the satellite from the receiver and move it into its orbit. Finally, we will account for the phase shifts in the down-conversion and PLL circuits of the receiver. Without loss of generality, we will assume that the satellite time clock t and the receiver time clock T are nearly the same, but that there is a time-dependent offset τ between them. At discrete time moments Ti of the receiver clock, the two clocks may be related as follows: Tl=tll. with it being understood that τi varies with time. The hypothetical satellite signal at the receiver's antenna (with zero distance) is:

φS(ti)=ΦS O+Sti.  (6)

[0073] Now, let us create a reference phase in the receiver which is of the form:

φR(ti)=ΦS O+Sti.  (7)

[0074] where we start the reference phase at time ti=0 with Ti=0, and where Φ0 S and S will be taken as fixed, known constants. At ti=0, the offset τi will be zero, but can be a nonzero value for Ti>0 due to the frequency and phase instability of the receiver's main oscillator which is used to generate the receiver's time moments Ti. As a practical matter, we will have to measure the Doppler phase observable φi(Ti) against the receiver's reference phase φR(Tl), and we therefore need to correct φR(Ti) for the effects time offset τi. If the satellite and receiver time clocks are exactly the same (τi=0), the receiver's reference phase φR(Ti) will measure out the same amount of phase at its time Ti as the satellite has provided by its time tl. However, if the receiver clock is advanced in time by an amount τi>0, the reference phase has counted out Sτi cycles more than actually transmitted by the satellite. To correct this, we need to subtract Sτi from φR(Ti) to get the actual number of cycles transmitted by the satellite in the time span measured by the receiver's clock. The corrected phase reflects the satellite phase as received at the receiver's antenna, and we denote is as φS A(Ti):

φS A(ti)=ΦS O+StiSτi.  (8)

[0075] Now, let us move the satellite to its normal orbital position, which will be a distance Di away from the receiver. As we do this, the phase seen by the receiver antenna decreases by the number of carrier cycles which spans the distance between the receiver and the satellite. When we reach the final distance Di, the number of carrier cycles occurring over the distance is SDi/c, where c is the speed of light. The satellite phase seen by the receiver's antenna is then:

φS A(ti)=ΦS O+StiSDi/c−Sτi.  (9)

[0076] The signal received by the antenna is down-converted with a local oscillator, which has a phase of:

[0077] φLO(Ti)=Φ+LO+L,nomTiLO+(SL,nom)Ti,  (10)

[0078] where L,nom is the nominal frequency of L, and where the nominal frequency L,nom is related to the nominal pedestal frequency p,nom as follows: p,nom=SL,nom. The down-converted signal is provided to the input of the PLL, and we will denote its phase as φS B(Tl). The down-conversion process effectively causes the phase (P B(Ti) to be equal to the difference of φS A(tl) and φLO(Ti) as follows: ϕ B S ( T i ) = ϕ A S ( t i ) - ϕ LO ( T i ) = ( Φ 0 S + f S T i - f S D i / c - f s τ i ) - ( Φ LO + ( f S - f L , nom ) T i ) = Φ 0 S - f S D i / c - f S τ i - Φ LO + f p , nom T i ( 11 )

[0079] Because the PLL circuit does not know which carrier cycle it first locks onto, the PLL phase φiNCO(Ti) tracks φS B(Ti) to within an unknown integer number Nnco of carrier cycles, which may have a positive or negative value. There is also a small tracking error ζφi due to the operation of the PLL circuit. Taking these two factors into account, we may write: ϕ iNCO ( T i ) = ϕ B S ( T i ) + N nco + ζ ϕ i = [ Φ 0 S - f s D i / c - f S τ i - Φ LO + f p , nom T i ] + N nco + ζ ϕ i ( 12 )

[0080] We have thus related the change in phase of the satellite signal φS A(ti) as received by the antenna to the change in phase of φiNCO(Ti) The above equation shows that the offset in clocks has an effect of −Sτi, and the distance has an effect of −SDi/c. Our phase observable  Φi(Ti)=p,nom(Ti−T p)−ΦiNCO(Ti)can now be written out as:

Φi(Ti)=SDi/c+Sτip,nomTp−ΦS OLO−Nnco−ζφi  (13)

[0081] Using the relation p,nom=SL,nom, we may further rewrite this as:

φi(T+i)=SDi/c+Si−Tp)+(φ O−ΦS O)−Nnco−ζφi  (14)

[0082] where φ′=ΦLO+L,nomTp. As it turns out, if we chose the time increments ΔTl for Ti (Ti=iΔTl)to be equal to ΔTi=2 ms, the term −STp is an integer number which can be consolidated with the integer ambiguity −Nnco into a single ambiguity +N.

[0083] φi(Ti)=SDi/c+Sτi+(φ )−ΦS ))+N−ζφi  (15)

[0084] Thus, our Doppler phase observable φi(Ti) has been related to the distance Dl between the satellite and receiver, the time offset τi of the receiver, an integer ambiguity N, and some initial phase offsets (φ′0−Φ0 S) which can be readily determined.

[0085] We will now write equation (15) for the base and rover stations, adding superscripts B and R for the base and rover stations, and subscript m to indicate the m-th satellite signal and the m-th tracking channel.

[0086] For the differential navigation mode, the difference of these phases is formed:

φB i,m(Ti)−φR i,m(Ti)=SDB i,m/c−SDR i,m/c+Si B−τi R)+(Nm B−Nm R)+(φ O B−φ O R)−(ζφ B i,mφ R i,m)  (17)

[0087] Using Nm=(Nm B−Nm R) to represent the difference between the ambiguities, and using the well-known relationship S/c=1/λm, where λm is the wavelength of the satellite carrier signal, we have:

φB i,m(Ti)=(1/λm)(DB i,m−DR i,m)+ Si B−τi R)+Nm+(φ O B−φ O R)−(λφ B i,m-31 λφ R i,m)  (18)

[0088] The values for φ′0 B and φ′0 R can be readily determined. The values of ζφi,m B and ζφl,m R cannot be determined, but they have zero mean values.

[0089] Our Inventions Relating to Differential Navigation.

[0090] Real time processing (RTP) in the differential navigation mode determines the baseline vector using the results of the pseudo-range and full phase measurements from satellites of the GPS and/or GLN systems. In a real time processing application, the computation of the baseline vector is made in the rover equipment that receives pseudo-range and full phase measurements obtained in the base equipment through the communication link.

[0091] The RTP methods and apparatuses include four main units: the extrapolating unit for the base measurements, the cycle slip detection and correction unit, the ambiguity resolution unit, and the unit of computation of the baseline vector. In addition to these main units, there are several auxiliary units that generate vectors and matrices for the operation of the main units.

[0092] The present application discloses three inventions for the first three of the four main units, respectively, which enables one to improve the quality of the operation of the first three units. The accuracy and reliability of the baseline determination, especially under conditions where the rover is moving, is improve as a result. While our three inventions are preferably used together, they may be used separately.

[0093] In the previous tutorial discussion, we used the symbol tl to indicate the time as measured by the GPS system clock, and the symbol Ti to indicate the time as measured by either of the base and rover receivers (Ti is not to be confused with a time interval Tl provided below). While the time Ti(rover) as measured by rover clock will deviate from the true GPS system time ti of the satellites, the navigation unit in the rover typically corrects the rover's time so its difference with the true GPS time is substantially less than any of the processing time intervals used in extrapolation unit, the cycle-slip detection unit, the and ambiguity resolution unit. This may also be said of the time Ti(base) as measured by the base station. This is the conventional practice in the GPS are, and we will adopt this convention in th discussion of our invention. Thus, while the base and rover times may have small offsets from the true GPS time, they are still referring to the same processing time moment, and in some cases we can (and will for convenience) interchange the time tl with either of times Tl(rover) and Tl(base) in many of the equations where the time offsets τl B and τl R have been introduced and accounted for. This will be the case for most of the equations that follow.

[0094] A. The extrapolating unit for Base measurements.

[0095] In the differential navigation mode of operation, both of the Base and Rover receivers generate navigation parameters at specific moments TM of time, and each receiver organizes its navigation parameters for each time moment into a data frame which contains the navigation parameters along with the value of the time moment. In real-time processing (RTP) of differential navigation, the frames of the Base station are transmitted serially to the Rover station over a communication link, and a processing unit at the Rover station takes the information in the Base frames and processes it with the data frames of the Rover to compute the baseline between the Base and Rover stations. Additional information, such as the signal quality of the communication link between the Base and Rover stations, can be added to each frame of the Base receiver. The baseline can also be computed in a post-processing mode instead of a real-time mode. In this case, the frames from both of the Base and Rover stations are recorded and then used at a later time at any location.

[0096] The extrapolating unit is necessary in the cases when the base-rover communication link has a limited carrying capacity (i.e., limited bandwidth, or data rate) and, as a consequence, has a limited speed of transmission. As a result, the sequential series of frames containing information and navigation parameters measured in the Base receiver arrive at the Rover equipment with an interval ΔTk between frames which substantially exceeds the time intervals at which the main units need to received the information from the Base receiver in order to perform real-time processing (RTP) in the differential navigation mode at the desired rate.

[0097] The purpose of the extrapolating unit is to use the information parameters from the Base receiver which have been received in previous data frames and to generated extrapolated values for the navigation parameters from time moments which are between the time moment of the last fully-received Base frame and the time moment of the next fully-received Base frame. The extrapolated values are generated periodically at shorter time intervals TI required by the desired rate of RTP processing. Because the shorter interval TI is associated with processing the navigation parameters, such as in the baseline computation or the ambiguity resolution, we call it the processing time interval TI. The value of interval TI is often different for each processing task.

[0098] General principles of extrapolation are well known to the art. Yet in the case under consideration one has to take into account some specific problems. First of all, it is necessary to take into account that the base-rover communication link often operates in an environment where there are strong additive and modulating interference signals. As a result, the conditions arise for the reception to be blocked or corrupted for limited intervals of time. Such intervals are usually detected in the receiver channel of the connection link by measuring signal-to-noise ratio and determining when it is below an admissible threshold. Other ways of detecting errors in the transmitted information parameters, such as those based upon the use of special codes and checksum codes, may also be used.

[0099] As a second problem, the measurements of navigation parameters in some channels of the base receiver may also turn out to be missing or inaccurate during some time intervals. This may happen, for example, if a local object near the Base station directs a strong reflected signal to the antenna of the Base receiver or if the object blocks the direct satellite signal from the antenna.

Indicators of Interference Events and the Generation of Alarm Signals in Navigation Receivers

[0100] Interference events, such as interference signals and blockages of signal reception by intervening objects, can cause inaccurate and inauthentic measurements of the navigation parameters. Indicators of interference events can help prevent the use of inaccurate and inauthentic measurements. Such an indicator may comprise, for example, an amplitude indicator which measures the signal-to-noise ratio in a satellite channel. An interference indicator may also comprise an Angle indicator, which indicates the presence of large peaks in the output Ep of a PLL discriminator.

[0101] An exemplary amplitude indicator for the m-th tracking channel may use the in-phase and quadrature phase correlation signals, denoted herein as Im(iΔTA) and Qm(iΔTA), respectively, to generate a first indicator signal G1 m as

G1m(iΔT A)=Z m 2 =I m 2(iΔT A)+Q m 2(iΔT A),   (19)

[0102] where Zm is proportional to the signal strength of the m-th satellite carrier being tracked by m-th the channel, and where both G1 m and Zm 2 are proportional to the signal's power level. Signal G1 m may be generated as G1 m=Zm instead of G1 m=Zm 2. These forms are suitable for both coherent and incoherent channels. If the value of indicator signal G1 m falls below a preset threshold value Th1, an alarm signal S1 m is generated to indicate that the output phase of the PLL circuit is unreliable and may be inaccurate. Here, we will take a value of S1 m=1 to indicate that signal G1 m is above Th1 and that the phase of the PLL circuit is probably accurate (alarm in inactive state); and a value of S1 m=0 to indicate that signal G1 m is below Th1 and the phase of PLL circuit is unreliable (alarm in active state). Of course, the reverse assignment of the 0 and 1 values may be chosen.

[0103] An exemplary angle indicator may use the output Ep of the PLL discriminator of the m-th tracking channel to generate signal G1 m=abs(Epm), where abs(*) is the absolute value function. In this case, Epm is preferably generated as Epm=arctan[Qm(iΔTA)/Im(iΔTA)]. or as Epm=Qm(iΔTA)/Im(iΔTA). In this case, if the value of G1 m rises above a preset threshold value Th1, the alarm signal S1 m is generate in its active state as S1 m=0 to indicate that the output phase of the PLL circuit is unreliable and may be inaccurate (otherwise it is generated in its inactive state as S1 m=1).

[0104] Another exemplary indicator, which is suitable for coherent channels, generates indicator signal G1 m as:

G1m(iΔT A)=I m 2(iΔT A)−Q m 2(iΔT A),  (20)

[0105] which provides an indicator signal which is related to the signal power level of the satellite input signal, and also to the PLL's tracking phase error. This form of signal G1 m can determine the loss of tracking in the situation when the satellite's signal power level is within acceptable limits but the difference between frequencies of the satellite carrier signal and the PLL reference carrier signal is greater than an acceptable value. If the value of signal G1 m falls below a preset threshold value Th1, alarm signal S1 m is generated in its active state as S1 m=0 to indicate that the output phase of the PLL circuit is unreliable and may be inaccurate (otherwise it is generated in its inactive state as S1 m=1).

[0106] Indicator signal G1 m and alarm signal S1 m may be generated at the end of each accumulation period of the channel's correlators. Typical accumulation period are 2 ms and 5 ms. Other forms for signal G1 m are also possible, and a combination of different forms may be used depending on the conditions of the receiver operation.

[0107] Indicator signal G1 m and alarm signal S1 m are based upon the most recent values of the correlation signals Im 2(iΔTA) and Qm 2(iΔTA) at time iΔTA, and are not based on previous values of these signals. Therefore, we refer to these signals as being inertia free or non-inertial. A second type of the indicator and alarm signals uses past values of the correlation signals as well present values. Such a second type of indicator signal G2 m may be generated from a running average of the first indicator signal G1 m, or from an un-weighted average of signal G1 m over a span of several accumulation periods, or from a weighted average of signal G1 m over a span of several accumulation periods. Because of its inertia, indicator signal G2 m is more smooth over time than the first type of indicator signal G1 m, and is less prone to the influences of noise. However, it is slower than signal G1 m at detecting shadowing events. An example of a running average for indicator signal G2 m is as follows:

G2m(iΔT A)=αG1m(iΔT A)+(1−α)G2m((i−1)ΔTA),   (21)

[0108] where iΔTA represent the end of the current accumulation period, (i−1)ΔTA represent the end of the previous period, where G1 m(iΔTA) is the most recent value of G1 m at the end of the most recent accumulation period, where G2 m(iΔTA) is the most recent value of signal G2 m, where G2 m((i−1)ΔTA) is the previous value of signal G2 m, and where α is a weight coefficient between 0 and 1. Previous values of signal G1 m are effectively accounted for by the term (1−α)G2 m((i−1)ΔTA) in the above expression. An example of an un-weight average is where signal G2 m is generated as the average of the proceeding N values of signal G1 m: G2 m ( i Δ T A ) = ( 1 / N ) k = 0 k = N - 1 G1 m ( ( i - k ) Δ T A ) . ( 22 )

[0109] In this example, signal G2 m is generated after N accumulation periods and at time moments iΔTA. However, this rate of generating signal G2 m is usually higher than is typically needed, and one usually generates signal G2 m once every N accumulation periods: NΔTA. An example of a weighted average for generating signal G2 m is as follows: G2 m ( i Δ T A ) = k = 0 k = N - 1 β k G1 m ( ( i - k ) Δ T A ) . ( 23 )

[0110] where βk are weight coefficients which sum to a value of 1. In each of the above examples, signal G2 m is slower acting than signal G1 m, but has less noise. We call the second-type signal G2 m an inertial signal.

[0111] A second alarm signal S2 is generated from the inertia signal G2 m in the same way that the first alarm signal S1 is generated from the inertia signal G1 m. If the inertia-free indicator signal G1 m is generated from an amplitude indicator for the m-th tracking channel, then the inertial alarm signal S2 m is generate in its active state when the inertial indicator signal G2 m falls below a second preset threshold value Th2 to indicate that the output phase of the PLL circuit is unreliable and may be inaccurate. Here, we will take a value of S2 m=1 to indicate that signal G2 m is above Th2 and that the phase of the PLL circuit is probably accurate (inactive state); and a value of S2 m=0 to indicate that signal G2 m is below Th2 and the phase of PLL circuit is unreliable (active state). Of course, the reverse assignment of the 0 and 1 values may be chosen. Likewise, if the inertia-free indicator signal G1 m is generated from the expression G1 m(iΔTA)=Im 2(iΔTA)−Qm 2(iΔTA), the inertial alarm signal S2 m is also generate in its active state when the inertial indicator signal G2 m falls below a second preset threshold value Th2. If signal G1 m is generated from an angle indicator for the m-th tracking channel, such as G1 m=abs(Epm), then the alarm signal S2 m is generated in its active state as S2 m=0 when the value of G2 m rises above threshold value Th2 to indicate that the output phase of the PLL circuit is unreliable and may be inaccurate (otherwise it is generated in its inactive state as S2 m=1).

[0112] For reliable implementations of differential navigation, one or both of the indicator signals G1 m and G2 m and their corresponding alarm signals S1 m and S2 m are preferably generated for each of the visible satellite signals at both the base and rover receivers, and the alarm signals are used to discard measured navigation parameters which may be unreliable. Herein, the alarm signal are denoted with a superscript B for the base receiver (S1 m B and S2 m B), and with the superscript R for the rover receiver (S1 m R and S2 m R). Because the rover receiver is in an environment which has more complicated electromagnetic interference than the base receiver, the alarm signals in the rover will be generated more frequently than the alarm signals in the base receiver.

[0113] As we indicated in the Summary of Invention section, some embodiments of our inventions use receivers which employ joint tracking loops (our co-pending patent application Ser. No.09/330,221). These loops, which are separate from the individual PPL circuits, are for jointly tracking changes to the satellite carrier phases which are caused by comment events. In a typical embodiment, there are three common loops for tracking changes in the position coordinates of the receiver's antenna, one loop for each coordinate, and there is one common loop for tracking the drift in the receiver's time clock. The four common tracking loops use the PLL phase discriminator signals Epm as inputs, and generate output correction signals for the individual PLL circuits which correct the phases of PLLs' reference carrier signals to account for changes that are caused by the common events. If a satellite signal is blocked from the receiver's antenna, the phase discriminator signal Ep from the channel tracking that signal will become unreliable and should not be used for the common loops. In a preferred implementation, alarm signal S1 m and S2 m are generated for each tracking channel, and discriminator signal Epm is disconnected from the input of the common loops when the inertia free alarm signal S1 m indicates that the phase of the PLL circuit is unreliable or may be inaccurate because the satellite signal has weakened or has been blocked. However, the common correction signal from the common loops to the affected PLL circuit remains connected to the PLL circuit since it can still provide the affected PLL circuit with valid corrections for the common events, with the corrections being determined by the good satellite signals. If the inertia alarm signal S2 m is also generated, the discriminator signal Epm is disconnected from the PLL loop filter, and the phase of the reference carrier signals of the PLL circuit is adjusted by the correction signal from the common loops until both alarm signals change to indicate that the satellite signal has strengthened or reappeared.

[0114] Exemplary Composition of the Information Parameters of a Base Frame

[0115] The following values are among information parameters which are transmitted through the communication link from the base receiver to the rover receiver for each m-th satellite channel at each k-th frame:

[0116] the full phase φB k,m (preferably in cycles, 1 cycle=2π radians) of the m-th satellite carrier signal as measured in the base receiver, such as expressed by equation (5) above;

[0117] the pseudorange γB k,m (preferably in meters) between the m-th satellite and the Base receiver as measured in the base receiver;

[0118] the time moment tk (in seconds) for the measurements of φB k,m and γB h,m, with the time th being the GPS time as measured by the base receiver's clock.

[0119] a weight coefficient KB k,m representative of the estimated quality of the measured values of φB k,m and ΞB k,m.

[0120] The full phase φB k,m may be constructed in the form provided by equation (5):

φB k,m(Ti)=p,nom(Ti−Tp)−φi,m,NCO(Ti),

[0121] or may be constructed in the form which includes the phase offsets of the base receiver:

φB k,m(Ti)=[p,nom(Ti−Tp)−φi.m,NCO(Ti)]−φ′0.

[0122] In either case, we will use the convention practice and have the base receiver correct its clock so that the base time Tl will be equivalent to the GPS time tk for the purposes of implementing our inventions (the time offset has already been accounted for in the above equations). For all practical purposes, times Ti and tk will refer to the same processing time increment, and can be interchanged in the above equations.

[0123] The weight coefficient KB k,m is set equal to zero if any of the alarm signals S1 m B and S2 m B in the m-th channel of the base receiver are generated in their active state (0) during the k-th frame; otherwise, the value of KB k,m is made proportional to the signal-to-noise ratio in the m-th tracking channel. For example, the weight coefficient may be set as KB k,m=Zk,m 2 if both of the alarm signals S1 m B and S2 m B are equal to 1. As a further approach, it is often useful to take into account that signals from satellites situated at low angles of elevation with respect to the receiver antenna usually have lower accuracy because these low-elevation signals are more likely to reflect off of objects near the antenna and generate multipath signals which interfere with the reception of the signal itself. In this case, the elevation angle of the m-th satellite signal may be denoted as ξk,m B, and it may be measured against a minimum elevation angle ξB mln at which the signal becomes visible at the base station. The weight coefficient may be generated in the form:

K B k.m =Z k,m 2sin(ξk,m B−ξB mln)   (24)

[0124] when ξk,m BB mln and the alarm signals S1 m B and S2 m B are not generated in an active state (e.g., S1 m B≠0 and S2 m B≠0). If either of the alarm signals is generated in an active state, or if ξk,m BB mln, the weight coefficient is generated as KB k,m=0.

[0125] Other expressions for the determination of KB k,m are possible too.

[0126] The procedure of the extrapolation unit operation

[0127] The information parameters from several (Mr) successive frames (k=1,2 . . . Mr) for each satellite channel, as received by the base receiver, are written to a memory unit 110 (e.g. a register bank) of an extrapolating unit 100. The organization of the memory unit for the parameters (φB k.m, γB k,m, tk, and KB k,m) for one satellite is shown in FIG. 1. If the differential navigation task is performed in real time, then these parameters are transmitted over the communication link between the base and rover stations, with the extrapolating unit being located at the rover station. In this case, the following two characteristics of the communication link, as measured during each frame, are preferably also stored in the memory unit: the signal-to-noise ratio snrk in the communication link and a bit flag νk indicating that the data has been corrupted in transmission over the link, and/or cannot be repaired (νk=0 or νk=1). The generation of the value of νk is preformed by an assessment unit 140 described below in greater detail. The above-described stored values are used for the computation of the extrapolating function parameters by a processing unit 160, which are also described in greater detail below. When a new frame is received, the oldest frame is discarded from the memory unit to make room for the new frame. The frames are received by a receiving unit 120, which provides the data (after optional decoding) to memory 110 and assessment unit 140. The signal-to noise ratio of the communication link is monitored by monitoring unit 130, which provides an output signal for each frame to memory unity 110 and assessment unit 140. Assessment unit 140 uses this signal to determine whether the frame is satisfactory.

[0128] In a preferred implementation, the navigation parameters are encoded by an error-correcting method before being transmitted over the communication link by the base station. In the rover receiver, the encoded parameters are decoded by a decoding method in receiving unit 120 which can detect errors in the parameters caused by the transmission and can correct many, but not all, of the errors. If receiving unit 120 finds errors that it cannot correct, it sends a corresponding signal to assessment unit 140. There are several well-known error-correcting encoding methods, and descriptions thereof are not needed for one of ordinary skill in the art to make and use the present inventions. These methods are modified to cause assessment unit 140 to set the value of νk to zero (νk=0) when the encoded parameters have errors which cannot be corrected (νk in active state), and to set the value of νk to one (νh=1) when the encoded parameters have no errors or have errors which have been corrected by the decoding method (νk in inactive state). (Of course, the reverse assignment of one and zero values may be used.) A more simple approach for transmitting the navigation parameters is to add a checksum word to each frame, or to each sub-frame (a sub-frame may comprise just the navigation parameters of one satellite or the parameters of a small number of satellites). The value of each checksum word is chosen such that sum of it and all the digital words in its frame or sub-frame forms a predetermined value in the least significant bits of the total. At the rover receiver, the digital words of each frame or sub-frame (including the checksum) are summed together and the least significant bits are tested to see if they match the predetermined number. If they do, the navigation parameters in the frame or sub-frame are assumed to be good, and the value of νk is set to one (νk=1). If not, the values are assumed to be bad and the value of νk is set to zero (νk=0). The checksum method can only detect errors in the transmitted data, and cannot correct them. An even simpler approach, but less reliable method, is to judge the reliability of the transmitted parameters only from the measured signal-to-noise ratio (snrk) of the communication link. This ratio may be measured by monitoring unit 130 during the transmission of each frame by any number of well-known techniques. In this case, the parameter νk would not be needed.

[0129] The purpose of the extrapolation unit is to extrapolate the full phase φB k,m and pseudorange ΞB k,m of each satellite signal received by the base receiver to a time selected by the rover station. The inventors have found that the most suitable extrapolation approach from the point of view of striking a balance between the extrapolation accuracy and complexity, is the choice of the extrapolating function in the form of a polynomial of degree np. In particular, for the degree np=2, such an extrapolating function is defined by three parameters, A, B, and C, and has the form: At2+Bt+C. The storage capacity Mr for the stored frames needs to be sufficient to hold at least np frames (Mr>np). Because some of the transmitted frames may have bad data or may be corrupted during transmission, the number Mr of frames stored by the memory unit should be much larger than np. In practice, the number Mr of frames depends upon the time interval (duration) ΔTk between frames and on the specific characteristics of the fluctuations of the phase (delay) in the satellite signal received by the base station. [There is a limited time period Tmax where a polynomial approximation is sufficiently accurate; periods longer than Tmax will lead to inadmissible errors. Therefore, we set MrΔTk<Tmax. Thus if ΔTk decreases, we should increase Mr, and vice versa. Increase of phase fluctuations decreases the value of Tmax; in this case, if ΔTk=constant, then Mr decreases. Thus, for ΔTk=1 second, it is reasonable to take Mr≦5.

[0130] A binary quality estimation (satisfactory/unsatisfactory) is made by assessment unit 140 for each frame and is stored in the memory unit. The frame quality is considered to be unsatisfactory if at least one of the following conditions is fulfilled:

[0131] the signal-to-noise ratio (snrk) in the communication link during the reception of the k-th frame by the rover is lower than the allowed threshold (in particular, if the signal is missing);

[0132] an error is detected in a received digital word representing an information parameter which cannot be corrected by the decoding methods used in the communication link (νk=0 is written to the memory unit);

[0133] a checksum error is detected in the frame (or sub-frame); or

[0134] the weight coefficient of the frame is equal to zero (KB k,m=0 is stored in the memory unit).

[0135] Assessment unit 140 receives these signals from units 120 and 130.

[0136] While all of these conditions are tested in preferred embodiments, less preferred embodiments may test fewer of the conditions. Then a true group comprising ns satisfactory frames is selected from memory unit 110, by a discriminator unit 150, for each satellite parameter to be extrapolated. The true group must include the number of frames which is not less than the number of parameters in the extrapolating function (ns>np). It is also important that the frames in the true group are in immediate sequential order. The extrapolating function parameters are determined from just the true group of frames. When extrapolating the full phase of a satellite signal, it is important that all the measured values φB k,m in the true group be referenced to the same steady balance point of the PLL circuit (i.e. that there were no cycle slips occurring between the frames in the true group). Usually, the beginning of a cycle slip will be detected by the indicator of the affected tracking channel in the base receiver, and marked as unsatisfactory by setting KB k,m=0. The subsequent frame may already be satisfactory. Yet it is impossible to use it for computation together with the preceding frames because the phase readings between these frames might be different by an integer number of half-cycles, and such a difference would lead to the erroneous computation of the extrapolating function parameters (e.g., A, B, and C). If Mr>3, then several groups of frames for each satellite parameter (φB k,m and γB k,m) may reside in the memory unit, each of which satisfies the conditions for usable data. In this case, it is necessary to choose one of these groups as the true one, it being better to choose the latest one (i.e., the group having data from the most recent frames). This will improve the extrapolation accuracy. The case is also possible when there is no group of frames in the memory unit which may be considered as the true one for any one of the parameters of the satellite signal. In this case, a signal NO BASE MEASUREMENTS (Sm B=0) is generated if any one of the parameters of the m-th satellite signal has no group of usable frames, and the extrapolating function parameters (e.g., A, B, and C) for the parameters of the m-th satellite signal are not recalculated until the disappearance of this signal (i.e., until Sm B=1), or if this condition continues for a long time, the measurements will be stopped and will be resumed only at the restoration of standard mode.

[0137] The extrapolating function parameters are computed from the selected group (as determined by discriminator unit 150) by the least-squares method, which is performed by processing unit 160. As is known in the art, the least-squares method uses a measurement vector to represent several measured values, at separate time moments, of navigation parameter which is being fitted by the polynomial model, a state vector A to represent the extrapolating function parameters to be found from the measured values of the navigation parameter, an observation matrix He which relates the function parameters to the measured values according to the model, and optionally a covariance matrix Re which represents the reliability of the measured data values. In our case, for extrapolating one navigation parameter from one satellite (generally represented as the m-th satellite), the measurement vector includes the measured navigation parameters (either the phases φB k,m or the pseudoranges γB k,m) of the true group (ns components), and the state vector Ae of the extrapolating function parameters includes (np+1) components. In the specific case when np=2, we have A e = [ A B C ]

[0138] The observation matrix He in this case comprises the time of the measurement of the navigation parameters of the true group stored in the memory unit, and for the case np=2 is given as: H e = [ t 1 2 t 1 1 t 2 2 t 2 1 t k 2 t k 1 t n s 2 t n s 1 ] .

[0139] The covariance measurement matrix Re is determined by the weight coefficients KB k,m and is given in the form: R e = [ ( K 1 , m B ) - 1 0 0 0 0 ( K 2 , m B ) - 1 0 0 0 0 0 ( K k , m B ) - 1 0 0 0 0 ( K n s , m B ) - 1 ]

[0140] According to the least-squares method, the extrapolation function parameters (in the Ae vector) for fitting the phase of the m-th satellite are defined as follows:

A φ e=(H e T R e −1 H e)−1 H e T R e −1φB,

[0141] where φB is the vector of the nS full phase measurements of the m-th satellite in the true group: φB=(φB 1,m, φB 2,m, . . . φB k,m, . . . φB n,ms)T. In a similar way, for pseudo-range measurements we have:

A γ e=(H e T R e −1 H e)−1 H e T R e −1γB,

[0142] where γB is the vector of the nS pseudo-range measurements of the m-th satellite in the true group: γB=(γB 1,m, γB 2,m, . . . γB k,m, . . . γB ns,m)T. (Here, and further on, the superscript T means the matrix transposition, and the superscript −1 means the matrix inversion.) As we indicated above, the use of the covariance matrix Re is preferred but optional. If matrix Re is not used, then the identity matrix E is used in its place in the above equations (The identity matrix has ones for its diagonal elements, and zeros for its off-diagonal elements.) The above steps are performed by processing unit 160.

[0143] After the determination of the extrapolating function parameters, the extrapolation is performed by a generator unit 170 at the processing time intervals TI required by the desired rate of RTP processing. Unit 170 receives the extrapolating function parameters from processing unit 160. During the time interval ΔTK between the last received frame and the next frame, the extrapolation may, for example, be done at time moments ti=iTI for i=1, 2 . . . I, where I=ΔTK/TI. In the particular case, having calculated three parameters, we may generate the extrapolation for the phase measurements as:

φB(t l)=A φ t l 2 +B φ t l +C φ, where [Aφ, Bφ, C100 ]T=Aφ e.

[0144] and we may generate the extrapolation of the pseudo-range measurements as:

γB(t l)=A γ t l 2 +B γ t l +C γ, where [Aγ, Bγ, Cγ]T=Aγ e.

[0145] When a new frame is received and stored in the register, all of the above steps are repeated by the units 120-170.

[0146] As indicated above, the extrapolation is made independently for each satellite channel, so the above steps are performed for the full phase and pseudo-range of each satellite received by the Base receiver.

[0147] Through their work, the inventors have found that the following values are most suitable for use in navigation receivers of GPS and GLN systems:

[0148] A frame duration of ΔTk=1 second; a number Mr of frames stored by the memory unit of Mr=5; the degree of the extrapolating polynomial of np=2, correspondingly ns=3, 4 or 5 are possible. The processing time interval TI may be different for the solution of different tasks. Thus for the unit of detection and correction of cycle slips, which will be discussed next, a short processing time interval of TI=5-10 ms is used, coinciding with the clock time interval in tracking systems of the receiver. A longer processing time interval of TJ=0.05 s-1.0 s may be needed for the ambiguity resolution unit and the unit of the baseline vector computation.

[0149] B. The cycle slip detection and correction unit

[0150] Characteristics and symptoms of a cycle slip.

[0151] As described in the above tutorial section on the structure of coherent navigation receivers, a cycle slip is the process of a PLL circuit transitioning (or changing) from one point of steady balance to another point of steady balance (also called herein as a steady balance point). The cycle slip is characterized by two main parameters: the value (e.g., the number of cycles or sometimes half-cycles) and the duration of the cycle slip.

[0152] The value of a cycle slip is random, but is always equal to a multiple of the phase interval (α) between two neighboring steady balance points of the PLL circuit. This interval depends upon the type of PLL circuit used. The typical value of α for receivers of navigation systems is α=0.5 cycles if the phase is measured in cycles, or α=π if the phase is measured in radians. In this case, the slip value may be equal to m/2 cycles (where m=1, 2 . . . ).

[0153] The duration of a cycle slip is also random. The minimum duration is determined by the time lag (i.e., sluggishness) of the PLL circuit, and the maximum duration depends upon the reason which caused the cycle slip, and it may reach several seconds.

[0154] A loss in PLL tracking, which is different from a cycle slip, can be viewed as a very long cycle slip if the PLL circuit does not need to undergo the re-acquisition process after the PLL tracking loss has ended. In those cases where the re-acquisition process is used to re-establish PLL tracking, the initial loss in PLL tracking cannot be viewed as a cycle slip.

[0155] Sometimes it is possible to detect a cycle slip in an individual channel by observing the rate of change in the phase of the PLL's controlled oscillator (e.g., NCO), and noting time intervals when this rate grows substantially. Yet such a detection is very unreliable, especially in the case of the rover receiver, as its velocity may change in a rather wide range.

[0156] The occurrence of a cycle slip is often connected with the shading (blockage) of the signal by a local object. At the disappearance of the signal, the feedback loop of the PLL circuit is usually opened, but the noise potential remaining on the PLL dynamic filter integrator continues to change the reference oscillator phase; and at the reappearance of the signal, the PLL may lock onto a new steady balance point. In this case, the duration of the cycle slip practically coincides with the duration of the blockage, and the cycle slip value is random and depends on the energetic potential and the characteristics of the PLL circuit. A cycle slip caused by a blockage is usually detected with sufficient reliability for all its duration by the amplitude and angle indicators of the affected channel, as we have described above. However, the situation is more complicated when the receiver functions in the presence of reflected signals. The reflected signal may be received also during the blockage of the direct signal. In this case, if the reflected signal is strong enough, the indicators usually produce only short pulses in the beginning and at the end of the cycle slip. During the major part of the blockage of the direct signal, the reflected signal acts as a substitute for the direct signal, and the receiver indicators cannot detect the cycle slip. At some values of the amplitude and phase of the reflected signal, the short pulses from the indictors at the beginning and at the end of the cycle slip may remain unnoticed against a noisy background, although the probability of that occurring is not very high given the average energetic potential of the signal.

[0157] Also possible are occurrences of short-time cycle slips due to strong impulse noise or interference, violent shocks to the antenna or the quartz crystal in the main signal oscillator, or even an occasional large spike in the receiver's intrinsic noise.

[0158] All of the cycle slip detection methods for a single channel, taken separately, are one way or another connected with (i.e., rely upon) the observation of the cycle slip process itself. After the slip has ended and the PLL circuit has locked onto a new steady balance point, it is impossible to detect the cycle slip in the affected tracking channel. In the majority of cases, it is also impossible to determine the cycle slip value in the affected channel, and consequently it is impossible to correct it.

[0159] As a rule, many satellite tracking channels operate simultaneously in a navigation receiver, and some redundancy exists. Using the redundancy, one can detect a tracking channel whose measurements differ strongly from those of another, and can consider that this difference is most probably the consequence of a cycle slip. By this way, it is possible to detect the cycle slip also after its completion. The existence of redundancy allows, in principle, one to estimate the slip value and to apply a correction after its completion. Yet, this method taken in itself is not sufficiently reliable either, especially if cycle slips occur in several channels simultaneously, or if the rover moves randomly and quickly enough, or if the energetic potential in some channels is not very high.

[0160] The second invention of the present application relates to methods and apparatuses to detect and simultaneously correct cycle slips based upon the use of the many characteristics and specific symptoms of cycle slips. The methods and apparatuses enable one to notice the occurrence of a cycle slip with high probability, and to exclude from the navigation processing tasks, during the entire duration of the cycle slip, the measurements of the navigation parameters from the channels where the slips were detected. After the completion of the cycle slip, it is possible to estimate the value and sign of the cycle slip, and to apply the corresponding correction.

[0161] Input values for the cycle slip detection and correction unit

[0162] The cycle slip detection and correction units (apparatuses) and methods of this invention use, as input data, a set of residuals Δφi,m of single phase differences and corresponding weight coefficients Ki,m R and Ki,m B at the chosen clock time moments tl (ti=iΔTI) for each channel. In the discussion below, each satellite and satellite signal will be generically indicated as the m-th satellite and m-th satellite signal, respectively, and a subscript m or a superscript m may be added to the symbols for various parameters to indicate that there is an instance of the parameter for each satellite being tracked by the receivers.

[0163] The residual of single phase differences Δφl,m (also called the phase residual Δφl,m) related to the m-th satellite signal is defined as follows:

Δφl,ml,m B−φl,m R−1/λm [D l,m B −D l,m R],

[0164] where λm is the wavelength of the m-th satellite signal, where Dl,m B and Dl,m R are the computed distances from the m-th satellite to the base and the rover receivers at the i-th clock time moment, respectively, where φi,m R is the full phase (in cycles) of the m-th satellite signal measured in the rover receiver at the m-th clock time moment, and where φl,m B is the full phase (in cycles) of the i-th satellite signal measured in the rover receiver at the i-th clock time moment. Each residual signal Δφi,m represents the deviation of the single difference of the phases (φl,m B−φl,m R) from the value predicted from the computed distances (1/λm[Di,m B−Dl,m R]).

[0165] For real-time processing applications, the full phase φi,m B is preferably computed by the extrapolating unit of our first invention at the i-th clock time moment from the information parameters received through the communication link between the base and rover stations. If a highly-reliable, high-bandwidth communication link is being used over a short distance (e.g., less than 0.5 km), it is possible that the full phase φi,m B may be received directly. The full phases φB i,m φR i,m may be constructed in the form provided by equation (5):

φB i,m(T i)=p,nom(T i −T p B)−φB i,m,NCO(T i),

φR i,m(T i)=p,nom(T i −T p R)−φR i,m,NCO(T i),

[0166] or may be constructed in the form which includes the phase offsets of the base receiver:

φB i,m(T i)=[p,nom([Ti −T p B)−φB i,m,NCO(T i)]−φ′0 B,

φR l,m(Ti)=[p,nom(T i −T p R)−φR i,m,NCO(T i)]−φ′0 R.

[0167] In either case, we will use the convention practice and have the base receiver correct its clock so that the base time Ti will be equivalent to the GPS time tl for the purposes of implementing our inventions (the time offset has already been accounted for in the above equations). For all practical purposes, times Ti and tl will refer to the same processing time increment, and can be interchanged in the above equations.

[0168] For each satellite signal, indicated herein generally as the m-th satellite signal, we define a weight factor Kl,m for the phase residual and generate it from the weight coefficients obtained in the rover receiver (Kl,m R) and the base receiver (Kl,m B). The coefficient Kl,m R is generated in the rover receiver at processing time intervals TI by the approach as previously described above where Kl,m R depends on the energetic potential and the angle of elevation of the m-th satellite signal as it is seen from the rover position.

[0169] The weight coefficient Kl,m B from the base receiver is extrapolated from the value of Kk,m B transmitted through the communication link. As it turns out, high accuracy is not needed in this extrapolation, and one can use the zero-order extrapolation of: Kl,m B=Kk,m B. The value Ki,m takes into account both weight coefficients, and it may be generated as:

K l,m −1=(K l,m B)−1+(Kl,m R)−1.

[0170] If either of the weight coefficients Ki,m B or Ki,m R is zero, the weight factor Ki,m is set to zero.

[0171] The single phase difference residuals of all of the operating channels may be grouped together as a vector which we call the phase residual vector Δφi. This vector includes n components, which we may identify as follows: Δφi[m], where m=1, 2 . . . , n.

[0172] The structure of the common inertial tracking loop

[0173] The general block schematic diagram of an exemplary apparatus and method of cycle-slip detection and correction for the rover receiver is shown at 200 in FIGS. 2A and 2B. Here the structure of the apparatus and method of control for one channel of the rover receiver is shown in detail, which is indicated generally as the m-th channel for the m-th satellite signal. The structure for the other channels is similar. The part of the apparatus and method that is shown in FIG. 2B is common for all of the channels.

[0174] The detection and correction apparatus and method for each channel receive the phase residual Δφi,m for each channel on a line 201, and generate an estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m of the phase residual for each channel at each i-th time moment on a line 202 (top of FIG. 2A). Each estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m is generated as an output of a common inertial tracking system 240 (FIGS. 2B and 2A). As described in greater detail below, the common tracking system 240 detects a change in the baseline vector between the base and rover stations caused by the motion of the rover or a drift in the rover's reference oscillator, and then changes the values of the estimates Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m to reflect the detected change. A correction unit 220 (FIG. 2A) uses the phase residuals Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m on line 201 and the phase estimates Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m on line 202 to generate an input (ψi,m) for the common tracking system on a line 222, and to generate a cycle slip correction φi,m C on a line 221 which is representative of the value of a cycle slip when it occurs. The cycle slip correction φl,m C is subtracted from the phase residual Δφl,m by an adder 205 to generate a corrected phase residual Δφi,m C. This signal is passed through a switch SW0 and provided on a line 204 as an output, which can be used in the ambiguity resolution and the baseline computation. Switch SW0, which is discussed in greater detail below, blocks the corrected phase residual Δφl,m C from being used when a cycle slip is occurring.

[0175] A summation node 224 of correction unit 220 generates a phase mismatch δφi,m for each satellite signal as the difference between the phase residual Δφl,m and its estimates Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m:

δφi,m=Δφi,m−Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m.

[0176] The mismatch δφi,m is provided to a transformation unit 226 of correction unit 220, where it is transformed by a nonlinear operator which includes the round(*) operation. The round(*) operation computes the nearest integer to its argument (*), and provides this integer as its output. A cycle slip correction φi,m C is generated from this operator output as:

φl,m C=αround(δφi,m/α),

[0177] where α is the distance (interval) in cycles between two neighboring points of steady balance of PLL circuit. The value α is a constant (fixed) parameter and is determined by the characteristics of the PLL discriminator. If a PLL discriminator with the transformation characteristic of the form arctan(Q/I) is used, then a 0.5.

[0178] The nonlinear transfer function of φl,m, versus δφl,m is shown in the plot of FIG. 3. As one can see from this plot, the transfer function has a stepwise characteristic. When the input mismatch δφl,m (shown as X-axis) reaches each of the specific points ofα/2, 3α/2. and so on, the value of the correction φl,m C jumps by a step ofα, as shown in the plot. Between these specific points, the value of the correction φl,m C does not change.

[0179] From φl,m C and δφl,m, a corrected mismatch ψl,m is generated by a summation node 228 of correction unit 220 as:

ψl,m=δφl,m−φl,m C.

[0180] The dependence of ψl,m on δφl,m is shown in the plot of FIG. 4. The plot of FIG. 4 shows the transfer function, also called the characteristic response, of the correction unit presented in FIG. 2A.

[0181] The corrected mismatches for all n channels may be grouped together as a vector ψi, which has n components. The corrected mismatches ψi of all the channels are provided to common tracking system 240 (FIG. 2B), which uses them to detect a change in the baseline between the base and rover stations. The common tracking system generates a state vector Aφ c that has three components (Aφ x, Aφ y, Aφ z) which estimate the baseline vector bias along three directional coordinates (which are usually Cartesian coordinates), and a fourth component (Aφ q) that estimates the phase bias of the rover's reference generator (i.e., estimates the clock drift). The vector Aφ c is related to the mismatches ψi through the observation matrix H, also called the Jacobian matrix H. This matrix is already generated in the rover's navigation unit and is used to determine the position coordinates of the rover. Matrix H is also called the geometric function matrix, the Jacobian geometric matrix, and for the most commonly-used Cartesian coordinate-system definitions it is called the matrix of directional cosines. For the purposes of describing the cycle-slip detection and correction unit, we will denote the observation matrix as Hi φ, where the superscript φ symbolically denotes that the matrix is being used in the cycle slip and correction process, and where the subscript i represents the time moment ti for which the matrix has been generated. Vector Aφ c is related to the mismatches ψi as: Hi φAφ ci. Matrix Hi φ enables one to directly find ψi if Aφ c is known. However, we have the opposite situation where we want to find Aφ c from ψi. We perform the reverse task by multiplying ψi with a pseudo-inverse matrix Gi φ of matrix Hi φ, where matrix Gi φ is determined from the least-squares method using matrix Hi φ and a covariance matrix Ri φ which represent the degree of error in the mismatches ψi. The use of matrix Ri φ is optional, but is preferable. Pseudo-inverse matrix Gi φ is also called a generalized inverse matrix for matrix Hi φ. To be a pseudo-inverse matrix of Hi φ, matrix Gi φ need only satisfy the relationships Gi φHiGi φ=Gi φ and Hi φGi φHi φ=Hi φ. We will now describe the specifics of the least squares process.

[0182] There are a number of spatial coordinate systems which may be used to specify the positions of the base receiver, the rover receiver, and the satellites. The selection affects the specifics of how the observation matrix Hi φ is generated. For the purposes of explaining the common tracking system, we will use the Earth-centered Earth-fixed (ECEF) system, but we will describe how Hi φ may be generated for other coordinate systems at the end of this section. The observation matrix Hi φ includes four columns (m1=1,2,3,4) in accordance with the number of the state vector components, and n rows (m2=1, 2 . . . , n) in accordance with the number of satellite channels (m=1, 2 . . . , n). Here, we will use the indices m2 and m interchangeably for indexing the rows of Hi φ. The elements of the first three columns of the m-th row at the i-th time moment are determined by the direction cosines (αi,m, βl,m, hi,m) of the vector which points from the rover to the corresponding m-th satellite, and are computed by the formulas:

αi,m=−(x l m −x i R)/D i,m R,

βi,m=−(y l m −y l R)/D l,m R,

h i,m=−(z i m −z i R)/D i,m R,

[0183] where xi m, yi m, and zi m are the satellite coordinates in the geocentric coordinate system at the moment of transmission of the m-th satellite signal; where xl R, yi R, zl R are the computed coordinates of the rover at the moment of transmission of the m-th satellite signal; and where Di,m R is the calculated distance from the rover to the satellite at the same moment.

[0184] The fourth column of the Hi φ matrix is the unit column.

[0185] The covariance observation matrix Ri φ is a square matrix with the dimensions nn. It contains as its main diagonal elements the weight factors K−1 l,m for the phase residuals: Ri φ m,m=K−1 l,m for m=1, 2 . . . , n. All of the off-diagonal elements are zero.

[0186] The state vector Aφ c is generated as

A φ c =G i φψi,

[0187] Where Gi φ is generated as Gi φ=[(Hi φ)T(Ri φ)−1(Hi φ)]−1(Hi φ)T(Ri φ)−1.

[0188] In common tracking system 240, processing block 242 generates matrix Gi φ from matrices Hi φ and Ri φ, and generates vector Aφ c from matrix Gi φ and the mismatch vector φi, from the steps described above. We may view each of the four components of the state vector Aφ c as a signal at the start of a respective common tracking loop of the common tracking system. From this point, the four component signals will be initially processed separately, and then combined together to form the estimates Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m. The estimates Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m, as previously described above, are provided to the correction units 220, which in turn generate their respective corrected mismatches ψi,m, which in turn are provided as inputs to common tracking system 240. The four signals thereby come back to generate themselves, and four closed feedback loops are thereby formed.

[0189] We will now describe the processing of these four component signals through the four feedback loops. Starting at the beginning point, the four obtained components of the state vector Aφ c then pass through four corresponding dynamic filters 244-1 through 244-4 which have the transfer functions Kdx(p), Kdy(p), Kdz(p), and Kdq(p). Four dynamic estimates Vdx, Vdy, Vdz, and Vdq, are obtained as a result. Together they form the dynamic estimation vector Vd,i. The transfer functions of the dynamic filters 244 define the pass band (e.g., the sluggishness, or time lag, of the four feedback loops) and the dynamic characteristics of four the common inertial tracking loops. The filters are preferably chosen to guarantee a sufficiently low tracking error of the rover movement and possible drifts of the rover's reference generator. This requirement means that the amount of the mismatch δφl,mwhich is caused by these perturbations, together with the noise fluctuations in the system, is preferably much less than α/2. If it is so, these perturbations do not effect the value of the correction φl,m C, as one can see from the plot of FIG. 3, and also do not upset the linearity of the common loop, as one can see from the plot of FIG. 4 (In FIGS. 3 and 4, the points of steady balance correspond to the points δφl,m=0, α, 2α, 3α, . . . etc.). Indeed, the total aggregate of the dynamic errors and noise errors in the vicinity around each point of steady balance (corresponding to δφl,m=0, α, 2α, 3α, . . . etc. in FIG. 4) is much less than the span of each sloping line section of the curve given in FIG. 4. Tutorial information on selecting the filter parameters is provided in Appendix A of this application.

[0190] Our research shows that in the case where the dynamics of the rover's movement approximate those of an ordinary car, the transfer functions Kdx(p), Kdy(p), Kdz(p), and Kdq(p) should be the same, and should include two integrators and have the form:

K d*(p)=K1+K2/p+K3/p 2,

[0191] where the asterisk star * symbol is a place holder for x, y z or q, where K1, K2, and K3 are constants (which can be dynamically changed during operation if so desired), and where p is the Laplacian operator (p=jω=j2πf). The above form, in combination with integrator I1, provides a third order of astaticism (type 3 servo system) for the common tracking loops. (The order of astaticism of the overall loop transfer function K(p) is equal to the polynomial degree of p appearing in the numerator K(p), with K(p) in rational formmeaning no fractions 1/p appearing the numerator or denominator of K(p).) The factors K1, K2, K3 are preferably chosen so that the equivalent noise band of the common loop is in the range of 15-25 Hz at a computation clock time interval of TI=5-10 milliseconds. (In this case, the time discretization only slightly affects the loop's frequency response characteristics, and the noise band can be defined with the corresponding linearized analog equivalent of the circuit taken separately, without taking into account the effects of other circuits).

[0192] As the next step, the vector of dynamic estimates Vd,i is projected onto the directions of distances to satellites by multiplying it with the observation matrix Hi φ to generate the n-dimensional projection vector Vp,i:

V p,i =H φ i V d,i

[0193] Each component of the obtained vector Vp,i corresponds to a respective channel and we identify each component of the vector as Vp,l,m for m=1, 2, . . . , n satellites. Processing block 246 generates matrix Hi φ or receives matrix from the navigation unit which computes the baseline vector. Processing block 246 generates vector Vp,i from matrix Hi φ and the dynamic estimate vector Vd,i.

[0194] Each component Vp,l,m of the vector is provided to the input of its own accumulator I1 (FIG. 2A) through an adder 248. Both accumulator and adder 248 are part of common tracking system 240. Adder 248 is used to inject a signal from local feedback loop, which is described in greater detail below. Accumulator I1 functions as a time integrator, and scales its input by the processing time interval TI. The output of accumulator I1 generates the estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m, which closes the feedback loop of the common tracking loop: Δ ϕ i , m = T I i V p , i , m .

[0195] If a cycle slip begins in one or more of the channels, but with a sufficiently high number of channels functioning normally without cycle slips, then the cycle-slips in this small number of channels do not appreciable affect the vectors Aφ c and Vd,i of the common tracking system. As a consequence, the phase residual Δφi,m of an affected channel changes with time but the estimate Δφi,m for the affected channel practically varies only slightly, and consequently the magnitude of the mismatch δφi,m increases with time ti because the phase residual Δφi,m is changing with time. When the value of the mismatch δφi,m reaches the threshold α/2, the correction φl,m C=α is generated, as might be seen from the plot in FIG. 3. As the mismatch increases further, the magnitude of the correction φl,m C grows by additional leaps (2α, 3α, . . . , and so on). This correction is used to correct the single phase difference residual Δφi,m. The corrected residual is denoted as Δφl,m C, and is generated as:

Δφl,m C=Δφl,m−φC l,m,

[0196] and the task of generating Δφl,m C is preformed by adder 205 (FIG. 2A).

[0197] After the cycle slip has been completed, the value of the correction φC l,m will coincide with the cycle slip value, and the corrected residual Δφl,m C turns out to be independent from the particular point of steady balance which the PLL circuit settled on.

[0198] Individual circuits

[0199] The common tracking loops, with properly chosen parameters, tracks quite well the perturbations common for all the channels, specifically, those connected with the rover movement and the drift in the rover's reference generator. Yet individual systematic variations of the phase residual Δφl,m may also take place in one or more channels, and which are different in each of the channels, and which cannot be compensated by the common tracking system. As a result of such individual variations, a drift in the mismatch δφl,m in each channel occurs, which begins to increase systematically, and ultimately reaches the threshold of α/2. Then a false correction will be generated, and the system operation will be disrupted. The cause of the individual systematic variations of the phase residual Δφl,m, and thus the cause of the false correction, is due to an error in the computed position coordinates of the rover. Indeed, as it was noted earlier, the residuals Δφi,m are defined relative to their computed values, and to compute these values one needs the computed distances Di,m R and Dl,m B. But the distances may be computed only if the receiver coordinates are known. The base coordinates may be supposed to be known with high-accuracy, but tie rover coordinates are not as accurate; especially in the beginning of measurements before the ambiguity resolution is completed when the rover coordinates are measured only with estimates of the pseudo-ranges. Consequently, the rover coordinate error may reach 10 meters to 15 meters. As a result of that, an error in the initial value of the computed distances Dl,m R arises, which varies slowly due to the satellite movement. This means that the residuals Δφl,m vary correspondingly too, and the rates of their respective variations can reach 0.05 cycles per second. The variations will be different in different channels, which leads to the arising, of the drift. After the ambiguity resolution step is completed, the rover coordinates become substantially more accurate. Correspondingly, the rates of variation in the residuals and drifts decrease by approximately two or three orders of magnitude.

[0200] To prevent a substantial increase in the mismatch and the occurrence of a false correction, an individual loop 260 for each satellite channel is included into the cycle-slip detection and correction unit (see FIG. 2A). Each individual loop 260 measures the amount of systematic drift in the mismatch δφl,m and corrected mismatch ψi,m of its channel, and generates a correction signal for the channels estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m which compensates for the systematic drift.

[0201] The corrected mismatch ψi,m of each channel is provided to an input of the individual loop 260 for each channel. The output of each individual loop is denoted as VIn,l,m, and is added with the corresponding component Vp,l,m of the vector Vp,i by an adder 248 of the common tracking system 240. In this way, the correction is made to the estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m. Thus, with the addition of the individual loop, the estimation Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m is generated as: Δ ϕ i , m = T I i ( V p , i , m + V In , i , m ) .

[0202] Each individual loop 260 samples the value of its corrected mismatch ψi,m at each i-th clock time moment, or periodically samples the value of its corrected mismatch ψi,m at selected time moments by the use of a switch SW2, and generates a value at its output VIn,l,m which would be representative of a systematic drift. For this, the sampled value is scaled by a gain value KΣ by a processing block 264, and optionally integrated by an accumulator I2. Specific ways of generating the output VIn,i,m are discussed below in greater detail. VIn,i,m is accumulated with signal Vp,i,m by accumulator I1, and thus affects the value of the estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m, which in turn affects the value of the corrected mismatch ψi,m, thus forming a negative feedback control loop which corrects small drifts in the corrected mismatch ψi,m. The addition of the individual loops makes the cycle-slip detection and correction unit become a multi-loop system.

[0203] Each individual loop tracks the drift in its corresponding mismatch δφl,m through the corrected mismatch ψi,m, and keeps the mismatch value δφl,m at a rather low level, preventing a false correction. However, here another danger arises, that of failing to detect a cycle slip. Specifically, an increase in the magnitude of the mismatch δφl,m due to a cycle slip could also be tracked by an individual loop, and the individual loop could change the value of the estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m to reduce the magnitude of the mismatch δφl,m and the corrected mismatch ψi,m. If this occurs to a sufficient degree, a cycle slip would not be detected by the common tracking system and the correction unit.

[0204] The following three ways may be used to eliminate this danger.

[0205] The first way is based upon the fact that the rate of drift in a phase residual Δφl,m caused by the movement of satellites is rather low. Therefore, to prevent the dangerous increase of the mismatch δφl,m, the individual loop should react slowly to the mismatch, and should generate a slow-acting correction output VIn,l,m. This may be done by sampling the value of the corrected mismatch ψi,m only at selected time moments tl spaced at long time intervals ΔTln relative to the processing time internal TI(ΔTIn>TI), scaling the sampled value by a factor KΣ such as KΣ=1/TI, and then outputting the scaled sample as VIn,l,m for only those time moments ti in which the sampling occurred. At other time moments tl, the value of the output VIn,l,m is zero. The sampling is performed by switch SW2 shown in FIG. 2A, as controlled through a logical AND gate 261 which receives a periodic gating signal having interval ΔTIn and denoted in FIG. 2A by the symbol ΔTIn. When switched on during a selected time moment ti, switch SW2 couples the value of ψi,m to gain block KΣ. Integrator I2 and the corresponding adder are not used in this implementation. If there is a slow drift in the mismatch, then the sampled values of ψi,m will have the same sign, and the periodic values of VIn,i,m which are added to accumulator I1 will have the same sign and will constructively add over a long period of time to change the estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m to follow the drift in the phase residual Δφi,m. If one chooses a sampling interval ΔTIn<4-5 seconds, it will be sufficient to prevent the occurrence of a false correction, even before the ambiguity resolution is completed. After the ambiguity resolution is completed and more precise rover coordinates are thereby obtained, it is possible to increase the interval ΔTIn up to several minutes. At such intervals, most cycle-slips will occur when switch SW2 is not sampling the corrected mismatch ψi,m. However, there is a finite possibility that switch SW2 will be switched on during a cycle slip, and such would distort the value of the correction φl,m c. This possibility is significantly reduced by detecting when a cycle slip is occurring and preventing switch SW2 from closing (i.e., switching on) during a cycle slip. Below, we describe a unit which detects the occurrence of a cycle slip and generates a blocking signal SBL, which is coupled to the AND gate 261 which operates switch SW2. While blocking signal SBL is active (e.g., SBL=0), switch SW2 is prevented from being switching on by the periodic gating signal because of the logic low signal at the lower input of AND gate 261.

[0206] The second way of preventing the individual loop from inadvertently correcting a cycle slip is a modification of the first way. In the modification, switch SW2 is maintained continually switched on (in the closed state) except when blocking signal SBL is active, and the gain factor KΣ is substantially decreased in value, such as by a factor of 5/TI. This provides for continual monitoring of the corrected mismatch signal, and for a narrow banded feedback loop.

[0207] The third way of preventing the individual loop from inadvertently correcting a cycle slip is based upon the fact that the rate of drift due to a systematic cause is almost constant over a rather large interval of time (up to 10-15 minutes). Therefore, the rate of the drift may be measured and stored in memory right at the beginning of the measurement, and then used for the compensation of the drift. To store the rate of the drift in an individual circuit, a memory unit comprising an accumulator I2 and having a transfer function of (1+K4/p) (FIG. 2A) is used in one exemplary embodiment. The switch SW2 is switched on once in the beginning of measurement for a time period Tw sufficient for storing the rate of change of ψi,m in accumulator I2. A signal applied to the upper input of AND 261 may be used for this purpose. During the switching on of switch SW2, an individual loop with the second order of astaticism (type 2 servo system) is formed. The amplification factor KΣ is selected to provide an equivalent noise bandwidth of 1-3 Hz for the individual loop. In this case, it will be sufficient to use an period of Tw=0.5 seconds to 3 seconds for storing. The rate of drift stored at the first turning on compensates for the growth of the mismatch for the time up until the ambiguity resolution. If the typical time up until the resolution of ambiguity exceeds 10-15 minutes, it may be required to increase the order of astaticism (increase the servo number) of the individual loop. To do that, one more integrator is added to the memory unit, which will now have the transfer function of a kind (1+K4′/p+K5′/p2) and will store not only the rate, but also the acceleration of drift.

[0208] After the ambiguity resolution, the rover coordinates are defined more accurately, and it is necessary to switch on switch SW2 again for a brief time to store a new, and considerably smaller, rate of drift. In the subsequent period, switch SW2 is infrequently turned on for brief periods of time, such as approximately once every 10-15 minutes, to set the memory with corrected rate of drift. In the second way, the occurrence of a cycle slip during the turning on of switch SW2 will distort the correction value for the cycle slip. However, since the switching on of switch SW2 is made rarely, and since the occurrence of a cycle slip is a relatively rare event, the probability of their coincidence is very small. In addition, one may delay the sampling of switch SW2 with the coupling of the blocking signal SBL to the lower input of AND gate 261 until all cycle slips have ended.

[0209] The main drawback of the second way is due to its strong sensitivity to the reflected signals having a Doppler frequency shift. Such reflections can arise from the rover movement. The multipath error in the measured phases due to the movement will vary, and the rate of its variation will bring an error into the rate of drift stored in the individual circuit. This may result in an erroneous correction. Therefore it is best to use the second way when the switching on of switch SW2 may be made when the rover is motionless (for example, prior to the beginning of the rover's movement), or when the Doppler shift of the reflected signal is negligibly small, or when there are only very weak signal reflections in the rover's environment. The first way, in contrast, has little sensitivity to reflected signals, but can ensure the correct amount of correction only when there are cycle slips of relatively short time duration (up to a maximum time duration of 4-5 seconds). This is because the sampling interval ΔTIn is set to a value in the range of 4 to 5 seconds. The second way has a longer sampling period Tw and can correct systematic drifts in the presence of long duration cycle slips.

[0210] Signal of blocking/interlocking

[0211] Whenever the operation of a channel is disturbed, such as by a cycle slip, it is advisable to disconnect the corrected mismatch signal ψl,m of the disturbed channel from the common tracking system, and to stop the sampling of switch SW2 of independent loop 260 until the disturbed channel resumes normal operation. The timely disconnection of the corrected mismatch signal of a disturbed channel prevents the occurrence of interchannel interferences, and increases the reliability of the common tracking system and the entire system. The timely stopping of switch SW2 prevents the individual loop from generating a correction based on false data. For this purpose, a blocking signal generator 270 receives the corrected mismatch signal ψi,m of the channel, the status signal Sm B from the extrapolation unit on the status of the measurements from the base station for the satellite signal being tracked by the channel, and the alarm signals S1 m R and S2 m R from the rover receiver, and generates a blocking signal SBL,m whenever it detects a disruption to the channel. For the purposes of discussion, and without loss of generality, we will use a value of SBL,m=1 to indicate a normal operation of the channel, and value of SBL,m=0 to indicate a disruption of the channel. However, it should be understood that the reverse assignment of 0 and 1 values, or the assignment of other values, may be equivalently used. When SBL,m=0, switch SW1 is switching off, and switch SW2 is prevented from being switched on by AND gate 261 for sampling by the individual loop. When SBL,m=1 switch SW1 is switched on, and switch SW2 is allowed to be switched on by either of the periodic signals ΔTIn or Tw.

[0212] At the occurrence of the signal of blocking (SBL,m=0) in any channel, the switch SW1 in FIG. 2A of the affected is disconnected, and the corrected mismatch signal ψl,m of the affected channel does not go to the common tracking system. Whenever a channel is disconnected, matrix Gi φ at processing block 242 should be recomputed from a reduced observation matrix Hi φ which has the corresponding row for the affected channel removed, and from a reduced covariance matrix Ri φ which has the corresponding row and column for the affected channel removed. To perform this task, the blocking signal SBL,m is provided to the Gi φ matrix processing block 242 of common tracking system 240. Whenever a channel is reconnected, matrix Gi φ is recomputed at block 242 with augmented matrices Hi φ and Ri φ which have the previously removed rows and column included. There is no matrix recalculation for the Hi φ matrix processing block 246 of the common tracing system when a channel is disconnected, or when it is reconnected.

[0213] The disconnected channel ceases to influence the generation of the estimates Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m by common tracking system 240, but the estimate Δ{circumflex over (φ)}i,m for the disconnected channel continues to be generated by common tracking system 240 from the data provided by the other channels. The mismatch δφl,m and correction φl,m C of the disconnected channel continue to be generated too. Therefore, a cycle slip in the disconnected channel can he corrected.

[0214] To prevent this correction from being distorted because of the influence of individual loop 260, the sampling of this individual loop is disabled by switch SW2 (FIG. 2A) when the blocking signal is active (i.e., at SBL,m=0).

[0215] The blocking signal SBL,m is generated in blocking signal generator 270 shown in FIG. 2A. The method of operation of this unit is explained by a flow diagram 400 shown in FIG. 5. Flow diagram 400 comprises a start block 402, and end block 420, and several processing blocks 404-416. The process repeats through the blocks 402-420 at each processing time increment T1(e.g., tl, tl+1, tl+2, tl+3, . . . ), or at a small multiple of the processing time increment T1(e.g., tl, tl+2, tl+4, tl+6, . . . ). At block 404, the alarm signals S1 m R and S2 m R from the rover, and alarm signal Sm B from the base station are tested to see if any one of them is active (e.g., is zero). An active alarm signal indicates that the channel has most likely been disturbed, and that cycle slips are likely to occur. If one of the alarm signals is active, then the processing moves to block 406, where the blocking signal SBL,m is set in an active state, e.g., SBL,m=0. This disables switches SW1 and SW2, and causes the common tracking system to recompute matrix Gi φ so as to exclude the channel's contribution and prevent its corrected mismatch ψl,m from influencing the generation of the estimates Δ{circumflex over (φ)}j,i. From block 406, the processing proceeds to block 408, where a timer is set so that a delay duration Td may be subsequently measured in another processing path of flow diagram 400. Instead of setting a timer, one can equivalently record a representation of the current time in a memory location, which can be later compared against the current time to find the delay. From block 408, the processing proceeds to end block 420, and waits for the next processing time increment. As long as one of the alarm signals S1 m R, S2 m R and Sm B is active, the process will follow the processing path through blocks 402, 404, 406, 408, and 420.

[0216] Another condition which indicates that the channel has likely been disturbed is when the magnitude of the corrected mismatch ψl,m is near its maximum value of α/2. Adhere α is the distance between the steady balance points in the PLL circuit. If the magnitude of the corrected mismatch (|ψl,m|) is within 85% to 100% of α/2, it would be advisable to activate the blocking signal SBL,m=0 if it has not already been activated by the alarm signals S1 m R. S2 m R and Sm B, or to maintain it in an activated state if the alarm signals have subsequently become deactivated. This test is done at processing block 410, which tests magnitude of the corrected mismatch (|ψl,m|) against a threshold value Πδ. The threshold value Πδ is typically in the range of 85% to 95% of α/2, and preferably around 90% of α/2. For a value of α=0.5 cycles (corresponding to 3.14159 radians), a threshold of 90% of α/2 corresponds to Πδ=0.225 cycles (corresponding to approximately 1.4 radians). Processing block 410 is reached from block 404 if the test preformed at block 404 indicates that all of the alarm signals S1 m R. S2 m R and Sm B are not active. At block 410, if the magnitude of the corrected mismatch (|ψl,m|) exceeds the threshold Πδ, the process proceeds through blocks 406, 408, and 420, where the same steps are performed in the case where one or more of the alarm signals are active.

[0217] When all the alarm signals are deactivated, and when the magnitude of the corrected mismatch (|ψl,m|) falls below the threshold Πδ, the disturbance may have ended and we want to consider deactivating the blocking signal SBL,m, e.g. by setting SBL,m=1. However, the mere disappearance of all of the alarm signals is usually not a sufficient condition to deactivate the blocking signal SBL,m, and the deactivation of the blocking signal SBL,m should be made with some amount of delay. The reason for this is that, as it was already stated earlier, the alarm signals can become deactivated during the middle of a cycle slip while, at the same time, there is an abnormal increase in the phase residual Δφi,m and of the corrected mismatch ψi,m. The latter condition indicates that the channel should still not be connected to the common tracking system. Therefore, after an activation of the alarm signals, and after all of the alarm signals have been subsequently deactivated, switches SW2 and SW1 should remain switched off for a time delay Td after the deactivation of the last active alarm signal. The delay Td is set by processing block 408, as previously described. During the duration of the delay Td, the corrected mismatch ψi,m will be large due to the effects of the cycle. When the cycle slip is finished, the corrected mismatch ψi,m will return to a value near zero. Thus we have to wait a time delay of Td to return mismatch ψl,m near zero.

[0218] This above-described methodology for deactivating the blocking signal SBL,m may be achieved by the topology of the processing blocks 410, 412, 414, and 416 shown in FIG. 5. Once all of the alarm signals have been deactivated, the process will go to processing block 408 to test the magnitude of the corrected mismatch (|ψl,m|) As long as this is above the threshold Πδ, the process will keep going through blocks 406 and 408, and the start of the time delay Td will keep being reset. This prolongs the active state of the blocking signal (SBL,m=0) past a time interval of Td. As soon as the corrected mismatch is returned to normal, which is at a level below the threshold Πδ, the process proceeds to block 412 instead of block 406, and the resetting of the timer for delay Td is stopped. At block 412, the process tests whether the time delay has finished. If not, the process proceeds to block 414, where the blocking signal continues to be activated during the time delay Td. The process will continue going through the path of blocks 402, 404, 410, 412, 414, and 420 until the time delay Td has finished, at which point the process will go from block 412 to block 416 when it next encounters block 412. At block 416, the blocking signal is disabled (SBL,m=1). At this point, the process will continue going through the path of blocks 402, 404, 410, 412, 416, and 420 until an alarm signal is activated, or until the magnitude of the corrected mismatch exceeds its threshold.

[0219] At processing block 412, the determination of whether the time delay Td has been reached may be done by looking at the contents of the timer, if a timer was used in step 408. If the value of the time has exceeded Td, the delay has been reached. If, instead of a timer, a representation of the staring time of the delay was stored to memory in step 408, the determination of whether the time delay has been reached may be done by subtracting the representation of the starting time from the representation of the current time, and then testing that value against the value of Td.

[0220] Compromises are made in the selection of values of the threshold Πδ and the time delay Td. At too small of a threshold Πδ, the probability of a false disconnection of the channel due to transient noise spikes will increase. We have found that a value of around 90% of α/2 is a good compromise (approximately 1.4 radians for α=0.5 cycles).

[0221] A too large of a delay Td will result in an excessive time for the disconnection of the channel after the cycle-slip has terminated. On the other hand, a too small of a delay Td will result in the channel being connected to the common loops before the cycle slip in the channel has finished. A satisfactory compromise is a choice of Td=1 to 2 seconds.

[0222] Exclusion of measurements of the channel from the further processing (signal Observation missing).

[0223] The navigation measurements from any channel in which cycle slip occurs should not be used for the resolution of ambiguity or the calculation of the baseline vector until the cycle slip ends and is corrected. The previously-described disconnection of a channel from common tracking system 240 does not necessarily mean that the measurements should be excluded from the ambiguity resolution or the baseline calculation. Some channels of the rover receiver, particularly those tracking satellites positioned at small elevation angles, may be tracking signals having relatively low energy potential, and their fast-response indicators frequently generate S1 R alarm signals which cause these channels to be disconnected from common tracking system 240. However, the low energy potential may still be appreciably above a usable threshold value, and the channels which have been disconnected from common tracking system 240 operate with stability in the individual mode (i.e., disconnected mode). The measurements from these channels (with their weight factors taken into account) may turn out to be rather useful for the computation of the baseline vector.

[0224] In order to determine when the navigation measurements of a channel should be excluded from the ambiguity resolution or the baseline computation because of a cycle slip, we may generate an alarm signal called the observations missing signal SA,m. This alarm signal is generated in each channel by a respective observation messing detector 280, and the subscript m identifies the channel to which the particular alarm signal belongs. For the purposes of discussion, and without loss of generality, we can assign a value of SA,m=0 to indicate an active alarm state, and a value of SA,m=1 to indicate a deactivated state.

[0225] The observation missing signal SA,m in the m-th rover channel is generated in an active state (SA,m=0) whenever one or more of the following events occur:

[0226] (1) the slow acting alarm signal S2m

[0227] of the channel is activated

[0228] (2) the base measurements are missing (Sm B=0), or

[0229] (3) whenever the correction φl,m C value is incremented or decremented.

[0230] The fast acting alarm signal S1 m R is not used. When a cycle slip occurs, one or both of the first two events is likely to occur before the third event (that of a change in the correction φi,m C) occurs. Additionally, when a cycle slip is nearing completion, both of the first two events are likely to disappear before the changes to the correction φl,m C are finished. Determining the end of the changes to the correction φi,m C is the most important factor for determining when it is safe to deactivate the missing observation signal (SA,m=0). Because the correction φl,m C changes in discrete steps, and does not change at each processing time increment TI, one has to observe the value of the correction φl,m C over a relatively long duration (i.e., over several time increments TI) before one can come to the conclusion that the cycle-slip has finished. To do this, we may use the same time delay approach (Td) in detector 280 that was used in the generation of the blocking signal (FIG. 5) in generator 270 (FIG. 2A). During each processing time increment TI(e.g., ti, ti+1, tl+2, tl+3, . . . ), or at a small multiple of the time increment TI(e.g., ti, tl+2, ti+4, ti+6, . . . ), the above five conditions are examined to see if any are active. If one or more are active, then the missing observation signal is activated (e.g., SA,m=0), and a timer for measuring a delay T1 is started. At each subsequent processing time increment, the timer is restarted if any of the above five conditions exists. When all of the five conditions are no longer present, and when the timer reaches the value of T1, the missing observation signal is deactivated (e.g., SAm=1). A flow control structure similar to that shown in FIG. 5 may be used to implement the time delay T1. We have found that a value of T1≅1 second is generally sufficient.

[0231] Features of the cycle slip detection and correction apparatus and method in the post-processing (PP) mode.

[0232] In the PP mode, there is no communication link operating, and the ambiguity resolution and the baseline calculation are performed after the termination of measurements at the rover and base stations. The information and navigation parameters of the base and rover receivers are recorded at periodic intervals at their respective locations, and the recorded parameters are assembled together at one location and processed to resolve the ambiguity and calculate the baseline vector. The time interval between recorded parameters is usually between 0.05 seconds and 1 second, and usually considerably exceeds the clock rate at which the PLL circuits are operated at, which is usually between 0.001 and 0.020 seconds. At such large periods between recorded parameters, the extrapolation of measurements for a moving rover with the required accuracy is practically impossible. In addition, the common tracking system of the cycle-slip detection and correction unit cannot track the rover movement with the required accuracy, and in a number of cases cannot track the phase drift of the rover's reference generator. For these reasons, the use of the our apparatuses and methods for the detection and correction of cycle slips in the PP mode is preferably limited to the case where the base and rover receivers are motionless and where highly-stable reference generators are used in the receivers. The required stability can be readily achieved in the receivers by using the joint tracking loops disclosed in our co-pending patent application Ser. No. 09/330,221. filed Jun. 10, 1999, entitled The Joint Tracking of the Carrier Phases of the Signals Received from Different Satellites, which was previously described above, and which is incorporated herein by reference.

[0233] Thus, in the above case, our apparatuses and methods of detection and correction of cycle slips can be used in the PP mode with the following changes:

[0234] 1. Residuals Δφi,m of the single differences of the phases are calculated directly, without extrapolation, from the records of information parameters received from the base and rover receivers, and are generated periodically at a time interval which coincides with the duration of the frame, and which lies in the range of 0.05 seconds to 1.0 second. This range corresponds to a frame clock frequency of 20 Hz to 1 Hz.

[0235] 2. Each loop of the common tracking system has an astaticism of the second order (type 2 servo system) and an equivalent noise band which is considerably smaller than the frame clock frequency, i.e., from 4.0 Hz to 0.2 Hz depending on the chosen frame clock frequency.

[0236] Model experiments which demonstrate the operation of the system of detection and correction of cycle slips

[0237] The operation of the apparatuses and methods of detection and correction of cycle slips according to the second invention of this application can be clearly illustrated with the help of a simulation model. The model simulated the operation of two receivers (Base and Rover), tracking simultaneously 8 satellites (n=8). In each satellite channel of the Base and Rover receivers, there is a PLL circuit which tracks the corresponding satellite carrier and a slave DLL circuit which tracks the C/A-code (GPS) of the satellite. (The DLL circuit is a slave unit in this case because it receives a Doppler-shift correction signal generated by the PLL circuit). Each receiver has 4 joint tracking loops as disclosed in our previously-mentioned co-pending patent application Ser. No. 09/330,221, three of which track the rover displacement along three coordinates, and one tracks the phase of the reference generator. The adjustment frequency of the joint tracking loops is set in the range of 100 Hz to 200 Hz. and the joint tracking loops have an astaticism of the 3-rd order (type 3 servo system) and an equivalent noise band of about 20 Hz. The channel DLLs have an astaticism of the 1-st order (type 1 servo system), have an equivalent noise band of about 1 Hz, and use strobed reference code signals. The channel PLLs have an astaticism of the 2-nd order (type 2 servo system). an equivalent noise band in the range of 2 Hz up to 5 Hz, and a typical discriminator with the characteristic of the form arctan(Q/I). The outputs of the channel PLLs which are provided to the joint tracking loops are blocked by respective alarm signals S1 m which indicate when the quality of the satellite carrier has fallen below acceptable levels. These alarm signals have been previously described above, and take the form of fast-response angular and amplitude indicators, which can perform a quality measurement at each adjustment clock time (e.g., once every 5-10 ms). Each channel also has an inertial amplitude indicator with an accumulation period of 250 ms which measures the signal-to-noise ratio of the satellite carrier signal. The inertial amplitude indicator generates a corresponding alarm signal S2 m, which indicates a loss or fade of the satellite carrier signal and is used to open the feedback loops of the PLL and DLL circuits when the alarm signal is active. The alarm signals S1 m and S2 m, together with the measured full phase and the signal-to-noise ratio in the channel, are provided to cycle-slip detection and correction unit 200.

[0238] In the model, rover movements with accelerations of up to 1.5 g are simulated. The acceleration affects the rover position as well as the frequency shift of the rover's reference generator (a quartz oscillator is modeled). In addition, a systematic frequency drift of up to 5 Hz to 10 Hz in the generator's oscillator due to instability is simulated, and random fluctuations in the oscillator due to vibrations in the band of up to 2 kHz with full dispersion of up to 100 g2 are also simulated. In the channels of the receiver, independent noise sources with energy potentials from 50 dBHz to 40 dBHz are also simulated. In specific test intervals of time, a reflected signal with the relative amplitude of up to 70% (0.7) of the direct-signal amplitude and Doppler frequency of up to 10 Hz is simulated. The blockage of a direct satellite signal by local objects is also simulated.

[0239] As a general rule, the blockage results in the cycle slip of the PLL circuit, which ends with the establishment of the PLL circuit at a new steady balance point, after which the tracking of the satellite carrier signal resumes. Typical results from the simulation are shown in the graphs of FIGS. 6-9. In one test experiment, two of the eight satellite signals were simultaneously blocked. The blocked signals were being tracked in channels No. 7 and No. 8. In channel No. 8, the blockage lasted for 6 seconds (from 3.1 seconds to 9.1 seconds), and in channel No. 7 the blockage lasted 0.3 seconds (from 3.1 seconds to 3.4 seconds). Simultaneously with the blockage, a reflected signal appears in each of channels No. 7 and 8 with a relative amplitude of 0.7 in relation to the direct signal and with a Doppler shift of 4 Hz. Such a scenario simulates the passage of the rover between two high local objects, one of which blocks both satellite signals, and the second of which produces the reflected signals. It was supposed that the initial rover position is determined with an error of 10-20 m, which results in an error in the baseline computation and, as a consequence, results in the presence of systematic variations in the residuals Δφi,m of the single phase differences in all of the channels.

[0240] As the result of the blockage in channel No. 8, a cycle slip with a duration of about 6 seconds and a value of 20.5 cycles occurred. In the plots of FIGS. 6, 7, and 8, the values of residuals of the single phase differences are given. For a more clear presentation of the results, the amount of phase variation due to the rover movement has been subtracted out form the plotted results.

[0241] In curve (a) of the plot of FIG. 6, we have shown the single phase difference residual Δφi,8 of the 8-th channel, and one can clearly see the process of the cycle slip in the 8-th channel in the interval between 3 and 9 seconds. The rate of the cycle slip is about 3.4 cycles per second, whereas during the intervals of normal tracking before and after, the residual Δφi,8 changes monotonically with a rate of 0.2 radians/second. The slow change during normal tracking is caused by a systematic error arising from an error in the initial computation of the rover's position. Curve (b) in FIG. 6 shows the process of the variation in the corrected residual Δφi,8 C before, during, and after the cycle slip. It can be seen that the correction has removed consequences of the cycle slip from the corrected residual Δφl,8 C, and that it has a time-average rate of change of 0.2 radians/second due to the systematic error. To better show the correction process on the corrected residual Δφi,8 Cwe have shown an expanded view of curve (b) in FIG. 7, where the vertical scale has been expanded. (A portion of curve (a) is also shown in FIG. 7.) Here it is seen that during the cycle slip, the value of Δφi,8 C has an error which oscillates in the range of approximately 1.5 radians, with the oscillations being caused by the correction process. It is apparent that on the interval from 3 seconds to 9 seconds, the measurements from the 8-th channel should be excluded from the computation of the baseline vector. This is accomplished by the activation of the missing observation signal SA,8(e.g., SA,8=0). For performing the ambiguity resolution, it is possible to use the measurements from the 8-th channel during the time interval before the cycle slip (0-3 seconds), and during the time interval after the cycle slip (9-20 seconds) in the computation of the baseline vector.

[0242] In curve (a) of the plot of FIG. 8, we have shown the single phase difference residual Δφi,7 in channel No. 7, as received in the same experiment as used for obtaining the results of channel No. 8. A relatively short cycle slip of one cycle is observed here. An undershoot spike at the end of the cycle slip can be seen in the plot, and is caused by the transient response of the PLL circuit when it locked onto the new steady balance point. The corrected residual Δφi,7 C for channel No. 7 is shown in curve (b) of FIG. 8. It is seen from comparison of the curves (b) in FIGS. 7 and 8 that two cycle slips occurred in two channels in the time interval between 3 and 4 seconds, and that both cycle slips were corrected simultaneously. The measurements in channel No. 7 are excluded from the process computing the baseline vector by the signal SA,7=0 in the time interval from 3.1 to 4.62 seconds, which completely covers the range with large errors. The start of the activation of alarm signal SBL,7=0 at 3.0 seconds was caused by a short pulse of the fast-response alarm indicator in channel No. 7, which generates alarm signal S1 7 R=0. The timer for delay T1 was then set to maintain signal SA,7 in an active state for at least I second, as described above. After the initial activation of signal SA,7 (SA,7=0), four stepwise changes occurred in the correction, each of which restarted the timer for delay T1. The process of generating the corrections Δφl,7 C in channel No. 7 is illustrated in the plot of FIG. 9. Here it is seen, that the first step in the correction occurred at 3.3 seconds, and that further steps occurred in short intervals thereafter, smaller than the time of delay T1=1 second. The last change in the correction took place at 3.62 seconds, when the transient was finished (i.e., when the cycle-slip was completed). Within 1 second (T1l) of the last change to the correction, channel No. 7 again was included into the computation of the baseline vector and the final value of the correction was fixed at 2π radians (corresponding to one cycle). Thus, the proposed system of detection and correction of phase cycle slips eliminates abnormal mistakes caused by a cycle slip and reduces the time required for the resolution of the ambiguity, and as a consequence, prevents loss of the accumulated navigational information due to the random occurrence of a cycle slip.

[0243] Use of different coordinate systems.

[0244] As is known in the global positioning art, there are a number of spatial coordinate systems for representing the position of an object in three dimensions. The most commonly used coordinate systems are the Cartesian system, Earth-centered Earth-fixed (ECEF) system, geodesic system, and topocentric system. Some of these systems are variants of the Cartesian system. Once the coordinate system is selected for the receiver, the mathematical expression for computing the distance Di,m between a visible satellite (m) and the antenna at the i-th time moment may be determined. From this expression, first three elements of the m-th row of the Jacobian matrix Hi φ are the set of mathematical derivatives of the distance Dl,m with respect to the antenna coordinates (generally indicated herein as: x, y, and z). The first three elements of the m-th row of Hi φ=(∂Di,m/∂x, ∂Di,m/∂y, ∂Di,m/∂z). Thus, the matrix elements of Hi φ are representative of the changes in the distance Di,m that would be caused by changes in the antenna's position in the selected coordinate system. The fourth element in the m-th row of Hi φ is conventionally the mathematical derivatives of the distance Di,m with respect to receiver's clock offset τl, as scaled by the speed of light c (i.e., with respect to cτl). This element is conventionally set to a value of 1 for all of the rows.

[0245] C. Ambiguity resolution unit.

[0246] The ambiguity resolution task comprises the following three main parts:

[0247] 1. Generation of the floating ambiguity estimations.

[0248] 2. Generation of the integer ambiguities.

[0249] 3. Formation of a signal of integer ambiguities resolution.

[0250] The third invention of the present application pertains to the first part, that of generating the floating ambiguity estimates. The second and third parts may be accomplished by apparatuses and methods well known in the art. The apparatuses and methods of our third invention use as an input data:

[0251] a) the pseudo-ranges and full phase measurements obtained in the Base and Rover receivers;

[0252] b) the satellites coordinates (which are highly predictable can be readily determined from the GPS time and information provided in the 50 Hz low-frequency information signal by methods well known to the art);

[0253] c) the estimated coordinates of the Base and Rover stations (as measured at their antennas); and

[0254] d) the weight coefficients characterizing the accuracy of the measurements.

[0255] According to the input data, a vector of observations and a covariance matrix of measurements are formed. After that a state vector is generated, components of which are floating ambiguities, the number of which is equal to the number of satellites. On the basis of the floating ambiguity values, a search of the integer ambiguities is performed with use of a least squares method which is modified for integer estimations.

[0256] Improvement of the floating ambiguity estimations takes place step-by-step, and the probability of correct ambiguity resolution increases step-by-step as information is accumulated. Finishing of this process is registered by appearance of the signal of integer ambiguities resolution, which indicates that ambiguity resolution was performed sufficiently safely. After that, the integer ambiguities together with other input data are used for accurate determination of the base line vector. The tasks of determining the integer ambiguities and of generating the signal of integer ambiguities resolution are known to the art and do not form part of our third invention. These tasks, therefore, are not described in greater detail.

[0257] All computations in the floating ambiguity resolution unit are performed with clock interval TJ which is selected with taking into account user's requirements and capacity of the used processor. A typical value of TJ is within 0.1-1.0 sec. In the RTP mode, the frame duration in the communication line may exceed required clock interval TJ. In this case. extrapolation of information parameters transmitted from Base station is used, e.g., by the apparatuses and methods of our first invention described in section A. Full phase measurements may be corrected for cycle slips, e.g., by the apparatuses and methods according to the second invention of the present application described in section B.

[0258] In our third invention, recurrent processing procedures for obtaining the floating ambiguity estimations, based on the method of least squares, are used. The procedures are suitable both for the RTP mode and for the PP mode under movable Rover, where the Rover coordinates may be random and independent in adjacent clock moments. For statistic measurements, when it is known that Rover is immovable, procedures enabling one to decrease processor load and increase measurements accuracy are provided.

[0259] A common feature of the proposed procedures of our third invention is that for every clock (j-th) time moment (tJ=jTJ, where j=1, 2 . . . ) joint processing of the code and phase measurements is performed for all satellites simultaneously. The obtained floating ambiguity estimations are accumulated in time and improved step-by-step.

[0260] In the discussion of this invention, we will be working mostly with vector forms of the information parameters, thus we have omitted the use of satellite index m for the most part.

[0261] C.1. The first recurrent procedure for determining the float ambiguity estimations.

[0262] We start this discussion with rewriting equation (18), which has the integer ambiguities Nm in vector form:

φB i(Ti)−φR i(Ti)=Λ−1(DB i−Dr i)+SB I−−τi R)+N+(φ O B−φ ) R)−(ζφ B i−ζφ R i),  

[0263] where Λ−1 is a diagonal matrix of inverse wavelengths. We note that the components of (φ′0 B−φ′0 R) can be selected to be integer constants, and can therefore be incorporated into the integer ambiguities N. Thus, we may simplify the above equation:

φi B(Ti)−φi R(Ti)=Λ−1(Di B−Di R)+Si B−τi R)+N−(ζφi B−ζφi R)

[0264] Our approach comprises solving the above equations to find an estimation for vector N. However, we cannot readily find measured values for vectors τi B, τi R, ζφi B, and ζφi R, and we have some errors in the range vectors Di B and Di R. Our approach is to represent (model) the errors in the range vectors Di B and Di R and the terms Si B−τi R)−(ζφi B−ζφi R ) by the following error vector: Λ−1Hj γ[Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T, where Hj γis the Jacobian matrix (e.g., directional cosine matrix), and where [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T are corrections to the baseline coordinates and clock offsets of the receivers. Thus, we will model the above equation as:

j R−φj B)−Λ−1(D j R −D j B)=N+Λ −1 H j γ[Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T

[0265] We will use the pseudo-ranges to find the vector Hj γ[Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T as follows:

j R−γj B)−(D j R −D j B)=H j γ[Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T

[0266] This will be done through use of the least squares method, and the formation of observation vectors, state vectors, and observation matrices, as described below in greater detail. Once the estimation of vector N is found, it will be accumulated and processed to find accurate estimates for the floating ambiguities.

[0267] Generation of the vector of observations.

[0268] In our first general recurrent (i.e., iterative) procedure, a vector of observations μj is generated at each clock time moment tj=jΔTJ and comprises 2n components, where n is the number of the satellite channels. The first n components are the residuals of the single differences of the Base and Rover pseudo-ranges, which we denote in vector form as Δγj:

Δγjj −D j

[0269] with

[0270] γjj R−γj B, and Dj=Dj R−Dj B; and

[0271] where γj R and γj B are vectors containing the pseudo-ranges of the satellites, measured in the Base and Rover receivers, respectively; and

[0272] Dj R and Dj B are vectors of the estimated ranges of the satellites from Base and Rover stations at the moment of j-th signal radiation.

[0273] The next n components of the observation vector μj are the residuals of the single differences of the Base and Rover full phases (Δφl), which we indicate here in vector form:

Δφjφj−Λ−1 D j

[0274] where

[0275] φjj R−φj B;

[0276] φj R and φj B are vectors of the full phases of the given satellite signal, measured at the Base and Rover receivers, respectively (the phases are measured in cycles); and

[0277] Λ−1 is a diagonal matrix of inverse wavelengths, where each diagonal component corresponds to a channel and is equal to 1/λ, where λ is the wavelength of the carrier signal in the given channel.

[0278] The full phase vectors φB l and φR l may be constructed in the form provided by equation (5):

φB l(T i)=p,nom(T i −T p B)−φB i,NCO(T i),

φR l(T i)=p,nom(T i −T p R)−φR i,NCO(T i),

[0279] or may be constructed in the form which includes the phase offsets of the base receiver:

φB l(T i)=[p,nom(T i −T p B)−φB i,NCO(T i)]−φ′0 B,

φR l(T l)=[p,nom(T i −T p R)−φR i,NCO(T i)]−φ′0 R.

[0280] In either case, we will use the convention practice and have the base receiver correct its clock so that the base time Ti will be equivalent to the GPS time tk for the purposes of implementing our inventions (the time offset has already been accounted for in the above equations). For all practical purposes, times Ti and tk will refer to the same processing time increment, and can be interchanged in the above equations.

[0281] Generation of the measurements covariance matrix.

[0282] Measurements covariance matrix RJ is formed in the following way on the basis of weight coefficients obtained in Base and Rover receivers: R j = [ R j γ 0 0 R j ϕ ] , where R j γ = [ ( K j , 1 γ ) - 1 0 0 0 ( K j , 2 γ ) - 1 0 0 0 ( K j , n γ ) - 1 ] , and R j ϕ = [ ( K j , 1 ϕ ) - 1 0 0 0 ( K j , 2 ϕ ) - 1 0 0 0 ( K j , n ϕ ) - 1 ] .

[0283] The weight coefficients (KJ1 γ, KJ2 γ, . . . , KJn γ) characterize the accuracy of the measurements of the residuals Δγj of the pseudo-range single differences for the corresponding satellite channels (1-st, 2-nd . . . n-th). Each of these coefficients is determined according to the weight coefficients measured in each channel by Base and Rover receivers for the pseudo-ranges, i.e., by values KJ γB, KJ γR.

[0284] Thus, for example, for the n-th channel

(Kγ jn)−1=(Ky j B n)−1+(Ky j R n)−1,  

[0285] where KJn γB, KJn γR are determined taking into account the measured signal-to-noise ratio in the receivers and the satellite elevation angles in the n-th channel (of Base and Rover, respectively) in the manner that was described earlier in section A (for determining weight coefficient KK). Specifically, for each of the receivers (no superscript used),

Kγ j,m=Zk 2 msin(ξk,m−ξmin)σ+HDγ2  

[0286] when ξk,m>ξ min, and

Kγ j,m=0  when ξk,m≦ξmin,

[0287] where Zk,m 2 is the signal strength of the m-th satellite carrier signal as received by the receiver (it has been normalized to a maximum value and made dimensionless), where ξk,m is the elevation angle of the m-th satellite as seen by the receiver, where a minimum elevation angle ξB min at which the signal becomes visible at the receiver, where σγ 2 is the variance of the code measurements (σγ≈1 m). The factor Zk,m 2sin(ξk,m−ξmln) is dimensionless.

[0288] Weight coefficients kj φ 1, Kj φ 2, . . ., Kφ jn characterize the accuracy of the measurements of the residuals Δφj of the phase single differences, and are determined similarly. Here the same input data is used: the signal-to-noise ratio and the angle of elevation, but another scale for the phase measurements is considered (e.g., σφ 2 instead of σγ 2). Specifically, for each of the receivers (no superscript used),

Kγ j,m=Zk 2 msin(ξk,m−ξmin)σ+HDφ2  

[0289] when ξk,m>ξ min, and

Kγ j,m=0  when ξk,m≦ξmin,

[0290] where Zk,m 2k,m and ξB mln are as they are above, and where σ100 2is the variance of the code measurements (σφ≈1 mm).

[0291] When the magnitudes of either of weight coefficients Kγ j B ,m or Kγ j R ,m is less than a first selected small threshold value, the value of Kj,m γ is generated as a first small number which is less than the first threshold value. This is equivalent to setting (Kj,m γ)−1 to a large number equal to the inverse of the first small number. Similarly, When the magnitudes of either of weight coefficients is less than a second selected small threshold value, the value of is generated as a second small number which is less than the second threshold value. This is equivalent to setting to a large number equal to the inverse of the second small number.

[0292] The elements of the covariance matrix Rj corresponding to the channels which should be excluded from processing (by the signal observation absence) are replaced by very large number. The very large number is selected in advance, and has a value which exceeds by several orders of magnitude the nominal values of the covariance matrix components or (KJ φ)−1 encountered during operation. Consequently, in further computations the weights of all measurements relating to these channels become so small that they do not influence the result.

[0293] Determination of the state vector estimation.

[0294] The state vector Aj in the first recurrent procedure of our third invention comprises (4+n) components. The first three components are increments (Δx, Δy, Δz) to the coordinates (x, y, z) of the base vector unknown at the j-th clock moment, the fourth component is the unknown increment of the reference oscillator phases(cΔτ). The remaining n components are the unknown floating ambiguities, different in different channels (N1, N2 . . . Nn).

[0295] 2n equations (according to the number of components of the observation vector)) may be used to determine the state vector Aj at the j-th clock moment (i.e., to determine 4+n unknown values). Solution of such a system of equations at n≧4 is performed by the method of least squares.

[0296] Since the vector of observations μj contains only the corrections to the estimated values, the system of equations is linearized and may be expressed in the form of

μj =H j μ A j,

[0297] where the observation matrix Hj μ specifies the relationship between the components of the observations vector μj and the state vector Aj. In this case, matrix Hj μ comprises 2n rows and (4+n) columns.

[0298] Matrix Hj μ may be divided into the following 4 parts (sub-matrices): H j μ = [ H j γ 0 Λ - 1 H j γ E ] .

[0299] The first part, the left upper corner of this matrix (the first four columns by the first n rows), is occupied by the observation matrix Hj γ relating to the pseudo-range measurements, each row corresponding to one channel (from the 1-st to the n-th). For the n-th channel, the corresponding row appears like this:

jn, βjn, hjn, 1],

[0300] where αjn, βjn, hjnthe directional cosines of the range vector to the n-th satellite from Rover for the j-th time moment. The generation of the elements of the pseudo-range observation matrix Hj φ was previously described above in section B on our second invention of the present application.

[0301] The second part of matrix Hj μ, the left lower corner (the first four columns by the last n rows), is occupied by the matrix product Λ−1Hj γ relating to the full phase measurements, each row corresponding to one channel (from the 1-st to the n-th).

[0302] For the n-th channel, the corresponding row appears like this:

jnn, βjnn, hjnn, 1/λn],

[0303] where λn is the wavelength of the carrier signal in the n-th channel.

[0304] The third part, the right upper corner (the last n columns by the first n rows) is occupied by zeroes.

[0305] The fourth part, the right lower corner (the last n rows by the last n columns) is occupied by the elements relating to the floating ambiguities. This part represents the identity matrix E with dimensions of nn.

[0306] The method of least squares gives an estimation j of the state vector Aj in the form of A ^ j = [ ( H j μ ) T R j - 1 H j μ ] - 1 ( H j μ ) T R j - 1 μ j

[0307] (here and further upper index T means matrix transposition, upper index −1 means matrix inversion).

[0308] Determination of the float ambiguity vector estimation.

[0309] From the obtained estimation vector j of the state vector, only those components are extracted which relate to the ambiguity (but not the components related to the base vector coordinates or to the frequency drift of the reference oscillator). The selected components form a preliminary estimation vector j of the floating ambiguity vector (this vector has n components).

[0310] As the next step, a main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j of the floating ambiguity vector is generated as a weighted summation of the preliminary estimation vector j and the value of the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j−1 generated at the previous clock moment t(J−1 )=(j−1)ΔTJ. The weighted summation is generated at each clock moment tJ=jΔTJ for j=1,2 . . . , where under j=1 it is assumed that {circumflex over (N)}1=1. Several exemplary procedures for performing the weighted summation are described below.

[0311] Exemplary procedures for performing the weighted summation.

[0312] The weighted summation of the preliminary estimation vector j and main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j−1 may be performed by different methods. The first exemplary method which we disclose here is the main one, and it is suitable for arbitrary observation time. In this first method, we first generate a covariance matrix

j for the estimation vector j of the state vector as follows:

j=[(H j μ)T R j −1 H j μ]−1.

[0313] We then generate a covariance matrix {tilde over (r)}N j for the preliminary estimation vector j by selecting from matrix

j only that part which relates to the floating ambiguity (e.g., the sub-matrix comprising the last n rows and last n columns of matrix j). The weighted summation is performed with taking into account the obtained covariance matrixes and main estimation j is found as follows:

{circumflex over (N)} j =W j {circumflex over (N)} j−1+(E−W j) j,

Wj={tilde over (R)}N j({tilde over (R)}N j−1)−1  

[0314] is the weight matrix,

RN j=[({tilde over (R)}N j)−1+({tilde over (R)}N j−1)−1]−1  

[0315] is the covariance matrix for the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j of the state vector at the j-th time moment, where for j=1 we set RN 1={tilde over (R)}N 1, and where E is the identity matrix.

[0316] As the weighted summation is generated through successive time moments, information at the current time is accumulated with information at previous time moments, and as a result the components of the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j of the floating ambiguities become more accurate with time. The accumulation process of the summation reduces the effects of measurement errors. The motion of the satellites over the accumulation period enables the method to generate many preliminary estimation vectors j, each having a different sets of pseudo-ranges and computed distances but having the same integer ambiguity.

[0317] A second exemplary method for generating the weighted summation is simplified, and is suitable for small observation intervals TS in the range of 10 to 20 seconds, and more typically in the range of 8 to 10 seconds. In this method, weight matrix Wj is not generated, which reduces processor load. The main estimation vector is generated as N ^ j = j - 1 j N ^ j - 1 + 1 j N ~ j .

[0318] In the simplified weighted summation, the vector components corresponding to those channels which should be excluded from further processing according to the signal Observation missing are excluded from vectors {circumflex over (N)}j−1 and j.

[0319] An exemplary third method combines the first and second methods. Over an integer number Ks of time moments tl, as indexed by index l, the second method is used to generate main estimation vectors {circumflex over (N)}l from preliminary estimation vectors l according to the second method as follows: N ^ l = l - 1 l N ^ l - 1 + 1 l N ~ l ,

[0320] where Ks is greater than one, where adjacent time moments l are separated by the interval ΔTJ, and where {circumflex over (N)}l=l for l=1. At the end of the Ks-th time moment (l=Ks), an intermediate estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}*kof the float ambiguity vector is generated as {circumflex over (N)}*k={circumflex over (N)}Ks, which will be used by the first method to generated a final estimation vector. The index I is reset to zero (l=0), and second method is repeated in the same manner for the next Ks consecutive time moments, which will generate the next intermediate estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}*k+1 as {circumflex over (N)}*k+1={circumflex over (N)}Ks. The second method is continually repeated in this manner to generated successive intermediate estimation vectors at periodic time intervals ΔTS=KsΔTJ, where ΔTS is preferably in the range of 10 to 20 seconds. For each intermediate estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}*k, a corresponding covariance matrix {haeck over (R)}N kis generated by a recurrent procedure which we describe next. During the interval l=1 to l=Ks over which the intermediate estimation vector is being generated, a temporary covariance matrix

* l is determined by the following recurrent procedure: l * = l - 1 l l - 1 * + 1 l R ~ l N ,

[0321] where for l=1. The covariance matrix is generated from the covariance matrix

j=(Hj TRj −1Hj)−1 described above by selecting from the covariance matrix j only that part which relates to the floating ambiguity (e.g., the sub-matrix comprising the last n row and last n columns of matrix j). At the end of the Ks-th time moment, the desired covariance matrix {haeck over (R)}N k is generated as: R k N = Ks * Ks .

[0322] The weighted summation according to the first method is performed on the intermediate estimation vectors {circumflex over (N)}*k, {circumflex over (N)}*k+1, etc., taking into account the weight matrixes

[0323] etc., to generate the main estimation vectors {circumflex over (N)}k, {circumflex over (N)}k+1, etc., of the floating ambiguity at clock moments tk=kΔTS as follows:

{circumflex over (N)} k =W k {circumflex over (N)} k−1+(E−W k){circumflex over (N)}* k,

[0324] The third method enables one to combine advantages of the second simplified method (which does not require frequent inversions of non-diagonal matrixes having large dimensionality) and the first main method which does not limit the observation time. It is apparent that in the third method the floating ambiguity estimations and, hence, the accurate estimations of the base vector will be provided with the longer time interval of ΔTS.

[0325] It may be appreciated that equivalent results in the solution process are obtained by exchanging the block matrix rows of the observation matrix Hj μ, exchanging the sub-vectors Δγj and Δφj of the observation vector μj, and exchanging the sub-matrices Rj and Rj γ of matrix Rj. Also, equivalent results in the solution process are obtained by exchanging the block columns of the observation matrix Hj μ, and exchanging the sub-vectors [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T and j of the estimated state vector j. This second set of exchanges may be done alone or in combination with the first set of exchanges.

[0326] Features of the first recurrent procedure at kinematic and static operating modes.

[0327] We use the term the kinematic mode to describe the operating mode where the Rover is moving, and its coordinates between adjacent clock moments is considered to be random and independent. In such a movement model, it is impossible to predict the Rover position for the j-th time moment, knowing its position at previous time moments. Therefore the Rover coordinates are determined at every moment again and are not improved in the long run by the use of accumulation.

[0328] We use the term the static mode to describe the operating mode where the Rover is immovable, and its coordinates are constant but unknown and are subject to determination. The coordinates of the immovable Rover are improved in the long run as information is accumulated. The above described first recurrent procedure is applicable to both the static and kinematic modes, since it provides for gradual accumulation of information about only the floating ambiguity estimations, which are constant in both modes. However, if it is known that the mode is static, it is possible to improve results at the expense of performing an additional accumulation of information about the Rover coordinates. This can be done by modifying the first recurrent procedure as we describe below, the essence of which comprises the expansion of the components of vector j.

[0329] In the static mode, a vector {tilde over (B)}j is obtained from state vector j, from which in this case it is necessary to extract not only the components relating to the floating ambiguity, but the three increments to the coordinates of the base vector as well. Thus, only the component in vector j for the phase drift of the main oscillators is not used. In this case, vector {tilde over (B)}j contains n+3 components and, strictly speaking, cannot be called the floating ambiguity estimation vector. We will therefore call it the augmented estimation vector. Further operation of the recurrent procedure is according to either the first or third methods of generating the weighted summation which we described above, with the substitution of {tilde over (B)}j for j, {circumflex over (B)}j for {circumflex over (N)}j, and {circumflex over (B)}j−1 for {circumflex over (N)}j−1, and with the expansion of the covariance matrices +E,olt Rn j to include the components of covariance matrix

j related to the coordinate increments as well as the components related to the floating ambiguities. The modified process is finished by extracting the main estimation of the floating ambiguity vector from the augmented estimation vector {circumflex over (B)}j.

[0330] Under such change of the first recurrent procedure, the accuracy of floating ambiguity increases more rapidly in time, and the time necessary for obtaining a reliable ambiguity resolution is reduced.

[0331] Another difference of the static and kinematic modes relates to the method of generating the observations vector μj and observations matrix Hj. As it was mentioned above, the generation of vector μj and matrix Hj uses the estimated values of the range vectors DB j and DR j as input. Since the Base station is immovable and since the Base coordinates are known, the components of vector DB j change only because of the movements of the satellites, which are considered to be known, and hence it is possible to determine vector DB j for every j-th moment with sufficient accuracy.

[0332] In the static mode, the Rover coordinates are constant, but have unknown accuracy at the beginning of the observation. Therefore, for initial range determination, the prior values of the Rover's coordinates are used, which are known, as a rule, with a large error. This error rapidly decreases when pseudo-range measurements are introduced into the processing. In fact, already after several clock intervals TJ, the accuracy is found to be sufficient for the linearization of the system of navigation equations and for the estimation of the directional cosines (which are components of matrix Hj). Further improvement of the Rover coordinates for determining vectors μj and Hj in the static mode is not needed. In the static (stationary) mode, the same geometric Jacobian matrix Hj γ may used for a plurality of discrete time moments j.

[0333] In the kinematic mode, the Rover coordinates change, therefore the estimated range vector DR j for the Rover should be recomputed at every processing time interval ΔTJ, taking into account the movements of both the satellites and the Rover. This may be done by using a stand-alone solution for the rover's position using only rover's measured navigation parameters Oust the rover). It may also be done updating the values of the vector DJ R (which holds the estimated distances between the satellites and the rover receiver) on the basis of the set of baseline estimation corrections [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T found from matrix j−1 at the previous time moment j−1. The geometric Jacobian matrix HJ γ may also be updated by either of the above methods. These updates may also be done in our second recurrent procedure, which is described below.

[0334] C2. The second recurrent procedure for determining the float ambiguity estimations.

[0335] In our second general recurrent procedure for determining the float ambiguities, two separate vectors of observations are formed: a pseudo-range observations vector μj γ and a phase observations vector μj φ. Two corresponding state vectors are also formed, state vector Aj γ and state vector Aj φ. Observations vector μj γ for the second recurrent procedure is generated at each time moment TJ, and comprises n components which represent the residuals of the single differences of the Base and Rover pseudo-ranges (vector Δγj). These differences are determined in the same way as in our first general recurrent procedure. The covariance matrix Rj γ of the measurements for the second recurrent procedure is generated in the same way as the corresponding matrix in the first recurrent procedure.

[0336] The observations vector μj φ is also generated at each clock time moment TJ and contains n components which represent the residuals of the single differences of the Base and Rover phases (vector Δφj). These components, as well as covariance matrix Rj φ, are determined in the same way as in the first recurrent procedure.

[0337] Determination of the state vector estimation according to the pseudo-range measurements.

[0338] State vector Aj γ in the second recurrent procedure contains 4 components. The first three are the unknown increments (Δx, Δy, Δz) to the coordinates (x, y, z) of the baseline vector at the j-th clock, and the fourth component (cΔτ) is the unknown increment of the reference oscillator phase.

[0339] n equations (according to the components number in vector of observations μj γ) are used for determining the state vector Aj γ. Solution of the system of equations under n≧4 is performed by the method of least squares.

[0340] The linearized system of equations is expressed as

μj γ =H j γ A j γ,

[0341] where the observations matrix Hj γ corresponds to the first part of matrix Hj μused in the first recurrent procedure.

[0342] The method of least squares gives an estimation of the 4component state vector in the form of:

j γ=[(H j γ)T(R j γ)−1 H j γ]−1(H j γ)T(R j γ)−1μj γ.

[0343] Determination of the estimation of the float ambiguity vector.

[0344] The obtained estimation state vector j γ, being based on pseudo-range measurements, enables one to find a desired value of the phase observations vector in the form of the estimation state vector {circumflex over (μ)}j φ. Estimation vector {circumflex over (μ)}j φ of the phase observations vector is a vector containing n components and is determined as:

{circumflex over (μ)}j φ =H j φ j γ,

[0345] where Hj φ−1Hj γ.

[0346] It is then possible to determine a preliminary estimation vector j of the floating ambiguity vector as a difference between the measured vector of the phase observations μj φ and its estimation {circumflex over (μ)}j φ as follows:

jj φ−{circumflex over (μ)}j φ.

[0347] The main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j of the float ambiguity vector is generated by a weighted summation of the preliminary estimation vector j and the main estimation vector {circumflex over (N)}j−1 determined at the previous clock moment t(j−1)=(j−1)TJ. All computations are repeated for every j-th clock moment under j=1, 2 . . . , where under j=1 it is assumed that {circumflex over (N)}1=1.

[0348] As well as in the first recurrent procedure, the weighted summation may be performed by any of the three methods which were described above. However, the form of the covariance matrix {tilde over (RN j for the preliminary estimation vector ({tilde over (N)})}j) is preferably different. In the second recurrent procedure, the matrix {tilde over (R)}j N is preferably generated in the following form:

[0349] A second, and less preferred way of generating covariance matrix {tilde over (RN j follows the method used in our first recurrent procedure. Specifically, we use the larger matrices Hj μand Rj −1 to form the larger covariance matrix

j=[(Hj μ)TRj −1Hj μ]−1, and we then generate covariance matrix {tilde over (RN j by selecting from matrix j only that part which relates to the floating ambiguities. )})}

[0350] In the second recurrent procedure (as well as in the first), in the kinematic mode, the estimated range vector DR j and matrices Hj φ and Hj γ should be recomputed taking into account the Rover's movement. This may be done by any of the methods described above for the first recurrent procedure (stand-alone position solution, or updating the components of

[0351] Hj φ, and Hj γ on the basis of the set of baseline corrections [Δx, Δy, Δz, cΔτ]T found at the previous time moment j−1). In the static mode, improvement of the Rover coordinates for determining the floating ambiguity is not needed.

[0352]FIG. 12 shows an exemplary schematic diagram of a general processing unit 500 which may be used to perform the first and second recurrent procedures, and their various configurations. A residual generator 510 receives the vectors γj B, γj R, Dj B, Dj R, φj B, φj R, and generates the residuals Δγj and Δφj, which are provided to a state vector processor 520. A first covariance generator 515 receives the weighting coefficients for the various measurements and generates covariance matrices Rj φ and Rj γ, which provides these matrices to state vector processor 520. Processor 520 generates the state vector from the provided information by any of the above-described procedures, and generates the state vector j as an output. This is provided to an accumulation processor 530 which extracts j or {tilde over (B)}j from j and generates {circumflex over (N)}j or {circumflex over (B)}j by any of the above methods with the aid of the appropriate covariance matrices, which are provided by a second covariance matrix generator 535.

[0353] While the present inventions have been particularly described with respect to the illustrated embodiments, it will be appreciated that various alterations, modifications and adaptations may be made based on the present disclosure, and are intended to be within the scope of the present invention. While the inventions have been described in connection with what is presently considered to be the most practical and preferred embodiments it is to be understood that the present inventions are not limited to the disclosed embodiments but, on the contrary, is intended to cover various modifications and equivalent arrangements included within the scope of the appended claims.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification342/357.27
International ClassificationH04B7/185, G01S1/00, G01S19/44, G01S19/48, G01S5/14
Cooperative ClassificationG01S19/41, G01S19/37, H04B7/18552, G01S19/44
European ClassificationG01S19/44, G01S19/41, G01S19/37, H04B7/185M8B2B
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