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Publication numberUS20020036176 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/001,833
Publication dateMar 28, 2002
Filing dateNov 16, 2001
Priority dateJul 23, 1996
Also published asUS6395170
Publication number001833, 10001833, US 2002/0036176 A1, US 2002/036176 A1, US 20020036176 A1, US 20020036176A1, US 2002036176 A1, US 2002036176A1, US-A1-20020036176, US-A1-2002036176, US2002/0036176A1, US2002/036176A1, US20020036176 A1, US20020036176A1, US2002036176 A1, US2002036176A1
InventorsDouglass Hughes, Raymond Bryan
Original AssigneeHughes Douglass E., Bryan Raymond G.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable water filters may be inserted into the neck of commercial plastic soda pop and mineral water bottles for reuse for drinking filtered tap water or attached to a straw and used in an open container such as a mug.
US 20020036176 A1
Abstract
Embodiments of a portable water filter are described and shown, each embodiment being adapted to fit and seal into a bottle neck without modification of, or attachment to, the bottle or its cap or other closure. The filter has a flange system that rests on the lip of the bottle neck and that has slanted or curved surfaces to seal with the neck and the bottle cap when the cap is screwed onto the bottle. The filter further includes a connector for attachment to a straw for an alternative use of the filter in a cup or mug. The filter water inlets are preferably in the lower region of the filter housing, to facilitate suctioning of the liquid from the bottom of the cup or mug even when the liquid level is low. Additional liquid inlet(s) may be added to the upper region of the filter housing, preferably sized and located to drain the last, small amount of liquid in the neck of a bottle when the bottle is inverted, without sucking in enough air in the mug-use application to interfere with adequate draining of the mug or cup.
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Claims(27)
The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:
1. A filter assembly comprising:
a radial flow filter element comprising a cylindrical body of filtering material having a first end through which filtered water flows, and a second end opposite said first end;
a cylindrical housing having a housing top and a housing body having a top end and a bottom end for receiving said filter media, said housing bottom end having a smaller diameter than said housing top end so that there is a space between said filter element and said housing, wherein said housing top secures said housing body around said filter element; and
a drinking straw, wherein said filter media is operatively connected to said straw.
2. The filter assembly of claim 1, further comprising a stem extending from the top end of said housing top and in fluid communication with the filter element, said stem adapted for attachment to said straw to suction liquid from a liquid container.
3. The filter assembly of claim 1, further comprising fluid inlets in the bottom ¼ to ⅓ of said housing body.
4. The filter assembly of claim 1, wherein said filter media is a carbon block.
5. The filter assembly of claim 1, further comprising an umbrella valve positioned in the bottom of said housing body.
6. A filter assembly in combination with a container having an open end opposite a bottom, said filter assembly comprising:
a radial flow filter element comprising a cylindrical body of filtering material having a first end through which filtered water flows, and a second end opposite said first end;
a cylindrical housing having a housing top and a housing body having a top end and a bottom end for receiving said filter media, said housing bottom end having a smaller diameter than said housing top end so that that is a space between said filter element and said housing, wherein said housing top secures said housing body around said filter element, said filter media first end operatively connected to a drinking straw, wherein said straw extends through the open end of said container.
7. The filter assembly of claim 6, further comprising fluid inlets in the bottom ¼ to ⅓ of said housing body.
8. The filter assembly of claim 6, wherein said filter media is a carbon block.
9. The filter assembly of claim 6, further comprising an umbrella valve positioned in the bottom of said housing body.
10. A method of filtering a liquid contained in a bottle having an open end, comprising:
providing a filter comprising a filter media and a housing having a top end and a bottom end for receiving said filter media, said housing further comprising a flange having a generally horizontal portion and a generally vertical portion;
inserting said filter into said bottle neck; and
securing said filter in said bottle neck by attaching a bottle tip closure having a lower surface to said open end of said bottle, wherein the horizontal portion of said flange extends between and forms a seal with the open end of said bottle and said bottle closure.
11. The method of claim 10, wherein said flange further comprises a generally vertical portion having an inner surface and an outer surface, wherein said outer surface has an area slanted outward from vertical to said horizontal portion for sealing with the open end of said bottle, wherein said inner surface of the flange has a radiused area for sealing with a lower surface of said bottle closure between the horizontal portion and the vertical portion.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein said inner surface radiused area has a radius of about 0.125 inches.
13. The method of claim 11, wherein said inner surface further has a slanted area at about 45 degrees from horizontal for sealing with the closure sealing ring.
14. The method of claim 11, wherein said area slanted outward from vertical is slanted outward at about 15 degrees from vertical for sealing with the bottle neck.
15. The method of claim 10, wherein the filter media is a carbon block.
16. The method of claim 10, wherein the container substantially surrounds the filter media.
17. The method of claim 10, further comprising a stem extending from said top end of said container in fluid communication with the filter media for connection to a straw.
18. The method of claim 10, wherein said horizontal portion extends out past the outer diameter of said bottle neck.
19. The method of claim 10, wherein the filter has one or more fluid inlets in the bottom ¼-⅓ of the container.
20. The method of claim 19, further comprising at least one fluid inlet near the top end of the container.
21. The method of claim 10, wherein said container further comprises an umbrella valve positioned in the bottom of said container.
22. A method of filtering a fluid in a non-bottle shaped container, comprising:
providing a filter having bottom end and comprising
(a) a filter media,
(b) a housing having a top end and a bottom end for receiving said filter media, said housing further comprising a stem extending from the top end of said housing in fluid communication with said filter media, and
(c) a straw connected to said stem; and
inserting said bottom end of said filter into said non-bottle shaped container.
23. The method of claim 22, wherein said straw is inserted into said stem.
24. The method of claim 22, wherein said stem is inserted into one end of said straw.
25. The method of claim 22, wherein the filter has one or more fluid inlets in the bottom ¼-⅓ of said housing.
26. The method of claim 22, further comprising an umbrella valve positioned in the bottom of said housing.
27. A filter assembly connected to a straw drinking tube for use with a container full of a liquid comprising a filter casing and filter element that are both tube shaped, and in which there is a small pre-filtration chamber created by leaving a small void or gap of from about 0.05 to 0.10 inches between the outer diameter of said filter element and the inner diameter of said filter casing, wherein the filter assembly has a top end and a bottom end is entirely closed except for at least on vent positioned at said bottom end of the filter assembly, such that when there is a pressure differential or vacuum caused by a sucking action on the straw drinking tube, the liquid inside the container is drawn upwardly into said pre-filtration chamber through said at least one vent so as to first flood the entirety of the pre-filtration chamber, thereby establishing a liquid flow pattern in which siad liquid to be filtered flows evenly around the entire length of the outside diameter of said filter element regardless of the height of the level of the water inside of the container.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO OTHER PATENT APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is a continuation of a prior U.S. Patent Application, entitled “Universal Filter for Soda Pop and Bottled Water Bottles,” filed Mar. 14, 2000, Ser. No. 09/525,106 which is a continuation-in-part of a prior, U.S. Patent application, entitled “Universal Filter for Soda Pop and Bottled Water Bottles,” filed Dec. 11, 1997, Ser. No. 08/988,864, now abandoned, which in turn is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Patent application, entitled “Sports Bottle Filter Cartridge,” filed Jul. 23, 1996, Ser. No. 08/685,334, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,840,185, all of which are herein incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] 1. Field of the Invention

[0003] This invention relates generally to portable water filters for removing chlorine and other components that contribute to poor taste and odor. More specifically, this invention relates to a water filter that (i) may be either inserted into the neck of many current commercial plastic soda pop and mineral water bottles to make desirable the re-use of these bottles for drinking filtered tap water or (ii) attached to a straw and used in an open container such as a mug.

[0004] 2. Description of the State of the Art

[0005] Today there is a growing awareness of problems with our tap water. Many people are mainly concerned with the taste of tap water, and secondarily concerned for health-related problems due to contaminants in water. Because of this, there have been increased sales of bottled water and of home water filters over the past ten years. Since it is often difficult to find clean, chlorine-free drinking water away from home, bottled water has become the accepted method of finding potable drinking water while away from home. Bottled water has also become the preferred water for home-use where the user has no need for a water filter to remove the chlorine, lead, Cryptosporidium, etc., from the tap water. Most home filtration devices are relatively expensive, which discourages families and small businesses from purchasing these filtration systems. In addition, there is the convenience factor of purchasing one or two bottles of drinking water at the supermarket. Therefore, when the consumer purchases bottled water, he or she is not just buying the water, but the convenience of having it in a half- or one-quart container.

[0006] In the typical home or business, there are many empty mineral water or pop bottles, that are destined for garbage. Because of their great numbers, it would be very convenient to reuse these soda pop or mineral water bottles for drinking water. However, as discussed above, it is usually inconvenient to produce filtered water to pour into these bottles, and, even if the consumer does so, he or she quickly consumes the bottle-full of filtered water away from home and is back to having to refill the bottle with tap water at a business, a friend's home or a public place.

[0007] There is still a need, therefore, for an economical and easy-to-use portable water filter for use with mineral water and/or pop bottles. There is still a need for such a filter that fits universally into a large number of the otherwise-discarded plastic bottles in our homes and businesses, without necessarily requiring modification of the bottles or their caps or in the alternative a filter that may be used.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0008] Accordingly, it is a general object of this invention to provide a liquid filter system that removes chlorine, heavy metals, taste, color, odor and microorganisms from water while at the same time is simple and sanitary to use.

[0009] Another object of the invention is to provide a filter in that is so versatile that it can fit into a variety of neck bottles, including existing 28 mm system neck bottles which account for nearly all of the soda pop and mineral water bottles made and distributed throughout North America.

[0010] A further object of the invention is to provide a liquid filter system that can also be used in combination with a straw within an open container such as a mug.

[0011] Additional objects, advantages and novel features of this invention shall be set forth in part in the description that follows, and in part will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon examination of the following specification or may be learned by the practice of the invention. The objects and advantages of the invention may be realized and attained by means of the instrumentalities, combinations, compositions, and methods particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

[0012] To achieve the foregoing and other objects and in accordance with the purposes of the present invention, as embodied and broadly described therein, the apparatus of this invention may comprise a filter media held by a container that may be inserted into a bottle neck, and a flange system connected to the container that rests on and forms a seal between the bottle neck and the bottle closure. In addition, the present invention preferably is adapted to be used with a straw, so that the straw-plus-filter unit may be used in the bottom of a mug or cup.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0013] The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and form a part of the specification, illustrate the preferred embodiments of the present invention, and together with the description serve to explain the principles of the invention.

[0014] In the Drawings:

[0015]FIG. 1 shows a perspective, expanded side view of one embodiment of the invented filter system, with the filter positioned for installation in the neck of a plastic bottle.

[0016]FIG. 2 shows a perspective, expanded side view of the embodiment of FIG. 1, with the filter positioned in the bottle neck.

[0017]FIG. 3 shows a perspective, expanded side view of the embodiment of FIG. 1, with the filter positioned in the bottle neck and the top closure installed to seal the filter in the bottle.

[0018]FIG. 4 shows a cross-sectional, side view of the filter of FIG. 1, installed in an alternative embodiment of a plastic bottle.

[0019]FIG. 5A is an enlarged, detailed view of the preferred sealing flange system of the invented filter of FIG. 1 indicated by dashed lines in FIG. 4.

[0020]FIG. 5B is an enlarged, detailed view of the sealing flange system of the present invention similar to the view shown in FIG. 5A but illustrating an alternative connection between the sealing flange system of the present invention and the bottle closure prior to tightening the bottle closure on the bottle neck.

[0021]FIG. 5C is an enlarged, detailed view of the sealing flange system of FIG. 5B illustrating the alternative location of contact between the sealing flange system of the present invention and the bottle closure top after tightening to obtain a water tight seal.

[0022]FIG. 6 is a perspective, expanded side view of the filter embodiment of FIG. 1.

[0023]FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional, expanded side view of the filter embodiment of FIG. 1.

[0024]FIG. 8 is a side, cross-sectional view of the filter of FIG. 1, installed with an alternative top closure (38′), with arrows showing water flow from the squeezed bottle through the filter and through the top closure.

[0025]FIG. 9 is a side, cross-sectional view of the filter of FIG. 8, with arrows showing air flow through the top closure, past the umbrella valve, and into the bottle.

[0026]FIG. 10 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the filter, including a slit for draining the last liquid from an inverted bottle.

[0027]FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the filter of FIG. 1 attached to a straw for use in a mug.

[0028]FIG. 12 is a perspective view of the filter of FIG. 1 attached to a straw for use in a cup.

[0029]FIG. 13 is a side, cross-sectional view of the filter flange system of FIG. 6, having a gasket installed on the flange's lower surface.

[0030]FIG. 14 is a side, cross-sectional view of the filter flange system of FIG. 6, having a gasket installed on the flange's lower and upper surfaces.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

[0031] The filter of the present invention cooperates with the necks of a variety of bottles to create an effective seal to prevent leaks and to effectively filter the bottle's contents, without the filter being connected or attached to either the bottle or to its closure, and without requiring modification of either the bottle or the closure. This is accomplished by making the filter unit just slightly smaller in diameter than the average bottle interior neck size, except for the special flange system near the top of the filter that extends radially outward over the top of the neck and that has a lower portion with a tapered/slanted outer surface that interferes slightly with the bottle neck inner surface when the filter is dropped into the neck (as shown in FIG. 5B). As the top closure is pressed down on the flange system, the flange will expand slightly to make a water tight seal with the bottle neck. This flange is preferably adapted to cooperate with a sealing member on the closure, such a generally cylindrical, downwardly-protruding, flexible ring, herein also called a “knife edge.” This ring is common to many pop-top closures sold with water and pop bottles, as it is effective in sealing even a pressurized, carbonated liquid in the bottle. In some embodiments of the present invention, adaptation of the flange, to seal with the downwardly-protruding ring and to flex and seal with the bottle, may be similar to the invented sealing system of the herein-incorporated disclosure of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 5,840,185, by Douglass Hughes, et al.

[0032] After the invented filter is inserted into the neck of a plastic bottle and a top closure is screwed down, water from the bottle passes through the filter and up through the closure to the user's mouth, as the user squeezes the sides of the plastic bottle. A top closure is necessary in this bottle-neck application to allow the filter system to function as intended. A top closure may be supplied as an accessory with the filter at the point of sale, in case a suitable closure is not available with the bottle. Alternatively, the filter has a port which may be attached to a straw and thus the filter may be used in a mug or cup.

[0033] Referring to the Figures, there are shown several, but not the only, embodiments of the invented portable water filter. The preferred filter 10 is dual-use, in that it may be either installed in a bottle neck 12, or attached to a straw 14 for use in a mug 16 or cup 18. FIGS. 1-5A, 8, and 9 illustrate the filter 10 sealed in the neck 12 of a “standard” bottle 13, which may be selected from the many bottles on the market that have an approximately 28 mm outside thread diameter neck. FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate the filter 10 in use with a straw, at or near the bottom of a container. In either use, the filter 10 does not need to be attached to the bottle or container or any closure member, and the bottle, container, and closure member need not be modified from their standard shape and configuration for use with the invented filter 10.

[0034] The filter 10 comprises a housing 19, which comprises a housing body 20 and a housing top 22. The elongated body 20 is a generally cylindrical casing, preferably constructed from a polypropylene or an ABS material, which houses or ABS, casing which houses a liquid filter 24. Filter 24 is typically a tube shaped filter which is open at both ends with an outside diameter and an inside diameter and a center core 34, made either of a solid but liquid porous carbon block 24 or of a sintered polymer and powdered activated carbon such that the filter is liquid porous. The housing top 22 is attached to the top of the body 20 to enclose the filter tube 24 and secure the filter tube 24 inside the housing 19. The housing 19 has an aperture 30 through the center of the bottom wall of the body 20 and an aperture 32 through the center of the housing top 22. The filter 24 has a tube-like construction with a center core 34. These housing and filter tube apertures and core result in a bore or central passage 36 extending straight though the middle of the filter 10 at the longitudinal central axis of the filter. This passage 36 is used to conduct water that has flowed radially from the outside diameter of the filter tube 24 into the core 34, and up and out the top of the filter 10 (FIG. 8). The same passage 36 is also used to conduct air returning into the bottle 13 (FIG. 9).

[0035] The housing 19 is preferably specially adapted to cooperate with the bottle neck 12 to create a seal between the filter housing and the bottle and between the filter housing and the top closure 38. The outer surface 40 of the body 20 is tapered to allow easy insertion of the filter 10 into the neck 12. The housing top 22 has a flange system, herein called the flange 50, which rests on the lip of the bottle neck 12 and seals with the inner surface of bottle neck 12. The flange 50 has a generally vertical lower portion 42 and a generally horizontal portion 44 (when in the orientation shown in FIGS. 1-4). The outer surface 46 of the lower portion 42 has a tapered area 48 that tapers upwardly and outwardly at about 15 degrees to vertical (preferably in the range of 10-20 degrees). This tapered area 48 around the housing top 22 seals with the top inner surface 52 of the bottle neck 12, especially when the flange 50 flexes slightly outward in response to the closure 38 being screwed down on top of the flange 50.

[0036] In general, the invented filter may be said to insert itself between the bottle neck and the top closure without disrupting the original sealing mechanisms. The filter flange surfaces replicate original sealing surfaces to an extent that allows the top closure and bottle to seal to the filter instead of to each other.

[0037] In use in the bottle neck, the top closure 38, 38′, screws down onto the neck 12, with the horizontal portion 44 of the flange 50 between the top surface of the neck and a portion of the bottom surface of the closure 38, 38′. Typically, the portion of the closure bottom surface that contacts the flange 50 comprises a cylindrical shoulder 54 that protrudes downward from the closure. This shoulder in many, if not all, embodiments of so-called 28 mm style closures available on the market today is expected to contact the upper surface horizontal portion 44 (as shown in FIGS. 5B and 5C) sufficiently to create a seal between the closure 38, 38′ and the horizontal portion 44. In addition, the shoulder 54 preferably places enough pressure on the flange 50 to slightly flex it outward to seal against the neck inner surface, as discussed above.

[0038] In the preferred embodiment of the top closure 38 and sealing system shown in FIG. 5A, the shoulder 54 includes a thin, flexible, generally downwardly-protruding “knife edge” ring or annular valve seal 56 that acts as the contacting member for abutting against, and sealing with, the flange 50. The preferred flange 50, therefore, has a slanted and/or radiused corner that forms the transition between the upper surface of the horizontal portion 44 and the inner surface of the lower portion 42. This slanted and/or radiused corner provides a surface for the annular valve seal 56 to contact and seal against, as the ring tends to flex inward as it is forced down against the flange. Thus, the annular valve seal 56 takes the general shape shown in FIG. 5A, sealing effectively against the flange and applying pressure to slightly flex the flange outward.

[0039] The most preferred embodiment of the corner of the flange 50, shown in FIG. 5A, includes a slanted area 60 (at about 45 degrees from horizontal) that joins to a radiused area 62 (at about R 0.125 inches). This preferred slant and radius combination provides an effective sealing surface, but other slants and curvatures may also be operable, for example slants in the range of 30-60 degrees or other ranges. In general, the corner may be described as more effective if it is “rounded off” or radiused. Whereas the preferred slanting of the corner as disclosed in the herein-incorporated U.S. Pat. No. 5,840,185 (10-20 degrees from vertical), is most effective for a typical sports bottle downwardly-protruding annular valve seal, the most effective corner shape for use with the thin, flexible annular valve seal 56 of this closure and bottle design has been found to be a radiused corner with a 45-degree slant near the top of the corner.

[0040] In an alternate embodiment, as briefly described above and illustrated in FIGS. 5B and 5C, effective sealing surfaces are obtained between the neck 12, the flange 50, and the top closure 38, 38′ when the thin, flexible annular valve seal 56 contacts the flat, upper surface of the horizontal portion 44 of the flange 50, rather than mating with slanted area 60 of the flange 50 as in FIG. 5A. The present invention provides effective sealing because as the top closure 38, 38′ is screwed down onto the neck 12 the flexible annular valve seal 56 compresses as it is pressed against the horizontal portion 44 to provide a circular sealing surface between the top closure 38, 38′ and the flange 50. Additionally, as discussed above, shoulder 54 of the top closure 38, 38′ applies sufficient pressure on the flange 50 to slightly flex it outward against the neck 12 inner surface to obtain a tight seal between the flange 50 and the neck 12. More particularly, FIG. 5B illustrates initial assembly with flange 50 inserted into neck 12 having a slightly smaller inner diameter than the outer diameter of the flange 50 and with annular valve seal 56 of top closure 38, 38′ about to make contact with horizontal portion 44 of flange 50. The tapered area 48 of the lower portion 42 of the flange 50 abuttingly contacts the neck 12 but a gap is formed between the horizontal portion 44 of the flange 50 and the neck 12, because as discussed above the radius of tapered area 48 is greater than the inner radius of bottle neck 12. Hence, tapered area 48 extends radially outward over the top of the neck 12 and thus rests on the bottle neck 12 when filter 10 is initially inserted into the bottle neck 12.

[0041] Referring to FIG. 5C, the invention is illustrated fully assembled with the top closure 38, 38′ tightly screwed onto the neck 12. During the tightening of the top closure 38, 38′, the flexible annular valve seal 56 contacts the horizontal portion 44 of the flange 50 and pushes or presses the flange 50 into the neck 12 until the lower surface of horizontal portion 44 contacts the top of the neck 12. The material of the flexible annular valve seal 56 deforms slightly to form a sealing surface with the horizontal surface 44. By forcibly pressing the larger flange 50 into the inner diameter of the neck 12, the upper portion of the neck 12 is pushed slightly outward and the radiused area 62 of the flange is pushed slightly inward. In this manner, a tight seal is formed between the flange 50 and the neck 12. This unique sealing feature facilitates the use of the filter 10 of the present invention in bottles 13 with necks 12 that vary slightly in size from standard sizes and with top closures 38, 38′ that have annular valve seals 56 at differing locations than that shown in FIG. 5A.

[0042] Although the invention includes other means of encasing and directing flow through a filter tube, the preferred housing is elongated to fit easily inside a narrow bottle neck. Additionally, the preferred elongated design with radial flow through the tubular filter element, provides a large surface area allowing lower flow resistance for the water and resists clogging of the carbon filter pores, which can be a concern with small pore sizes.

[0043] Manufacture of the filter housing 19 may be of any plastic material such as, but not limited to, polypropylene or ABS, while the filter tube 24 may be of powdered activated carbon which has been formed into a solid but liquid porous carbon block through compression or extrusion, or the tube may be formed through sintering with a powdered polymer to create a liquid porous plastic tube. The invented housing and filter tube design allow for a press fit of the housing around the carbon block, which is preferred as an easy and inexpensive assembly technique. Alternatively, conventional assembly and connection methods may be used, such as hot melt adhesives or spin welding.

[0044] In use in a plastic bottle neck, the filter 10 is inserted into the bottle neck as shown in FIGS. 1-3 and as described above. As the plastic bottle 13 is squeezed, water is purified as it is forced through the filter tube. As the user releases the bottle, it remembers its original shape and attempts to return to that shape. In doing so, the bottle sucks in air from the atmosphere. The air in this case passes through the center passage 36 and down to the bottom of the filter housing body 20, where it exits through an umbrella valve 70, preferably made of silicone, but it may also be made of ethylene propylene (for example, “EPDM”).

[0045] The umbrella valve 70 is a one-way valve that collapses flat against the bottom surface of the filter housing body when the bottle is squeezed, but opens easily as air pushes against it from the opposite direction. Essentially, it opens the same way an umbrella would inappropriately collapse if pointed away from the wind. The use and position of this umbrella valve enables the filter tube's matrix 24 to be made with a much tighter median pore diameter (about 30-60 micron ranges) than it would if the path of air return were through the filter tube itself (where about 80 micron median pore diameter or higher would be necessary). This is because the pore diameter of the carbon tube would otherwise be left more open since the air would not easily return through a pore diameter much smaller than that. However, with the air-return path being through the central passage 36 and the umbrella valve 70, the pore diameter of the filter tube is able to be brought down to a more preferred smaller range.

[0046] This tighter pore size has several advantages. First, it creates a more tortuous pathway for the water, which in turn provides increased contact between the water and the activated carbon in the filter tube. The increased contact accelaerates the chlorine and lead reduction adsorption processes. A second advantage is the tighter pore diameter range creates a tortuous pathway for water-borne parasites commonly found in municipally treated tap water, for example, the Cryptosporidium, and Giardia lamblia that are estimated to be in 39% of all U.S. tap water. Thus, the invented filter also may be used to effectively reduce water-borne parasites from municipally treated water.

[0047] Another advantage of the umbrella valve is that it quickly returns air into the bottle so that the user is able to drink rapidly without having to first wait for the air to return through the filter and, second, to have to squeeze the water back into the filter tube each and every time another drink is taken. Another advantage of the umbrella valve 70 is that it puts less stress on the bottle. As the bottle's memory returns it to its original shape, it must work against any obstruction in the air pathway. If the air were forced to return through the wall of the carbon block, it would put greater stress on the plastic bottle.

[0048] The invented filter is intended to be a dual-use filter, and includes a stem 72 protruding from the housing top 22 of filter unit 10, for enabling the filter 10 to be attached to a drinking straw and used in any open container for liquids such as, but not limited to a cup, mug, or the common mug with a straw attached. In use as a “loose” filter for purifying liquid in a non-bottle-shaped container of liquid, the stem 72 or other straw attachment port of the housing top 22 is pushed into the end of a typical high-density polyethylene straw tube or alternatively a so-called memory straw that is designed to bend and hold its shape. The stem 72 may fit inside the straw tube or memory straw and hold it through interference or friction thereby creating a watertight seal. Alternatively, some flexible tubing has a smaller outside diameter. In this case the stem 72 is designed in such a way to also receive a smaller tube on the inside diameter of the same stem 72. This inside diameter features a very slight draft so that as the tube is pushed down into it, the draft increases the friction or interference, thereby holding it even more firmly and making it less likely to inadvertently come apart. The combined straw-filter unit may be placed inside the container. This system works well in a wide variety of containers, such as mugs 16 or cups 18. As the user sucks on the straw water flows through the inlets 74 in the housing body rather than through the housing body aperture 30. For “air return,” an open cup simply replaces the filtered liquid with air from the atmosphere. Covered mugs, such as shown in FIG. 11, typically provide their own air return through an opening in the mug's cap. Other containers provide an adjustable plug, which can be closed for transportation and opened for use. In any case, when in use with a straw, the filter 10 may not need to provide for an air return, and the umbrella valve 70 need not perform the role of an air-return valve as it does in the bottle neck scenario.

[0049] The location of the valve 70 at the bottom of the filter is well-suited for use with a straw tube, as it closes effectively even when there is only a little liquid in the bottom of the cup or mug. Also, because of the valve's location, it in no way obstructs the use of the filter with the straw.

[0050] Thus, the invented filter may be interchangeably used either installed in a bottle neck for squeezing of water through the filter, or inserted with a straw into the bottom of a cup or mug for sucking of water through the filter and the straw. No filter found today has the advantages of being so universal that a specific container is not needed. Empty plastic bottles are everywhere, as well as mugs and containers using straws. Mug-style containers are even given away at fast food restaurants to promote the restaurant. Empty soda pop or mineral water bottles are disposed of as trash. The invented filter may therefore become an economical and easy-to-use accessory for making these containers reusable and for making tap water a more desirable and pleasant drink.

[0051] In either bottle-use or cup/mug use, the filter housing serves several functions. It cosmetically covers the filter tube, which is most often a black, carbonaceous material, protects it, and provides a means for holding it in place in the bottle neck. In addition, the filter housing also serves to define the water inlet points and to direct water and air flow. The preferable placement of the water inlets 74 is near the bottom of the housing body. These perforations in the housing body are preferably elongated and are spaced around the circumference of the body, but preferably extend about ¼-⅓ of the wall up the wall of the body. In this way, when used in the bottom of a mug or cup, nearly all the liquid may be sucked up through the straw. Also, in most bottles, depending on the neck diameter and geometry, this water inlet 74 is effective in emptying all but a small amount of liquid from the bottle. The small amount left in the bottle may be described generally as the volume between the bottle neck and the water inlets 74, which remains in the bottle when the bottle is tipped up for drinking.

[0052] Optionally, as shown in the filter 10′ of FIG. 10, one or more small slits 80 may be added to the housing 19 at or near the top of the housing body 20, in order to allow complete or nearly complete emptying of the bottle. One slit 80 of about ¾ inch length and about {fraction (1/32)}-{fraction (1/16)} inch width is preferably located at the top of the body, and serves as an additional water inlet near the top of the filter (in the neck, which is the “bottom” of the bottle when the bottle is inverted for finishing the drink). This single slit is sized and located to drain that last amount of water, but is small enough that it does not significantly interfere with use of the filter with a straw. When in a cup or mug, little or no air passes through the slit 80 and through the carbon filter even when the liquid level is below the slit 80, and so little or no effect of the slit 80 is noticed in the straw application.

[0053] In alternate embodiments, shown in FIGS. 13 and 14 flanges 150 and 250, respectively, may further comprise a resilient material to create a seal much like a rubber gasket. For use with a geometry like flange 150 or 250 this seal may be made by a separate gasket, or co-molded onto the flange 150 or 250 of the filter. The resilient material is co-molded onto the flange and may be a thermoplastic elastomer material such as by brands Kraton and Sanoprene. As shown in FIG. 13 the resilient material 184 is shown to reside only on the bottom surface 180 of horizontal portion 144 of flange 150 and not on the upper surface 182 of the horizontal portion. Alternatively, the resilient material 284 could reside on the upper surface 282 and the bottom surface 280 of horizontal portion 244 of flange 250, as shown in FIG. 14.

[0054] The foregoing description is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. The words “comprise,” “comprising,” “include,” “including,” and “includes” when used in this specification and in the following claims are intended to specify the presence of one or more stated features, integers, components, or steps, but they do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, components, steps, or groups thereof. Furthermore, since a number of modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and process shown described above. Accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to falling within the scope of the invention as defined by the claims which follow.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7416087Oct 13, 2005Aug 26, 2008Kim SieckmannInteriorly disposed filter for portable fuel container
US7604737Jan 25, 2008Oct 20, 2009Acuity/Sparkle, Ltd. (Cayman)Water filter device for use with individual containers
US8337697 *Feb 11, 2010Dec 25, 2012Simplipure, Inc.Multi-compartment water purification bottle having a replaceable filter
US8758605Aug 22, 2012Jun 24, 2014Simplipure, Inc.Filter block having a hollow center
US20100219151 *Feb 11, 2010Sep 2, 2010Tareq Adel RisheqMulti-Compartment Water Purification Bottle Having a Replaceable Filter
EP2482953A2 *Oct 1, 2010Aug 8, 20123M Innovative Properties CompanyBottle for water treatment device
EP2569074A2 *Feb 11, 2011Mar 20, 2013Move Collective LLCSqueezable beverage bottle and filter system
WO2011041633A2 *Oct 1, 2010Apr 7, 20113M Innovative Properties CompanyBottle for water treatment device
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/767, 210/282, 210/473, 210/464
International ClassificationC02F1/00, B01D35/02, B01D35/04
Cooperative ClassificationC02F1/003, B01D35/04, B01D35/02, C02F2307/02, C02F1/002, C02F2201/006
European ClassificationB01D35/02, C02F1/00D2, C02F1/00D4, B01D35/04
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 28, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: HUGHES, DOUGLASS E., COLORADO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SAFARI WATER FILTRATION SYSTEMS, INC;REEL/FRAME:013436/0795
Effective date: 20021022
Nov 16, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: SAFARI WATER FILTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. A NEVADA COR
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HUGHES, DOUGLASS E.;BRYAN, RAYMOND G.;REEL/FRAME:012349/0611;SIGNING DATES FROM 20000721 TO 20000802