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Publication numberUS20020043111 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/940,669
Publication dateApr 18, 2002
Filing dateAug 29, 2001
Priority dateAug 31, 2000
Also published asCN1344932A, EP1184657A2, EP1184657A3, US6523416
Publication number09940669, 940669, US 2002/0043111 A1, US 2002/043111 A1, US 20020043111 A1, US 20020043111A1, US 2002043111 A1, US 2002043111A1, US-A1-20020043111, US-A1-2002043111, US2002/0043111A1, US2002/043111A1, US20020043111 A1, US20020043111A1, US2002043111 A1, US2002043111A1
InventorsShusaku Takagi, Kaneaki Tsuzaki, Tadanobu Inoue
Original AssigneeShusaku Takagi, Kaneaki Tsuzaki, Tadanobu Inoue
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for setting shape and working stress, and working environment of steel member
US 20020043111 A1
Abstract
A delayed fracture is effectively prevented by appropriately setting a shape and working stress, and working environment of a high strength member having more than 1,000 MPa of tensile strength. For this end, the relationship between a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) and Weibull stress are found and the content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion during the use of the steel member (He) is also found. Then, Weibull stress in the Hc that is equal to the He is found, thus determining the shape and working stress of the steel member so as to provide stress below the Weibull stress.
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Claims(5)
What is claimed is:
1. A method for setting a shape and working stress of a steel member comprising the steps of finding the relationship between a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) and Weibull stress and finding a content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion during use of the steel member (He); finding Weibull stress in the Hc which is equal to the He; and determining a shape and working stress of the steel member so as to provide stress below the Weibull stress.
2. The method according to claim 1, wherein the Weibull stress is calculated by an electronic arithmetic unit in accordance with a finite element method based on the following Formula 1:
σ w = [ 1 V 0 V f ( σ eff ) m V f ] 1 m Formula 1
wherein σeff is maximum principal stress which influences a fracture; Vo is a reference volume of a certain area where a fracture is likely to occur; Vf is an area where a fracture is likely to occur; and m is a constant called Weibull shape parameter.
3. A method for setting a working environment of a steel member comprising the steps of finding the relationship between a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) and Weibull stress (σwA) and finding Weibull stress (σwB) of the steel member in actual use based on a shape and working stress of the steel member in actual use; finding Hc in the Weibull stress (σwA) which is equal to the Weibull stress (σwB); and determining a working environment of the steel member so as to provide a content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion during use of the steel member (He) which is less than the Hc.
4. The method according to claim 3, wherein the Weibull stress is calculated by an electronic arithmetic unit in accordance with a finite element method based on the following Formula 1:
σ w = [ 1 V 0 V f ( σ eff ) m V f ] 1 m Formula 1
wherein σeff is maximum principal stress which influences a fracture; Vo is a reference volume of a certain area where a fracture is likely to occur; Vf is an area where a fracture is likely to occur; and m is a constant called Weibull shape parameter.
5. A method for evaluating a delayed fracture of a steel member comprising the steps of finding the relationship between a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) and Weibull stress (σwA) and finding a content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion during use of the steel member (Hc); finding the Weibull stress (σwA) in the Hc which is equal to the He; and comparing the σwA to Weibull stress (σwB) which is calculated from a shape and working stress of the steel member in use, and determining that there will be no delayed fracture when the σwA is larger than the σwB.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The present invention relates to a method to prevent a delayed fracture of a steel member, and relates to a method for setting a shape and working stress, and working environment of a steel member so as to prevent a delayed fracture. More specifically, the present invention relates to a method for setting a shape and working stress, and working environment of a steel member so as to prevent a delayed fracture in steel members using high strength steel or the like having tensile strength of more than 1,000 MPa.

[0003] 2. Description of the Related Art

[0004] Recently, high strength steel having tensile strength of more than 1,000 MPa has been developed. As it is known that a delayed fracture is found from such high strength steel, the steel is rarely employed for practical use. The delayed fracture is a phenomenon where high tensile steel suddenly fractures due to stress at less than tensile strength after a certain period.

[0005] Even though the same stress is applied to steel members, some members fracture and others do not due to a difference in stress concentration depending on the shape of the steel members. Thus, steel members have been conventionally designed to prevent stress concentration for the steel members from which a delayed fracture is expected. However, it is practically impossible to completely prevent a delayed fracture simply by changing the shape of steel members. Thus, steel members in complex shapes, such as bolts, have been designed with an extremely high safety factor.

[0006] Another method to prevent a delayed fracture is to increase Hc, in other words, a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens. However, a delayed fracture has not yet been prevented completely by the method.

[0007] An object of the present invention is to solve the above-noted conventional problems. The purposes of the present invention include: accurate prediction of a delayed fracture of a steel member, complete prevention of a delayed fracture by appropriately setting the shape, working stress and working environment of a steel member, and designing even a steel member in a complex shape with an appropriate safety factor.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0008] In order to solve the above-noted problems, a method for setting a shape and working stress of a steel member according to the present invention includes the steps of finding the relationship between a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) and Weibull stress, and finding the content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion during the use of the steel member (He) finding Weibull stress in the Hc which is equal to the He; and determining a shape and working stress of the steel member so as to provide stress below the Weibull stress.

[0009] It is preferable that the Weibull stress is calculated by an electronic arithmetic unit in accordance with a finite element method based on the following Formula 1: σ w = [ 1 V 0 V f ( σ eff ) m V f ] 1 m Formula 1

[0010] A method for setting a working environment of a steel member according to the present invention includes the steps of finding the relationship between a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) and Weibull stress (σwA), and finding Weibull stress (σwB) of the steel member in actual use based on a shape and working stress of the steel member in actual use; finding Hc in the Weibull stress (σwA) which is equal to the Weibull stress (σwB); and determining a working environment of the steel member so as to provide the content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion during the use of the steel member (Ho) which is less than the Ho.

[0011] It is preferable that the Weibull stress (σwA) and the Weibull stress (σwB) are calculated by an electronic arithmetic unit in accordance with a finite element method based on the Formula 1 mentioned above.

[0012] A method for evaluating a delayed fracture of a steel member includes the steps of finding the relationship between a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) and Weibull stress (σwA), and finding the content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion during the use of the steel member (He); finding the Weibull stress (σwA) in the Hc which is equal to the He; and comparing the σwA to Weibull stress (σwB) which is calculated from a shape and working stress of the steel member in use, and determining that there will be no delayed fracture when the σwA is larger than the σwB.

[0013] The present invention is based on the following knowledge obtained by the present inventors.

[0014] (1) The occurrence of a delayed fracture can be principally predicted based on the Weibull stress (σw) and a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc). In other words, the occurrence of a delayed fracture can be predicted without depending on a shape and working stress of a steel member.

[0015] (2) When a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) is larger than the content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion during the use of the steel member (He), a delayed fracture will not occur.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0016]FIG. 1 is a diagram, showing steps of the present invention;

[0017]FIG. 2 is a figure, explaining an area Vf that is likely to be fractured;

[0018]FIG. 3 is a graph, showing the relationship between distances from a notch root and maximum principal stress;

[0019]FIG. 4 is a graph, showing the relationship between calculation results of Weibull stress (σw) and measurement results of a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc);

[0020]FIG. 5 is a graph, showing the relationship between calculation results of average applied stress (σave) and measurement results of a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc);

[0021]FIG. 6 is a graph, showing effects of Weibull stress (σw) on the occurrence of a delayed fracture; and

[0022]FIG. 7 is a graph, showing effects of average applied stress (σave) on the occurrence of a delayed fracture.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

[0023] Embodiments of the present invention will be explained. Terms used in the present invention are as follows.

[0024] A maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) means a maximum diffusible hydrogen content in steel when specimens do not fracture under certain load. Hc can be experimentally measured, for instance, by the following method. When voltage is applied to steel samples as a cathode in electrolyte, hydrogen is introduced to the steel. In order to diffuse hydrogen evenly in the samples, the samples may be plated with Cd thereon, and are held or heated at room temperature. Constant load is applied to the samples, and a maximum diffusible hydrogen content is measured for the samples which did not fracture after 100 hours. Diffusible hydrogen contents are measured by the following method. The samples are heated up to 350 C. at a constant gradient between 50 C. and 800 C. per hour, and the content of hydrogen released during the period is measured. Released hydrogen can be quantitatively measured, for instance, by quadrupole mass spectrometer or gas chromatography.

[0025] The content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion (He) means a maximum hydrogen content entered into steel from an actual working environment. He is empirically and experimentally found from the actual working environment of a steel member. Experimentally, samples are placed into a testing machine where a working environment is reproduced as accurately as possible, and an exposure test is performed. The method of measuring hydrogen contents is the same as the hydrogen content measurement method for the Hc.

[0026] Weibull stress (σw) is calculated by a mathematical procedure, and can be calculated based on a shape and working stress of a steel member. There are several calculation methods. In the present invention, the Weibull stress (σw) is found by the finite element method of the following Formula 1: σ w = [ 1 V 0 V f ( σ eff ) m V f ] 1 m Formula 1

[0027] wherein σeff is maximum principal stress which influences a fracture; Vo is a reference volume of a certain area where a fracture is likely to occur, and Vo may be any constant and does not influence relative comparison with Weibull stress at any value, and can be, for instance, 1 mm3; Vf indicates an area where a fracture is likely to occur, for instance, a shaded area in relation to stress (σ) as shown in FIG. 2; and m is a constant called Weibull shape parameter, which is normally 10 to 30. As calculation conditions are determined, Weibull stress can be calculated by using an electronic arithmetic unit based on a finite element method.

[0028] A typical embodiment of the present invention will be explained in detail. FIG. 1 is a diagram, showing the steps of the present invention. First, a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) is measured, and Weibull stress is then calculated from samples in a simple shape. Relationships between Hc and the Weibull stress are found, and a plotted curve of maximum values of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) and the Weibull stress (σw) is prepared. FIG. 4 is a typical example of this curve. On the other hand, the content of diffusible hydrogen entered into a steel member in use from the environment due to corrosion (He) is experimentally measured or predicted from empirical values. Subsequently, Weibull stress (σwA) in Hc which is equal to He, is calculated from the curve. A shape and working stress of a steel member in actual use are determined so as to provide Weibull stress (σwB) which is less than the Weibull stress (σwA). In other words, the shape and working stress of a steel member in actual use are determined so as to provide σwA>σwB. When (σwA>σwB, no delayed fracture is found in the steel member. When σwA≦σwB, a delayed fracture is likely to be found in the steel member. In this case, the shape and working stress of the steel member in actual use are corrected, and the Weibull stress (σwB) is calculated again. The above-noted correction is repeated until σwA>σwB. In this way, the shape and working stress of the steel member in actual use can be appropriately designed.

[0029] The present invention determines a working environment of a steel member so as to provide the content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion during the use of the steel member (Hc), which is smaller than the maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) in the Weibull stress (σwB) calculated on the basis of the shape and working stress of the steel member in actual use. In other words, the working environment of the steel member in actual use is determined so as to provide Hc>He. The working environment indicates, for instance, temperature, humidity, components of atmospheric gas, floating salt in the atmosphere and the like in a place where a steel member is used. Specifically, it means an environment where a steel member is used, such as the seaside, inside an engine room of a vehicle, inside a tunnel on a freeway, and the like.

[0030] The present invention finds relationships between a maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc) and Weibull stress (σwA), and finds the content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion during the use of the steel member (He). Subsequently, the Weibull stress (σwA) is found in the Hc which is equal to the He, and the Weibull stress (σwA) is compared to Weibull stress (σwB) which is calculated from a shape and working stress of the steel member in use. It is determined that there will be no delayed fracture when σwA is larger than σwB. According to the present invention, the occurrence of a delayed fracture can be accurately predicted for a steel member.

[0031] According to the present invention, even if a steel member in actual use has a complex shape, it could be designed with an appropriate safety factor. It becomes practically easy to use high strength steel which has tensile strength of more than 1,000 MPa and has been hardly used in a practical way. Various types of devices, machines and the like can be reduced in weight, thus improving the energy efficiency of society as a whole.

[0032] Moreover, the present invention is applicable to every steel member as a component without depending on the composition of the steel member. The present invention is preferably applied to high strength steel which has tensile strength of more than 1,000 MPa and has been rarely employed for practical use.

EXAMPLES

[0033] Table 1 shows conditions of a delayed fracture test. Symbols in Table 1 will be explained. Kt indicates a stress concentration factor, and is a constant which is determined by a notch shape of a sample. For instance, a sample having no notch has Kt of 1.0. σw is calculated Weibull stress. σmax is maximum applied stress. σave is average applied stress. Hc is a measured maximum value of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens. A used steel member has tensile strength of about 1,400 MPa. The chemical components thereof are 0.40% of C, 0.24% of Si, 0.8% of Mn, 0.02% of P, 0.007% of S, 1.0% of Cr and 0.16% of Mo in mass %. The remnant consists of Fe and inevitable impurities. The sample is a round bar having a diameter of 10 mm, and has a ring notch at the center. Hc was measured under each condition. The Weibull stress (σw) under each condition was calculated based on the finite element method (implicit solution method) by using commercial analyzing software. V0=1 mm3 and m=20 when the Weibull stress (σw) was calculated. Since it was found that σw and Hc have principal relations and are not influenced by Kt only in case of m=20. Typical maximum applied stress (σmax) for calculation is shown in FIG. 3. FIG. 3 shows the relationship between distances from a notch root of a sample and maximum principal stress (σmax). In this example, Kt=4.9 and applied stress/tensile strength of notched specimens=0.47 in accordance with Table 1. As shown in FIG. 3, the maximum applied stress (σmax) changes in a tensile direction. The stress is at the maximum of 2,544 MPa near a notch root, and sharply decreases as it is apart from the notch root. The stress becomes constant at 587 MPa at a location fully apart from the notch root. The stress is not at the maximum level at the notch root because the material has a partial yield and plastic deformation in this example. FIG. 2 shows an area Vf which is used for the calculation of the Weibull stress (σw). Vf is an area which is likely to be fractured.

[0034]FIG. 4 shows the relationship between calculation results of the Weibull stress (σw) and measurement results of maximum values of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc). It is found from FIG. 4 that σw and Hc have principal relations and are not influenced by Kt. This knowledge is extremely useful in predicting the occurrence of a delayed fracture. The content of diffusible hydrogen entered into steel from the environment due to corrosion (He) of the steel member can be empirically predicted from the working environment. It is found that the He of the steel member is 0.05 to 0.09 ppm. According to FIG. 4, σw is 2,300 MPa when He is 0.09 ppm. Accordingly, it is possible to predict that the occurrence of a delayed fracture of the steel member is zero at less than 2,300 MPa of σw.

[0035]FIG. 5 shows the relationship between calculation results of average applied stress (σave) and measurement results of maximum values of diffusible hydrogen contents of unfailed specimens (Hc). It is found, from FIG. 5, that σave and Hc have no principal relations and are heavily influenced by Kt. It is known that the steel member has 0.05 to 0.09 ppm of He. However, it is almost impossible to predict, from FIG. 5, the level of the average applied stress (σave) from which the steel member will have no delayed fracture. This is because σave where Hc is larger than He becomes different when Kt is different.

[0036] From FIG. 4, the occurrence of a delayed fracture of the steel member is predicted to be zero when σw is less than 2,300 MPa. A test was carried out to confirm whether or not this prediction was correct. An exposure test was performed under the same stress conditions as for the delayed fracture test. For the test, predetermined load was applied on samples. Three-percent salt solution was sprayed on the samples twice, in the morning and in the evening, and the samples were examined for fracture after 100 hours. The occurrence of a delayed fracture is found by performing the exposure test to twenty samples under each condition, and is a value where the number of fractured samples is divided by 20.

[0037]FIG. 6 shows the results of the exposure test. FIG. 6 shows the effects of σw on the occurrence of a delayed fracture. When σw was less than 2,300 MPa, the occurrence of a delayed fracture was zero. At 2,300 MPa or higher, the occurrence of a delayed fracture went up as σw increased. Accordingly, it is realized that the prediction based on FIG. 4 was correct, that is the occurrence of a delayed fracture of the steel member is zero at less than 2,300 MPa of σw. In other words, even if a steel member has a different shape from that of the steel member used for the delayed fracture test, a delayed fracture can be prevented as the steel member is designed at less than 2,300 MPa of σw.

[0038]FIG. 7 shows the effects of σave on the occurrence of a delayed fracture. FIG. 7 has been conventionally used for the prediction of a delayed fracture. When the stress concentration factor (Kt) is different, a critical σave that provides zero occurrence of a delayed fracture, becomes different. It is almost impossible to predict the level of σave from which no delayed fracture is caused in the steel member. It is also difficult to predict the occurrence of a delayed fracture of a steel member having a different shape from that of the steel member to which the delayed fracture test was carried out. It is obvious that, in the conventional method, a delayed fracture test has to be carried out to every design shape of a steel member.

[0039] The present invention can accurately predict whether or not a steel member will have a delayed fracture. The present invention can also effectively prevent a delayed fracture by appropriately setting the shape and working stress, and working environment of a steel member. Even a steel member having a complex shape can be designed with an appropriate safety factor for actual use. The practical use of high strength steel having more than 1,000 MPa of tensile strength and previously hardly used, becomes easy. Various types of devices, machines and so forth can thus be reduced in weights, improving energy efficiency of society as a whole.

TABLE 1
Conditions of Delayed Fracture Test
Applied
stress/
tensile Occur-
strength rence
Sample of Hc/ of
diameter/ notched σw/ σmax/ σave/ mass delayed
mm Kt specimen MPa MPa MPa ppm fracture
10 6.9 0.86 2930 3434 1849 0.0692 1.00
10 6.9 0.72 2715 3274 1543 0.0794 0.80
10 6.9 0.47 2334 2860 1004 0.0908 0.10
10 6.9 0.40 2196 2710  841 0.1408 0.00
10 6.9 0.33 2021 2494  701 0.3355 0.00
10 4.9 0.86 2828 3164 1849 0.0729 0.90
10 4.9 0.72 2606 2961 1543 0.0812 0.50
10 4.9 0.47 2203 2544 1004 0.1276 0.00
10 4.9 0.40 2047 2379  841 0.2151 0.00
10 4.9 0.33 1863 2187  701 0.5240 0.00
10 3.3 0.86 2732 2808 1849 0.0754 0.85
10 3.3 0.72 2478 2590 1543 0.0850 0.30
10 3.3 0.60 2194 2364 1291 0.1439 0.00
10 3.3 0.47 1921 2110 1004 0.3940 0.00

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Classifications
U.S. Classification73/760
International ClassificationC22C38/04, G01N33/20, G01N3/08, G01N1/28, C22C38/22, G01N3/00
Cooperative ClassificationC22C38/22, G01N33/20, C22C38/04
European ClassificationC22C38/04, C22C38/22
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 24, 2007FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20070225
Feb 25, 2007LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Sep 13, 2006REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Mar 12, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: KAWASAKI STEEL CORPORATION, JAPAN
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Owner name: NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR MATERIALS SCIENCE, JAPAN
Owner name: KAWASAKI STEEL CORPORATION C/O TECHNICAL RESEARCH
Owner name: NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR MATERIALS SCIENCE C/O TECHN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:TAKAGI, SHUSAKU /AR;REEL/FRAME:012671/0666;SIGNING DATESFROM 20010905 TO 20010911