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Publication numberUS20020053122 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/027,661
Publication dateMay 9, 2002
Filing dateDec 20, 2001
Priority dateJan 6, 2000
Also published asUS6345429, US6425706
Publication number027661, 10027661, US 2002/0053122 A1, US 2002/053122 A1, US 20020053122 A1, US 20020053122A1, US 2002053122 A1, US 2002053122A1, US-A1-20020053122, US-A1-2002053122, US2002/0053122A1, US2002/053122A1, US20020053122 A1, US20020053122A1, US2002053122 A1, US2002053122A1
InventorsDavid Jalanti, Edward Furey
Original AssigneeInternational Business Machines Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus and method for fastening objects flush to a surface
US 20020053122 A1
Abstract
An apparatus for securing an object to a surface comprises a mounting cover having a first surface and a pair of sidewalls depending away from the first surface. The sidewalls are in a facing spaced relationship and secured to a second surface. At least two securement members are secured to the first surface between the pair of sidewalls. The securement members are configured to define a receiving area. Each securement member has a pair of engagement members secured within at least a pair of openings in the first surface. Each pair of engagement members include an upper surface. The upper surfaces of the pairs of engagement members are flush with respect to the first surface. An actuating member having a first portion, and a second portion depending away from said first portion, is configured to be slidably engaged in the receiving area. The second portion has a pair of engagement openings for slidably receiving a pair of guide members mounted to the object.
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Claims(13)
1. An apparatus for securing an object to a surface, comprising:
a mounting cover having a first surface and a pair of sidewalls depending away from said first surface, said sidewalls being in a facing spaced relationship and being secured to a second surface;
at least two securement members being secured to said first surface between said pair of sidewalls, said at least two securement members being configured to define a receiving area, said at least two securement members each having a pair of engagement members being secured within at least a pair of openings in said first surface, said pair of engagement members each include an upper surface, said upper surfaces of each of said pair of engagement members being flush with respect to said first surface; and
an actuating member having a first portion configured to be slidably engaged in said receiving area and a second portion depending away from said first portion, said second portion having a pair of engagement openings for slidably receiving a pair of guide members mounted to said object.
2. The apparatus as in claim 1, wherein each of said pair of openings comprises a receiving opening, an engagement opening, and a staking opening, said receiving opening includes a pair of sidewalls positioned between said receiving opening and said engagement opening, said pair of sidewalls being tapered, said staking opening and said receiving opening each are configured to have a dimension greater than a portion of each of said pair of engagement members, said engagement opening being further defined by a pair of tab portions, said tab portions depend inwardly towards each other.
3. The apparatus as in claim 2, wherein said tab portions each have an engagement surface, said engagement surface being chamferred and making contact with said portion of said pair of engagement members as said pair of engagement members are inserted in said engagement openings.
4. The apparatus as in claim 1, wherein said securement members are self-fixtured and self-aligned within said mounting cover.
5. The apparatus as in claim 1, wherein a pair of shoulders of said first portion of said actuating members engage said securement members as said actuating member is slidably inserted into said receiving area.
6. An apparatus for securing a circuit card to a surface, comprising:
a mounting cover having a first surface and a pair of sidewalls depending away from said first surface, said sidewalls being in a facing spaced relationship and being secured to a second surface;
at least two securement members being secured to said first surface between said pair of sidewalls and being in a facing spaced relationship with respect to said second surface, said at least two securement members being configured to define a receiving area, said at least two securement members each having a pair of engagement members being secured within at least a pair of openings in said surface, said pair of engagement members each include an upper surface, said upper surfaces of said pair of engagement members being flush with respect to said first surface; and
an actuator slidably mounted to said circuit card, said actuator having an engagement portion configured for being slidably received within said receiving area defined by said at least two securement members, said actuator causing said circuit card to travel in a first direction as said actuator is slid into said receiving area in a direction orthogonal to said first direction.
7. The apparatus as in claim 6, wherein each of said pair of openings comprises a receiving opening, an engagement opening, and a staking opening, said receiving opening includes a pair of sidewalls positioned between said receiving opening and said engagement opening, said pair of sidewalls being tapered, said staking opening and said receiving opening each are configured to have a dimension greater than a portion of each of said pair of engagement members, said engagement opening being further defined by a pair of tab portions, said tab portions depend inwardly towards each other.
8. The apparatus as in claim 7, wherein said tab portions depend inwardly towards each other, and each have an engagement surface, said engagement surface being chamferred and making contact with said portion of said pair of engagement members as said pair of engagement members are inserted in said engagement openings.
9. The apparatus as in claim 8, wherein said engagement opening supports said pair of engagement members within said opening.
10. The apparatus as in claim 6, wherein said securement members are self-fixtured and self-aligned within said mounting cover.
11. The apparatus recited in claim 6, wherein a pair of shoulders of said first portion of said actuating members engage said securement members.
12. An apparatus for securing card carriers to a planar surface, comprising:
a mounting cover having a first surface and a pair of sides depending downward from said first surface in a facing spaced relationship, said pair of sides being secured to said planar surface to define receiving areas for a plurality of card carriers, said plurality of card carriers comprising a card slidably secured to an actuating member by a pair of coupling members slidably received within a pair of opposing slots within said actuating member; and
a plurality of securement members depending downward from said first surface, said plurality of securement members each having a pair of engagement members being secured within at least a pair of openings in said planar surface, said pair of engagement members each include an upper surface, said upper surfaces of said pair of engagement members being flush with respect to said first surface;
said actuating member of said plurality of card carriers slidably engages said plurality of securement members in a first direction until reaching a first position within said receiving areas, said actuating member slidably engages said plurality of securement members in a direction parallel to said second surface within said receiving areas;
said card of said plurality of card carriers moves in a second direction orthogonal to said first direction from said first position to a second position and engages an interface mechanism of said second surface when said card is in said second portion.
13. A method for securing a circuit card to a surface, comprising:
inserting an actuator of said circuit card into a receiving area defined by a plurality of securement members secured to a portion of a mounting cover, said receiving area being disposed above said surface, said plurality of securement members each having a pair of engagement members being secured within at least a pair of openings in said mounting cover, said pair of engagement members each include an upper surface, said upper surfaces of said pair of engagement members being flush with respect to a first surface of said mounting cover;
sliding said actuator and said circuit card in a first direction into an area between said surface and said mounting cover; and
contacting said circuit card with an interface mechanism wherein further movement of said actuator in said first direction will cause said circuit card to travel in a second direction, said second direction being orthogonal to said first direction and a portion of said circuit card is intimately received by said interface mechanism positioned on said surface.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

[0001] This is a division of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/478,314 filed on Jan. 6, 2000, which is incorporated by reference herein.

TECHNICAL FIELD

[0002] The present invention relates to an apparatus and method for fastening and, more particularly, to an apparatus and method for fastening objects flush to a surface.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] Large networked computer systems require a substantial number of printed circuit cards to perform a countless variety of tasks. The printed circuit cards are typically housed within a plurality of rectangular boxes, which are commonly referred to as a chassis or a main carrier of components. The chassis are then loaded into the system having a cabinet like structure which is configured to receive and support a number of chassis. The chassis are generally inserted laterally and stacked one on top of the other. Each chassis has at least one exposed end where a cable is inserted so that the printed circuit cards can interface, for example, with an SP computer system. The cabinet like structure can also expose two ends of the rectangular chassis so that a cable can connect with, for example, a 390 computer system.

[0004] The cabinet like structure provides an area defined only slightly greater in length, width and height than the chassis itself. As a result, the chassis cannot have any protrusions or extensions, such as a screw head or other securement devices, located on its outer surface. A screw head can actually prevent the chassis from properly loading into the structure. Moreover, and if the chassis cannot be inserted into the structure then the computer system cannot interface with the printed circuit cards. Consequently, if the printed circuit cards or components are secured in the chassis, then the securement device must be flush to the outer surface of the chassis.

[0005] Other alternatives such as using adhesives, employing screws and even welding are labor intensive and do not provide a convenient removable means for securing printed circuit cards flush to the outer surface of the chassis.

[0006] As a result, there is a need for an apparatus and method for fastening objects flush to a surface.

[0007] There is also a need for an apparatus and method for fastening a securement member flush to an upper surface of a mounting cover.

[0008] There is yet another need for a method and apparatus for fastening a securement member flush to a mounting cover so that a printed circuit card or other component may properly interface with a printed circuit board in a chassis without interfering with the insertion of the chassis into the computer system.

[0009] There is also a need for an apparatus and method for fastening a securement member flush to an upper surface of a cover mounted to a chassis to ensure the chassis will properly load into its intended structure for use with a computer system.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0010] An apparatus for securing an object to a surface comprises a mounting cover having a first surface and a pair of sidewalls depending away from the first surface. The sidewalls being in a facing spaced relationship and being secured to a second surface. At least two securement members being secured to the first surface between the pair of sidewalls. The at least two securement members being configured to define a receiving area. The at least two securement members each having a pair of engagement members being secured within at least a pair of openings in the first surface. The pair of engagement members each include an upper surface. The upper surfaces of each of the pair of engagement members being flush with respect to the first surface. An actuating member having a first portion configured to be slidably engaged in the receiving area and a second portion depending away from the first portion. The second portion having a pair of engagement openings for slidably receiving a pair of guide members mounted to the object.

[0011] These and other features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following brief description of the drawings, detailed description, and appended claims and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0012] The invention will be further described in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

[0013]FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the present invention;

[0014]FIG. 2 is an isometric view of the mounting cover;

[0015]FIG. 3 is an opening of the mounting cover shown in FIG. 2 prior to undergoing the “swaging” process;

[0016]FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of an opening shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 after the “swaging” process;

[0017]FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of a securement member;

[0018]FIG. 6 is an end view of the preferred embodiment of the securement member shown in FIG. 5;

[0019]FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of a securement member;

[0020]FIG. 8 is an end view of the preferred embodiment of the securement member shown in FIG. 7;

[0021]FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the securement members in FIGS. 5-6 mating with the mounting cover;

[0022]FIG. 10 is an expanded view of an engagement member inserted into an opening as shown in FIG. 8;

[0023]FIG. 11 is a perspective view from 10-10 of the engagement member mating with the opening;

[0024]FIG. 12 is an enlarged view of a receiving area defined by the securement members of FIGS. 5-6 in a facing spaced relationship as shown in FIG. 1;

[0025]FIG. 13 is an enlarged view of a receiving area defined by the securement member of FIG. 5 and the securement member of FIG. 7;

[0026]FIG. 14 depicts two side views of an actuator;

[0027]FIG. 15 depicts an actuator containing a blank plastic card and an actuator electronic interposer card, respectively; and

[0028]FIG. 16 is an alternative embodiment of the mounting cover.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0029] Referring now to FIGS. 1-4, a mounting structure 10 constructed in accordance with the present invention is shown. Structure 10 has a mounting cover 12. Cover 12 preferably is constructed out of steel or any other type of sheet metal. Cover 12 has a plurality of retention slots or openings 16 in an upper surface 18. Cover 12 is configured to have a pair of side portions 20 and an end portion 22. Side portions 20 and end portion 22 are positioned to extend downwardly from upper surface 18. Side portions 20 also have a plurality of apertures 24 for mounting cover 12 preferably to a chassis containing a printed circuit board (not shown). Apertures 24 are formed in mounting cover 12 by a two step process and can be generally defined as follows: holes are punched out of cover 12, which displace excess material; then, the hole is struck a second time creating aperture 24 with chamferred sides for receiving screws. This second hit, which creates the chamferred sides of the aperture, is referred to as a countersink. Cover 12 is also configured to have an edge 27.

[0030] A partition 32 is configured, dimensioned and positioned to provide additional support to mounting cover 12 (FIG. 1). Partition 32 includes a top portion 34 and a base portion 36 for mounting it to cover 12 at apertures 24 and the chassis, respectively.

[0031] A pair of openings 17 are positioned and located to accommodate the positioning of partition 32 (FIGS. 1 and 2). Alternatively, partition 32 can be centered underneath cover 12, placed off centered to either the left or right underneath cover 12, and/or placed at the anterior or open end of cover 12 or posterior at end portion 22 of cover 12. Partition 32 can likewise extend the entire length of cover 12 or just a portion of it as required by the dimensions outlined in the engineering documents (drawings, specifications, etc.). Moreover, a plurality of partitions 32 can be used (FIG. 2). Partition 32 is constructed from the same materials as mounting cover 12 as well as other suitable durable materials such as plastics and metal alloys containing steel. Cover 12 can also be configured, dimensioned and positioned, when mounted, to not require partition 32 for support.

[0032] Mounting cover 12 can be manufactured from materials such as metals or metal alloys, but preferably steel or an alloy containing steel. Cover 12 can also be scaled in size and thickness to accommodate different geometric configurations. However, the thickness of cover 12 is limited by the stamping process used to create the plurality of openings 16. Mounting cover 12 preferably is approximately 57.3 cm long and approximately 19.5 cm wide; however, cover 12 can be constructed and dimensioned as required by its specific application.

[0033] Referring now to FIGS. 3-4, plurality of openings 16 are formed using a “swaging” process and can be generally defined as follows: a hole having an “H” like configuration is stamped in cover 12 using a device or a manually operated tool (FIG. 3), then the narrow portion of the “H” like configuration is “swaged” or stamped a second time with a device or a manually operated tool to create plurality of openings 16 (FIG. 4). Plurality of openings 16 are adapted to receive a plurality of male fasteners or engagement members 52 of securement members 28. Once engagement members 52 are received within plurality of openings 16, the position of openings 16 cause securement members 28 to be arranged in a uniform manner. Once fully engaged within opening 16, the positioning and configuring of securement members 28 define a plurality of receiving areas 102 (FIG. 1).

[0034] Referring now to FIG. 2, in one embodiment plurality of openings 16 are equally spaced from each other and define two rows of openings 16 in upper surface 18 of mounting cover 12 (FIG. 2). Of course, and as contemplated in accordance with the instant application, the location, size and configuration of openings 16 may vary. For example, the configuration of securement members 28, such as the length, width and size of an engagement member 52 or a portion extending from securement member 28, will affect the position of plurality of openings 16. Referring now to FIG. 4, plurality of openings 16 are further defined to each have a receiving opening 40, a second portion or an engagement opening 42, and a first portion or a staking opening 44.

[0035] A pair of tab portions 46 extend into openings 16 and are in a facing spaced relationship so as to define engagement opening 42 (FIG. 4). Tab portions are located intermediate receiving opening 40 and staking opening 44. Tab portions 46 are also chamferred so as to have an engagement surface 48. Engagement surface 48 provides a male fastener supporting means within an angular configuration (FIG. 4). Upon insertion of engagement members 52 into openings 16, engagement opening 42 supports engagement members 52 within openings 16.

[0036] A portion of receiving opening 40 is defined by a pair of sidewalls 50 in a facing spaced relationship. Pair of sidewalls 50 are positioned to depend angularly inwardly to each other to promote smooth engagement of engagement members 52 within openings 16 as engagement members 52 slide in the direction of arrow 98 as indicated by the dashed lines in FIG. 9. Staking opening 44 includes a back edge 49 or a stop surface that prevents engagement member 52 from sliding any further in the direction of arrow 98. In the exemplary embodiment, opening 16 is approximately 2.8 cm-4.0 cm long. Both receiving opening 40 and staking opening 44 are approximately 0.75 cm (0.30 in.) wide. Engaging opening 42 is approximately 0.264 cm (0.10 in.). However, plurality of openings 16 including receiving opening 40, engaging opening 42 and staking opening 44 again may be scaled in size and configured to receive engagement members 52 of different lengths, widths and shapes.

[0037] Referring now to FIGS. 5-8, securement members 28 as well as securement member 30 each have a pair of engagement members 52, or portions extending from securement members 28 and securement member 30, which are received and engaged by plurality of openings 16. Engagement members 52 can be positioned anywhere along the top of securement members 28 and securement member 30 in accordance with the design specifications required for the desired application. In addition, securement members 28, 30 each have a pair of cut-outs 53. Securement members 26 can be manufactured with as many cut-outs 53 as required (FIGS. 5 and 7). The significance of cut-outs 53 will be discussed further in the specification.

[0038] Securement members 28 and securement member 30, and engagement members 52, preferably are constructed from extruded aluminum which possesses malleable qualities, or other metals possessing similar malleable qualities including but not limited combinations or alloys containing aluminum and other malleable metals. Securement members 28 and securement member 30 are first extruded and then undergo secondary machining to create engagement members 52. Engagement members 52 also possess the same malleable qualities of securement members 28 and securement member 30. In the preferred embodiment, engagement members 52 are configured to have a top portion 54 wider than a base portion 56, which are defined by a pair of side portions 58 extending angularly inward (FIGS. 5-8).

[0039] In the exemplary embodiment, securement members 28 are approximately 14.5 cm (5.71 in.) long, 0.87 cm (0.34 in.) wide at its base and stands approximately 1.45 cm (0.571 in.) tall. In the exemplary embodiment, securement member 30 is approximately 14.5 cm (5.71 in.) long and approximately 1.47 cm (0.579 in.) wide at its base and stands approximately 1.45 (0.571 in.) cm tall. In the exemplary embodiment, engagement members 52 are approximately 1.000.05 cm (0.3940.02 in.) long and have a width less than the width of both receiving opening 40 and staking opening 44. However, both securement members 28 and securement member 30, as well as engagement members 52, can be constructed in accordance with the design specifications of the desired applications so that the length, width and height of securement members 28 and securement member 30 can vary as well as the length, width and shape of engagement members 52.

[0040] Referring now in particular to FIG. 6, securement member 28 has a first sidewall 60 depending downwardly from the top of securement member 28. A longitudinal shoulder 62 is depends outwardly from first sidewall 60. A second sidewall 64 depends downward from longitudinal shoulder 62. A base portion 66 depends outwardly from second sidewall 64. Securement member 28 also has a flanking first sidewall 68 depending downwardly from the top of securement member 28. A first slanted sidewall 70 depends downward and angled inward from flanking first sidewall 68. A flanking second sidewall 72 depends downwardly from first slanted sidewall 70. A second slanted sidewall 74 depends outwardly and angled from flanking second sidewall 72. A flanking base portion 76 depends outwardly from second slanted sidewall 74.

[0041] Referring now in particular to FIG. 8, securement member 30 has a first sidewall 80 depending outwardly from the top of securement member 30. A longitudinal shoulder 82 depends outwardly from first sidewall 80. A second sidewall 84 depends outwardly from longitudinal shoulder 82. A base portion 86 depends outwardly from second sidewall 84. A flanking first sidewall 88 depends downwardly from the top of securement member 30. A ceiling 90 depends inwardly from flanking first sidewall 88. A flanking second sidewall 92 depends downwardly from ceiling 90. A base portion 94 depends outwardly from flanking second sidewall 92. Securement member 30 is configured to accommodate the position of partition 32 as well as define a portion of receiving area 104.

[0042] Referring now to FIG. 9, engagement members 52 are first inserted through receiving openings 40 in a first direction shown by an arrow 96. During the insertion of engagement members 52, top portion 54 does not rise above upper surface 18 of mounting cover 12. Top portion 54 of engagement members 52 remain level with upper surface 18 of mounting cover 12. Securement members 28 are then repositioned in a second direction indicated by an arrow 98 so that engagement members 52 are now positioned within engagement opening 42 and staking area 44. Engagement surfaces 48 make contact with and positively grip the side portions 58 of engagement members 52 as securement members 28 slidably engage engagement openings 40 in the second direction shown by arrow 98. The positioning and configuration of side portions 58 and engagement surfaces 48 keep engagement member 52 at or below upper surface 18. Once engagement members 52 are repositioned, top portions 54 are always level with upper surface 18 of cover 12.

[0043] Referring now to FIGS. 10-11, once engagement members 52 are positively gripped by engaging opening 42, engagement members 52 now rest in engaging opening 42 and staking opening 44. A downward force is applied in a direction depicted by an arrow 100 to areas 101 of each top portion 54 of engagement members 52. An apparatus or a device such as a press equipped with a hammer, or a person using a hammer, applies the downward force as illustrated by a hammer 55 in FIG. 10. The hammer is configured to strike areas 101 and can resemble a split fork with two separate and distinct striking surfaces as shown in FIG. 10. When applied, such a pair of striking surfaces simultaneously strike upper surface 54 of engagement members 52 and deflect the malleable material of engagement member 52 at areas 101.

[0044] As engagement member 52 is forced downward in the direction of arrow 100, a portion of engagement member 52 is forced into portions of staking opening 44 (FIGS. 10-11). Staking opening 44 possesses a width larger than the width of engaging members 52. Prior to engaging members 52 being forced downward into staking opening 44, an open space or unoccupied portion exists on either side of that part of engaging member 52 within staking opening 44 (FIG. 10-11).

[0045] As areas 101 of engaging member 52 are forced downwardly, portions of engaging member 52 remain supported by engaging surfaces 48 of engaging opening 42 (FIGS. 10-11). However, the part of engagement member 52 located in staking opening 44 and without engagement surfaces 48 for support are forced into the open or unoccupied portions of staking opening 44 (FIG. 4). Once engagement members 52 are forced into staking area 44, engagement members 52, securement members 28, and securement member 30 are all prevented from being repositioned again. Accordingly, engagement members 52 are now fastened flush to cover 12.

[0046] Fastening engaging members 52 to cover 12 in this manner is referred to as a self-fixturing method. Typically, before two parts can be joined, a separate tool is specifically designed and implemented to hold each part in place. Once the two parts have been secured, fastened, adhered, etc. together by another device or tool, the separate tool designed to hold the parts in place is removed. This process is referred to as fixturing.

[0047] In the present invention, a separate tool is not required to hold securement members 28 or securement member 30 in place within mounting cover 12 prior to applying the engaging force in the direction of arrow 100; thus, the method is referred to as self-fixturing. Once engagement members 52 slidably engage opening 16 and engagement opening 42 positively support sidewalls 58 of engagement members 52, securement members 28 remain in place within mounting cover 12. Securement members 28 do not require further alignment or a separate tool to hold them in place within mounting cover 12 prior to applying the engaging force in the direction of arrow 100. As a result, the method for inserting securement members 28 into openings 16 is a self-fixturing process. Additional benefits, such as time and cost efficient and not as labor intensive, are realized since designing, manufacturing and using a special tool is not required.

[0048] As illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 12, once engagement members 52 of securement members 28 are fixedly secured within openings 16 of mounting cover 12, securement members 28 are positioned to define a receiving area 102. Flanking first sidewall 68 and first slanted sidewall 70 of securement members 28 are in a facing spaced relationship with first sidewall 60 of the opposing securement members 28. Flanking second sidewall 68 of securement members 28 are in a facing spaced relationship with a portion of first sidewall 60 as well as longitudinal shoulder 62 and second sidewall 64 of the opposing securement members 28. Flanking second sidewall 74 and second slanted sidewall 76 of securement members 28 are in a facing spaced relationship with a second sidewall 64 of another securement members 28. Securement members 28 define a receiving area 102 having the configuration illustrated in FIG. 12.

[0049] As illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 13, once securement member 30 is fixedly secured to mounting cover 12, securement member 28 and securement member 30 are positioned to define a receiving area 104 when engagement members 52 are fixedly engaged within openings 16 and 17, respectively. Flanking first sidewall 88 and an upper portion of flanking second sidewall 92 of securement member 30 are in a facing spaced relationship with first sidewall 60 and second sidewall 64 of securement member 28 (FIG. 13). The rest of flanking second sidewall 92 of securement member 30 is in a facing spaced relationship with second sidewall 64 of securement member 28 (FIG. 13).

[0050] Securement member 30 has an area defined by ceiling 90, flanking second sidewall 92 and base portion 94 which is considerably larger in size than an area defined by first slanted sidewall 70, flanking second sidewall 72, second slanted sidewall 74 and base portion 76 of securement member 28. Securement member 30 is also wider than securement member 28; however, securement member 30 is shorter in length than securement member 28. Securement member 30 has a larger area, a greater width and a shorter length because it is located behind partition 32. Securement member 30 must be wider then partition 32 so that securement member 30 can define a receiving area 104. Securement member 28 and securement member 30 define a receiving area 104 having the configuration illustrated in FIG. 13.

[0051] Again referring to FIGS. 12-13, securement members 28 are configured to define a plurality of openings 105 in between each base surface portions 66, 76 of first securement member 28 and base surface portions 86, 94 of second securement members 30.

[0052] Referring now to FIGS. 14-15, receiving areas 102, 104 define a geometry specific to a card carrier. Such a card carrier preferably is an actuator 106 containing a card 108. Actuator 106 is molded plastic and fastened to card 108 using shoulder screws 110 located in opposing slots 112 found on actuator 106 (FIG. 14). This allows actuator 106 to move independently of card 108. Card 108 can encompass any type of electronic interposer card having different functions such as wrapping signals generated from circuitry to fiber optics. Additionally, card 108 can also be a “blank”, which is a plastic card used to occupy a space (FIG. 15). Actuator 106 is laterally inserted into receiving areas 102, 104. Actuator 106 is guided by a shoulder 114 located on either side of actuator 106. Opposing shoulders 114 are supported by first sidewall 60, longitudinal shoulder 62, second sidewall 64 and base portion surface 66 of securement member 28 and engages flanking first sidewall 68 of opposing securement member 28.

[0053] Once card 108 reaches an interface mechanism (not shown), shoulder screws 110 of actuator 106 are automatically aligned with cut-outs 53 of securement members 28 and securement member 30. At this point card 108 can no longer move forward in either receiving area 102 or 104. Actuator 106 is then pushed forward causing card 108 to slide at an angle within opposing slots 112. Card 108 moves downward in a vertical direction. Card 108 then mates blind with interface mechanism in a camming action as actuator 106 reaches the end of slots 112. Card 108 is now fastened flush to the chassis.

[0054] When actuator 106 is laterally inserted into receiving area 104, actuator 106 is again guided by opposing shoulders 114, which is supported by base portion 94 of securement member 30 and engages first sidewall 60, longitudinal shoulder 62, second sidewall 64 and base portion 66 of opposing securement member 28. Both actuator 106 and card 108 engage receiving area 104 and interfacing mechanism, respectively, in the same manner as when laterally inserted into receiving area 102. In this preferred embodiment of the present invention, once actuator 106 and card 108 are laterally inserted into receiving areas 102 and 104, a retaining bar 116 is fixedly attached to the end of cards 108 and edge 27 of cover 12. The retaining bar 116 shields electromagnetic emissions emanating from the operation of the electronic equipment and prevents mounting structure 10 from becoming conductive.

[0055] Referring now to FIG. 16, as contemplated and in accordance with the present invention, an alternative embodiment of cover 12 can further include an end portion 22 having a pair of apertures 118 and a flange 120, which extends outwardly from end portion 22. A gasket 122 is mounted to the top of flange 120 by an adhesive found on gasket 122. In this alternative embodiment, gasket 122 is an emc gasket commercially available from Parker Hannafin Seal Group, Irvine, Calif. Gasket 122 seals electromagnetic emissions emitted from the printed circuit board. Pair of apertures 118 are adapted to receive a screw or similar securement means to secure a separate cover placed upon chassis 26 to complete the enclosure and ensure correct air flow.

[0056] Accordingly, and as contemplated in accordance with the present invention, a mounting structure scalable in size for fastening objects flush to a surface, large or miniature, may be configured to receive various guidance mechanisms having different geometries. Therefore, the present invention provides a most economical and spatially conservative means for fastening objects flush to a surface.

[0057] While the invention has been described with reference to a preferred embodiment, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes may be made and equivalents may be substituted for elements thereof without departing from the scope of the invention. In addition, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation or material to the teachings of the invention without departing from the essential scope thereof. Therefore, it is intended that the invention may not be limited to the particular embodiment disclosed as the best mode contemplated for carrying out this invention, but that the invention will include all embodiments falling within the scope of the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7626826 *Jan 31, 2007Dec 1, 2009Sun Microsystems, Inc.Expansion card carrier and method for assembling the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/428
International ClassificationH05K7/14, G06F1/18
Cooperative ClassificationY10T29/53261, G06F1/185, Y10T29/49826, G06F1/186, Y10T29/53265, Y10T403/7094, Y10T29/5313, Y10T29/53978, Y10T403/7015, G06F1/184, H05K7/1418
European ClassificationG06F1/18S4, G06F1/18S5, H05K7/14D2, G06F1/18S2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 16, 2014FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20140730
Jul 30, 2014LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Mar 7, 2014REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Jan 21, 2010FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Mar 14, 2006CCCertificate of correction
Nov 18, 2005FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4