Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20020077189 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/016,965
Publication dateJun 20, 2002
Filing dateDec 14, 2001
Priority dateDec 14, 2000
Also published asCA2364919A1
Publication number016965, 10016965, US 2002/0077189 A1, US 2002/077189 A1, US 20020077189 A1, US 20020077189A1, US 2002077189 A1, US 2002077189A1, US-A1-20020077189, US-A1-2002077189, US2002/0077189A1, US2002/077189A1, US20020077189 A1, US20020077189A1, US2002077189 A1, US2002077189A1
InventorsKevin Tuer, Farid Golnaraghi
Original AssigneeMechworks Software Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Proprioceptive golf club with analysis, correction and control capabilities
US 20020077189 A1
Abstract
A method of analyzing the swing of a sport implement and player over time in three dimensional space involving implanting implement sensors at numerous locations in the implement adapted for measurement of linear motion on three axes and angular motion on said three axes, such as: linear motion inertial sensors; angular motion sensors; axial strain gauges; flexural strain gauges; and torsional strain gauges. Player sensors are set at a number of locations on the player's body, also adapted for measurement of linear motion on three axes and angular motion on said three axes. Data from the sensor suites are communicated via a wireless communications device to a processing unit by: infrared; radio frequency; or the Bluetooth system. Data is processed from the sensor units to derive an output communicated to the player via an interface such as: visual graphics display; text display; sound interface; tactile device; and vibratory device. The output includes an actuator signal communicated to actuator units engaging at least two actuatable portions of the sport implement moveable relative to each other, such as: solenoids; fluid power cylinders; piezoelectric actuators; magnetic actuators; magneto-restrictive actuators; and rheological fluid actuators.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(10)
We claim:
1. A method of analysing the swing of a sport implement and player over time in three dimensional space, the sport implement having a manual grip on a shaft supporting a head with a strike face, the method comprising:
implanting an implement sensor suite comprising a plurality of implement sensors disposed at a plurality of locations in the implement, the implement sensors adapted for measurement of linear motion on three axes and angular motion on said three axes, the implement sensors selected from the group consisting of: linear motion inertial sensors; angular motion sensors; axial strain gauges; flexural strain gauges; and torsional strain gauges;
attaching a player sensor suite comprising a plurality of player sensors disposed at a plurality of locations on the player's body, the player sensors adapted for measurement of linear motion on three axes and angular motion on said three axes, the player sensors selected from the group consisting of: linear motion inertial sensors; and angular motion sensors;
communicating data acquired from the sensor suites via a wireless communications device to a processing unit, the wireless device selected from the group consisting of: infrared; radio frequency; and the Bluetooth system;
processing data from the sensor units with the processing unit to derive an output;
communicating the processor output to the player via an interface selected from the group consisting of: visual graphics display; text display; sound interface; tactile device; and vibratory device; and
wherein the output includes an actuator signal communicated to an actuator suite of actuator units engaging at least two actuatable portions of the sport implement moveable relative to each other, the actuator units selected from the group consisting of: solenoids; fluid power cylinders; piezoelectric actuators; magnetic actuators; magneto-restrictive actuators; and Theological fluid actuators.
2. A method according to claim 1 wherein the linear motion sensor is a micro electromechanical accelerometer.
3. A method according to claim 1 wherein the angular motion sensors are selected from the group consisting of: micro electromechanical gyroscopes; angular accelerometers; a plurality of coacting linear accelerometers.
4. A method according to claim 1 wherein the implement is a golf club and the actuator units are programmed to control the level of vibration induced within the shaft of the golf club.
5. A method according to claim 4 wherein the processor output is selected from the group consisting of: sensor position relative to a selected reference; sensor velocity; sensor acceleration; movement of swing rotation center; golf club head impact position; golf club face angle at impact; effective loft angle at impact; wrist cock angle; and swing tempo profile.
6. A method according to claim 1 wherein the processor output includes a parameter by parameter comparison of sensor data with an optimal model data set.
7. A method according to claim 1 wherein the processor output includes player body characteristics selected from the group consisting of: trunk angle tilt; body rotation; center of rotation shift; arm motion trajectory; and center of gravity shift.
8. A method according to claim 1 wherein processor output includes a control signal communicating with the actuator suite.
9. A method according to claim 1 wherein the processing step includes processing techniques selected from the group consisting of: Kalman filtration; state estimation; and extrapolation of data to predict motion.
10. A method according to claim 1 wherein the sport implement is selected from the group consisting of: golf clubs; baseball bats; racquets; cricket bats; and fencing swords.
Description
TECHNICAL FIELD

[0001] The invention relates to a method of sensing motion, analysing, correcting and controlling the use of sporting implements such as golf clubs, tennis racquets, and baseball bats, that are swung in 3D space using intelligent active electronic sensing, signal processing, actuating, vibration dampening, motion computing and displaying components. The invention may also be used in other applications involving sensing and/or controlling of motion in 3D space such as automotive, aerospace, mining, and self sensing, autonomous toys, to name a few.

BACKGROUND OF THE ART

[0002] A proprioceptive golf club or other sporting instrument is one which includes sensors and electronics to provide signals from within the golf club itself.

[0003] U.S. Pat. No. 3,945,646 to Hammond, for example, includes a golf club with measurement system having accelerometers in the golf club head, a torque strain gauge in the golf club shaft as well as a flex strain gauge, radio transmitter and battery power source. FM radio transmission is received by a remote receiver and signals are fed into a computer, which analyses the data and organizes it for display and processing.

[0004] U.S. Pat. No. 5,779,555 to Nomura et al. provides another example of prior art swing type athletic equipment with a tri-axial acceleration sensor that accurately determines whether or not a golf ball has been hit on the “sweet spot” of a golf club head.

[0005] U.S. Pat. No. 5,941,779 to Zeiner-Gundersen also provides a golf club swinging training device which includes two directional gyroscopes, power source, a set of sensors and alarms to give an audible or tactile alarm when the golf swing is outside of each gyroscope's predetermined and set rotating direction.

[0006] U.S. Pat. No. 3,717,857 to Evans discloses a wrist mounted measurement system for transmitting a signal from strain gauges and accelerometers to analyses, compare and correct the swing of a baseball player wrist during practice sessions.

[0007] U.S. Pat. No. 5,056,783 to Matcovich et al. discloses a baseball bat with acceleration measurement that transmits a signal to a processor for display of the swing performance.

[0008] Further objects of the invention will be apparent from review of the disclosure, drawings and description of the invention below.

DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION

[0009] The invention comprises a method of sensing motion, analysing, correcting and controlling the use of sporting implements such as golf clubs, tennis racquets, and baseball bats, that are swung in 3D space using intelligent active electronic sensing, signal processing, actuating, vibration dampening, motion computing and displaying components.

[0010] Specifically, the invention provides a method of analysing the swing of a sport implement and player over time in three dimensional space involving implanting implement sensors at numerous locations in the implement adapted for measurement of linear motion on three axes and angular motion on said three axes, such as: linear motion inertial sensors; angular motion sensors; axial strain gauges; flexural strain gauges; and torsional strain gauges. Player sensors are set at a number of locations on the player's body, also adapted for measurement of linear motion on three axes and angular motion on said three axes. Data from the sensor suites are communicated via a wireless communications device to a processing unit by: infrared; radio frequency; or the Bluetooth system. Data is processed from the sensor units to derive an output communicated to the player via an interface such as: visual graphics display; text display; sound interface; tactile device; and vibratory device. The output includes an actuator signal communicated to actuator units engaging at least two actuatable portions of the sport implement moveable relative to each other, such as: solenoids; fluid power cylinders; piezoelectric actuators; magnetic actuators; magneto-restrictive actuators; and rheological fluid actuators.

[0011] For example, a golf club can be constructed according to the invention with a suite of inertial sensors, specifically a combination of MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems) accelerometers and rate gyro sensors, able to sense and measure the club's own motion. The invention also considers the golfer wearing one or more sensor suites to measure the motion of the golfer throughout the golf swing. The measurements made by the sensor suites are then used in combination to analyse the dynamics and mechanics of the golfer's swing and club/ball impact using Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) techniques, compare the swing performance to the optimal case, make recommendations for improvement, and effect active control to reduce vibrations as a result of club impact with the ball. In order to remove sensor or other sources of noise, sophisticated methods of filtration and signal processing such as Kalman Filters, state observers, low pass filters, and other means of embedding modelled and/or empirical knowledge of the motion of the golf club are used in hardware and software.

[0012] The invention can be applied to any sporting implement and includes software and hardware with one or more inertial/vibrational/torsional Sensor Suite(s) installed on/within the sporting implement and attached to the user, an Electronics Package, a Power Source, a Computational Capability, a Display Device, an Actuator Suite, and Communications Links to facilitate the exchange of information between components.

[0013] The invention may also be used in other applications involving motion in 3D space such as automotive, aerospace, mining, and self sensing, autonomous toys to name a few. Further advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description and accompanying drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0014] In order that the invention may be readily understood, one embodiment of the invention is illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawings.

[0015]FIG. 1 is a schematic perspective view of a golf club containing a sensor suite comprised of linear and rotational sensors located in the club head, a sensor suite comprised of linear and rotational sensors attached to the user, vibration dampening actuators in the shaft as well as shaft sensors, a RF transmitter and power source for each sensor suite, with a computer housing RF receiver and the computational capability, electronics package, and display devices.

[0016]FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram indicating the integration of various components.

[0017]FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram indicating the physical and communications interfacing of the components.

[0018]FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of the underlying software/hardware/firmware platform of the invention indicating the communications, signal processing, Inertial Navigation System techniques, embedded modelled and/or empirical knowledge, and interfacing of the components.

[0019] Further details of the invention and its advantages will be apparent from the detailed description included below.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0020] The device is comprised of software and hardware comprising one or more Sensor Suites (club mounted and user mounted), an Electronics Package, a Power Source, a Computational Capability, a Display Device, an Actuator Suite, and Communications Links to facilitate the exchange of information between components.

[0021] Features of the Sensor Suite include the following:

[0022] The Sensor Suite will be able to measure up to 6 degrees of motion (linear motion in three axes and angular motion in three axes).

[0023] Linear motion shall be measured using inertial sensors (i.e. sensors that can measure low frequency and constant signals) such as MEMS accelerometers or custom sensors. This signal will be integrated in hardware or software to provide acceleration, speed and position information relative to an earth based reference frame.

[0024] Angular motion shall be measured using inertial sensors such as MEMS gyroscopes, angular accelerometers, multiple linear accelerometers, or custom sensors. This signal will be integrated in hardware or software one or more times to provide angular speed and position information relative to the moving reference frame. In addition to defining club face angles, this information will be used to resolve the linear accelerometer signals into the appropriate earth based co-ordinates (prior to integration) and to facilitate the implementation of a gravity compensation mechanism.

[0025] The Sensor Suite will accommodate a GPS or DGPS positioning system capability. The Sensor Suite will measure sufficient signals to provide all or some of the following information: acceleration, speed, position, in both translation and rotation, of one or more points on the club head, on the club shaft, or on the user (e.g. the shift of the centre of swing rotation, the wrist cock angle, etc.); ball/club head impact point; point of ball/club impact with respect to the club head speed curve; angle of the club face at impact; the effective loft angle of the club at impact; tempo of the swing; and vibration induced within the club shaft.

[0026] The Sensor Suites will be embedded in the club head (block 1 shown in FIG. 1) or shaft (block 2), mounted on the club shaft 3, or attached to the user 4 (e.g. wrist, waist, neck, etc.).

[0027] Features of the Electronics Package may include circuits 5 mounted in the club shaft 3 and as follows. The Electronics Package is comprised of a microcontroller and memory for storage of collected information. The Electronics Package may also contain drivers and hardware to support communication of data. The Electronics Package will possess the capability of initialising, resetting and otherwise controlling the Sensor Suites.

[0028] The microcontroller will read in information from the sensors at a pre-specified rate and associate a time base with each piece of data. The microcontroller may contain part or all of the Computational Capability. The microcontroller may also implement vibration or other control laws. The microcontroller may also drive control actuators 7, such as solenoids, fluid power cylinders, piezoelectric materials, magnetic devices, magneto-restrictive or Theological fluids, or other custom designed actuation means. The microcontroller will control the communication of information to the display device, such as computer monitor or a specially designed display console.

[0029] The Electronics Package 8 will be embedded within the golf club head or shaft, will be mounted externally on the shaft, or will be attached to the user.

[0030] Features of the Power Source include the following. The Sensor Suite will be powered using the device's battery power pack. The Electronics Package will be powered using the device's battery power pack. The Display Device local to the golf club will be powered using the device's battery power pack or its own power source. The Display Device local to the golfer will be powered via its own power source. The Display Device remotely located will be powered via its own power source. The Actuator Suite will be powered using the device's battery power pack.

[0031] Features of the Computational Capability include the following. The Computational Capability will derive, from the sensor data, acceleration, speed, and position information in both translation and rotation, movement of the centre of swing rotation, club head/ball impact characteristics, club face angle at impact, effective loft angle at impact, wrist cock angle, and tempo profiles.

[0032] The Computational Capability will process sensor data and generate a control signal to drive the actuator suite. The Computational Capability will generate a time base which is to be associated with the data. The Computational Capability will be able to compare raw and derived information to an optimal case and make recommendations for improved performance. The Computational Capability will formulate an interactive mathematical model using the collected swing data and provide a swing simulation capability. In addition, the user will be able to change key parameters of the swing model to ascertain the effect on swing performance. The Computational Capability will include advanced filtration and signal processing techniques such as Kalman filters, state estimators, observers, and low pass filters to effectively reduce noise and to estimate and predict motion. The Computational Capability will be capable of storing, re-displaying and printing graphical and/or numeric data associated with the golf swing.

[0033] Features of the Communications Links include the following. There will be three primary Communications Links—Sensor Suite(s) to Electronics Package, Electronics Package to Actuator Suite, and Electronics Package to Display Device. The Sensor Suites to Electronics Package Communications Link is used to transmit signals from each sensor in the sensor suite to the microcontroller. The Electronics Package to Actuator Suite Communications Link is used to transmit control signals generated by the Electronics Package to the actuators. The Electronics Package to Display Device Communications Link is used to transmit performance information for display to the user. This link also passes commands issued by the user via the Display Device to the Electronics Package. Each of these Communications Links will be via wired or wireless means (e.g. infrared (IR), radio frequency (RF), Bluetooth, etc.).

[0034] Features of the Display Device 6 include the following. Information regarding the golfer's swing statistics will be communicated to a Display Device. The Display Device is local to the golfer, local to the golf club, or remotely located. The Display Device local to the golf club may be mounted on the golf club shaft. A Display Device local to the golfer could be wrist mounted (e.g. watch), belt or waist mounted or a device hung around the golfer's neck. A Display Device remotely located may include a personal data system (e.g. PalmPilot™), a laptop or notebook computer, a desktop computer, a personal gaming device (e.g. Gameboy™) or any other remote device capable of computation and display of data. The Display Device may contain part or all of the Computational Capability. The Display Device will have the capability to store raw data and display raw or processed data in graphical or numeric format. The Display Device will be capable of accepting commands from the user regarding the operation of the invention via a graphical user interface, a text based menu or a command line.

[0035] Features of the Actuator Suite include the following. The Actuator Suite will be comprised of active or passive actuators for the purpose of controlling the dynamics of the club head or club shaft, including vibration. The Actuator Suite 7 will be attached to or embedded within the club head or club shaft. This technology is applicable to a variety of sports instruments for which golfing is but one example. Other examples include baseball bats, tennis or racquetball racquets, cricket bats and fencing swords. Although the above description relates to a specific preferred embodiment as presently contemplated by the inventor, it will be understood that the invention in its broad aspect includes functional equivalents of the elements described herein.

[0036] The invention may also be used in other applications involving sensing and/or controlling motion in 3D space such as automotive, aerospace, mining, and self sensing, autonomous toys to name a few.

[0037] The invention includes full 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) motion sensing and measurement capabilities (3 DOF in translation, 3 DOF in rotation). Prior art typically incorporates a sensor suite of reduced measurement capability (i.e. less than 6 DOF) and the adoption of assumptions regarding the motion of the club (e.g. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,779,555, 5,233,544, 3,717,857).

[0038] Both the golf club and the player be instrumented with sensor suites and data be collected from each. This collected data will be fused to perform the analysis. For example, the club path information derived from the club mounted sensor suite will be combined with the shift motion of the user measured using the player mounted sensor suite to isolate characteristics of the swing. Prior art shows instrumentation of the club (e.g. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,779,555, 5,233,544) or instrumentation of the user but not instrumentation of both and the combined use of data to analyse the swing.

[0039] Given a complete data set, the swing can be scrutinised to indicate source of problems—not just indicate that a problem exists. Quite often, prior art shows devices with capabilities to indicate that there is a problem with the swing (e.g. U.S. Pat. No. 5,779,555) but there are often several possible sources of the problem, which the devices fail to identify.

[0040] Given the ability to define sources of problems, recommendations for correcting swing problems can be made. Many of the analysis and training devices are able to provide feedback (e.g. audible, tactile) that a problem exists (e.g. U.S. Pat. No. 5,941,779) but fail to quantify the depth of the problem or suggest recommendations for corrections.

[0041] Using the data collected from the swing, an accurate mathematical model of a user's golf swing is developed. This model can be used for parametric analysis studies to see how changing aspects of the swing can change the swing performance. Prior art shows some devices with the capability to replay the swing or display characteristics of the swing (e.g. U.S. Pat. No. 5,056,783) but none have been found that develop a mathematical model of the swing. Further, the use of Inertial Navigation Systems and advanced signal processing methods such as Kalman Filters, state estimators and observers, as well as embedded modelled or empirical knowledge of golf club motion have not been addressed.

[0042] An optimal trajectory and swing parameters may be obtained for the player. Using the data collected from the sensor suite, a full dimensional path of the club can be defined in an earth fixed or inertial reference frame. Most of the prior art shows the use of video systems or external, earth fixed measuring devices to measure club trajectory.

[0043] Using the club head orientation information, the acceleration, velocity, and position data can be resolved into their components to identify problems with the swing. Once again, prior art does not show this being done to the proposed level of kinematics detail (i.e. 6 degrees of freedom).

[0044] Parameter by parameter comparison capability to a standard or optimal swing is possible. This is made possible by the availability of full kinematics information, which is not present in the prior art.

[0045] Given complete kinematics information and a mathematical model, information regarding the use of the player's muscles can be derived. Although prior art includes muscle trainers, none are known to quantify the degree of use of muscles in generating a swing.

[0046] The invention has the ability to communicate via wired or wireless means to a variety of new display and computational devices, such as a PalmPilot™, a Gameboy™, etc. Although prior art shows the use of both wired and wireless communication (e.g. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,233,544, 5,056,783), specific application level details differ with the availability of new display devices.

[0047] The user mounted sensor suite can be used to define body characteristics such as trunk angle tilt, body rotation, shift of the centre of rotation, arm motion, weight shift, etc., all of which are known to effect swing performance. U.S. Pat. No. 5,233,544, claim 4 makes some mention of this concept but in little detail.

[0048] Depending on the display device of choice, the invention can be self-contained and portable.

[0049] Having a complete set of swing information available means that many aspects of the swing can be analysed using the same device. Prior art shows existing devices target only certain aspects of a swing.

[0050] Club face angle can be measured in two directions because of full orientation data being available. One of these angles will provide information on the effective loft angle of the club, which is known to affect ball trajectory. Prior art shows measurement of club face angle in one direction (e.g. U.S. Pat. No. 3,945,646) but none have been identified that are able to measure the club face angle that defines the effective loft angle of the club.

[0051] The location of the club face/ball impact point is defined using impact measurements made by the sensor suites. Prior art shows the use of special club faces or sensor arrays (e.g. U.S. Pat. No. 4,991,850) to accomplish this task.

[0052] Active vibration control. Most prior art systems use passive means (e.g. U.S. Pat. No. 5,718,643, 5,935,027) to reduce shaft vibrations. The sensor suite supports the interchangeability of sensors to maximise versatility. Improved performance are realised from the sensor suite by quantifying characteristics of the sensor and embedding this knowledge, be it modelled or empirical, into the platform software.

[0053] Significant performance enhancement is achieved via embedded knowledge of the motion of the golf club and the sensor suite. Moreover, embedded knowledge of the motion of the gold club may result in a reduction in the number of sensors required to generate the full kinematic/dynamic details of the golf swing/club leading to a more cost effective solution.

[0054] Although the above description relates to a specific preferred embodiment as presently contemplated by the inventors, it will be understood that the invention in its broad aspect includes mechanical and functional equivalents of the elements described herein.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7041014 *Apr 3, 2002May 9, 2006Taylor Made Golf Co., Inc.Method for matching a golfer with a particular golf club style
US7159451Nov 26, 2003Jan 9, 2007Max Out Golf LlcSystems and methods for fitting golf equipment
US7166035 *Nov 26, 2003Jan 23, 2007Max Out Golf LlcSystems and methods for fitting golf equipment
US7217197 *Oct 30, 2003May 15, 2007Glenn ParkGolf swing training device
US7274439Dec 3, 2004Sep 25, 2007Honeywell International Inc.Precise, no-contact, position sensing using imaging
US7289902Dec 3, 2004Oct 30, 2007Honeywell International Inc.Three dimensional balance assembly
US7295947Dec 3, 2004Nov 13, 2007Honeywell International Inc.Absolute position determination of an object using pattern recognition
US7340344Dec 3, 2004Mar 4, 2008Honeywell International Inc.Spherical position monitoring system
US7366613Dec 3, 2004Apr 29, 2008Honeywell International Inc.RF wireless communication for deeply embedded aerospace systems
US7383728Jul 12, 2006Jun 10, 2008Ultimate Balance, Inc.Orientation and motion sensing in athletic training systems, physical rehabilitation and evaluation systems, and hand-held devices
US7425097Jul 17, 2007Sep 16, 2008Honeywell International Inc.Inertial measurement unit with wireless power transfer gap control
US7458264Dec 3, 2004Dec 2, 2008Honeywell International Inc.Generalized inertial measurement error reduction through multiple axis rotation during flight
US7492367Mar 3, 2006Feb 17, 2009Motus CorporationApparatus, system and method for interpreting and reproducing physical motion
US7617070Nov 12, 2007Nov 10, 2009Honeywell International Inc.Absolute position determination of an object using pattern recognition
US7621828Jan 23, 2006Nov 24, 2009Max Out Golf Labs, LLCSystems and methods for evaluating putter performance
US7634379Mar 21, 2008Dec 15, 2009Ultimate Balance, Inc.Newtonian physical activity monitor
US7639681Nov 23, 2004Dec 29, 2009Microsoft CorporationSystem and method for a distributed server for peer-to-peer networks
US7647176Jan 11, 2007Jan 12, 2010Honeywell International Inc.Method and system for wireless power transfers through multiple ports
US7671607Sep 6, 2007Mar 2, 2010Honeywell International Inc.System and method for measuring air bearing gap distance
US7672781 *Jun 5, 2006Mar 2, 2010Microstrain, Inc.Miniaturized wireless inertial sensing system
US7698064Dec 3, 2004Apr 13, 2010Honeywell International Inc.Gas supported inertial sensor system and method
US7736242Mar 23, 2004Jun 15, 2010Nike, Inc.System for determining performance characteristics of a golf swing
US7762133Jul 17, 2007Jul 27, 2010Honeywell International Inc.Inertial measurement unit with gas plenums
US7821407Jan 29, 2010Oct 26, 2010Applied Technology Holdings, Inc.Apparatus, systems, and methods for gathering and processing biometric and biomechanical data
US7825815Jan 29, 2010Nov 2, 2010Applied Technology Holdings, Inc.Apparatus, systems, and methods for gathering and processing biometric and biomechanical data
US7870790 *Oct 31, 2007Jan 18, 2011Bridgestone Sports Co., LtdMethod and apparatus for evaluating feeling of hitting generated by golf club
US7887440 *May 8, 2006Feb 15, 2011Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Method for matching a golfer with a particular club style
US7955180May 29, 2009Jun 7, 2011Norman Douglas BittnerGolf putter with aiming apparatus
US7967695Jan 5, 2007Jun 28, 2011Max Out Golf Labs, LLCSystems and methods for fitting golf equipment
US7978081Nov 17, 2006Jul 12, 2011Applied Technology Holdings, Inc.Apparatus, systems, and methods for communicating biometric and biomechanical information
US8002643Nov 10, 2008Aug 23, 2011Norman Douglas BittnerGolf putter and grid for training a golf putting method
US8033916 *May 4, 2007Oct 11, 2011Theodore CaldwellGrip pressure sensor
US8047928Dec 21, 2010Nov 1, 2011Norman Douglas BittnerPutter training system
US8064955Apr 20, 2011Nov 22, 2011Broadcom CorporationCommunication devices with integrated gyrators and methods for use therewith
US8123624Oct 6, 2005Feb 28, 2012Theodore Weissenburger CaldwellShot Monitoring Watch
US8152649Jul 14, 2011Apr 10, 2012Norman Douglas BittnerGolf putter and grid for training a golf putting method
US8177656Aug 16, 2011May 15, 2012Norman Douglas BittnerPutter training system
US8210960 *Sep 9, 2011Jul 3, 2012Golf Impact LlcGolf free swing measurement and analysis system
US8221257 *Sep 3, 2011Jul 17, 2012Golf Impact LlcGolf free swing measurement and analysis system
US8267812 *Apr 22, 2010Sep 18, 2012Joseph SeryPutting/chipping trainer
US8337321Feb 24, 2012Dec 25, 2012Norman Douglas BittnerPutting stroke training system
US8398501 *Sep 25, 2008Mar 19, 2013William Bradford PriesterMuscle training apparatus and method
US8409025May 6, 2010Apr 2, 2013Nike Inc.System for determining performance characteristics of a golf swing
US8414411May 6, 2010Apr 9, 2013Nike, Inc.System for determining performance characteristics of a golf swing
US8425340 *Nov 6, 2011Apr 23, 2013Golf Impact LlcGolf free swing measurement and analysis system
US8465376Mar 15, 2011Jun 18, 2013Blast Motion, Inc.Wireless golf club shot count system
US8506425Feb 14, 2011Aug 13, 2013Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Method for matching a golfer with a particular golf club style
US8550939 *Nov 24, 2010Oct 8, 2013Sri Sports LimitedMethod for evaluating hit feeling
US8579720Nov 19, 2012Nov 12, 2013Norman Douglas BittnerPutting stroke training system
US8589114Aug 19, 2008Nov 19, 2013Angelo Gregory PapadourakisMotion capture and analysis
US8616993 *May 24, 2013Dec 31, 2013Norman Douglas BittnerPutter path detection and analysis
US8657707 *Sep 7, 2012Feb 25, 2014Dunlop Sports Co. Ltd.Swing analysis method
US8668595Sep 30, 2011Mar 11, 2014Nike, Inc.Golf clubs and golf club heads
US8690705Jul 15, 2011Apr 8, 2014Nike, Inc.Golf clubs and golf club heads having adjustable characteristics
US8696482Oct 3, 2011Apr 15, 2014Swingbyte, Inc.Three dimensional golf swing analyzer
US8696497Jun 27, 2011Apr 15, 2014Max Out Golf, LlcSystems and methods for fitting golf equipment
US8715096May 17, 2012May 6, 2014Michael Robert CHERBINIGolf swing analyzer and analysis methods
US8727903Oct 3, 2013May 20, 2014Norman Douglas BittnerPutting stroke training system
US8795098May 6, 2010Aug 5, 2014Nike, Inc.System for determining performance characteristics of a golf swing
US8801533 *Jul 16, 2013Aug 12, 2014Nike, Inc.Golf clubs and golf club heads having digital lie and/or other angle measuring equipment
US8827842Nov 26, 2003Sep 9, 2014Max Out Golf LlcSystems and methods for fitting golf equipment
US8827843May 23, 2012Sep 9, 2014William B. PriesterMuscle training apparatus and method
US20090018795 *Sep 25, 2008Jan 15, 2009William B. PriesterMuscle training appratus and method
US20090325721 *Jun 25, 2009Dec 31, 2009Gbt Technologies, LlcSystems and methods for golf ball selection
US20100222152 *Sep 1, 2007Sep 2, 2010Richard JaekelApparatus and method for controlling the hitting accuracy in the case of a golf club
US20110092260 *Apr 26, 2010Apr 21, 2011Wilbert Quinc MurdockMethod of conducting an interactive computer sport
US20110124440 *Nov 24, 2010May 26, 2011Sri Sports LimitedMethod for evaluating hit feeling
US20110313552 *Sep 3, 2011Dec 22, 2011Golf Impact LlcGolf Free Swing Measurement and Analysis System
US20120266652 *Apr 18, 2012Oct 25, 2012Masatoshi KatoMethod for evaluating hit feeling
US20130018494 *Jul 14, 2011Jan 17, 2013Alexander Andre AminiSystem and method for motion analysis and feedback with ongoing dynamic training orientation determination
US20130065711 *Sep 7, 2012Mar 14, 2013Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd.Swing analysis method
US20130073248 *Sep 20, 2011Mar 21, 2013Noel PerkinsApparatus and method for employing miniature inertial measurement units for deducing forces and moments on bodies
US20130252751 *May 24, 2013Sep 26, 2013Norman Douglas BittnerPutter path detection and analysis
US20130303295 *Jul 16, 2013Nov 14, 2013Nike, Inc.Golf clubs and golf club heads having digital lie and/or other angle measuring equipment
US20140045630 *Aug 9, 2012Feb 13, 2014Noel PerkinsPitcher training apparatus and method using a ball with an embedded inertial measurement unit
USRE44862 *Apr 12, 2011Apr 22, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Method for matching a golfer with a particular club style
DE102007029689A1 *Jun 27, 2007Jan 2, 2009Ecker & Buchner GdbR (vertretungsberechtigte Gesellschafter: Franz Ecker, 94086 Bad Griesbach, Peter Buchner, 94036 Passau)Tragbares Trainingsgerät
EP1804932A1 *Sep 22, 2004Jul 11, 2007Yale UniversityGolf swing tempo measurement system
EP2752223A1 *Sep 27, 2010Jul 9, 2014Head Technology GmbHApparatus and method for enhancing performance in racket sports
WO2002035184A2 *Oct 17, 2001May 2, 2002Fibersense Technology CorpMethods and systems for analyzing the motion of sporting equipment
WO2004056425A2 *Dec 19, 2003Jul 8, 2004Fortescue CorpMethod and apparatus for determining orientation and position of a moveable object
WO2004096372A2 *Apr 26, 2004Nov 11, 2004Glenn ParkGolf swing training device
WO2005025681A2 *Sep 10, 2004Mar 24, 2005Boogie BoschaA system for and a method of manufacturing personal golf putters
WO2005094949A1 *Mar 26, 2004Oct 13, 2005Science & Motion GmbhPosition sensor and movement analysis method
WO2005094953A2 *Mar 22, 2005Oct 13, 2005Nike IncSystem for determining performance characteristics of a golf swing
WO2005113079A2 *May 19, 2005Dec 1, 2005Fortescue CorpMotion tracking and analysis apparatus and method and system implementations thereof
WO2005118086A1 *Jun 2, 2005Dec 15, 2005Infinics IncA swing diagnosis device for use in ball game sports
WO2006060610A2 *Dec 2, 2005Jun 8, 2006Honey Well Internat IncRf wireless communication for deeply embedded aerospace systems
WO2009002218A1 *Jun 5, 2008Dec 31, 2008Maxim Alexeevich VasinTraining method and a device for carrying out said method
WO2010068901A2 *Dec 11, 2009Jun 17, 2010Gizmo6, LlcInterface apparatus for software
WO2012110026A2 *Feb 17, 2012Aug 23, 2012Klaus EnglertApparatus and method for detecting when a golf club strikes a golf ball
WO2012149337A1 *Apr 27, 2012Nov 1, 2012Nike International Ltd.System for golf clubs and golf club heads
WO2012149359A1 *Apr 27, 2012Nov 1, 2012Nike International Ltd.System for golf clubs and golf club heads
WO2012158955A2 *May 17, 2012Nov 22, 2012NEWMAN, Harvey H.Golf swing analyzer and analysis methods
WO2013012795A1 *Jul 16, 2012Jan 24, 2013Nike International Ltd.Golf clubs and golf club heads having adjustable characteristics
WO2013032836A1 *Aug 23, 2012Mar 7, 2013Icuemotion, LlcRacket sport inertial sensor motion tracking and analysis
WO2013136712A1 *Mar 4, 2013Sep 19, 2013Sony CorporationInformation processing device, information processing system, and program
WO2014022865A1 *Aug 5, 2013Feb 6, 2014Joseph SeryPutting/chipping trainer
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/151
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2220/40, A63B2220/16, A63B2220/803, A63B71/0619, A63B69/3632, A63B2220/833
European ClassificationA63B69/36D2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 25, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: MECHWORKS SYSTEMS INC., CANADA
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:MECHWORKS SOFTWARE INC.;REEL/FRAME:014312/0593
Effective date: 20020513
Dec 14, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: MECHWORKS SOFTWARE INC., CANADA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:TUER, KEVIN;GOLNARAGHI, FARID;REEL/FRAME:012385/0318
Effective date: 20011213