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Publication numberUS20020104811 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/778,164
Publication dateAug 8, 2002
Filing dateFeb 7, 2001
Priority dateFeb 7, 2001
Publication number09778164, 778164, US 2002/0104811 A1, US 2002/104811 A1, US 20020104811 A1, US 20020104811A1, US 2002104811 A1, US 2002104811A1, US-A1-20020104811, US-A1-2002104811, US2002/0104811A1, US2002/104811A1, US20020104811 A1, US20020104811A1, US2002104811 A1, US2002104811A1
InventorsChina Young, Jude Pauli
Original AssigneeChina Young, Jude Pauli
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Desktop organizer
US 20020104811 A1
Abstract
A desktop organizer composed of a flexible and pliable material is provided comprising at least one container element, at least two vertical partitions for receiving paper and the like, and at least one magnetic element disposed on the surface, or just below the surface, thereof for attracting and retaining paper clips and the like. In the preferred embodiment, the desktop organizer is composed of a foam rubber-type material, which material allows pushpins or needles to be safely and conveniently stored therein by merely inserting the pin into the surface of the organizer, without damaging the organizer in the process.
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Claims(7)
Wherefore, we claim:
1. A desktop organizer for receiving and retaining desktop items, said organizer comprising at least one container disposed adjacent to at least one vertical partition elements, said organizer being composed of a semi-rigid, yet flexible material.
2. The desktop organizer of claim 1, wherein said desktop organizer is composed of a material adapted to receive pin-type securing devices without damaging said organizer and said desktop items.
3. The desktop organizer of claim 2, wherein said substance is foam rubber.
4. The desktop organizer of claim 1, having exactly three vertical partition elements.
5. The desktop organizer of claim 1, further including at least one magnetic element disposed on the surface thereof.
6. The desktop organizer of claim 1, further including at least one magnetic element disposed directly beneath the surface thereof.
7. A desktop organizer for receiving and retaining desktop items, said organizer comprising at least one container disposed adjacent to a plurality of vertical partition elements, and further including at least one magnetic element disposed on the surface of said organizer, said organizer being composed of a semi-rigid, yet flexible material, said material adapted to receive pin-type securing devices without damaging said organizer and said desktop items.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The present invention relates generally to a desktop organizer, and more particularly, to a desktop organizer composed of a flexible and pliable material comprising at least one container element, at least two vertical partitions for receiving paper and the like, and at least one magnetic element disposed on the surface, or just below the surface, thereof for attracting and retaining paper clips and the like. In the preferred embodiment, the desktop organizer is composed of a foam rubber-type material, which material allows pushpins or needles to be safely and conveniently stored therein by merely inserting the pin into the surface of the organizer, without damaging the organizer in the process.

[0003] 2. Description of the Prior Art

[0004] Devices to aid in the organization of desktops are of particular concern in the modem age, where the available work surface on desks is diminishing as a result of computers, telephones, and the like taking up a large percentage of the desk surface. In addition, peripheral items such as mouse pads, lamps, staplers, pictures and books all compete for space on the desktop. Desk drawers may be used to store some of these items; however, such items tend to get lost in the clutter of the drawers.

[0005] Desktop organizers and other means for storing and organizing papers, stationery, pens, pencils, paper clips and other items typically found on a desk or in a desk drawer have long been known in the industry. These devices typically take the form of devices for holding and organizing papers, such as stackable trays, or means for storing pens and pencils, such as writing instrument holders. Each of these storage devices is designed with the goal of organizing and storing such desktop items so as not to clutter the desk surface, but still be readily accessible by an individual sitting at the desk.

[0006] For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,775,521 which issued to Tisbo on Jul. 7, 1998 for an “Office organizer” discloses an office organizational apparatus constructed of interlocking slat wall sections adapted to receive one or more organizational accessories which may be removably placed on the slatwall as needed and positioned upon consumer preference.

[0007] Similarly, U.S. Pat. No. 5,765,697 which issued to Soong on Jun. 16, 1998 for a “Desktop organizer” discloses a desktop organizer, particularly for CD's and computer discs, comprising an elongated base having a track with a slot extending axially therealong, end walls supporting the base and a rear wall extending perpendicularly between the end walls and parallel to the base. A support member includes a coiled spring mounted within an upper recess and affixed at its lower end within the base slot for spring urged movement of the support member to and fro along the base.

[0008] Further examples of desktop organizers include U.S. Pat. No. 5,601,193 which issued to Santoya on Feb. 11, 1997 for a “Desk organizer,” which discloses a base plate supporting a plurality of spaced vertical stands, each supporting a plurality of note clips thereon, and thereby providing a means for isolating notes placed in such clips to permit designating areas of urgency of action denoted by such notes, and U.S. Pat. No. 5,040,681 which issued to Grusin on Aug. 20, 1991 for a “Desk organizer or the like,” which discloses a desk organizer including a plurality of vertically stackable trays having partitions formed therein for storing articles of various sizes and shapes. Each of Grusin's trays has a hollow upright center post which is received within the center post of the tray positioned immediately on top of it.

[0009] In addition, U.S. Pat. No. 4,991,712 which issued to Wagner on Feb. 12, 1991 for a “Desk organizer” discloses a desk organizer for office supplies including first and second sidewalls joined at their common ends and an endwall connecting opposite ends of the first and second sidewall. This desk organizer also includes a bottom wall and means for dividing the organizer into a plurality of successive bins.

[0010] A flexible desktop organizer is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,802,593 which issued to Romanos on Feb. 7, 1989 for a “Flexible desktop organizer” comprising: a gridded planar base having a plurality of openings therein and a plurality of functional modules capable of being located in various positions on the base, the modules being adapted to function as containers for a variety of desk implements or serving other functions.

[0011] Still other examples of desktop organizers include U.S. Pat. No. 4,700,829 which issued to Goodyear on Oct. 20, 1987 for an “Office organizer for desks” discloses an office organizer for desks having multiple compartments or containers, trays, slots and cups for retaining or storing tools and materials used in office work and for easy access thereof and U.S. Pat. No. 4,429,932 which issued to Brennan on Feb. 7, 1984 for a “Desk top organizer” discloses an office organizer comprising a sub-assembly of folded partitions perpendicularly to one another to form double walled compartments, a tray folded around the sides, top and bottom of the sub-assembly of partitions and a wrap, having a rectangular center portion and curved end sections and attachable to the sides and bottom of the tray, being so dimensioned as to provide forwardly projecting winged sides for and an extension of the bottom surface of the tray.

[0012] In addition to the above-references U.S. utility patents, there are also numerous design patents for desktop organizers and the like, including U.S. Pat. Nos. D407,753; D393,455; D393,455; D391,295; D377,951; D373,794 and D369,620, just to name a few.

[0013] However, the prior art desktop organizers fail to offer the unique advantages contemplated by the present invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0014] Against the foregoing background, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide a desktop organizer for efficiently storing papers and stationery, writing implements, paper clips, pushpins and other common desktop accessories.

[0015] It is another object of the present invention to provide such a desktop organizer that includes a container for storing pens, pencils and similar elongated desktop accessories.

[0016] It is yet another object of the present invention to provide such a desktop organizer that includes at least two vertical partitions for separately storing and organizing papers, files and stationery.

[0017] It is another object of the present invention to provide such a desktop organizer that includes at least one magnetized element disposed on the surface thereof or just below the surface thereof, for attracting and retaining paperclips and other metallic desktop accessories.

[0018] It is still another object of the present invention to provide such a desktop organizer that is composed of a resilient and flexible material.

[0019] It is but another object of the present invention to provide such a desktop organizer that allows for the safe storage of pushpins, pins, needles and the like without damaging organizer.

[0020] It is another object of the present invention to provide such a desktop organizer that is inexpensive to manufacture.

[0021] To the accomplishments of the foregoing objects and advantages, the present invention, in brief summary, comprises a desktop organizer composed of a flexible and pliable material comprising at least one container element, at least two vertical partitions for receiving paper and the like, and at least one magnetic element disposed on the surface, or just below the surface, thereof for attracting and retaining paper clips and the like. In the preferred embodiment, the desktop organizer is composed of a foam rubber-type material, which material allows pushpins or needles to be safely and conveniently stored therein by merely inserting the pin into the surface of the organizer, without damaging the organizer in the process.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0022] The foregoing and still other objects and advantages of the present invention will be more apparent from the detailed explanation of the preferred embodiments of the invention in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

[0023]FIG. 1 is a perspective illustration of the desktop organizer of the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0024] Referring to the drawings and, in particular, to FIG. 1 thereof, the desktop organizer of the present invention is provided and is referred to generally by reference numeral 10. The desktop organizer 10 comprises a generally cube-shaped device having at least one separate container 12 and at least one vertical partition 14, said container 12 and said partition 14 being disposed adjacent to each other such that the container 12 itself can act as an additional partition.

[0025] In the preferred embodiment, the desktop organizer 10 is composed of a semi-rigid, yet flexible material such as foam rubber, which material allows the desktop organizer 10 to be easily and inexpensively produced, while allowing the desktop organizer 10 to withstand the general wear and tear that is common to similar organizers. In addition, the foam rubber material allows the desktop organizer 10 to be utilized as a storage means for pushpins, pins, needles and the like, by allowing these items to be inserted, point first, into the surface of the desktop organizer 10, without damaging the desktop organizer 10, or the materials or items stored therein.

[0026] The container 12 is adapted to receive and retain writing implements and other similar elongated items such as rulers through opening 16 at the top of container 12. Accordingly, the depth of container 12 should be sufficient so as to allow these items to be securely stored therein without the possibility that the items will tip out. In the preferred embodiment, the depth of the container 12 should be at least 2½ to 3½ inches deep. The width of opening 16 may be made larger so as to accommodate larger desktop items such as staplers or the like.

[0027] Each partition 14 extends from the base 18 of the desktop organizer 10 and is separated from its adjacent partition 14 (or container 12) by a slot 20, said slot being adapted to receive and retain papers, folders, files or other rigid or semi-rigid items. The length of the slot 20 should be sufficient so as to receive and retain the papers or folders without allowing these items to tip out. In the preferred embodiment, the length of slot 20 should be at least 2½ to 3½ inches. If the slot 20 is too short, the papers or files will not stand vertically therein, and will spill out of the slot 20. If the slot 20 is too long, the container 10 may become too bulky, and the papers or files may become lost within the slot 20.

[0028] The width of the slot 20 depends upon the particular application of the desktop organizer, although in the preferred embodiment, this slot is between ¼ inch and 1 inch wide. The narrower the slot 20, the smaller the width of the materials that will fit between the partitions 14, while the wider the slot, the greater the width of the materials that will fit therebetween. However, if the slot 20 is too large, papers tend to slide to the bottom of the slot 20, thereby reducing the efficiency of the desktop organizer 10. It should be appreciated that if the desktop organizer 10 is composed of a flexible material such as foam rubber, the partitions 14 will have some degree of flexibility, thereby allowing wider materials to be placed therein, and thus allowing the partitions 14 to securely hold such materials.

[0029] In the preferred embodiment, disposed on at least one surface of the desktop organizer is at least one magnetic element 22 adapted to attract and retain metallic items such as paper clips, clasps, and the like. Illustrated in FIG. 1 is a geometric array of circular magnetic elements 22 arranged along one side of the container 12 in an aesthetically pleasing pattern. It should be appreciated, however, that the shape and size of the magnetic elements 22 is limited only by the size of the desktop organizer 10, and may come in any variety of creative or artistic shapes. Furthermore, it should be appreciated that these magnetic elements 22 may be disposed slightly beneath the surface of the desktop organizer 10 so as to be hidden, yet still function to attract and retain metallic items.

[0030] The bottom 24 of the desktop organizer 10 is generally planar so as to allow the desktop organizer 10 to sit on the surface of a desk. It should be appreciated that in the preferred embodiment in which the desktop organizer 10 is composed of a foam rubber-type substance, the high coefficient of friction of such substance will serve to prevent the desktop organizer 10 from sliding on the surface of the desktop.

[0031] Having thus described the invention with particular reference to the preferred forms thereof, it will be obvious that various changes and modifications can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7070095 *Dec 15, 2004Jul 4, 2006American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc.Foldable transaction cards and methods of making the same
US7137552Mar 17, 2004Nov 21, 2006American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc.Portable electronic devices interconnected with convenient or foldable transaction cards
US7147151Dec 10, 2003Dec 12, 2006American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc.Foldable transaction card systems
US7278584Nov 21, 2005Oct 9, 2007American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc.Portable electronic music devices with convenient or foldable transaction cards
US7347360Jun 7, 2004Mar 25, 2008American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc.Foldable transaction card systems for non-traditionally-sized transaction cards
US7520439Jan 31, 2007Apr 21, 2009American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc.Portable electronic devices with convenient or foldable transaction cards
US7540426Nov 27, 2006Jun 2, 2009American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc.Foldable transaction cards and methods of making the same
US8162156 *Jun 29, 2009Apr 24, 2012Bruce CrismanImplement holder and methods of use
US8220645 *Aug 1, 2008Jul 17, 2012Henry RobinsonDesk organizer device
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/13.1, 211/45, 211/69.5
International ClassificationG09F1/14, G09F1/10
Cooperative ClassificationG09F1/10, G09F1/14
European ClassificationG09F1/10, G09F1/14
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 12, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, NEW JERSEY
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:TRI-COASTAL DESIGN GROUP INC.;LOOP DESIGN CO., INC.;REEL/FRAME:012274/0819
Effective date: 20010912