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Publication numberUS20020121454 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/132,207
Publication dateSep 5, 2002
Filing dateApr 26, 2002
Priority dateMay 1, 2000
Publication number10132207, 132207, US 2002/0121454 A1, US 2002/121454 A1, US 20020121454 A1, US 20020121454A1, US 2002121454 A1, US 2002121454A1, US-A1-20020121454, US-A1-2002121454, US2002/0121454A1, US2002/121454A1, US20020121454 A1, US20020121454A1, US2002121454 A1, US2002121454A1
InventorsEdward Ross
Original AssigneeRoss Edward N.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combined pill and water container
US 20020121454 A1
Abstract
A combined pill and water container comprising a cylindrical housing is disclosed. A first cylindrical chamber is adapted for holding a supply of water or other liquid for facilitating the swallowing of pills, tablets or other dry medication forms which are stored, separately, in a second chamber screwably attached to the first chamber, so that a person carrying the cylindrical housing can take their pills with water any time.
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Claims(11)
I claim:
1. A container for separately housing and sealing two disparate items, comprising:
a first hollow cylinder having an open top, a vertical wall of a predetermined height, a closed bottom, and screw threads internal of said wall of said first cylinder proximate said open top, said first cylinder adapted for containing a potable liquid therein;
a second hollow cylinder having an open top, a wall of a predetermined height, a closed bottom, and screw threads external of said wall proximate said closed bottom, said threads of said first cylinder adapted for interaction with said threads of said second cylinder, thereby sealing said first cylinder and isolating the interior volume of said first cylinder from the interior volume of said second cylinder, said second cylinder adapted for containing pills therein; and
closure means adapted to seal said second cylinder.
2. A container for separately housing and sealing two disparate items, as defined in claim 1, further comprising a gasket disposed between said first cylinder and said second cylinder, said gasket enhancing the seal formed by said threads.
3. A container for separately housing and sealing two disparate items, as defined in claim 2, wherein said gasket comprises one of the group: a deformable polymer formed as an integral part of said first cylinder and said second cylinder, and an O ring.
4. A container for separately housing and sealing two disparate items, as defined in claim 1, wherein said closure means comprises one of the group: screw on, bayonet, plug, and snap on cap.
5. A container for separately housing and sealing two disparate items, as defined in claim 1, further comprising: a clip affixed to said first cylinder and adapted to facilitate retention of said container in a pocket.
6. A container for separately housing and sealing two disparate items, as defined in claim 1, further comprising: closure attachment means affixed to said second cylinder and to said closure means for retaining said closure means proximate said second cylinder when said closure means is removed therefrom.
7. A container for separately housing and sealing two disparate items, comprising:
a first hollow cylinder having an open top, a vertical wall of a predetermined height, a closed bottom, and screw threads external of said wall of said first cylinder proximate said open top, said first cylinder adapted for containing a potable liquid therein;
a second hollow cylinder having an open top, a wall of a second predetermined height, an open bottom, a bulkhead separating said open top and said open bottom, and screw threads internal of said wall proximate said open bottom, said second cylinder adapted for containing pills therein;
a gasket disposed between said first cylinder and said second cylinder;
said threads of said first cylinder adapted for interaction with said threads of said second cylinder, thereby sealing said first cylinder against said second cylinder and said gasket, thereby isolating the interior volume of said first cylinder from the interior volume of said second cylinder by a watertight seal;
closure means adapted to seal said second cylinder.
8. A container for separately housing and sealing two disparate items, as defined in claim 7, wherein said gasket comprises one of the group: a deformable polymer formed as an integral part of said first cylinder and said second cylinder, and an O ring.
9. A container for separately housing and sealing two disparate items, as defined in claim 7, wherein said closure means comprises one of the group: screw on, bayonet, plug, and snap on cap.
10. A container for separately housing and sealing two disparate items, as defined in claim 7, further comprising: a clip affixed to said first cylinder and adapted to facilitate retention of said container in a pocket.
11. A container for separately housing and sealing two disparate items, as defined in claim 7, further comprising: closure attachment means affixed to said second cylinder and to said closure means for retaining said closure means proximate said second cylinder when said closure means is removed therefrom.
Description
    RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    This application is a Continuation-in-Part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/563,242, filed May 3, 2000.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to containers. More particularly, the invention comprises a two-part container for carrying pills or similar items and, in a separate portion of the container, a liquid, such as water, to facilitate swallowing the pill or other medication.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    In general, a first field of use of the disclosed invention is by those who take pills or other medications requiring water to wash them down, especially while away from home. However, many other fields, such as manufacturers of camping equipment, food, etc., could find potentially beneficial uses of this invention.
  • [0004]
    Thus, it can be seen that the potential fields of use for this invention are myriad and the particular preferred embodiments described herein is in no way meant to limit the use of the invention to the particular field chosen for exposition of the details of the invention.
  • [0005]
    A comprehensive listing of all the possible fields to which this invention may be applied is limited only by the imagination and is, therefore, not provided herein. Some of the more obvious applications are mentioned in the interest of providing a full and complete disclosure of the unique properties of this previously unknown general purpose article of manufacture. It is to be understood from the outset that the scope of this invention is not limited to these fields or to the specific examples of potential uses presented herein.
  • DISCUSSION OF THE PRIOR ART
  • [0006]
    Numerous attempts have been made in the prior art to devise containers for holding two different separate products.
  • [0007]
    U.S. Pat. No. 378,752, issued to Henry Ader on Feb. 28, 1888, discloses a bottle having a fully removable upper cap with a smaller, sealable mouth therein. A second chamber is formed by an intermediate partition within the bottle which allows a liquid to be carried in the upper end and a dry item in the lower. Access to the second chamber is by either removing the lower chamber from the bottle or by a second removable cap at its lower end.
  • [0008]
    U.S. Pat. No. 2,766,796, issued to Earl S. Tupper on Oct. 16, 1956, discloses vacuum and seal receptacle, a plastic tumbler with a sealable cap. A second, dry compartment is located on the upper surface of the cap with a second sealable cap.
  • [0009]
    U.S. Pat. No. 3,514,008, issued to Philip K. Dorn on May 26, 1970, discloses a combination pill container and drinking cup. An outer sleeve is mounted on the pill container and is axially slidable from a retracted storage position to an extended position when the pill container is inverted. The sleeve serves as a drinking cup in the extended position.
  • [0010]
    U.S. Pat. No. 3,920,120, issued to Andrew P. Shveda on Nov. 18, 1975, discloses a combination package. The combination package is for a primary product and a secondary product complementary to the primary product. The secondary product is restrained in the secondary product containment volume.
  • [0011]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,051,977, issued to Carolyn VeAlletto Steinfeld on Oct. 4, 1977, discloses a pill and water dispenser in which a removable, spring loaded tablet dispenser occupies one end of a cylinder and a removable water vial occupies the opposite end of the cylinder.
  • [0012]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,171,753, issued to Bastiaan Vreede on Oct. 23, 1979, discloses a holder for capsules, pills and similar objects. A spring within a hollow cylinder pushes tablets within a second cylinder upwardly against the top of the second cylinder. Tablets may be removed, individually, by sliding them through a slot in the wall of the second cylinder.
  • [0013]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,324,338, issued to Robert Beall on Apr. 13, 1982, discloses a compartmented container, typically intended for either one time use or use at a fixed location. The cup constitutes an upper chamber, while a second chamber is formed by a downward extension of the cup wall beyond the floor of the cup. A cap with slot engaging pins around its perimeter fits within the walls of the second chamber to form a loose seal. Optionally, the cup and second compartment could be sealed for one time use by an adhesive seal.
  • [0014]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,387,804, issued to John J. Austin on Jun. 14, 1983, discloses a convertible pill cup package. The package is for containing a preselected quantity of product such as a pill, which may be easily and quickly converted for use as a drinking cup. A portion of the package enclosing the product may be removed from the remaining part of the package which defines the cup.
  • [0015]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,416,370, issued to Robert Beall on Nov. 22, 1983, discloses a compartmented container. The compartmented container is capable of being used to efficiently and expeditiously dispense both a liquid and a non-liquid substance therefrom. It is easy to handle so that it reduces the overall time required for dispensing the substances therefrom.
  • [0016]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,076,433, issued to James P. Howes on Dec. 31, 1991, discloses a prize delivery system. It consists of a container, holder or instrument for use with food products. It is identical in all respects to typical product containers, holders or instruments, but which secretly contains a hidden prize award.
  • [0017]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,397,017, issued to Robert Muza, et al., on Mar. 14, 1995, discloses a pill dispenser cap for sealing a bottle containing a liquid. A plurality of chambers surround a central, threaded bottle cap portion. A rotating disk allows access to individual chambers for dispensing of tablets or the like.
  • [0018]
    In contradistinction, the container of the present invention has a first, upper cylinder adapted to hold pills or the like. The upper cylinder has internal threads, or in an alternate embodiment, external threads, adapted to interact with mating threads (either internal or external, as required) on a lower cylinder. The lower cylinder is adapted to hold a liquid such as water. A two-compartment structure wherein a first part is screwed into or onto a second part is not shown in the prior art.
  • [0019]
    None of the above inventions and patents, taken either singly or in combination, is seen to describe the instant invention as claimed.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0020]
    The present invention provides a combined pill and liquid container. A first portion is adapted to hold pills or other medications. Threads on the first portion are adapted to mate with corresponding threads on a lower portion of the container. The lower portion is adapted to hold water or a similar liquid to facilitate swallowing a pill stored in and removed from the upper container portion. The screw interface between the upper and lower portions provides a liquid proof seal for the lower portion of the container.
  • [0021]
    Accordingly, it is a principal object of the invention to provide a combined pill and water container that will overcome the shortcomings of the prior art devices.
  • [0022]
    Another object of the invention is to provide a combined pill and water container that consists of a two-part container having a first portion that is screwably attached to a second portion.
  • [0023]
    An additional object of the invention is to provide a combined pill and water container wherein a pill container (i.e., the upper portion) is retained by threads to a lower portion which is adapted to hold a liquid, each compartment having a separate sealing means.
  • [0024]
    A further object of the invention is to provide a combined pill and water container that is simple and easy to use.
  • [0025]
    A still further object of the invention is to provide a combined pill and water container that is economical to manufacture.
  • [0026]
    It is an object of the invention to provide improved elements and arrangements thereof in an apparatus for the purposes described which is inexpensive, dependable and fully effective in accomplishing its intended purposes.
  • [0027]
    These and other objects of the present invention will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification and drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0028]
    Various other objects, features, and attendant advantages of the present invention will become more fully appreciated as the same becomes better understood when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which like reference characters designate the same or similar parts throughout the several views, and wherein:
  • [0029]
    [0029]FIG. 1 is an environmental perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the container of the present invention.
  • [0030]
    [0030]FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the embodiment at FIG. 1., with the pill compartment cap open;
  • [0031]
    [0031]FIG. 3 is a front elevational view of the container of FIG. 1, with the pill compartment cap closed;
  • [0032]
    [0032]FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic cross sectional view of the container of FIG. 1 at line 4-4 of FIG. 3;
  • [0033]
    [0033]FIG. 5 is an environmental perspective view of a second embodiment of the container of the present invention;
  • [0034]
    [0034]FIG. 6 is a front elevational view of a second embodiment of the container of FIG. 5; and
  • [0035]
    [0035]FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic cross sectional view of the container of FIG. 5 at line 7-7 of FIG. 6.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0036]
    Referring first to FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 4, there are shown perspective, side elevational, front elevational and cross-sectional views, respectively, of a first embodiment of a two-part container, generally at reference number 100. Container 100 has an elongated, lower cylinder 102 having a closed bottom and an open top. Internal threads 104 are disposed in the upper region of cylinder 102.
  • [0037]
    A shorter upper cylinder 106 has a closed bottom and an open top and has external threads 108 formed on a lower portion thereof. Internal threads 104 are adapted to fit snugly with external threads 108 so that as upper cylinder 106 is screwed into lower cylinder 102, a liquid tight joint is formed. A gasket 105, such as an O ring, occupies a groove 107 around the open top of lower cylinder 102 enhances the seal between lower cylinder 102 and upper cylinder 106. It would be evident to one skilled in the art that gasket 105 could be incorporated into the lower surface of upper cylinder 106 with equal effectiveness. It would be further evident that in lieu of a gasket 105, a seal 105 could be formed by the use of a deformable polymer in either upper cylinder 106 or lower cylinder 102. Upper cylinder 106 is adapted to receive a cap 110 at its open, upper end. Cap 110 may be affixed to upper cylinder 106 in a number of ways. Although a screw cap is the preferred embodiment, other typical attachment methods may include bayonet, plug-in (e.g., corks), or a snap on connections. Any other method known to those of skill in the art could be used. Because cylinder 106 is adapted to hold pills, capsules 112, tablets, or other solid pharmaceutical dispensing units 112, it is important that the cap 110 be retained tightly and sealed to keep the pills water and air tight and to avoid accidental spillage of the contents of cylinder 106. For purposes of brevity, the term pill will be used to represent any physical pharmaceutical dispensing unit. On the other hand, cap 110 should be relatively easy to remove by the person consuming the medication. It would be evident to one skilled in the art that a although not a vital element of the invention, a gasket could be incorporated in the inner perimeter of upper cylinder 106 or the rim of cap 110 to enhance the seal between cylinder 106 and cap 110.
  • [0038]
    Lower cylinder 102 is adapted to hold a liquid 114, typically water, used to facilitate the ingestion of pill(s) 112 and sealed to isolate pill(s) 112 in an air and watertight environment. The term water 114 will be used hereafter to designate any potable liquid which might be used to facilitate ingestion of pill(s) 112.
  • [0039]
    In the embodiment chosen for purposes of disclosure, cap 110 is shown connected to cylinder 106 by a tether 116. Tether 116 prevents accidental loss of cap 110 when it is removed for access to pills 112.
  • [0040]
    The inventive container would typically be used in the following manner. A user would remove cap 110 and remove one or more pills 112 from upper cylinder 106. After pills 112 are removed, cap 110 is reinstalled on upper cylinder 106. Upper cylinder 106 is then unscrewed from lower cylinder 102 and water 114 within lower cylinder 102 is used to facilitate ingestion of pill(s) 112. Upper cylinder 106 is then reattached to lower cylinder 102 (i.e., the two cylinders are screwed back together).
  • [0041]
    A clip 118 may be attached to lower cylinder 102 to facilitate retention of container 100 within the pocket of a garment, etc. It will be recognized that while clip 118 is attached to lower cylinder 102 in the preferred embodiment, it could readily be attached to upper cylinder 106 in alternate embodiments.
  • [0042]
    Referring now to FIGS. 5, 6 and 7, there are shown perspective, front elevational and cross-sectional views, respectively, of a second embodiment of a two-part container, generally at reference number 200. Container 200 has an elongated, lower cylinder 202 having a closed bottom and an open top. External threads 204 are disposed on the upper region of cylinder 202.
  • [0043]
    A shorter upper cylinder 206 has a open bottom, an open top and a bulkhead 207 separating the upper region and the lower region of the cylinder. Internal threads 208 are formed within the lower region thereof. External threads 204 are adapted to fit snugly with internal threads 208 so that as upper cylinder 206 is screwed over lower cylinder 202, a liquid tight joint is formed. A gasket 205, such as an O ring, is disposed within the lower perimeter of bulkhead 207 to enhance the seal between lower cylinder 202 and upper cylinder 206. It would, again, be evident to one skilled in the art that gasket 205 could be formed through the use of a deformable polymer in either upper cylinder 206 or lower cylinder 202. Upper cylinder 206 is adapted to receive a cap 210 at its open, upper end. Cap 210 may be affixed to upper cylinder 206 in a number of ways. Although the preferred embodiment is a screw cap, other typical attachment methods may include bayonet, plug-in (e.g., corks), or a snap on connections. Any other method known to those of skill in the art could be used. Because cylinder 206 is adapted to hold pills 212, it is important that the cap 210 be retained tightly so as to avoid accidental spillage of the contents of cylinder 206 and maintain pill(s) 112 in an air and watertight environment. On the other hand, cap 210 should be relatively easy top remove by the person consuming the medication. It would again be evident to one skilled in the art that, while not an integral part of the present invention, the seal between cap 210 and upper cylinder 206 could be enhanced by a gasket.
  • [0044]
    Lower cylinder 202 is adapted to hold a liquid 214, typically water, used to facilitate the ingestion of pill(s) 212 and sealed to maintain pill(s) 112 in an air and watertight environment. The term water 214 will be used hereafter to designate any potable liquid which might be used to facilitate ingestion of pill(s) 212.
  • [0045]
    In the embodiment chosen for purposes of disclosure, cap 210 is shown connected to cylinder 206 by a tether 216. Tether 216 prevents accidental loss of cap 210 when it is removed for access to pills 212.
  • [0046]
    A clip 218 may be attached to lower cylinder 202 to facilitate retention of container 200 within the pocket of a garment, etc. It will be recognized that while clip 218 is attached to lower cylinder 202 in the preferred embodiment, it could readily be attached to upper cylinder 206 in alternate embodiments.
  • [0047]
    It is to be understood that the present invention is not limited to the embodiments described above, but encompasses any and all embodiments within the scope of the following claims.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4094408 *Feb 14, 1977Jun 13, 1978Ford John BContainers for pills and the like
US4765459 *Aug 10, 1987Aug 23, 1988Edwards Charles LIntegrated keyholder/container
US5667094 *Apr 29, 1996Sep 16, 1997West Penn PlasticsContainer and closure assembly
US6149939 *Oct 19, 1998Nov 21, 2000Strumor; Mathew A.Healthful dissolvable oral tablets, and mini-bars
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7198167Oct 31, 2003Apr 3, 2007Cosco Management, Inc.Sipper cup with medicine dispenser
US7823723Oct 14, 2008Nov 2, 2010Mead Johnson Nutrition CompanyNutritive substance delivery container
US8402722Oct 28, 2009Mar 26, 2013Omni Partners LlcMethod for manufacturing a container assembly
US8523837Oct 14, 2008Sep 3, 2013Mead Johnson Nutrition CompanyNutritive substance delivery container
US8550240 *Aug 24, 2007Oct 8, 2013Robert MarcusCombination water dose and medication container
US8801688Oct 14, 2008Aug 12, 2014Mead Johnson Nutrition CompanyNutritive substance delivery container
US20050092754 *Oct 31, 2003May 5, 2005Marsden Andrew W.Sipper cup with medicine dispenser
US20080000898 *Feb 13, 2007Jan 3, 2008Christopher Edward RamsdenMethods and apparatus for providing edible substances with a beverage
US20080296181 *Jun 1, 2007Dec 4, 2008Carlisle StephensPill dispensing liquid container
US20090014405 *Jun 27, 2006Jan 15, 2009Jan Wim Anton OuboterScrew cap
US20090050495 *Aug 24, 2007Feb 26, 2009Robert MarcusCombination water dose and medication container
US20100089776 *Oct 14, 2008Apr 15, 2010Mead Johnson & CompanyNutritive substance delivery container
US20100089860 *Oct 14, 2008Apr 15, 2010Mead Johnson & CompanyNutritive substance delivery container
US20100183776 *Jan 17, 2009Jul 22, 2010Eric William GruenwaldWater bottle with dosage in a blister pack
US20110097453 *Oct 28, 2009Apr 28, 2011Scott Michael BueschingContainer Assembly for a Potable Liquid and Method for Manufacturing Same
US20160198874 *Jan 8, 2016Jul 14, 2016Eric PisarevskyDetachable storage container for a drinks container
USD743742Jun 28, 2012Nov 24, 2015Brita GmbhDrinking bottle
USD744781Jun 28, 2012Dec 8, 2015Brita GmbhDrinking bottle
DE102006008003A1 *Feb 21, 2006Aug 23, 2007Imago Edv-Systems GmbhTherapeutically active substances obtained from natural products or reprocessed natural products, have natural or reprocessed natural products which are crop based and extracted not excluding combination of product typical ingredients
WO2007019911A1 *Jun 27, 2006Feb 22, 2007Jan Wim Anton OuboterScrew cap
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/539, 206/217, 206/538
International ClassificationA61J1/03, B65D23/00, B65D51/28
Cooperative ClassificationB65D51/28, A61J1/03, B65D23/003
European ClassificationB65D23/00D, B65D51/28, A61J1/03