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Publication numberUS20020123302 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/797,701
Publication dateSep 5, 2002
Filing dateMar 5, 2001
Priority dateMar 5, 2001
Publication number09797701, 797701, US 2002/0123302 A1, US 2002/123302 A1, US 20020123302 A1, US 20020123302A1, US 2002123302 A1, US 2002123302A1, US-A1-20020123302, US-A1-2002123302, US2002/0123302A1, US2002/123302A1, US20020123302 A1, US20020123302A1, US2002123302 A1, US2002123302A1
InventorsVerica Maras, Lloyd Oliver
Original AssigneeS-B Power Tool Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cutting and grinding wheel for a rotary tool
US 20020123302 A1
Abstract
A cutting and grinding wheel made of a circular disk having a center, two opposing surfaces, an outer circumference, and a center defining a bore hole. A plurality of teeth are evenly distributed around the disk's outer circumference, with each tooth having an apex and a pair of opposing sidewalls generally parallel to the disk opposing surfaces. The teeth formed in a generally sinusoidal pattern, and each adjacent pair of teeth are separated by a gullet. An abrasive coating is disposed to be concentrated upon the wheel teeth apexes and opposing teeth sidewalls.
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Claims(20)
We claim:
1. A cutting and grinding wheel comprising:
a circular disk having a center, two opposing surfaces, an outer circumference, and said center defining a bore hole;
a plurality of teeth evenly distributed around said outer circumference, each of said teeth having an apex and a pair of opposing sidewalls generally parallel to said disk opposing surfaces, said teeth formed in a generally sinusoidal pattern, each adjacent pair of said teeth being separated by a gullet; and
an abrasive coating disposed to be concentrated upon said wheel teeth apexes and said opposing teeth sidewalls.
2. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said opposing surfaces on said disk, other than said bore hole, are solid.
3. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said plurality of teeth number 45.
4. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said wheel has an outer diameter measuring one inch.
5. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said abrasive coating forms an included angle at said peripheral edge.
6. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said pattern of said teeth and said gullets is a radiused, gear-like pattern.
7. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said teeth sidewalls are coextensive with said disk opposing surfaces.
8. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said disk opposing surfaces are generally planar.
9. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 8, wherein said teeth sidewalls are coextensive with said disk opposing surfaces.
10. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said abrasive coating is formed by magnetic structuring.
11. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said abrasive coating is a tungsten-carbide grit.
12. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 11, wherein said tungsten-carbide grit is approximately 100 grit.
13. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said teeth and said grit are brazed with a eutectic brazing metal.
14. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 13, wherein said brazing metal is a NiCr braze alloy.
15. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said abrasive coating is formed of a single layer of brazed grit particles.
16. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said disk opposing surfaces are non-planar.
17. The cutting and grinding wheel according to claim 1, wherein said abrasive coating forms a thickness which is wider than said thickness of said disk for promoting air flow and evacuating material away from said coating.
18. A cutting and grinding wheel assembly comprising:
a circular disk having a center, two opposing surfaces, an outer circumference, and said center defining a bore hole;
a plurality of teeth evenly distributed around said outer circumference, each of said teeth having an apex and a pair of opposing sidewalls generally parallel to said disk opposing surfaces, said teeth formed in a generally sinusoidal pattern, each adjacent pair of said teeth being separated by a gullet;
an abrasive coating disposed to be concentrated upon said wheel teeth apexes and said opposing teeth sidewalls;
a mandrel having a first and second ends, said first end for engagement in the chuck of a rotary power tool; and
wherein the wheel is secured to said second end of said mandrel by a threaded fastener passing through said bore hole and into a threaded blind-end bore located on said second end of said mandrel.
19. A cutting and grinding wheel comprising:
a circular disk having a center, two solid and generally planar opposing surfaces, an outer circumference, and said center defining a bore hole;
a plurality of teeth evenly distributed around said outer circumference, each of said teeth having an apex and a pair of opposing sidewalls generally parallel to and coextensive with said disk opposing surfaces, said teeth formed in a generally sinusoidal radiused gear-like pattern, each adjacent pair of said teeth being separated by a gullet; and
an abrasive coating disposed to be concentrated upon said wheel teeth apexes and said opposing teeth sidewalls, said coating formed by magnetic structuring and consisting of tungsten-carbide grit particles secured to said teeth apexes and said sidewalls with a stainless eutectic NiCr braze alloy.
20. A cutting and grinding wheel comprising:
a circular disk having a center, a thickness, two opposing surfaces, an outer circumference having a pair of opposing sidewalls, and said center defining a bore hole; and
an abrasive coating disposed to be concentrated upon said outer circumference and said sidewalls to form a thickness which is wider than said thickness of said disk for promoting air flow and evacuating material away from said coating.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates to cutting wheels for use in rotary power tools. More specifically, the present invention is concerned with an improved tooth formation with an abrasive coating which provides simultaneous cutting and grinding operations on known soft and composite materials.

[0002] Cutting wheels for use in rotary power tools are well known. One known wheel is disclosed in Hariu U.S. Pat. No. 5,876,274. The Hariu patent discloses a corrugated electrodeposited diamond cutting wheel having diamond abrasive particles electrodeposited on the outer circumference of a circular substrate. Corrugated ridges and grooves are employed for cooling apertures during use on heat-softening materials. For additional cooling, the diamond wheel employs a plurality of aperture holes for cooling around the body of the substrate.

[0003] Apertures in the body of the wheel, however, weaken the structural strength of the wheel, causing it to bend or flex in operation, and sometimes break. Operational flexing limits the utility of the wheel for precision operations. Furthermore, ridges and grooves do not provide sufficient cooling of the cut material edge at the point of contact from the wheel cutting edge. Because softer materials often begin to melt from the friction of cutting, insufficient cooling often requires an additional grinding or sanding operation to smooth the cut edge. In addition, diamond particles are expensive to use as an abrasive material, and they are difficult to apply to metal surfaces.

[0004] It is also known to provide a cutting wheel formed of metal and being completely covered on both sides with an abrasive material. The abrasive material is secured to the wheel by painting, spraying, or dipping. The wheel includes cooling aperture holes positioned throughout the wheel body, and along an outer circumference.

[0005] Due to the fact that the outer cooling apertures are large relative to the diameter of the cutting wheel, these apertures create a strong kickback during both low and high speed operations of the wheel. Furthermore, the wheel is formed from a relatively soft metal and tends to flex and distort during operation. The large inner cooling apertures further weaken the structural strength of the wheel body, thereby increasing the wheel's distortion during use. Additionally, the abrasive coating disposed across the entire surface of the wheel body tends to collect waste material from the cutting operation, and thus reduces both the cutting ability of the wheel and its cooling efficiency. Another disadvantage is that painting, spraying, or dipping does not create a secure bond between the abrasive particles and the wheel, and the wheel tends to shed these individual particles during operation. Yet another drawback of this conventional wheel is that abrasive particle loss greatly reduces the useful life of the wheel.

[0006] Accordingly, one object of this invention is to provide a new and improved cutting and grinding wheel for use with a rotary power tool.

[0007] Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved cutting wheel that will simultaneously grind and smooth the cut edge of a material being cut.

[0008] A further object of the present invention is to provide an improved cutting and grinding wheel which is subject to relatively negligible distortion during high speed or rigorous use.

[0009] Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an improved cutting and grinding wheel that provides sufficient cooling without sacrificing structural strength.

[0010] A still further object of the present invention is to provide an improved cutting and grinding wheel that has little to no kickback during cutting operations or in side-to-side grinding operations.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0011] The above-listed objects are met or exceeded by the present cutting and grinding wheel, which features a solid and rigid body structure, with a plurality of gear-like teeth around the outer circumference of the wheel. Each tooth is armed at its peak with an abrasive grit material coating. A gullet between each adjacent tooth allows airflow that,cools the wheel and the cut material. The grit material is structured to surround the outer edge of each tooth apex and both of its adjacent sides, thereby forming the abrasive cutting edge. This cutting edge is thicker than the wheel body itself, and therefore facilitates airflow and cooling around the cutting edge. By armoring only the outer or peripheral edge and adjacent sidewalls of the wheel with abrasive grit, a cutting or kerf width is provided which is wider or thicker than the blade disk or body.

[0012] More specifically, the present invention provides a cutting and grinding wheel formed of a circular disk having a center, two opposing surfaces, an outer circumference, and a center defining a bore hole. A plurality of teeth are evenly distributed around the outer circumference, each of the teeth having an apex and a pair of opposing sidewalls generally parallel to the disk opposing surfaces. The teeth are formed in a generally sinusoidal pattern, and each of the adjacent teeth in the pattern are separated by a gullet. An abrasive coating is disposed to be concentrated upon the wheel teeth apexes and the opposing outer teeth surfaces.

[0013] The cutting edge of this wheel, with its improved cooling features, is effective for cutting known soft and composite materials. The wheel is pairticuilarly useful for slicing and cutting, slotting, and general material removal of rubbers, elastomers, soft woods, and hard wools. Because of this improved cutting edge, the resulting simultaneous cutting and grinding operations provide smoother and cleaner cuts. Another feature is that the relatively small teeth provide little or no kickback, making the present wheel easier to control and useful for fine precision work. One embodiment of the present cutting and grinding wheel is particularly effective for vehicle rubber tire repair. This improved design has a longer useful working life than conventional cutting wheels that are known in the art.

[0014] In an alternate embodiment, the present wheel is provided without teeth, instead having a relatively continuous outer edge. An abrasive coating as described above is still applied to the outer peripheral edge and immediate sides of that edge, as in the preferred embodiment. The relatively thicker peripheral edge, compared to the remainder of the disk, promotes cooling of the wheel, the workpiece, and the evacuation of cut material.

[0015] In the preferred embodiment, the present cutting and grinding wheel is attached to a chuck for insertion into a known hand-held rotary power tool. For this application, the present cutting and grinding wheel has an enhanced ability to perform fine detailing and precision work.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

[0016]FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a cutting and grinding wheel according to the invention;

[0017]FIG. 2 is a fragmentary elevational view of the cutting and grinding wheel illustrated in FIG. 1;

[0018]FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the cutting and grinding wheel taken along the line 3-3 in FIG. 1, and in the direction indicated generally;

[0019]FIG. 4 is an elevational view of the present cutting and grinding wheel and chuck assembly in partial section;

[0020]FIG. 5 is an end elevational view of another embodiment of the present invention; and

[0021]FIG. 6 is a front elevational view of a prior art cutting wheel.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0022] Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, a cutting and grinding wheel is generally designated 10. The cutting and grinding wheel 10 includes a planar, generally circular disk 12, preferably having a plurality of teeth 14, and a center bore hole 16. In the preferred embodiment, the circular disk 12, and also the teeth 14, are formed from metal, and preferably from spring steel AISI 1095. Other, relatively high grade metals are contemplated, and show reduced tendency to distort at high-speed operations. The disk 12 has parallel opposing surfaces 18 which are preferably planar, so as to minimize the thickness of the cutting edge. In the preferred embodiment, the diameter of the wheel 10 is preferably 1″, but other sizes of wheels are contemplated depending on the application. Located in the center of the disk 12, the bore hole 16 provides an attachment point for rotary power tools. Preferably, the hole 16 is round, but can also be square, hexagonal, or a variety of other shapes that would provide secure attachment and prevent slipping within a rotary power tool.

[0023] Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, at an outer circumference 20 of the disk 12, the teeth 14 are evenly distributed and are configured to define a generally sinusoidal pattern, and preferably formed into a generally gear-like pattern. This tooth pattern on the disk 12 may be stamped, laser cut, ground, molded, or created by any number of other methods well known in the art. With a wheel diameter of 1″, the plurality of teeth 14 preferably numbers 45, however it is contemplated that the number of teeth may vary to suit the application.

[0024] Measured between a pair of adjacent teeth apexes 22, and having a vertex located at the center of the disk 12, is a pitch angle Θ. In the preferred embodiment, Θ measures between 5 and 10 degrees. Best seen in FIGS. 1 and 3, the height H of each tooth 14 is generally small relative to the diameter of the disk 12. This relatively large number of comparatively small teeth 14 allows for a smoother cutting and grinding operation, that provides little or no kickback. Kickback is further reduced in that the apexes 22 of the teeth 14 are preferably radiused, however, in some applications sharpened teeth are contemplated.

[0025] Referring now to FIG. 2, between each pair of adjacent teeth 14 a gullet 24 is formed. The gullets 24 allow airflow between the teeth 14 for better cooling at the point where cutting is performed. Additionally, the gullets 24 are preferably radiused to keep from collecting waste material generated during the cutting operation, however other gullet shapes are contemplated, depending on the application.

[0026] Referring now to FIG. 3, an opposing sidewall 26 of each tooth 14 is generally parallel to, and preferably coextensive with, a respective adjoining disk opposing surface 18. Waste material is therefore more easily shed during the cutting operation.

[0027] Surrounding the upper portion of each sidewall 26 and each tooth apex 22 is an abrasive grit structure 28, made up of individual grit particles 30. It is preferred that the grit structure 28 does not continue down the sidewall 26, or down the circular disk 12. By completely surrounding the tooth apex 22 and adjoining upper sidewall 26 near the peripheral edge 20, only the abrasive grit structure 28 will come in contact with the material to be cut during high speed operation. Therefore, the abrasive grit structure 28 forms the actual cutting edge of the wheel 10.

[0028] A width or thickness WC of the grit structure 28 edge is wider or thicker than a width or thickness WD of the disk 12. The difference in the widths WC and WD is important during operation because it provides even more airflow, and therefore more cooling, around the cutting edge and down the opposing surfaces 18 of the disk 12. A cutting edge wider than the disk 12 is also useful in allowing more waste material to be shed during the cutting operation.

[0029] The abrasive grit structure 28 may be either single or multi-layer, though a single layer is preferred to provide a relatively narrow cutting edge for precision work. In the preferred embodiment, this grit structure is formed of tungsten-carbide particles, and formed on the tooth apexes 22 of the disk 12 by magnetic structuring. However, other known particularate grinding media are contemplated, including, but not limited to diamond grit. This process of magnetic structuring is described in Oliver U.S. Pat. No. 3,918,217, which is herein incorporated by reference. The preferred size of the individual grit particles 30 is 100 grit or smaller, although it is contemplated that grit particle size may vary with the application. Though the grit structure may be adhered to the wheel 10 by a number of methods known in the art, the structure is preferably adhered by a process of brazing with stainless eutectic brazing metal. A NiCr alloy is the preferred brazing metal, however other alloys are contemplated as are known in the art, and any eutectic brazing alloy capable of bonding to metal carbides, carbon of diamond and/or to boron composed grits will be suitable.

[0030] In an alternate embodiment, designated 10′, the blade 10′ may be made similar to the description above, changing only by eliminating the tooth gullets 24. Thus, the teeth apexes 22 form a generally continuous outer peripheral edge 20. The abrasive grit structure 28 has the same configuration as depicted in FIG. 3, as does the cross section of the grinding wheel 10′. Thus, it is concentrated on the peripheral edge 20 of the wheel, 10′ and on the sidewalls 26′ adjacent the peripheral edge. The only difference is that this cross-section extends about the entire periphery of the wheel 10. Since, as described above, the grit structure 28 actually does most of the cutting, the performance of the wheel 10′ should not be that different from the wheel 10. As is the case with the wheel 10, in the wheel 10′, the relatively wider width WC compared to the width or thickness WD is important during operation because it provides even more airflow, and therefore more cooling, around the cutting edge and down the opposing surfaces 18 of the disk 12. A cutting edge wider than the disk 12 is also useful in allowing more waste material to be shed during the cutting operation. As another alternative, the abrasive grit structure 28 may also be formed to have included angle β at the peripheral edge 20, as seen on the right side of the wheel 10 in FIG. 3. This configuration results in a sharper edge for enhanced penetration.

[0031] Referring now to FIG. 4, an assembly 40 is formed by engaging the cutting and grinding wheel 10 to the chuck of a rotary power tool (not shown) using a mandrel 42. In the preferred embodiment, the wheel 10 is secured to an end 44 of the mandrel 42 by a threaded fastener 46 passing through the bore hole 16 and into a threaded blind-end bore 48 (shown hidden) of the mandrel 42 to form the assembly 40. The assembly 40 is of particular use for attachment to most hand-held rotary power tools.

[0032] It has also been found that a wheel according to this embodiment of the present invention is useful as a grinding tool. In operation at high rotational speeds, the assembly 48 can be used solely as a grinding wheel. By moving the cutting edge perpendicularly along a metal blade, or by moving a metal blade along the stationary rotating cutting edge, an edge on a metal blade may be sharpened.

[0033] Referring now to FIG. 5, another embodiment of the cutting and grinding wheel is generally designated 50. Shared components with the wheel 10 are designated with identical reference numerals. In this embodiment, the cutting and grinding wheel 50 includes a generally circular disk 12 with opposing sides 18, having a plurality of teeth 14, and a center bore hole 18. In this embodiment, the disk 12 is not planar, but instead defines a serpentine, or “wiggle-waggle” shape when viewed on end. The wiggle-waggle shape provides a thicker cut and allows significantly more airflow at the point where cutting is performed. This shape is particularly useful where large amounts of material are to be cut, and where less precision is required. Because less precision is required, the tooth apex 22 is not radiused, but pointed in this embodiment. On this pointed apex 22, is formed the abrasive grit structure 28 according to the same process disclosed for the wheel 10.

[0034] It has been found that a cutting wheel 10 according to the present invention provides, on average, a 17% faster, as well as a smoother cut to known soft and composite materials (soft wood, plastics, etc.) at 30,000 rpm than the prior art wheel 60 shown in FIG. 6. The prior art wheel 60 has a pair of opposing surfaces 62 totally covered with grit 64, a central bore hole 66 for mandrel mounting, and a plurality of apertures 68 for cooling. As described above, these apertures 68 weaken the structure of the wheel 60. The large, arcuate shaped tooth gullets 70 also weaken the structure of the wheel 60, in addition to creating undesirable kickback during operation.

[0035] Furthermore, because the grit 64 is secured to the wheel 60 by painting or dipping, the wheel 60 tend to shed the grit 64 during operation, thereby shortening the useful working life of the wheel 60. In contrast, the wheel 10, 50 according to the present invention was found to provide a substantially longer useful working life with little to no kickback, than was the prior art wheel 60.

[0036] While a particular embodiment of the cutting and grinding wheel with an improved abrasive tooth structure of the invention has been shown and described, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made thereto without departing from the invention in its broader aspects and as set forth in the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6878051Feb 5, 2003Apr 12, 2005Saint-Gobain Abrasives Technology CompanySaw blade with shaped gullets
US7670211 *Jul 5, 2004Mar 2, 2010Taiyo Shokai Co., Ltd.Rotating polishing tool
US7794783 *Apr 13, 2007Sep 14, 2010Kennametal Inc.a magnetically deposited wear-resistant coating comprising ferromagnetic or paramagnetic hard particles( cobalt cemented tungsten carbide)substantially uniformly distributed in a braze alloy (Ni, Cr, B)matrix covering at least a portion of the article of manufacture
US7946907Apr 20, 2005May 24, 2011Saint-Gobain Abrasives, Inc.Saw blade gullet configuration
US7959495 *Oct 18, 2007Jun 14, 2011B&J Rocket America Inc.Method and apparatus for finishing the surface of rubber covered rollers
US8701536Jan 21, 2009Apr 22, 2014Saint-Gobain Abrasives, Inc.Circular saw blade with offset gullets
EP1867420A1Jun 5, 2007Dec 19, 2007HILTI AktiengesellschaftSaw blade with lateral buckles
WO2008051779A2 *Oct 18, 2007May 2, 2008B & J Mfg CompanyMethod and apparatus for finishing the surface of rubber covered rollers
Classifications
U.S. Classification451/542
International ClassificationB24D5/12, B23D61/02
Cooperative ClassificationB23D61/025, B24D5/12
European ClassificationB23D61/02D, B24D5/12
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 5, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: S-B POWER TOOL COMPANY, ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MARAS, VERICA;OLIVER, LLOYD R.;REEL/FRAME:011586/0293;SIGNING DATES FROM 20010126 TO 20010224