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Publication numberUS20020134615 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/790,229
Publication dateSep 26, 2002
Filing dateFeb 21, 2001
Priority dateFeb 21, 2001
Publication number09790229, 790229, US 2002/0134615 A1, US 2002/134615 A1, US 20020134615 A1, US 20020134615A1, US 2002134615 A1, US 2002134615A1, US-A1-20020134615, US-A1-2002134615, US2002/0134615A1, US2002/134615A1, US20020134615 A1, US20020134615A1, US2002134615 A1, US2002134615A1
InventorsKevin Herreman, Richard Godfrey, Fred Ernest, Karl Washburn
Original AssigneeHerreman Kevin Michael, Godfrey Richard Davis, Ernest Fred R., Washburn Karl Barclay
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Noise reduction system for kitchen
US 20020134615 A1
Abstract
A method and system of achieving noise reduction in a kitchen environment is disclosed. Noise reduction is achieved through the application of transmission loss paneling, sound absorption paneling, and vibro-acoustical isolation paneling to surfaces of a kitchen environment surrounding typical kitchen appliances. Targeted, noise reduction of the kitchen environment is achieved by installing the noise reduction system of the present invention to walls, cabinetry and flooring of a typical kitchen environment.
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Claims(29)
What is claimed:
1. A noise reduction system for a kitchen having cabinetry, flooring and walls, said noise reduction system comprising:
a plurality of panels applied to at least one of said cabinetry, said flooring and said walls of said kitchen to achieve noise attenuation, wherein said plurality of panels include
a transmission loss panel;
an absorption panel; and
an isolator treatment panel.
2. The noise reduction system of claim 1, wherein said transmission loss panel includes a mass-based, constraining layer and a viscoelastic damping layer.
3. The noise reduction system of claim 1, wherein said absorption panel includes at least one porous media layer separated by at least one facing material layer.
4. The noise reduction system of claim 3, wherein said absorption panel further includes a thin film polymer layer and an adhesive layer.
5. The noise reduction system of claim 4, wherein each of said porous media layers and each of said facing material layers are positioned between said adhesive layer and said thin film polymer layer.
6. The noise reduction system of claim 2, wherein said constraining layer is formed from a semi-rigid material.
7. The noise reduction system of claim 2, wherein said viscoelastic damping layer is formed from a material selected to provide damping at common use frequencies of a plurality of kitchen appliances.
8. The noise reduction system of claim 7, wherein said viscoelastic damping layer includes a viscoelastic adhesive component and a viscosity enhancing component.
9. The noise reduction system of claim 3, wherein each of said porous media layer is made from a porous foam or fibrous material having an airflow resistance selected for noise attenuation of a predetermined peak frequency.
10. The noise reduction system of claim 3, wherein each facing material layer is a non-porous film of metal, paper, polymer or fiberglass.
11. The noise reduction system of claim 1, wherein said isolator treatment panel is constructed of materials selected to isolate at common frequencies emitted from a plurality of kitchen appliances during operation.
12. The noise reduction system of claim 1, further comprising a vibro-acoustically dampened kitchen countertop material.
13. The noise reduction system of claim 12, wherein said vibro-acoustically dampened countertop material includes at least one particle board countertop material layer and at least one viscoelastic damping material layer for damping a working surface of said kitchen countertop material.
14. A kitchen countertop comprising:
a vibro-acoustically dampened kitchen countertop material.
15. The kitchen countertop of claim 14, wherein said vibro-acoustically dampened countertop material includes at least one particle board countertop material layer and at least one viscoelastic damping material layer for damping a working surface of said kitchen countertop material.
16. The kitchen countertop of claim 14, further comprising a laminated and hardened, working surface material.
17. The kitchen countertop of claim 15, further comprising a laminated and hardened, working surface material covering a side of said at least one viscoelastic damping material layer.
18. A method of attenuating noise in a kitchen environment, the method comprising at least one of:
applying transmission loss panels to a plurality of surfaces surrounding a source of noise emission; and
applying sound absorption panels to a plurality of surfaces surrounding an appliance or a source of noise emission of a known peak frequency.
19. The method according to claim 18, wherein said transmission loss panels include a viscoelastic damping layer and a constraining layer made of a semi-rigid material.
20. The method according to claim 18, further comprising the step of applying an isolator between an appliance and a floor of said kitchen environment for preventing vibro-acoustic energy from being transmitted from said appliance to said floor.
21. The method according to claim 18, further comprising the step of installing a kitchen countertop including a layer of viscoelastic material into said kitchen environment.
22. The method according to claim 20, further comprising the step of installing a kitchen countertop including a layer of viscoelastic material into said kitchen environment.
23. The method according to claim 18, further comprising the steps of applying an absorption panel material between a rear and bottom surface of a microwave; and
applying an isolator between said microwave and the bottom surface of said microwave for preventing vibro-acoustic energy from being transmitted from said microwave to said kitchen environment.
24. The method according to claim 18, further comprising the steps of applying a transmission loss panel to a surface of a sink, wherein said transmission loss panel includes a mass-based, constraining layer and a viscoelastic damping layer.
25. The method according to claim 18, further comprising the steps of applying an absorption panel to a surface of a garbage disposal, wherein said absorption panel includes at least one porous media layer.
26. The method according to claim 18, further comprising the steps of applying a transmission loss panel to a lower surface of a sink, wherein said transmission loss panel includes a mass-based, constraining layer and a viscoelastic damping layer; and
applying an absorption panel to a surface of a garbage disposal, wherein said absorption panel includes at least one porous media layer.
27. The method according to claim 18, wherein said appliance is a trash compactor.
28. The method according to claim 18, wherein said appliance is a refrigerator.
29. A method of attenuating noise in a kitchen environment, the method comprising the steps of:
providing at least one layer of kitchen countertop material;
providing at least one layer of viscoelastic damping material; and attaching each of said kitchen countertop material layers to each of said viscoelastic damping material layers to provide a dampened kitchen countertop for said kitchen environment.
Description
TECHNICAL FIELD AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present invention is generally directed to a noise reduction system for a kitchen, and more particularly to a noise reduction system and method designed to reduce targeted emissions from appliances and structure associated with the kitchen.

BACKGROUND OF THE PRESENT INVENTION

[0002] Currently the kitchen environment is recognized as one of the loudest rooms within the home. However, the kitchen conventionally has the least amount of energy reduction materials of any room in the home. Some related noise reduction techniques of the conventional art have been aimed at noise reduction of the machines or appliances themselves.

[0003] For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,855,353 to Shaffer et al. teaches a method and apparatus for damping vibration in a vibration generating device such as an appliance. This technique utilizes a vibration damping system including a constraining layer and a layer of adhesive. The adhesive layer is used to adhere the constraining layer to a surface of the vibration generating device. The adhesive layer further includes a fibrous carrier material and a viscous adhesive material. Shaffer et al. teach that the system is applied/incorporated into the appliances in order provide a vibration damping system with increased creep resistance and/or resistance to failure of the components.

[0004] Other conventional techniques have shown that noise from operating machines and appliances can be reduced with targeted, frequency specific, dissipation. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,965,851 to Herreman et al. teaches a method and apparatus of attenuating noise from a machine or applicance having a known peak frequency. An acoustical insulation system is applied to the surface of the machine to achieve targeted, frequency specific dissipation. A two part stratum is incorporated into this conventional system that utilizes a porous, sound absorbing layer and a sound reflecting barrier positioned between the surface of the machine and the first, porous layer.

[0005] However, as discussed hereinabove, many conventional techniques of the prior art are focused specifically on noise reduction through improvement or modification of the appliances themselves. The characteristics of the environment in which these same appliances or machines are intended to operate will often have a negative effect on any efforts aimed exclusively at reduction of noise emitted from the appliances.

[0006] Therefore, efforts to produce appliances with improved noise reduction characteristics will not be effective unless the kitchen or other operating environment is equally addressed with noise reduction considerations.

SUMMARY OF THE PRESENT INVENTION

[0007] The present invention, in part, is a recognition that typical household appliances found in the kitchen will emit sound at specific frequencies from their internal components.

[0008] The present invention, also in part, is a recognition that the kitchen environment usually has the least amount of energy reduction materials of any room in the home. Therefore, it is an object of the present invention to provide a noise reduction system for improving the noise reduction characteristics of the environment in which kitchen appliances will operate.

[0009] The components of the present invention will reduce the acoustic energy transmitted from appliances to the kitchen environment.

[0010] The present invention, also in part, is a recognition that through isolation and dissipation of vibro-acoustic energy, the noise radiated into the kitchen will be greatly reduced. The noise reduction characteristics of the present invention will ultimately improve the atmosphere of the kitchen environment and improve communication within the kitchen by reduction of noise and energy emitted from the appliances and other kitchen components.

[0011] The present invention, in part, provides a noise reduction system for a kitchen having cabinetry, flooring and walls, the noise reduction system comprising a plurality of panels applied to at least one of said cabinetry, said flooring and said walls of said kitchen to achieve noise attenuation, wherein said plurality of panels include a transmission loss panel, an absorption panel, and an isolator treatment panel.

[0012] The present invention, also in part, provides a method of attenuating noise in a kitchen environment, the method comprising at least one of applying transmission loss panels to a plurality of surfaces surrounding a source of noise emission, and applying sound absorption panels to a plurality of surfaces surrounding an appliance or a source of noise emission of a known peak frequency.

[0013] The present invention, also in part, provides a method of attenuating noise in a kitchen environment, the method comprising the steps of providing at least one layer of kitchen countertop material, providing at least one layer of viscoelastic damping material, and attaching each of said kitchen countertop material layers to each of said viscoelastic damping material layers to provide a dampened kitchen countertop for said kitchen environment.

[0014] Advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the detailed description given hereinafter. However, it should be understood that the detailed description and specific examples, while indicating preferred embodiments of the present invention, are given by way of illustration only, since various changes and modifications within the spirit and scope of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from this detailed description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0015] The present invention will become more fully understood from the detailed description given hereinbelow and the accompanying drawings which are given by way of illustration only, and thus do not limit the present invention.

[0016]FIG. 1 is a schematic view of a typical kitchen appliance space treated with a noise reduction system according to an embodiment of the present invention;

[0017]FIG. 1A is a detailed cross-sectional view of a portion of FIG. 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention;

[0018]FIG. 2 is a elevational view of an appliance space provided with a noise reduction system according to an embodiment of the present invention;

[0019]FIG. 2A is a detailed cross sectional view of a vertical surface shown in FIG. 2;

[0020]FIG. 2B is a detailed cross sectional view of a floor surface shown in FIG. 2;

[0021]FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a countertop material according to an embodiment of the present invention;

[0022]FIG. 4 is a plan view of a kitchen component incorporating the noise reduction system of the present invention;

[0023]FIG. 5 is a rear, side view of a kitchen component incorporating the noise reduction system of the present invention;

[0024]FIG. 6 is an elevational view of the kitchen component shown in FIG. 4 and FIG. 5; and

[0025]FIG. 7 is a schematic view of a typical kitchen appliance space treated with a noise reduction system according to an embodiment of the present invention.

[0026] The figures are not drawn to scale.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

[0027] The components of this present invention will reduce the acoustic energy transmitted from the appliances to the kitchen environment by resisting the transmission of vibro-acoustic energy through the cabinetry, flooring and walls. The components of this present invention have been designed to isolate as well as dissipate vibro-acoustic energy. By isolating and dissipating the vibro-acoustic energy, the noise radiated into the kitchen will be reduced. This will improve the atmosphere of the kitchen and improve communication within the kitchen by lowering background sound levels due to appliances and other kitchen apparatus.

[0028] As discussed hereinabove, prior efforts have shown that this noise can be reduced with targeted, frequency specific, dissipation. However, one of the aspects of the present invention, in part, is that it has been determined that the transmission of vibro-acoustic energy can be controlled by the application of mass based treatments to the cabinets, isolation treatments to reduce transmission of energy to the floors, and damping treatment to dissipate the energy transmitted into kitchen components such as countertops.

[0029] Transmission Loss Panels

[0030] One embodiment of the present invention includes transmission loss panels for the cabinet side walls, the surrounding wall(s) behind, and the countertop above the appliances, as depicted in FIG. 1 and in yet more detail in FIG. 1A. The transmission loss panels 3 include a constraining layer 11 made from a rigid material that is attached to a damping material 12. The damping material 12 also acts as an adhesive to hold the product in place after application. An additional/optional layer of release paper (not depicted) can be provided to cover the adhesive surface of the damping material until installation is desired by an installer.

[0031] More particularly, FIG. 1 is directed toward an embodiment of the present invention showing transmission loss panels 3 installed on the surfaces surrounding a conventional kitchen appliance installation in a kitchen. The appliance space 10 for, e.g., a dishwasher, trash compactor, or refrigerator is formed beneath a typical kitchen countertop area 4C and bounded on at least left and right sides by conventional cabinet side walls 13. Further, the rear side is bounded by either the wall of the kitchen or another conventional cabinet side wall. Transmission loss panels 3 are applied to the top, rear (not shown), left and right cabinet side walls 13 in a preferred embodiment.

[0032] Furthermore, transmission loss panels 3 can similarly be applied to the floor of the appliance space if desired. However, as discussed in further detail hereinafter, the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 1 shows the use of isolator treatment panels 2 on the floor of the appliance space 10.

[0033]FIG. 1A shows a more detailed view of the transmission loss paneling as applied to the appliance space of FIG. 1. The constraining layer 11 and viscoelastic damping material 12, the characteristics of each which are described hereinbelow, serve as a barrier against sound transmission from the appliance space to the cabinet side walls 13. However, additional appliances and their respective locations within a kitchen may be similarly treated according to this embodiment of the present invention. Alternatively, according to the present invention, transmission loss panels 3 may be similarly installed on wall(s) and/or surface(s) surrounding additional appliances such as disposal units, trash compactors, refrigerators, or microwave ovens.

[0034] As aforementioned, the damping material 12 is composed of a viscosity enhancing component and an adhesive component. The characteristics of the damping material 12 are preferably optimized to provide damping at common use frequencies of the targeted appliance for which it surrounds, e.g., a dishwasher, trash compactor, or refrigerator.

[0035] The viscosity enhancing component may be any material that enhances the viscosity of the adhesive, but also reinforces the adhesive and thereby increases the adhesive's resistance to shock and shearing forces. Some examples of potential viscosity enhancing material that may be used are one or more of the following exemplary materials: organic fibers including cellulose, carbon fiber, asbestos, and inorganic fibers including glass fiber, steel wool, synthetic fibers, etc.

[0036] Any suitable viscoelastic material may be used for the adhesive component as long as it remains viscous after curing. For instance, the adhesive can be any one or more of the following exemplary adhesives: a pressure sensitive hot or cold melt adhesive, an acrylic based adhesive such as acrylic viscoelastic polymers, pressure sensitive damping polymers, pressure sensitive damping polymers, adhesive epoxy resins, urea resins, melamine resins, phenol resins, vinyl acetates, cyanoacrylates, urethanes, synthetic rubbers, etc.

[0037] The constraining layer 11 can be constructed from fiber-reinforced polymer, steel, aluminum, wood, or any other semi-rigid material that matches the substrate in extensional stiffness. The installer of these panels can peel off the (optional) release paper and (if provided) mount the panel to the wall, the bottom of the countertop, and the surrounding cabinets as desired for the individual kitchen environment.

[0038] The amount of sound transmitted through an object can be measured by a Sound Transmission Class (“STC”) according to the standard ASTM method E90-90. The STC is measured on a scale in decibels, from zero decibels, meaning all the sound is transmitted, to approximately 70 decibels, meaning almost no sound is transmitted. Usually the STC is measured over a range of frequencies. Depending on the targeted application of the present invention, e.g. a refrigerator, microwave or dishwasher, a wide range of STC values may be indicative of preferable materials or components for the transmission loss panels of the present invention.

[0039] However, a preferred method of material selection for the constraining layer of the present invention involves a determination of mass/area characteristics of the material. Experimental results performed by the inventors indicate that preferred materials for the transmission loss panels of the present invention should have mass/area (kg/m2) values, i.e., the mass of the material divided by its cross-sectional area, in the range of 1.0 to 3.0 kg/m2.

[0040] Absorption Panels

[0041] As aforementioned, conventional efforts have shown that noise from appliances can be further reduced with targeted frequency specific absorption. However, conventional efforts have been aimed at targeted application of materials to the appliances or within the structure of the appliances themselves. The present invention is directed toward further improvement, in either a supplemental or complementary manner, of the effects of these noise reduction techniques.

[0042] Specifically, the present invention achieves additional noise reduction through targeted treatment of the surfaces and components of the kitchen environment itself. According to another embodiment of the present invention, such noise reduction includes the use of absorption panels 30 depicted in FIG. 2 and in yet more detail in FIG. 2A. The absorption panels 30 include one or more layers of a porous media 21 separated using facing materials 22 with a density sufficient to allow the tuning of the resulting absorption. A thin polymer skin 20 covers the porous media 21 and protects the assembly from damage. A layer of adhesive 23 secures the absorption panels 30 to a surface.

[0043] More particularly, FIG. 2 is directed toward an embodiment of the present invention showing absorption panels 30 installed on the surfaces surrounding a conventional kitchen appliance A, e.g., a refrigerator. Nearly any appliance or component and its respective location within a kitchen may be similarly treated according to this embodiment of the present invention. For example, the absorption panels 30 may be similarly installed on wall(s) and/or surface(s) surrounding additional appliances such as disposal units, trash compactors, refrigerators, or microwave ovens.

[0044]FIG. 2A and FIG. 2B show absorption panels 30 and transmission loss panels, respectively, applied to the appliance's (A's) surroundings in FIG. 2. FIG. 2A shows how the appliance A is separated from the vertical wall (including a layer of gypsum or drywall 24 and a supporting 2″×4″ stud 25) by a layer of air M, thin polymer skin 20, porous media layer 21, facing material layer 22 and adhesive layer 23. FIG. 2B shows the appliance A is separated from the floor material 15, sub-flooring 14A and floor joist 14B by a layer of air M, a constraining layer 11 and damping material layer 12.

[0045] The porous media layer(s) 21 can be made from melamine, urethane, or any other porous foam, fibrous materials such as fiberglass, polymers, or metals as long as the material airflow resistance can be adjusted to optimize the system performance. The facing material layer 22 can be a non-porous film of metal, paper, polymer, fiberglass, or any other material with a mass per unit area which optimizes the performance of the system. The enclosing skin 20 can be any polymer material that will allow/permit the attachment of an adhesive 23.

[0046] Similarly, the porous media layers 21 can be selected based upon standard noise absorption scales. The reduction in sound transmission by absorption can also be measured in sabines using the standard ASTM method E-1050. Sound absorption values are typically measured on a scale from zero, meaning no sound is absorbed, to 1.0, meaning all the sound is absorbed.

[0047] However, it is preferred that the material for the porous media layer(s) should have satisfactory sound absorption qualities at predetermined frequencies of targeted appliances, e.g. a refrigerator, microwave or dishwasher. A preferred method of selecting materials for the porous media layer(s) of the present invention involves a determination of material airflow resistivity. Experimental results performed by the inventors indicate that preferred materials for the porous media layer of the present invention should have airflow resistance (mks rayl/m) values, i.e., the quotient of its specific airflow resistance divided by its thickness, in the range of 14,000 to 30,000 mks rayl/m.

[0048] Appliance Isolation (Isolators)

[0049] An additional aspect of the present invention is directed toward the use or application of an isolator(s) to a kitchen component. According to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, an isolator 2 (as in FIG. 1) is incorporated into the noise reduction system that prevents vibro-acoustic energy from being transmitted from the appliances to the floor of the kitchen.

[0050] As seen in FIG. 1, the isolator 2 may be constructed from a combination of steel, asphalt, rubber, plastic, or any other material whose properties that can be optimized to isolate at the frequencies emitted from the appliances during operation. In a preferred embodiment, an appliance such as a dishwasher would rest on the floor layer comprised of an isolator 2.

[0051] Countertop Damping

[0052] An additional aspect of the present invention is directed toward the reduction of noise through the use of targeted materials in kitchen countertop design. Further, calculations show that the current materials used for countertops have very low coincidence frequencies. This implies that damping treatments will provide a reduction of transmitted vibro-acoustic energy.

[0053] As seen in FIG. 3, a preferred embodiment of the present invention includes a standard particle board countertop material covered with a lamination of a hard working surface material 4L that acts as the upper decorative working surface and a layer of damping material 6. The damping material 6 is optimized to provide damping at common use frequencies of the appliances and other kitchen apparatus within the kitchen environment. The damping material 6 is applied between a standard particle board countertop material 4C and the working surface layer 4L or as a series of layers (as shown in FIG. 3) between two sections of the standard particle board countertop material 4C. Either option may be used simultaneously to further enhance the performance of the system. The damping material 6 can be constructed of any viscoelastic damping material, such as the exemplary materials for the adhesive component mentioned hereinabove for the transmission loss panels' 3 viscoelastic damping material layer 12. The viscoelastic damping material can alternatively be a suitable viscoelastic damping material, not necessarily with adhesive properties as aforementioned, such as a polymer or asphalt.

[0054] The dampened countertop of the present invention will be mounted in much the same manner as conventional countertops 4C. The application of the damping material will preferably be accomplished during the manufacturing phase of the countertop system so that the customer will have no added difficulty in the installation of these components. As aforementioned, the damping material 6 can also serve as an adhesive that joins the series of layers together 4L, 4C when cured. This will permit customers or installers to purchase and install prefabricated countertop materials with a preferred level or degree of damping characteristic (i.e., quality or amount of damping material utilized).

[0055] Vibro-acoustic energy of the products such as dishwashers and garbage disposals will be further reduced by this aspect of the present invention. Further, a reduction in impact sound is noted with the use of this component in the noise reduction system of the present invention. For instance, energy from items dropped on the counter should be quickly dissipated, thereby reducing the airborne sound(s). Similarly, the breakage of items or containers within the kitchen environment normally caused by dropping items on the counter may also be reduced.

[0056] For instance, characteristically brittle items such as glass or ceramics have microscopic structural defects or cracks. When one of these cracks receive enough energy to allow the crack to propagate, they spontaneously propagate until the energy is dissipated. The result is the breakage of the glass or ceramic item. By dampening the energy of the impact, breakage of glass or ceramic materials may be avoided.

[0057] Microwaves and Appliances

[0058] An additional aspect of the present includes combinations of the aforementioned techniques into layers of materials that produce multiple noise attenuation effects. For instance, it may be desirable to implement a support frame or other component surrounding an appliance, such as a microwave, with one side containing a isolator 2 material and a second side a noise absorption layer/material 30.

[0059]FIG. 4 is a plan view of an “L” shaped support frame's 40 bottom portion 32 according to an embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 5 is a rear view of an “L” shaped support frame's 40 rear portion 31 according to an embodiment of the present invention. As seen in FIG. 4 and FIG. 5, the “L” shaped support frame 40 for a microwave oven A can combine vibration isolation with acoustic absorption. The rear portion 31 of the “L” shaped support frame includes a layer 30 of absorption materials on the rear portion and bottom portion. Further, an isolator 2 material is provided between the bottom portion 32 and the surface which the microwave will rest, such as a countertop 4C. FIG. 6 is a plan view showing the “L” shaped frame 40 positioned beneath a microwave A.

[0060] A preferred embodiment of the present invention includes the use of the “L” shaped frame 40 for a microwave. The “L” shaped frame 40 is made of a damped flexible material 30 with an insert made of a porous media layer 42 having a very thin polymer skin to protect the assembly from damage and a layer of adhesive. The “L” shaped frame can have dimensions designed to surround a typical kitchen microwave.

[0061] As seen in FIG. 6, the “L” shaped component of this present invention is placed on a typical countertop with the microwave resting on it. The vertical portion should be placed near the rear of the microwave leaving approximately 2″ or more of space for ventilation. The present invention provides vibration isolation of the microwave from the countertop material. The stiffness of the frame material is such that the internal damping of the frame material dissipates the vibration transmitted from the microwave.

[0062] The porous media layer 42 at the center of the lower portion of the frame dissipates the acoustic energy radiating from the bottom of the microwave. The vertical absorption material dissipates the acoustic energy that radiates from the rear of the microwave as air is exhausted by the microwave's fan(s). As seen in FIG. 4, the “L” shaped member 40 comprises a cross-shaped section of a porous media layer 42. The porous media can be made from foams such as urethanes and melamine or fibrous materials such as fiberglass and polyester. In addition, the absorption materials are covered with a polymer skin, preferably a thin film material or any thin polymer skin.

[0063] The space between the microwave and the vertical panel of the present invention will provide adequate ventilation for the microwave as well as a way for the turbulent airflow to reduce velocity and not create additional noise due to the presence of the “L” shaped frame. Further, this component of the present invention can be installed so as to be recessed into the countertop material.

[0064]FIG. 7 shows an additional embodiment incorporating the present invention for noise reduction. A sink 60 and garbage disposal unit 70 is shown with a conventional drain through a flexible hose connection 50. Transmission loss paneling 3 is applied to the horizontal surfaces between the sink 60 and garbage disposal unit 70. As aforementioned, the transmission loss paneling 3 includes a viscoelastic damping layer 12 that also serves as an adhesive. A mass or constraining layer 11 is applied as a barrier between the viscoelastic damping layer 12 and the disposal 70. Similarly, the garbage disposal unit 70 is applied with a combination of a porous media layer 42 for sound absorption and a barrier layer 43.

[0065] Accordingly, the present invention is directed toward a method of applying a unique combination of noise reduction materials to the structure and components of a typical kitchen environment. The noise reduction system and method of the present invention can be used to advantageously reduce undesirable noise in a kitchen environment.

[0066] The various embodiments of the present invention have been tested by the inventors to determine their ability to accomplish noise reduction. Table 1 shows the percent reduction in subjective loudness levels as per ISO 532(A) and 532(B) achieved as a result of the application of the present invention in each of the aforementioned applicances/applications found in a typical kitchen environment.

TABLE I
PERCENT LOUDNESS REDUCTION
Microwave:
OSB
Oriented Microwave:
Strand Particle Refri- Dish- Garbage
Appliance Board Board gerator washer Disposal
Loudness 21 12 20 11 11
ISO 532A
(%
reduction)
Loudness 22 19 13 7 14
ISO 532B
(%
reduction)

[0067] Further examples of suitable vibro-acoustic materials and their desired material properties, potential applications of the present invention, and known targeted frequencies of various appliances are described in the following U.S. Patent Nos., the entirety of each of which is hereby incorporated by reference: U.S. Pat. No. 5,855,353 to Shaffer et al.; and U.S. Pat. No. 5,965,851 to Herreman et al.

[0068] The present invention being thus described, it will be obvious that the same may be varied in many ways. Such variations are not to be regarded as a departure from the spirit and scope of the present invention, and all such modifications as would be obvious to one skilled in the art are intended to be included within the scope of the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US7923092Aug 22, 2005Apr 12, 2011Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcDie cut insulation blanket and method for producing same
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US8317935Dec 1, 2006Nov 27, 2012Electrolux Home Products, Inc.Dishwasher apparatus including sound absorbing device
US8556025 *Jul 7, 2011Oct 15, 2013Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbhMethod for manufacturing a dishwasher with at least one, especially prefabricated, bitumen mat for deadening of noise and/or sound absorption of a component
US20120013228 *Jul 7, 2011Jan 19, 2012BSH Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbHMethod for manufacturing a dishwasher with at least one, especially prefabricated, bitumen mat for deadening of noise and/or sound absorption of a component
US20130193826 *Jan 23, 2013Aug 1, 2013Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgerate GmbhHousehold appliance, in particular dishwasher, with an acoustic sealing frame for noise reduction
EP2087813A1 *Feb 2, 2009Aug 12, 2009Materia ABA table and tabletop
WO2010094718A1 *Feb 17, 2010Aug 26, 2010Ask Industries S.P.A.Muffler unit for fume extractor hood
WO2012161695A1 *May 24, 2011Nov 29, 2012Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcAcoustically insulated machine
WO2013060631A1 *Oct 19, 2012May 2, 2013BSH Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbHDomestic appliance, in particular a domestic dishwasher, having butyl material, in particular butyl adhesive, or an acrylic material, in particular acrylate adhesive, on a component wall
Classifications
U.S. Classification181/290, 181/284
International ClassificationA47B96/20, A47B96/00, A47B77/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47B96/201, A47B96/206, A47B77/022, A47B96/00, A47L15/4255
European ClassificationA47L15/42J4, A47B96/20A, A47B77/02B, A47B96/20C2, A47B96/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 11, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS TECHNOLOGY, INC., ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HERREMAN, KEVIN M.;GODFREY, RICHARD D.;ERNEST, FRED R.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:011786/0718;SIGNING DATES FROM 20010216 TO 20010220