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Publication numberUS20020144438 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/785,335
Publication dateOct 10, 2002
Filing dateFeb 20, 2001
Priority dateFeb 20, 2001
Publication number09785335, 785335, US 2002/0144438 A1, US 2002/144438 A1, US 20020144438 A1, US 20020144438A1, US 2002144438 A1, US 2002144438A1, US-A1-20020144438, US-A1-2002144438, US2002/0144438A1, US2002/144438A1, US20020144438 A1, US20020144438A1, US2002144438 A1, US2002144438A1
InventorsAnthony Better
Original AssigneeBetter Anthony Wilbur
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Convertible golf cleat
US 20020144438 A1
Abstract
This invention is a golf cleat that converts street footwear into golf shoe. The golf cleat features a circular golf cleat molded into a single unit from a durable plastic, rubber or any of the durable synthetic materials. The center of the bottom of the golf cleat is dome-shaped. Embedded in the dome are three individually evenly spaced cavities. The three cavities extend upward to form a sphere at the vertex, which is a traction device against the ground. At the base of the cavities are holes that extend from the bottom to the top. The purpose of the holes is to secure the golf cleat to the sole of the shoe with screws or nails. A plurality of evenly spaced pyramid-like shapes, flush against the outer edge of the circular golf cleat serves as traction against the ground.
Images(5)
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Claims(6)
I claim:
1. A golf cleat comprising:
a single molded disk made of a durable plastic, rubber or any of the durable synthetic material;
top surface for contacting with the sole of a shoe;
a bottom surface consisting of a plurality of traction units.
2. A golf cleat as set forth in claim 1, wherein the top surface has three evenly spaced holes to insert metal screws or nails to secure the golf cleat to the sole of the shoe.
3. A golf cleat as set forth in claim 1, wherein the bottom surface provides traction against the ground, which can be a varsity of configuration or shapes, evenly spaced and flush again the outer edge of the golf cleat.
4. A golf cleat as set forth in claim 1, wherein the center section is dome-shaped, with three individually evenly spaced cavities embedded at the base.
5. A golf cleat as set fort in claim 1, wherein the three individually evenly spaced cavities extend upward to form a sphere at the vertex to provide traction against the ground.
6. A golf cleat as set forth in claim 1, wherein at the base of the cavities are holes that extend from the bottom to the top to insert a metal screw or nail to secure the golf cleat to the sole of the shoe.
Description
REFERENCES

[0001] U.S. Patent Documents

6154984 December 2000 Adam
6115947 September 2000 Swindle
6006454 December 1999 Sitzler
5794367 August 1998 Carroll
5791071 August 1998 Roadail
5727340 May 1998 Suk
5600901 February 1997 Leonor
3866339 February 1995 Latto
5367793 November 1994 Deacon, et al.
5259129 November 1993 Deacon, et al.
4885851 December 1989 Peterson
4723366 February 1988 Hagger
4777738 October 1988 Giese, et al.
4689901 September 1987 Ihlenburg
4571852 February 1996 Lamarche, et al
4587748 May 1986 Collins
4330950 May 1982 Reddien
4240215 December 1980 Broussard

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] This invention relates to golf cleats. More particularly, golf cleats for shoes designed for street wear.

[0003] The prior art in golf footwear is a removable golf cleat or spike, which consists of a threaded stud on the surface of a generally concave-convex flange. The threads on the male threaded stud are sized to cooperate in a hole with the female threads in the sole of the golf shoe. The purpose of the male threaded stud and the female thread is to secure the golf cleat onto the sole of the shoe. A pair of holes is provided at diametrically opposing points in the bottom surface of the flange to facilitate the engagement of the threaded male studs to each female threaded hole within the sole of the golf shoe. A tool designed to screw the threaded male studs into the threaded female holes are available.

[0004] The above prior art relates to converting shoes designed for street wear into golf shoes. This is done by a cobbler, who removes the sole of the street shoe and replaces it with a sole designed with the female threads.

[0005] There is a movement among golf course superintendents to restrict the use of metal spikes as a mean of traction on the bottom of golf shoes. Metal spikes have a tendency to damage the surface of the golf greens on the golf course by leaving spike marks on the putting surface. Spike marks on the putting green can cause an erratic effect on a golf ball rolling over it.

[0006] The recent prior art employs a plurality of shapes, configurations and pattens made of durable plastic, rubber or any of the durable synthetic materials in the bottom surface of the golf cleat to facilitate traction. This design is fast replacing the metal spike as a traction device on the bottom surface of the golf cleat. But the prior art still employs the male threaded stud and the female thread to secure the top of the golf cleat to the sole of the shoe.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0007] The objectives of present invention are to:

[0008] 1. Convert street shoes into golf shoes without the male threaded stud and female thread to secure the top of the golf cleat to the sole of the shoe.

[0009] 2. Provide more traction against the ground than the standard golf shoe.

[0010] 3. Minimize the damage to the putting surface of the golf course.

[0011] The objectives can be achieved in the following manner:

[0012] 1. Replace the prior art of securing the golf cleat to the sole of a shoe with nails or screws.

[0013] 2. Provide more traction than the standard golf shoe by increasing the number of golf cleats on the sole of the shoe.

[0014] 3. Minimize the damage to the putting surface of the golf course by replacing the metal spike as a traction device with durable plastic, rubber or any of the durable synthetic materials in the bottom surface of the golf cleat to facilitate traction.

[0015] Accordingly, the achievement of the objectives cited will become apparent from the following description of the convertible golf cleat and from the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING

[0016] Features of the invention will be more readily understood by the accompanying drawing:

[0017]FIG. 1 is top perspective view, which show a single unit with three evenly space holes in the center of the golf cleat to insert metal nail or screws to attach the golf cleat to the sole of the shoe.

[0018]FIG. 2 is the bottom perspective view, which show the embodiment of the bottom singe unit.

[0019]FIG. 3 is the isometric view.

[0020]FIG. 4 is the bottom isometric view.

[0021]FIG. 5 is a partial cross-section views of the golf shoe cleat.

[0022]FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the outer edge traction unit.

[0023]FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the center section of the bottom of the invention.

[0024]FIG. 8 is a cross-section view of the method of securing the golf cleat to the sole of the shoe.

[0025]FIGS. 9 & 10 are a view of the male thread stud and female thread hole of the prior art cleats that provide traction

[0026]FIGS. 11 & 12 show additional cleats that can be added to the sole of the street shoe to increase traction against the ground.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0027] The invention features a circular golf cleat molded into a single unit from a durable plastic, rubber or any of the durable synthetic materials. The center of the bottom golf cleat is dome-shaped. Embedded in the dome are three individually evenly spaced cavities. The three cavities extend upward to form a sphere at the vertex, which is a traction device against the ground. At the base of the cavities are holes that extend from the bottom to the top. The purpose of the holes is to secure the golf cleat to the sole of the shoe with screws or nails. A plurality of evenly spaced pyramid-like shapes, flushed against the outer edge of the circular golf cleat serve as traction against the ground. One of the problems of the prior art is the tendency of the male threaded stud to become unscrewed from the female threaded hole while wormed, before the golf cleat needs to be replaced. The invention's three individually evenly spaced holes to attach the golf cleat with screws or nails to the sole should minimize the problem. The male thread stud and the female thread hole of the prior art can become stripped, which makes it very difficult to remove and usually can't be replaced. Because the invention does not have the thread male stud and the female hole, replacement of the golf cleat is made easy.

[0028] Golf shoes with the standard thread male stud and thread female hole limit the traction against the ground to the area where the thread female hole is located on the sole of the golf shoe. The prior art restricts the use of other area on the sole of the shoe. Because the invention can utilize a greater area on the sole of the shoe, traction against the ground can be maximized (see FIGS. 11-12).

[0029] As stated previously, there is a movement among golf course superintendents to restrict the use of metal spikes as a mean of traction because the metal spikes damage the putting greens on the golf course. A golf cleat molded into a single unit from a durable plastic, rubber or any of the durable synthetic materials satisfy the concerns of course superintendents by minimizing the damage to the putting green on the golf course.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7146752 *Jul 30, 2004Dec 12, 2006Red Wing Shoe Company, Inc.Footwear outsole including star shapes
US7596889Oct 27, 2006Oct 6, 2009Red Wing Shoe Company, Inc.Footwear outsole including star shapes
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/127, 36/134, 36/67.00D, 36/67.00R
International ClassificationA43B5/00, A43C15/16
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/165, A43B5/001
European ClassificationA43C15/16C1A, A43B5/00B