Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20020157279 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/984,409
Publication dateOct 31, 2002
Filing dateOct 30, 2001
Priority dateApr 27, 2001
Also published asCN1145424C, CN1383770A
Publication number09984409, 984409, US 2002/0157279 A1, US 2002/157279 A1, US 20020157279 A1, US 20020157279A1, US 2002157279 A1, US 2002157279A1, US-A1-20020157279, US-A1-2002157279, US2002/0157279A1, US2002/157279A1, US20020157279 A1, US20020157279A1, US2002157279 A1, US2002157279A1
InventorsYoshikazu Matsuura, Mamoru Suehiro
Original AssigneeYoshikazu Matsuura, Mamoru Suehiro
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Walking shoes for the aged
US 20020157279 A1
Abstract
The object of this invention is to facilitate the aged to shift in particular the body weight of the forelimb when he or she walks by sloping the toe region and the heel region of the sole of the shoes.
In order to achieve said object, the walking shoe for the aged includes a transitive region (Z) defined by a line extending from the fore-end inner side (X) to the fore-end outer side (X2) and protruding in the oblique line (XX1) inward direction at an angle of 15°, a heel region (2) of the sole extending from the terminal end (Y) of the sole to the transitive line (XX2) inclining at an appropriate angle (α) to the floor surface, and a toe region (3) of the sole of the shoe body (1) rising at an appropriate angle (β) from an oblique line (4) linking the fifth metatarsophalangeal joint and the first metatarsophalangeal joint towards the tiptoe.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(5)
What is claimed is:
1. A walking shoe for the aged comprising a transitive region (Z) is defined by a line linking the fore-end inner side (X) and a fore-end outer side (X2) and protruding in the oblique line (XX1) inward direction at an angle of 15°, a heel region (2) of the sole extending from the end (Y) of the sole to the transitive line (XX2) inclines at an appropriate angle (α) to the floor surface, and a toe region (3) of the sole of the shoes body (1) rises at an appropriate angle (β) from an oblique line (4) linking the fifth metatarsophalangeal joint and the first metatarsophalangeal joint towards the tiptoe.
2. A walking shoe for the aged described in claim 1, wherein the heel region of the sole of the shoe inclines at an angle of 15° from the inside of the fore-end (X) of the heel region to the outside contributing to the stability of the heel region and the walkableness of the whole shoe.
3. A walking shoe for the aged described in claim 1, wherein the oblique line (4) linking the first metatarsophalangeal joint and the first metatarsophalangeal joint is a line protruding in the oblique line outward direction at an angle of about 13°.
4. A walking shoe for the aged according to any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein the appropriate angle (α) of the heel region (2) of the sole extending from the terminal end (Y) of the sole to the transitive line (XX2) is within a range of 7°-15°.
5. A walking shoe for the aged according to any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein the appropriate angle (β) of an area extending from the oblique line (4) to the tiptoe is in a range of 7°-15°.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] This invention relates to walking shoes, more specifically for the aged.

[0003] 2. Description of Related Art

[0004] Traditionally “walking” is the most basic exercise for us humans. By walking, humans absorb a large amount of oxygen, activate the pulsing function of the heart, and improve the blood circulation, which are considered to be useful for dissipating stress.

[0005] A great expectation is placed in particular on walking as one of the means to prevent or cure geriatric diseases, chronic diseases, etc. of the aged. And walking is considered far less burdensome on the feet, the waist and the heart than jogging and other sports, safe and very useful for maintaining and promoting the health of the middle-aged and the aged.

[0006] The applicants of this invention, who had already obtained a utility model No. 3040369 in Japan, further developed walking shoes for the aged which are easier to use for the aged as a result of their researches. Specifically, as shown in FIG. 4 (the arrows mark the shift of the body weight from the heel to the big toe), we humans walk by repeating the movement of landing on the ground with the heel, shifting the body weight to the outside of the foot, in other words to the little toe side, shifting the same from the root of the small toe to the inside, kicking the ground with the first metatarsophalangeal joint portion, and finally the top of the big toe leaving the ground.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0007] It is therefore the object of this invention to facilitate the “walking” motion necessary to maintain and promote health by sloping the front part of the shoe sole, to make the whole shoes more walkable so that the aged may be able to shift easily the body weight on the forelimb, and thus to provide walking shoes which are walkable and do not cause fatigue to the aged.

[0008] Humans normally walk with their tiptoes directed somewhat outwards. This angle is called “walking angle” or “feet angle” and its regular angle value is 15°. As for the walking characteristics of humans, when they suspend downward their legs at the relaxed position of the leg tendon, the angle of the sole of a foot to the floor is in most cases 15° toward inside regardless of the age, whether he or she is an aged person or a young. However, the angle of setting foot, in other words, the angle of the sole of a foot with the floor when the heel touches the ground is said to be 25° for the young but 20° in the case of the aged.

[0009] This difference in angle is considered to be attributable to the difference in length of a walking step due to the age, and scientists reportedly found that the length of a step of the aged is shorter than that of the young.

[0010] Therefore, this invention inclines the heel portion of the sole of the walking shoes for the aged in such a way that the whole shoes may be walkable. These walking shoes for being in harmony with the aged having a toe portion rising upward by 20° and the walking angle or foot angle of 15°, the one third portion of the sole near the heel, includes, an arch region (XYX2), namely heel region (2), and a transitive region (Z) constituting a oblique line (XX1) inward direction at an angle of 15°, the heel region from the rear end (Y) of the sole to the transitive line (X X2) is inclined at an appropriate angle to the floor surface, and the toe region defined by the oblique line (4) linking the fifth metatarsophalangeal joint and the first metatarsophalangeal joint and extending to the toe region inclines at an appropriate angle to the floor surface.

[0011] Further, according to this invention, the heel region of the sole of the shoes inclines at an angle of 15′ from the inside of the fore-end (X) of the heel region to the outside contributing to the stability of the heel region and the walkableness of the whole shoes. In general, the inner side of the heel region (2) of the sole inclines towards the outer side rising 4 mm higher than the inner side and the 15° inclination of the sole from the rear end (Y) to the transitive line (X X2) against the floor surface resulting rise of the toe portion of the sole beginning with the transitive line (X X2) at an angle of 15° which is close to the 20° angle at which the aged steps out foot facilitate walking. The whole contour is designed to match the walking pattern and therefore it facilitates the aged to walk.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

[0012]FIG. 1 is a side view of a preferred embodiment of this invention.

[0013]FIG. 2 is a plan view of the sole of the walking shoe.

[0014]FIG. 3 is a skeletal view of the foot.

[0015]FIG. 4 is a bottom view of the foot describing the shift of body weight during walking.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0016] A preferred embodiment of this invention will be described below with reference to FIG. 1 and FIG. 2. It consists of walking shoes for the aged in the shoe body (1) of which the transitive region (Z) of the sole is defined by a line extending from the fore-end inner side (X) to the fore-end outer side (X2) protruding in the oblique line (XX1) inward direction at an angle of 15°, and the heel region (2) of the sole extending from the rear end (Y) of the sole to the transitive line (XX2) inclines at an appropriate angle (α) to the floor surface, and the toe region (3) of the sole of the shoes body (1) inclines at an appropriate angle (β) to the floor surface over an area extending from the oblique line (4) linking the fifth metatarsophalangeal joint and the first metatarsophalangeal joint to the tiptoe.

[0017] Incidentally, an appropriate angle (α) of the heel region (2) of the sole extending from the terminal end (Y) of the sole to the transitive line (XX2) is preferably within a range of 7°-15°. And the oblique line (4) linking the first metatarsophalangeal joint and the first metatarsophalangeal joint is a line protruding in the oblique line outward direction at an angle of about 13°, and an appropriate angle (β) of an area extending from the oblique line (4) to the tiptoe is preferably in a range of 7°-15°.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7287340 *May 18, 2004Oct 30, 2007Sydney Design Technologies, Inc.Energy translating mechanism incorporated into footwear for enhancing forward momentum and for reducing energy loss
US7603794 *Feb 21, 2007Oct 20, 2009Dong Jae OhRear balance walking shoes
US8112910 *Apr 28, 2008Feb 14, 2012Kate HerberShoe wrap and system
US8127467Jan 10, 2007Mar 6, 2012World Wing Enterprise Co.Sole, and footwear provided with the same
US8256146Apr 30, 2008Sep 4, 2012The Stride Rite CorporationInfant shoes
US8387278Jan 12, 2009Mar 5, 2013Langer (Uk) LtdSole for footwear
US8881427 *May 27, 2010Nov 11, 2014Deckers Outdoor CorporationFor a shoe, in particular for a sports shoe
US20100263233 *Apr 6, 2010Oct 21, 2010Northwestern UniversityRocker shoes for prescribed ankle motion
US20120151796 *May 27, 2010Jun 21, 2012Jean-Luc DiardFor a shoe, in particular for a sports shoe
WO2007086251A1 *Jan 10, 2007Aug 2, 2007Yasushi KoyamaSole and footware provided with this
WO2009087398A1 *Jan 12, 2009Jul 16, 2009Langer Uk LtdA sole for footwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/25.00R, 36/103
International ClassificationA43B7/00, A43B13/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/148, A43B13/143, A43B7/00
European ClassificationA43B7/00, A43B13/14W6, A43B13/14W