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Publication numberUS20020170567 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/827,686
Publication dateNov 21, 2002
Filing dateApr 6, 2001
Priority dateApr 6, 2001
Also published asCA2443030A1, WO2002080707A1
Publication number09827686, 827686, US 2002/0170567 A1, US 2002/170567 A1, US 20020170567 A1, US 20020170567A1, US 2002170567 A1, US 2002170567A1, US-A1-20020170567, US-A1-2002170567, US2002/0170567A1, US2002/170567A1, US20020170567 A1, US20020170567A1, US2002170567 A1, US2002170567A1
InventorsJohn Rizzotto, Eugene Kardelis
Original AssigneeJohn Rizzotto, Eugene Kardelis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chewable flavor delivery system
US 20020170567 A1
Abstract
A flavor delivery system, e.g. oral tobacco substitute comprising a cellulosic plant material dried to 8% or less moisture and having at least 30% cell walls intact, coffee or caffeine extract, non-tobacco flavoring, humectant, minor amount of sweetening agent and optional tobacco flavoring. The compositions can be used as prepared or placed in heat sealable paper pouches.
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Claims(35)
What is claimed:
1. A chewable flavor delivery system comprising in combination:
a carrier consisting of an edible cellulosic plant material dried to a moisture content of at or below 8% by weight; said plant material having at least 30% intact cell walls;
a water soluble but not water containing flavoring ingredient in liquid form and capable of entering said cell walls of said plant material; and
an effective amount of a food safe humectant.
2. A delivery system according to claim 1, wherein said cellulosic plant material is formed into strands.
3. A delivery system according to claim 1, wherein said cellulosic material is in a granular form.
4. A delivery system according to claim 3, wherein said cellulosic material is sized to pass a 16 mesh and be retained on a 30 mesh screen of a U.S. Standard Sieve Series of screens.
5. A delivery system according to claim 4, wherein said cellulosic material is sized to pass a 16 mesh screen and be retained on a 20 mesh screen.
6. A delivery system according to claim 4, wherein said cellulosic material is sized to pass a 20 mesh screen and be retained on a 30 mesh screen.
7. A delivery system according to claim 1, wherein said humectant is selected from the group consisting of propylene glycol and glycerin.
8. A delivery system according to claim 1, including a minor amount of a sweetening agent.
9. A delivery system according to claim 1, wherein said cellulosic plant material is freeze dried green cabbage classified as Brassica oleracea capitata.
10. A flavor delivery system comprising in combination:
a heat sealable paper pouch adapted to be placed in the mouth of a user; and
a mixture comprising an edible cellulosic plant material having at least 30% intact cells, a flavoring ingredient, incorporated into said plant material and a humectant, inserted into said paper pouch.
11. A flavor delivery system according to claim 10, wherein said cellulosic material is in a granular form.
12. A flavor delivery system according to claim 11, wherein said cellulosic material is sized to pass a 16 mesh and be retained on a 30 mesh screen of a U.S. Standard Sieve Series of screens.
13. A flavor delivery system according to claim 12, wherein said cellulosic material is sized to pass a 16 mesh screen and be retained on a mesh screen.
14. A flavor delivery system according to claim 12, wherein said cellulosic material is sized to pass a 20 mesh screen and be retained on a 30 mesh screen.
15. A flavor delivery system according to claim 10, wherein said humectant is selected from the group consisting of propylene glycol and glycerin.
16. A flavor delivery system according to claim 10, including a minor amount of a sweetening agent.
17. A flavor delivery system according to claim 10 wherein, said cellulosic plant material is freeze dried green cabbage classified as Brassica oleracea capitata.
18. An oral tobacco substitute comprising in combination:
an edible cellulose plant material dried to a moisture content at or below 8% by weight, said plant material having at least 30% intact cell walls;
a water soluble but not water containing flavoring ingredient in liquid form and capable of entering said cell walls of said plant material; and
an effective amount of a food safe humectant.
19. A tobacco substitute according to claim 18, wherein said cellulosic plant material is formed into strands.
20. A tobacco substitute according to claim 18, wherein said cellulosic material is in a granular form.
21. A tobacco substitute according to claim 20, wherein said cellulosic material is sized to pass a 16 mesh and be retained on a 30 mesh screen of a U.S. Standard Sieve Series of screens.
22. A tobacco substitute according to claim 21, wherein said cellulosic material is sized to pass a 16 mesh screen and be retained in a 20 mesh screen.
23. A tobacco substitute according to claim 21, wherein said cellulosic material is sized to pass a 20 mesh screen and be retained on a 30 mesh screen.
24. A tobacco substitute according to claim 18, wherein said humectant is selected from the group consisting of propylene glycol and glycerin.
25. A tobacco substitute according to claim 18, including a minor amount of a sweetening agent.
26. A tobacco substitute according to claim 18, wherein said cellulosic plant material is freeze dried green cabbage classified as Brassica oleracea capitata.
27. A tobacco substitute comprising in combination:
26 to 46 percent by weight cellulosic plant material having at least about 30% intact cell walls;
29 to 53% by weight humectant;
11 to 14% by weight being one of coffee or caffeine
0.7 to 1% by weight sweetening agent; and
5 to 10% by weight flavoring ingredient other than tobacco.
28. A tobacco substitute according to claim 27, wherein said cellulosic plant material is freeze dried green cabbage classified in Brassica oleracea capituta.
29. A tobacco substitute according to claim 28, wherein said cabbage is in granular form.
30. A tobacco substitute according to claim 29, wherein said cabbage granulars are sized to pass a 16 mesh and be retained on a 30 mesh screen of a U.S. Standard Sieve Series of screens.
31. A tobacco substitute according to claim 30, wherein said cellulosic material is sized to pass a 16 mesh screen and be retained on a 20 mesh screen.
32. A tobacco substitute according to claim 30, wherein said cellulosic material is sized to pass a 20 mesh screen and be retained on a 30 mesh screen.
33. A tobacco substitute according to claim 28, wherein said cabbage is formed into strands.
34. A tobacco substitute according to claim 28, including up to 1% by weight tobacco flavoring.
35. A tobacco substitute according to claim 28, including an effective amount of a coloring agent to give said cellulosic material to appearance of chewing tobacco.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present invention pertains to chewable flavor delivery systems with sustained release of flavorant containing only natural ingredients.

[0002] Chewing gums, as shown by U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,116,627 and 5,139,787 contain, among other things, a flavoring that the user of the gum desires to have present in the mouth for a period of time.

[0003] Synthetic compositions for providing sustained release of flavorants have been developed. One such composition is illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 4,992,280.

[0004] Even animals have been provided with extended flavor releasing toys, such as shown in U.S. Pat. No. 4,557,219.

[0005] In addition to chewing gums, there is a segment of the population that uses what is referred to as smokeless tobacco. The smokeless tobacco is taken orally and can be flavored or unflavored. Smokeless tobacco can be chewed much like chewing gum. Chewing tobacco is usually formed in strands or larger pieces of the tobacco leaf. Smokeless tobacco can also be placed loose between the cheek and gum, with this type usually manufactured in small granular form. Another form of smokeless tobacco is finely divided tobacco particles that are packed into porous paper pouches, which are also placed between the cheek and gum.

[0006] The flavor enjoyment of smokeless tobacco comes partially from the initial flavor burst from any flavors such as peppermint, apple, peach and the like that are added to the tobacco and lastly, the slow release of the tobacco flavor itself.

[0007] In the past, mixing flavors with a substrate such as a cellulose powder has been tried as a tobacco substitute but found to be unsatisfactory. This has been due to the fact that the flavors wash out of the substrate thus, they do not last as long as tobacco based products.

[0008] Therefore, there is a need to find a tobacco substitute that in essence eliminates the use of the tobacco leaf itself and may use only minor amounts of tobacco flavoring.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] The present invention uses a dried cellulosic material, e.g. cabbage, which is prepared into strand form or relatively coarse granules. The cellulosic material is dried to a moisture content of less than 8% by weight and is prepared in a manner so that at least 30% of the cell walls of the cellulosic material remains in tact. The cellulosic material is combined with flavoring ingredients and a humectant to achieve the final composition which can be chewed or used without chewing in the mouth of a user.

[0010] Therefore, one aspect of the present invention is a chewable flavor delivery system comprising in combination; a carrier consisting of an edible cellulosic plant material dried to a moisture content of at or below 8% by weight, the plant material having at least 30% intact cell walls, a water soluble but not water containing flavoring ingredient in liquid form and capable of entering the intact cell walls in the plant material, and an effective amount of a food safe humectant contained in the delivery system.

[0011] In another aspect the present invention is a flavor delivery system comprising in combination; a heat sealable paper pouch adapted to be placed in the mouth of a user, and a mixture comprising an edible cellulosic plant material having at least 30% intact cell walls, a flavoring ingredient, incorporated into the plant material and a humectant, inserted into said paper pouch.

[0012] In yet another aspect the present invention is a tobacco substitute comprising in combination; an edible cellulose plant material dried to a moisture content at or below 8% by weight, the plant material having at least 30% intact cell walls, a water soluble but not water containing flavoring ingredient in liquid form and capable of entering the intact cell walls in the plant material, and an effective amount of a food safe humectant.

[0013] In still a further aspect, the present invention is a tobacco substitute comprising in combination 26 to 46 percent by weight cellulosic plant material having at least about 30% intact cell walls; 29 to 53% by weight humectant; 11 to 14% by weight being one of coffee or caffeine 0.7 to 1% by weight sweetening agent; and 5 to 10% by weight flavoring ingredient other than tobacco.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0014] In recent years, much as been written about the oral use of tobacco either as chewing tobacco or what is sometimes referred to as snuff, a finally divided granular tobacco that is placed loosely between the cheek and gum or is packed into porous paper pouches and which can be placed between the cheek and gum of the user.

[0015] Confirmed oral tobacco users could attempt to stop the use of conventional oral tobacco products if a chewable flavor delivery system simulating oral tobacco were devised.

[0016] According to the present invention, such an oral tobacco substitute can be manufactured using dried cellulosic material such as freeze dried cabbage. The freeze- dried cabbage is combined with a flavoring, humectant, minor amounts of a sweetener and optionally a coloring ingredient to simulate oral tobacco.

[0017] The humectant is selected to provide, in the case of smokeless tobacco, like properties of cohesiveness and wetness. In other applications the humectant will act as a lubricant that will not promote microbiological growth while giving the appearance of wetness. In addition to glycerins and propylene glycol vegetable oils can be used.

[0018] It is also within the purview of the present invention to achieve other chewable flavor delivery systems, the salient feature of the invention being the use of a 5 cellulosic material dried to a moisture content of 8% or below and having at least 30% of the cell walls in tact.

[0019] One particular cellulosic material that is found to be particularly effective in the present invention is a freeze dried green cabbage, which is classified as Brassica, oleraeca capitata sold by R. J. Van Drunen & Sons Inc. of Momence, Ill. Freeze-dried green cabbage granules having a size range from minus twelve (−12) to plus thirty (+30) mesh determined by using a U.S. Standard Sieve Series apparatus are particularly effective for use in the present invention.

[0020] Set forth in Table 1 are a series of compositions that were prepared according to the present invention.

TABLE 1
SAMPLE (% by weight)
COMPONENT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
CABBAGE 46.96 44.5 48.0
(−20 +30)
CABBAGE 40.00 40.00 40.00 40.00
(−16 +20)
CABBAGE 26.82
(−12 +20)
USP 31.33 29.55 31.33 53.62 42.90 42.83
GLYCRINE
96%
PROPYLENE 42.90 42.83
GLYCOL
COLOMBIAN 13.20 13.20 13.40 11.0 11.00 11.00 11.00
COFFEE*
CAFFEINE 13.64
IRISH CREME 6.40 5.36 5.36 5.36 5.36 5.36
FLAVOR
PEPPERMINT 7.00 9.09
FLAVOR
TOBACCO 0.54 0.45 0.10
FLAVOR
ASPARTAME 0.98 0.95 0.98 0.80 0.7 0.7 0.81 0.81
CARMEL 1.82
COLOR

[0021] Sample 1 in Table 1 was prepared by adding the aspartame and coffee to dry cabbage granules, which were then mixed well. Thereafter, glycerin and flavors were added with further mixing. The composition was then packaged into Dexter No. 11557 heat sealable paper pouches, which are approximately 0.5 inches by 0.8 inches in dimension. Each pouch contained approximately 0.35 grams of the composition. The pouches were pretreated by being dipped into a solution containing, water, Freeze-dried (instant) Colombian Coffee 1A-BBB, natural peppermint flavor 2006, aspartame and Frutarom tobacco flavor 36.210. FD (freeze-dried) Colombian Coffee 1A-BBB is the same coffee used in preparing sample 1 and is available from American Instants of Flanders, N.J. The natural peppermint flavor is available from Mother Murphy of Greensboro, N.C. and the tobacco flavoring is available from Frutarom of North Bergen, N.J. The pouches were air dried after dipping and before filling.

[0022] Sample 2 was prepared using cabbage granules having a particle size of minus 20 plus 30 mesh, natural caffeine anhydrous U.S.P. available from Haglin Flavors of Branchberg, N.J, natural peppermint flavor #2006, caramel color 325 available from Sethness of Clinton, Iowa, aspartame and Frutarom tobacco flavor 36.210. The pouches into which sample 2 were packed were the same size as the pouches used for sample 1, except that the pouches were dipped into a solution containing water, natural peppermint flavor #2006, caramel color #325, aspartame and Frutarom tobacco flavor 36.210.

[0023] Sample 3 was the same as sample 1 except that Irish Crème flavor 867.150/WC supplied by Flavors of North America of Carol Stream, IL was included in addition to the Colombian Instant coffee 1A-BBB. Compositions according to sample 3 were also packaged into pouches similar to those used for samples 1 and 2 with the pouches being pretreated by dipping in a solution containing water, Colombian Instant Coffee Irish Crème flavor 867.150WC, aspartame and Frutarom tobacco flavor 36.120, followed by drying the dipped pouches prior to filling.

[0024] Sample 4 was made with cabbage granules having a size of a minus 12 to plus 20 mesh and after mixing were not placed into pouches but were packaged into air tight containers or into film having a good barrier to entry of atmospheric moisture.

[0025] Sample 5 was produced with 40% by weight cabbage granules having a size of minus 16 to plus 20 mesh and was packaged into an airtight container.

[0026] Sample 6 was the same as sample 5, except that propylene glycol was substituted for the glycerine.

[0027] Sample 7 was the same as sample 6 with propylene glycol instead of glycerin with a slight adjustment in the content of the aspartame and the propylene glycol.

[0028] Sample 8 was a replication of sample 7 using glycerin instead of the propylene glycol.

[0029] All of the above samples were tested by users of smokeless tobacco and were found to be acceptable substitutes.

[0030] As stated herein before, the core of the invention is using a cellulosic plant material in place of gums or synthetic carriers to provide the carrier for the flavor.

[0031] Maintaining a minimum quantity of the cell walls of the cellulosic material in tact provides a place for the flavoring to be captured and to provide the extended release aspect of the present invention.

[0032] Having thus described our invention what is desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is set forth in the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7901512Nov 2, 2004Mar 8, 2011U.S. Smokeless Tobacco CompanyFlavored smokeless tobacco and methods of making
US7950399Apr 28, 2006May 31, 2011Philip Morris Usa Inc.Non-tobacco pouch product
US7980251Apr 28, 2006Jul 19, 2011Philip Morris Usa Inc.Method of making pouched tobacco product
US8029837Jun 5, 2008Oct 4, 2011Philip Morris Usa Inc.Chewable pouch for flavored product delivery
US8053008Nov 20, 2006Nov 8, 2011Philip Morris Usa Inc.Method of manufacturing flavor pouches
US8067046Jun 6, 2008Nov 29, 2011Philip Morris Usa Inc.Oral pouch product including soluble dietary fibers
US8119173Jul 16, 2008Feb 21, 2012Philip Morris Usa Inc.Method of flavor encapsulation through the use of a drum coater
US8389034Aug 26, 2011Mar 5, 2013Philip Morris Usa Inc.Chewable pouch for flavored product delivery
US8424541 *Jul 16, 2008Apr 23, 2013Philip Morris Usa Inc.Tobacco-free oral flavor delivery pouch product
US8616221Feb 26, 2008Dec 31, 2013Philip Morris Usa Inc.Oral pouch product with flavored wrapper
US8671952Jun 16, 2011Mar 18, 2014Philip Morris Usa Inc.Tobacco pouch product
US8678015Apr 29, 2011Mar 25, 2014Philip Morris Usa Inc.Non-tobacco pouch product
US8685478Nov 20, 2006Apr 1, 2014Philip Morris Usa Inc.Flavor pouch
US20100300465 *Mar 26, 2010Dec 2, 2010Zimmermann Stephen GOral Pouch Products Including a Liner and Tobacco Beads
WO2005041699A2 *Nov 2, 2004May 12, 2005Frank AtchleyFlavored smokeless tabacco and methods of making
WO2006120570A2 *Apr 28, 2006Nov 16, 2006Philip Morris ProdTobacco pouch product
WO2007126361A1 *Apr 26, 2007Nov 8, 2007Swedish Match North Europe AbA moist snuff non-tobacco composition and a method for production thereof.
WO2007144687A1 *Jun 12, 2006Dec 21, 2007Philip Morris ProdNon-tobacco pouch product
WO2008042331A2 *Sep 28, 2007Apr 10, 2008Monosol Rx LlcFilm embedded packaging and method of making same
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/359
International ClassificationA24B15/16, A24B13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA24B15/16, A24B13/00
European ClassificationA24B13/00, A24B15/16
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 4, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: PARTMERS INC., PENNSYLVANIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:RIZZOTTO, III, JOHN BAPTIST DECEASED BY DEBORAH A. RIZZOTTO ADMINISTRATRIX OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN BAPTIST RIZZOTTO, III;KARDELIS, JR., EUGENE;REEL/FRAME:013246/0725
Effective date: 20020827