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Publication numberUS20020194806 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/887,772
Publication dateDec 26, 2002
Filing dateJun 21, 2001
Priority dateJun 21, 2001
Also published asCA2451532A1, CA2451532C, EP1407089A2, EP1407089A4, EP1407089B1, WO2003000013A2, WO2003000013A3
Publication number09887772, 887772, US 2002/0194806 A1, US 2002/194806 A1, US 20020194806 A1, US 20020194806A1, US 2002194806 A1, US 2002194806A1, US-A1-20020194806, US-A1-2002194806, US2002/0194806A1, US2002/194806A1, US20020194806 A1, US20020194806A1, US2002194806 A1, US2002194806A1
InventorsRoger Roen
Original AssigneeRoger Roen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Structurally integrated accessible floor system
US 20020194806 A1
Abstract
A floor system for a building that includes primary and secondary structural supports, a grid attached to the supports, and a plurality of panels removably mounted in the grid to provide access to the space below the panels and the grid. The floor system replaces conventional permanent structural floors, and provides ready access to the underlying space which would otherwise be inaccessible in a conventional floor.
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Claims(28)
1. A floor for a building, comprising:
a plurality of primary structural building members;
a plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members spanning the primary building members, each one of the plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members having a top surface and a bottom surface;
a support grid on the top surfaces of the secondary building members and configured to receive panels; and
a plurality of panels mounted on the support grid to form a floor, each of the plurality of panels individually removable from the support grid to provide access to the space between the plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members.
2. The floor of claim 1, comprising means for fastening the plurality of panels individually to the support grid.
3. The floor of claim 1, comprising a system for leveling the floor.
4. The floor of claim 1 wherein the leveling system comprises a plurality of structures individually interposed between each of the plurality of spaced apart secondary structural building members and the support grid, and individually adjustable to vary a distance between each of the plurality of spaced apart secondary structural building members and the support grid.
5. The floor of claim 1 wherein the plurality of panels comprises at least one panel configured to enable the passage of gas from a first side of the at least one panel to a second side of the at least one panel.
6. The floor of claim 5, comprising a partition in the space between the plurality of spaced apart secondary structural building members to subdivide a plenum formed by the floor.
7. The floor of claim 1, comprising a fire resistant barrier affixed to the bottom surfaces of the plurality of spaced apart secondary structural building members.
8. The floor of claim 1 wherein the plurality of panels are configured to dampen sound transmission.
9. The floor of claim 1 wherein a major axis of the support grid is oriented at about 90 degrees to a longitudinal axis of the plurality of spaced apart secondary structural building members.
10. The floor of claim 1 wherein a major axis of the support grid is oriented at about 45 degrees to a longitudinal axis of the plurality of spaced apart secondary structural building members.
11. A floor structure for use with a primary support system, the structure, comprising:
means adapted for spanning a primary support system to provide a secondary support system;
means for supporting a plurality of floor panels on the spanning means, the supporting means configured to enable removal of individual floor panels to provide access to a space beneath the panels and between the supporting means; and
means for adjusting the position of the supporting means on the spanning means.
12. The structure of claim 11 wherein the supporting means comprises a grid having a plurality of openings, each of the plurality of openings configured to receive one of the plurality of floor panels.
13. The structure of claim 11, further comprising means for fastening each of the plurality of floor panels to the supporting means.
14. A floor structure, comprising:
a plurality of horizontal structural members held in a spaced-apart relationship;
a grid assembly, attached to the plurality of horizontal structural members, and having a plurality of first and second intersecting grid members defining a plurality of openings; and
a plurality of panels, each sized and shaped to be individually and removably engaged with the grid assembly to cover the plurality of openings.
15. The structure of claim 14 wherein each of the plurality of panels is removable to provide access to a space beneath the plurality of panels and between the plurality of horizontal structural members.
16. The structure of claim 14 wherein each of the plurality of panels is configured to fit within a respective opening, and each panel includes an upper surface configured to extend over a portion of those of the plurality of grid members that form the respective opening.
17. The structure of claim 16 wherein each the plurality of panels is provided with a flexible gasket surrounding the upper surface, such that when the plurality of panels are placed within contiguous ones of the plurality of openings, adjacent flexible gaskets engage one another.
18. The structure of claim 16 wherein the plurality of panels comprises at least one panel configured to enable gas to pass from a first side to a second side.
19. The structure of claim 16 wherein the plurality of panels comprises at least one panel configured to distribute power via an electrical outlet.
20. The structure of claim 16 wherein each of the plurality of panels is configured to dampen sound transmission from one of the plurality of panels to a contiguous one of the plurality of panels.
21. The structure of claim 16 wherein each of the plurality of panels is configured to be removably attached to the grid assembly.
22. The structure of claim 14, further comprising an attachment system configured to attach the grid assembly to the plurality of structural members and to maintain an adjustable gap between the grid assembly and each of the plurality of structural members to provide for leveling of the grid assembly.
23. The structure of claim 14, further comprising walls removably attached to the grid assembly.
24. A floor assembly, comprising:
a plurality of longitudinal structural supports, each of the plurality of longitudinal structural supports having an upper surface and a lower surface;
a grid assembly having a plurality of openings;
an attachment system attaching the grid assembly to the upper surface of each of the longitudinal structural supports and configured to enable adjustment in the position of the grid assembly relative to the longitudinal structural supports; and
a plurality of panels, each panel having a top portion and a bottom portion, the size and shape of at least the bottom portion configured to be slidably received into one of the plurality of openings, the size and shape of the top portion selected to bear against a top surface of the grid assembly.
25. The floor of claim 24 wherein each of the plurality of panels is individually removable to permit access to a space beneath the grid assembly and between the plurality of longitudinal structural supports.
26. A building, comprising:
a plurality of primary structural building members;
a plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members spanning the primary building members, each one of the plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members having a top surface and a bottom surface;
a support grid affixed to the top surfaces of the secondary building members and configured to receive panels; and
a plurality of panels removably received in the support grid to form a floor, each of the plurality of panels individually detachable from the support grid to provide access to the space between the plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members.
27. A building, comprising:
a plurality of primary structural building members;
a plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members spanning the primary building members, each one of the plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members having a top surface and a bottom surface;
a support grid affixed to the top surfaces of the secondary building members and configured to receive panels;
an attachment system attaching the support grid to the top surface of each of the plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members and configured to enable adjustment in the position of the support grid relative to the plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members; and
a plurality of panels removably received in the support grid to form a floor, each of the plurality of panels individually detachable from the support grid to provide access to the space between the plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members.
28. A building, comprising:
a plurality of primary structural building members;
a plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members spanning the primary building members, each one of the plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members having a top surface and a bottom surface;
a support grid affixed to the top surfaces of the secondary building members and configured to receive panels;
a plurality of panels removably received in the support grid to form a floor, each of the plurality of panels individually detachable from the support grid to provide access to the space between the plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members; and
walls, removably attached to the support grid.
Description
TECHNICAL FIELD

[0001] The present invention relates to floor structures, and more specifically to a floor assembly having removable access panels supported on a grid that is supported on a plurality of primary and secondary structural supports.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The increase in the use of computers, communication devices, and other electronic hardware has placed new demands on building designers. Users desire a large number of outlets for access to electrical power and communication signals, and they need the ability to change the location of such outlets on a regular, sometimes weekly basis. Power and data outlets have been located in, or under, a floor, typically in removable floor sections elevated above the original floor by supports. Two typical types of elevated floors are the pedestal floor and the low-profile floor.

[0003] The pedestal access floor has pedestals that consist of metal rods with a base plate at one end and a supporting plate on the other that supports removable horizontal panels, thus forming a raised floor structure. The metal rods are height adjustable and rest on a conventional solid floor deck. The solid floor deck may be made of wood, concrete, or a combination of metal deck and a concrete topping slab. The rods are arranged in a grid, typically square. The rods and plates support removable floor sections. The height of the rods is typically about 18 inches and can be adjusted to a desired height prior to installing the floor sections. Electrical power and data cables are laid between the solid floor deck and the underside of the floor sections. The cables penetrate the floor sections at a desired location to suit the user's needs. The penetrations may consist only of cables, or may be a junction box, similar to a common electrical wall outlet. The penetrations may accommodate power wires, or signal cables such as cable television, speaker wire, computer networks, etc. In some designs, the space between the floor deck and the elevated floor sections is enough to enable the distribution of conditioned air through grilles and/or registers located in selected floor sections. Because it is relatively expensive, this system is generally used where accommodation must be made for changes in elevation of the floor.

[0004] There is a labor premium involved in having to locate and install the foregoing pedestal system. The pedestals must be braced to meet seismic code, further increasing labor and cost. Moreover, the pedestals increase ceiling height requirements, and ultimately the height of the building, which increases the area of the exterior envelope, thereby increasing not only construction costs but also operating costs due to heat loss. If the pedestal access floor is only used in parts of a building, ramps or structural accommodations must be made for the changes in floor elevation. As users re-route electrical cables below the access floor, the pedestals may present an impediment in pulling cables to a new location. The access floor also represents another step in the construction schedule. The acoustical properties of this system are poor. The floor sections are usually relatively thin and rigid and transmit sound both horizontally and vertically.

[0005] The second type of elevated floor is a low-profile design, which may be roughly 2˝ inches to 4 inches high. This design does not use pedestals to raise and support the floor sections, but rather relies on “feet” at the corners of the sections to create the space above the solid floor deck and below the underside of the panel. The panels, with low “feet,” rest directly on the floor deck. This low-profile design is less costly than the pedestal floor, but still impacts the cost of a traditionally designed floor in a building because it requires the use of a solid floor deck. The problem of elevation changes between the existing conventional floor and accessible floor also remains.

[0006] There are also disadvantages to the low-profile floor compared to the pedestal floor. The space below the low-profile sections is not deep enough to be used to supply air. The resulting floor is not as stable, in either the horizontal or vertical dimension, as the pedestal access floor described above. Since the sections are not fastened to the floor deck, they can move when cable is being pulled and re-routed. It also increases the floor-to-floor height of the building, and thus the construction and operating costs. In general, the smaller distance between the solid floor deck and the surface of the floor sections decreases the flexibility of the low-profile floor. Both types require an underlying solid floor deck for support and to provide structural stability to the exterior building.

[0007] In addition, the acoustical characteristics of both common types of elevated floors are typically very poor. They tend to transmit noise to a degree that makes them impractical for use in many environments.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0008] In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, a floor assembly for a building is provided, the floor assembly having a plurality of primary structural building members, a plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members spanning the primary building members, a support grid on the top surfaces of the secondary building members, and a plurality of panels mounted on the support grid to form the floor, with each of the panels individually removable from the support grid to provide access to the space beneath.

[0009] According to an alternative embodiment of the invention, a floor assembly is provided that includes a plurality of longitudinal structural supports, a grid assembly, an attachment system attaching the grid assembly to the upper surface of each of the longitudinal structural supports and configured to enable adjustment in the position of the grid assembly relative to the longitudinal structural supports, and a plurality of panels, the bottom portion of the panels configured to be received into openings in the grid, and the top portion configured to bear against a top surface of the grid assembly.

[0010] In accordance with another embodiment of the invention, a building is provided that includes a plurality of primary structural building members, a plurality of spaced-apart secondary structural building members spanning the primary building members, a support grid affixed to the top surfaces of the secondary building members and configured to receive panels, an attachment system attaching the support grid to the top surface of each of the secondary structural building members and configured to enable adjustment in the position of the support grid relative to the secondary structural building members, and a plurality of panels received in the support grid to form a floor, each of the panels individually detachable from the support grid to provide access to the space between the secondary structural building members.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0011]FIG. 1 shows an isometric view of a section of the floor system formed in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

[0012]FIG. 2 shows a detail of a structural support grid element of a floor system formed in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention;

[0013]FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along line III-III of a portion of the floor system of FIG. 1;

[0014]FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional illustration of an alternative embodiment of the floor system of FIG. 3 taken along line IV-IV;

[0015]FIG. 5 is a plan view of a floor system according to another embodiment of the invention;

[0016]FIG. 6 is a plan view of a floor system according to an alternative embodiment of the invention;

[0017]FIG. 7 is an isometric view of a further embodiment of a floor system of the present invention; and

[0018]FIG. 8 is an isometric view of a floor system illustrating an alternative embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0019] The structurally integrated accessible floor system, hereinafter referred to as the floor system, is designated generally as 100, and is shown isometrically in FIG. 1.

[0020] Primary framing members 102 are provided, which can be formed as integral parts of metal frame type buildings. Secondary framing members, such as joists 104 are connected to the primary framing members 102. According to one embodiment of the invention, a structural support grid 106 is then formed over the secondary framing members 104. The grid 106 is configured to receive removable floor panels 108 in the openings 110 formed by the grid 106. The removable floor panels 108 are of a uniform size to allow interchangeability, and they may be provided with terminals or hookups 112 for electrical power and communication access, and with vents or registers 114 for ventilation.

[0021] For the sake of convenience and clarity, one type of power terminal 112 is shown in FIG. 1. However, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that a wide variety of terminals may be used, including standard 110 volt sockets, coaxial cable terminals, fiber optical connections, heavy duty power terminals, T2 connectors, etc. A user may further choose to provide an opening in the panel to enable the passage of cable without the use of a terminal. These and other options are considered to be within the scope of the invention.

[0022] By the same token, a wide variety of means to transmit air and gas may be used in place of the vent 114, including compressed air hookups, vacuum lines, fans, directionally adjustable vents, filters, emergency gas evacuation systems, compressed oxygen, CO2, propane, nitrogen, etc.

[0023]FIG. 1 also shows optional panels 116 attached to metal channels 118, which are in turn affixed to the underside of the secondary framing members. These panels 116 are ideally constructed of material that resists fire, thus forming a fire block. The panels 116 isolate one story of a building from the next, establishing fire protection, which may required by many building codes. The panels 116 attached to the underside of the secondary framing members enclose the space between the secondary framing members. This enclosed space may be employed as a plenum for HVAC. This can result in a financial savings, because ductwork is reduced or eliminated. Partitions may be used within this space to permit discreet sections of the floor system to pressurize for use as a plenum.

[0024] Referring next to FIG. 2, shown therein is a section of one embodiment of the structural support grid 106. According to this embodiment, the structural support grid comprises L-shaped rail members 202 affixed in back-to-back relationship to T-shaped joint nodes 200 to form supports for the removable floor panels. The nodes and rail members are standardized to permit interchangeability.

[0025] It is to be understood that the rail members may have many different cross-sectional shapes and node configurations. For example, some alternative cross-sectional shapes include channel, “T”, and square.

[0026]FIG. 3 shows the floor system 100 in cross-section taken along lines III-III in FIG. 1. The removable floor panel 108 has a plurality of layers, including a top layer 300, which is configured according to the requirements of the particular application and may have a carpeted surface or a tile surface. Alternatively, the top layer may be formed using chemically resistive materials for use in a lab or other caustic environments. The top layer 300 and a bottom layer 306 are designed to provide structural stiffness to the panel 108 and are configured according to the structural and weight bearing requirements of the particular application. Fire retardant layers 304 are composed of fire resistant materials such as gypsum, or other appropriate material, and serve to inhibit the passage of fire from one side of the panel 108 to the other. An insulation layer 302 provides thermal and acoustic insulation, as well as additional stiffness.

[0027] It will be understood that the composition of the removable floor panels will vary according to the requirements of a particular application and will in part be dictated by the anticipated environment, the required load carrying capacity, the desired appearance, the anticipated degree of noise control, local building and fire codes, and other factors.

[0028] Although the removable floor panels 108 bear against the structural support grid 106, panel fasteners 310 may be used to positively attach the panels 108 to the structural support grid 106. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, the panel fasteners 310 comprise threaded fasteners that pass from a lower surface of the structural support grid 106 into an opening in a lower surface of the removable panel 108 via an opening 311 in the rail member 202 of the structural support grid 106. The opening 311 is oversized in relation to the threaded fastener 310 to enable adjustment in the position of the removable panel 108 relative to the structural support grid 106. The threads of the threaded fastener 310 engage the removable panel and a hexagonal head of the fastener 310 bears against the lower surface 324 of the support grid 106, drawing the removable panel tight against the structural support grid 106. Thus, in this embodiment access to the panel fasteners 310 is from beneath the structural support grid 106.

[0029] A leveling unit 308 is provided to control a vertical distance 320 between the structural support grid 106 and the secondary framing members 104. FIG. 3 shows one of a plurality of similar units that comprise the leveling system, which functions as described below.

[0030] As shown in FIG. 3, the leveling unit 308 includes a threaded rod 312 attached to a support plate 314 that bears against an upper surface 322 of the secondary framing member 104. The threaded rod 312 passes through a lift plate 316 via an opening in the lift plate 316, with the lift plate 316 bearing upward against the lower surface 324 of the structural support grid 106. The rod 312 is slideably received in an opening 307 formed in the grid 106. A pair of jam nuts 318 on the threaded rod supports the lift plate 316. The position of the jam nuts 318 on the threaded rod determines the distance 320 between the upper surface 322 of the secondary framing member 104 and the lower surface 324 of the structural support grid 106.

[0031] By adjusting each of the plurality of units of the leveling system, the bearing surface 326 of the floor system 100 can be leveled, even if the upper surfaces 322 of the secondary framing members are not level.

[0032] In another embodiment of the invention, leveling devices that are functionally similar to the leveling unit 308 described above may be employed between an upper surface 120 (shown in FIG. 1) of the primary framing members 102 and the part 105 of the secondary framing members 104 that bears against the primary framing members. By adjusting the vertical distance between the primary and secondary framing members, the level of the structural support grid 106 can be controlled.

[0033] Other methods of controlling the vertical distance (not shown) between the primary and secondary framing members 102, 104, or between the structural support grid 106 and the secondary framing members 104 will be obvious to those skilled in the art. These methods include the use of wedges, shims, threaded devices that are accessed from above the floor system, automatic or remotely adjustable devices, etc., all of which are deemed to be within the scope of the invention.

[0034]FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a floor system 100, taken along line IV-IV, and shows an alternative embodiment of the removable panel 108. In this embodiment, a flexible gasket 400 is affixed to the top edge 412 of each panel 108, 109. The gaskets 400 of adjoining panels 108, 109 press against each other, providing a seal between the removable panels 108, 109. The seal may be employed to prevent spills from leaking through the floor system. In applications where spills of caustic or dangerous fluids might be anticipated, the composition of the gasket 400 is chosen to be resistant to the particular classes of substances in use. Multiple or interlocking gaskets may also be employed to provide a more secure seal. Alternatively, a single gasket may be wedged between the adjoining panels 108, 109 after they are installed on the structural support grid 106. The gasket 400 may also be used in applications where it is desirable to control the movement of air or other gasses from one side of the floor system to the other.

[0035]FIG. 4 also shows an alternative embodiment of the panel fasteners. Here, the panel fastener 410 is accessed with a tool (not shown) that is inserted from above the surface of the floor system into the center of the joint node 200. The panel fastener 410 is rotated approximately 45°. Fastener blades 408 rotate from positions in slots (not shown) in the joint node 200 into slots in the corners of the removable panels 406, locking them in place.

[0036] Other locking devices and systems will be evident to those skilled in the art and are considered to be within the scope of the invention. Such devices include those employing cam-type fasteners, devices that are accessible from the surface of the removable floor panels, devices that latch automatically when the removable floor panels are emplaced, etc.

[0037] Depending upon the height and local requirements, some buildings include devices or methods of construction that provide earthquake resistance. In conventional construction methods a solid floor deck functions as a diaphragm, which is resistant to dimensional stresses.

[0038] According to one embodiment of the invention, and as illustrated in FIG. 5, the structural support grid 106 is attached orthogonally, relative to the primary 102 and secondary 104 framing members. Diagonal stays 500 are employed to brace and provide the requisite stability to the structure. The stays 500 are attached directly to the primary columns 502 of a building and pass underneath the floor structure 100.

[0039]FIG. 6 shows an alternative embodiment of the invention, in which the structural support grid 106 is oriented diagonally, relative to the primary 102 and secondary 104 framing members. In this embodiment, the structural support grid 106 itself forms the diagonal bracing that reinforces the building structure.

[0040] In a further embodiment of the invention, and as shown in FIG. 7, repositionable walls 700 may be employed as part of the structurally integrated accessible floor system. These repositionable walls may consist of floor to ceiling room dividers, which may be assembled on site, as shown in FIG. 7, or prefabricated and installed as individual units, or alternatively they may be prefabricated cubicle dividers of the type common in office environments. The repositionable walls 700 are affixed directly to the structural support grid 104. Partial floor panels 1 08a may be cut to the necessary size at the site, using conventional methods, or may be manufactured in common dimensions. By affixing the walls 700 to the grid 106 and employing partial floor panels, acoustical isolation is enhanced and the structural stability of the walls 700 is improved.

[0041] Electrical components in the walls 700, such as light switches, thermostats, power connections etc, may be wired directly through the bottom of the walls via harnesses (not shown) that can be connected to cables and connectors underneath the floor panels 108. This is a significant advantage, especially in the case of cubicle dividers, over the methods currently in use, because conventional cubicle dividers must bring power into open areas and may involve complex interconnections between the dividers, and power drops from ceilings. Other methods include the use of wireless technology for switches and controls. Such technology has the advantage that it doesn't require any wiring connections in the walls.

[0042]FIG. 8 illustrates an alternative embodiment of the invention in which structural support rails 800 are employed. The rails 800 span the secondary framing members 104 and support the removable floor panels 108 on two sides. The floor panels 108 of this embodiment are configured to span the structural support rails 800.

[0043] In a conventional building, an elevated floor system of the type described in the background section of this document is installed on top of an existing floor. The elevated floor occupies a space above the floor, and is not part of the building structure. The accessible space provided by such an elevated floor is that space between the panels that form the surface of the elevated floor and the upper surface of the solid floor deck. In the structurally integrated accessible floor system of the embodiments of the invention described herein the solid floor deck is not needed. The removable panels provide access to the space beneath the grid and between the individual secondary framing members. In prior floor structures, this space is inaccessible and wasted. Because the structural support grid of the present invention spans the secondary framing members, the space beneath is unobstructed, providing simplified access for pulling cables, laying conduit, ducting, and pipe.

[0044] The cost of the floor system disclosed herein is significantly mitigated by several factors. A conventional structural floor is not required, and the floor system is essentially the same height as a conventional structural floor, obviating the need for ramps in areas where conventional floors adjoin the floor system. Because the floor system does not add height per story to the final building structure, there will be a savings in building materials, and a savings in operating costs over those of a similar building using accessible floors according to the prior art. Also, because the space under the floor system is unencumbered by pedestals, feet, or other support devices, the floor system has improved flexibility and changeability. Pulling cable, laying conduit and pipe, and installing ducting are all simplified. The labor costs and down time costs are reduced during changeovers.

[0045] From the foregoing it will be appreciated that, although specific embodiments of the invention have been described herein for purposes of illustration, various modifications may be made without deviating from the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, the invention is not limited except as by the appended claims and the equivalents thereof.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7509782 *Apr 14, 2004Mar 31, 2009Tate Asp Access Floors, Inc.Metal framed floor panel having flange outward of rib with u-shaped portion of gasket over top of rib, portion of gasket between rib and flange, and convex sealing portion of gasket below flange and outward of rib
US8267026 *Oct 23, 2009Sep 18, 2012Stx France S.A.Passenger ship with outer passageways provided with ventilation means
US20100107951 *Oct 23, 2009May 6, 2010Stx France S.A.Passenger ship with outer passageways provided with ventilation means
US20110047917 *Sep 1, 2009Mar 3, 2011Roen Roger CStructurally integrated accessible floor system
EP1611299A2 *Apr 9, 2004Jan 4, 2006Roger C. RoenStructurally integrated accessible floor system
WO2004092498A2 *Apr 9, 2004Oct 28, 2004Roger C RoenStructurally integrated accessible floor system
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/506.01, 52/506.07, 52/507, 52/506.09, 52/506.03
International ClassificationE04B5/48, E04B5/10, E04F15/024
Cooperative ClassificationE04B5/48, E04B5/10
European ClassificationE04B5/10, E04B5/48