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Publication numberUS20020199124 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/887,793
Publication dateDec 26, 2002
Filing dateJun 22, 2001
Priority dateJun 22, 2001
Publication number09887793, 887793, US 2002/0199124 A1, US 2002/199124 A1, US 20020199124 A1, US 20020199124A1, US 2002199124 A1, US 2002199124A1, US-A1-20020199124, US-A1-2002199124, US2002/0199124A1, US2002/199124A1, US20020199124 A1, US20020199124A1, US2002199124 A1, US2002199124A1
InventorsRichard Adkisson
Original AssigneeAdkisson Richard W.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
System and method for synchronizing data transfer across a clock domain boundary
US 20020199124 A1
Abstract
A system and method for synchronizing data transfer operations between two circuit portions across a clock domain boundary. A primary clock signal is operable to clock a first circuit portion and a secondary clock signal, generated from the primary clock signal, is operable to clock a second circuit portion. A SYNC pulse signal is generated based on coincident rising edges of the primary and secondary clock signals. A clock synchronizer controller is operable to generate a plurality of control signals based on the SYNC pulse signal for actuating data transfer circuitry disposed between the first and second circuit portions. A SYNC adjuster portion included in the clock synchronizer controller is operable to re-position the SYNC pulse signal by redefining a new coincident rising edge with respect to the primary and secondary clock signals based on a clock skew relative to each other.
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Claims(20)
What is claimed is:
1. A system for synchronizing a first circuit portion operating in a first clock domain that is clocked with a first clock signal and a second circuit portion operating in a second clock domain that is clocked with a second clock signal, comprising:
means for generating a SYNC pulse signal based on a predetermined temporal relationship between said first and second clock signals; and
a clock synchronizer controller operable to generate a plurality of control signals based on said SYNC pulse signal, said clock synchronizer controller including a SYNC adjuster operable to re-position said SYNC pulse signal based on a skew between said first and second clock signals, wherein at least a portion of said plurality of control signals actuate data transfer synchronizer circuitry disposed between said first and second circuit portions.
2. The system as set forth in claim 1, wherein said SYNC adjustor comprises:
a SYNC correct block operable to receive said SYNC pulse signal via a SYNC distributor, said SYNC correct block for correcting said SYNC pulse signal if said SYNC pulse signal has a particular clock period difference with respect to said first clock signal;
a ratio detector coupled to said SYNC correct block for detecting a frequency ratio relationship between said first and second clock signals;
a state/correct block associated with a phase detector for determining a state indicative of a phase difference between said first and second clock signals, said state/correct block operating responsive to said frequency ratio relationship detected by said ratio detector; and
a skew compensator operating responsive to said state to redefine a new coincident rising edge with respect to said first and second clock signals, whereby said SYNC pulse signal is re-aligned so as to correspond with said new coincident rising edges of said first and second clock signals.
3. The system as set forth in claim 2, further comprising a tapline and selection block operable to drive said plurality of control signals at predetermined times based on said SYNC pulse signal.
4. The system as set forth in claim 3, wherein said SYNC distributor comprises a plurality of registers.
5. The system as set forth in claim 3, wherein said data transfer synchronizer circuitry comprises at least one of a CLK1-TO-CLK2 synchronizer operable to facilitate data transmission from said first circuit portion to said second circuit portion and a CLK2-TO-CLK1 synchronizer operable to facilitate data reception by said first circuit portion from said second circuit portion.
6. The system as set forth in claim 5, wherein said plurality of control signals comprises a CLK1-TO-CLK2_VALID signal provided to said first circuit portion and an NDSYNC signal operable to actuate said CLK1-TO-CLK2 synchronizer.
7. The system as set forth in claim 5, wherein said plurality of control signals comprises a CLK2-TO-CLK1_VALID signal provided to said first circuit portion and an NRSYNC signal operable to actuate said CLK2-TO-CLK1 synchronizer.
8. The system as set forth in claim 5, wherein each of said CLK1-TO-CLK2 and CLK2-TO-CLK1 synchronizers includes a set/reset asynchronous flip-flop.
9. The system as set forth in claim 5, wherein said tapline and selection block comprises a plurality of delay registers.
10. The system as set forth in claim 5, wherein each of said plurality of control signals is staged through at least a flip-flop.
11. A method of synchronizing data transfer operations between two circuit portions across a clock domain boundary, comprising the steps:
generating a secondary clock signal from a primary clock signal, wherein said primary clock signal is operable to clock a first circuit portion and said secondary clock signal is operable to clock a second circuit portion;
generating a SYNC pulse signal based on a predetermined temporal relationship between said primary and secondary clock signals;
compensating for a skew between said primary and secondary clock signals and adjusting said SYNC pulse signal, if necessary; and
generating data transfer control signals at appropriate times relative to said primary and secondary clock signals based on said SYNC pulse signal to control data transfer operations between said first and second circuit portions.
12. The method as set forth in claim 11 wherein said secondary clock signal is generated by a phase-locked loop (PLL) based on said primary clock signal.
13. The method as set forth in claim 11, wherein said SYNC pulse signal is generated when a rising edge in said primary clock signal coincides with a rising edge in said secondary clock signal.
14. The method as set forth in claim 11, wherein said SYNC pulse signal is corrected if said SYNC pulse signal has a select clock period difference with respect to said primary clock signal.
15. The method as set forth in claim 11, wherein said step of compensating for a skew is comprised of the steps:
determining a state indicative of a phase difference between said primary and secondary clock signals; and
redefining a new coincident rising edge with respect to said primary and secondary clock signals based on said state.
16. The method as set forth in claim 15, wherein said new coincident rising edges with respect to said primary and secondary clock signals are redefined by adding at least an extra clock cycle when said state indicates that said primary clock signal lags with respect to said secondary clock signal by a predetermined amount.
17. The method as set forth in claim 15, wherein said new coincident rising edges with respect to said primary and secondary clock signals are redefined by deleting at least an extra clock cycle when said state indicates that said secondary clock signal lags with respect to said primary clock signal by a predetermined amount.
18. The method as set forth in claim 11, wherein said data transfer control signals are staged through a plurality of registers before being provided to data transfer synchronizer circuitry disposed between said first and second circuit portions.
19. The method as set forth in claim 11, wherein said primary clock signal comprises a core clock in a computer system.
20. The method as set forth in claim 19, wherein said secondary clock signal comprises a bus clock in a computer system.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION(S)

[0001] This application discloses subject matter related to the subject matter disclosed in the following commonly owned co-pending patent application(s): (i) “SYNC Pulse Compensation And Regeneration In A Clock Synchronizer Controller,” filed ______, Ser. No.: ______ (Docket Number 10012773-1), in the name(s) of: Richard W. Adkisson, which is(are) hereby incorporated by reference for all purposes.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] 1. Technical Field of the Invention

[0003] The present invention generally relates to clock synchronization techniques. More particularly, and not by way of any limitation, the present invention is directed to a system and method for synchronizing data transfer operations across a clock domain boundary separating two clock domains.

[0004] 2. Description of Related Art

[0005] Computer systems often need to communicate with different interfaces, each running at an optimized speed for increased performance. Typically, multiple clock signals having different frequencies are utilized for providing appropriate timing to the interfaces. Further, the frequencies of such clock signals are generally related to one another in a predetermined manner. For example, a core or system clock running at a particular frequency (FC) may be utilized as a master clock in a typical computer system for providing a time base with respect to a specific portion of its digital circuitry. Other portions of the computer system's digital circuitry (such as a bus segment and the logic circuitry disposed thereon) may be clocked using timing signals derived from the master clock wherein the derived frequencies (FD) follow the relationship: FC/FD≧1.

[0006] Because of the asynchronous—although related—nature of the constituent digital circuit portions, synchronizer circuitry is often used in computer systems to synchronize data transfer operations across a clock domain boundary so as to avoid timing-related data errors. Such synchronizer circuitry is typically required to possess low latency (which necessitates precise control of the asynchronous clocks that respectively clock the circuit portions in two different clock domains). Furthermore, since phase-locked loops (PLLs) utilized in conventional arrangements to produce clocks of different yet related frequencies can have a large amount of input/output (I/O) jitter, it is essential that the synchronizer circuitry be able to tolerate significant amounts of low frequency phase difference (or, skew) between the clocks caused thereby.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0007] Accordingly, the present invention advantageously provides a system for synchronizing data transfer operations between two circuit portions across a clock domain boundary by utilizing a high skew tolerant, low latency clock synchronizer controller. A primary clock signal (i.e., a first clock signal) is operable to clock a first circuit portion and a secondary clock signal (i.e., a second clock signal), generated from the primary clock signal, is operable to clock a second circuit portion. A SYNC pulse signal is generated based on a predetermined temporal relationship between the primary and secondary clocks. Preferably, a high SYNC pulse is produced when the rising edges of the primary and secondary clock signals coincide. The clock synchronizer controller is operable to generate a plurality of control signals based on the SYNC pulse signal, wherein at least a portion of the control signals are utilized for actuating data transfer circuitry disposed between the first and second circuit portions. A SYNC adjuster portion included in the clock synchronizer controller is operable to re-position the SYNC pulse signal based on a clock skew relative to each other.

[0008] In a presently preferred exemplary embodiment of the present invention, the SYNC adjustor comprises a SYNC correct block that receives the SYNC pulse signal via a SYNC distributor. The SYNC correct block is operable to correct the SYNC pulse signal if it has a predetermined clock period difference with respect to the first clock signal. A ratio detector is coupled to the SYNC correct block for detecting a frequency ratio relationship between the first and second clock signals. A state/correct block associated with a phase detector is operable to determine a clock state indicative of a phase difference between the first and second clock signals. Further, the frequency ratio relationship detected by the ratio detector is also provided to the state/correct block for determining the clock state. A skew compensator operates responsive to the clock state to redefine a new coincident rising edge of the first and second clock signals. The SYNC pulse signal is re-aligned thereafter so as to correspond with the new coincident rising edges of the first and second clock signals.

[0009] In a further embodiment of the present invention, a tapline and selection block, preferably comprising a plurality of delay registers coupled to suitable logic, is included for driving the control signals at appropriate times relative to the primary and secondary clocks based on the SYNC pulse signal.

[0010] In another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, the data transfer synchronizer circuitry comprises a synchronizer operable to facilitate data transmission from the first circuit portion to the second circuit portion and a synchronizer operable to facilitate data transmission from the second circuit portion to the first circuit portion.

[0011] In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of synchronizing data transfer operations between two circuit portions across a clock domain boundary. A secondary clock signal (e.g., a bus interface clock) is generated from a primary clock signal (e.g., a core clock), wherein the primary clock signal is operable to clock a first circuit portion and the secondary clock signal is operable to clock a second circuit portion. A SYNC pulse signal is generated based on a predetermined temporal relationship between the primary and secondary clock signals. Skew between the primary and secondary clock signals is compensated for by detecting the leading and lagging of the clocks via a phase detector. The positioning of the SYNC pulse signal is adjusted accordingly, if necessary. Data transfer control signals are generated thereafter at appropriate times relative to the primary and secondary clock signals based on the SYNC pulse signal to control data transfer operations between the first and second circuit portions.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0012] A more complete understanding of the present invention may be had by reference to the following Detailed Description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

[0013]FIG. 1 depicts a functional block diagram of a presently preferred exemplary embodiment of a system for synchronizing data transfer operations between two circuit portions across a clock domain boundary in accordance with the teachings of the present invention;

[0014]FIG. 2 depicts a timing sequence of an exemplary SYNC pulse signal based on a pair of clock signals (CLK1 (primary) and CLK2 (secondary) signals) having a 5:4 frequency ratio in an exemplary embodiment of the present invention;

[0015]FIG. 3 depicts a functional block diagram of a presently preferred exemplary embodiment of a high skew tolerant, low latency clock synchronizer controller circuit of the present invention for controlling data transfer synchronizer circuitry disposed between two circuit portions;

[0016]FIG. 4 depicts an exemplary clock state diagram which includes a plurality of states indicative of different amounts of phase difference between the exemplary primary and secondary clock signals having a 5:4 frequency ratio;

[0017]FIG. 5A depicts a timing diagram of the various signals used in the present invention, wherein the exemplary primary and secondary clock signals are in a normal state;

[0018]FIG. 5B depicts a timing diagram of the various signals used in the present invention as shown in FIG. 5A, wherein the primary clock signal leads the secondary clock signal;

[0019]FIG. 5C depicts a timing diagram of the various signals used in the present invention as shown in FIG. 5A, wherein the secondary clock signal leads the primary clock signal;

[0020]FIG. 6A depicts an exemplary data transfer synchronizer circuit for facilitating data transmission from the circuit portion clocked with the primary clock signal to the circuit portion clocked with the secondary clock signal;

[0021]FIG. 6B depicts an exemplary data transfer synchronizer circuit for facilitating data transmission from the circuit portion clocked with the secondary clock signal to the circuit portion clocked with the primary clock signal;

[0022]FIG. 7 is a flow chart of the various steps involved in an exemplary methodology for synchronizing data transfer operations in accordance with the teachings of the present invention; and

[0023]FIG. 8, comprising FIGS. 8A and 8B, depicts a further exemplary embodiment of the clock synchronizer controller circuit of the present invention, wherein SYNC pulse regeneration and compensation is advantageously provided.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0024] In the drawings, like or similar elements are designated with identical reference numerals throughout the several views thereof, and the various elements depicted are not necessarily drawn to scale. Referring now to FIG. 1, depicted therein is a functional block diagram of a presently preferred exemplary embodiment of a system 100 for synchronizing data transfer operations between two circuit portions across a clock domain boundary in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. Reference numeral 102 refers to a portion of the system 100 wherein a first circuit portion 114 that is clocked with a first (or, primary) clock (CLK1) signal 104 and a second circuit portion 112 that is clocked with a second (or, secondary) clock (CLK2) signal 105 derived from the primary CLK1 signal 104 are disposed. In an exemplary implementation, CLK1 104 is representative of a system clock (also referred to as a core clock) of a computer system and CLK2 105 is representative of a bus clock (i.e., an interface clock) that is generated based on CLK1 for operating a particular bus portion of the computer system at a predetermined frequency. Analogously, CLK1 domain logic and CLK2 domain logic are exemplary of the first and second circuit portions, 114 and 112, respectively, of the computer system wherein data is transferred therebetween.

[0025] A phase-locked loop (PLL) 106 is preferably utilized for generating CLK2 105 from CLK1 104. A feedback clock (FBCLK) signal 110 is produced by PLL 106 that is fed back for developing an error signal used in locking the input CLK1 signal 104 with the FBCLK signal 110. Generally, the frequencies of CLK1 and CLK2 are disposed such that the frequency of CLK2 is lower than or equal to the frequency of CLK1. Moreover, in the presently preferred exemplary embodiment of the present invention, the frequency ratio between CLK1 and CLK2 signals is optimized at N: (N−1). That is, for every N cycles of CLK1, there can be (N−1) CLK2 cycles.

[0026] Continuing to refer to FIG. 1, a SYNC pulse signal 108 is also preferably generated by PLL 106 based on a predetermined temporal relationship between CLK2 and CLK1 (or, FBCLK signal, more particularly). In the exemplary embodiment, the SYNC pulse is generated when a rising edge of the CLK1 signal coincides with a rising edge of the CLK2 signal. As will be described in greater detail hereinbelow, the SYNC pulse signal 108 is advantageously used by a clock synchronizer controller 120 in accordance with the teachings of the present invention for controlling data transfer synchronizer circuitry (comprised of CLK2-TO-CLK1 synchronizer 116 and CLK1-TO-CLK2 synchronizer 118) disposed between CLK1 and CLK2 domain circuit portions.

[0027]FIG. 2 depicts an exemplary timing sequence 200 of SYNC pulse signal 108 and the primary and secondary clock signals having a 5:4 frequency ratio in an exemplary embodiment of the present invention. A cycle count 202 determines the number of CLK1 cycles into the timing sequence 200. Those skilled in the art should recognize that although the waveform of CLK1 104 is illustrated in this FIG., it is the FBCLK signal (which is essentially a replica of CLK1) that may be used in an exemplary implementation.

[0028] As alluded to hereinabove, the SYNC pulse 108 is high on coincident edges of CLK1 and CLK2. In a normal condition where there is no skew (or, jitter, as it is sometimes referred to) between CLK1 and CLK2, the coincident edges occur on the rising edges of the first cycle (cycle 0) as shown in FIG. 2. Data transfer operations across the clock boundary between the asynchronous domains are timed with reference to the SYNC pulse. Since there are 5 CLK1 cycles and 4 CLK2 cycles, CLK1 domain circuit portion cannot transmit data during one cycle, as CLK2 domain circuit portion does not have a corresponding time window for receiving it. Typically, the cycle that is least skew tolerant is the one where data is not transmitted and, in the exemplary timing sequence shown in FIG. 2, it is the fourth cycle (i.e., cycle 3). Similarly, because of an extra cycle (where the data is indeterminate and/or invalid), CLK1 domain circuit portion must not receive data during one cycle. Again, it is the cycle with the least skew tolerance (for example, cycle 1) during which data is not received by the first circuit portion.

[0029] Skew between CLK1 and CLK2 signals will cause, for example, a variance in the positioning of the SYNC pulse which affects the data transfer operations between CLK1 and CLK2 domains. In the exemplary 5:4 frequency ratio scenario set forth above, if CLK2 leads CLK1 by a quarter cycle for instance, then instead of the edges being coincident at the start of cycle 0, they will be coincident at the start of cycle 1. In similar fashion, if CLK2 lags CLK1 by a quarter cycle, the edges will be coincident at the start of the last cycle (i.e., cycle 4).

[0030]FIG. 3 depicts a functional block diagram of a presently preferred exemplary embodiment of a high skew tolerant, low latency clock synchronizer controller circuit 120 that advantageously compensates for the CLK1/CLK2 skew in generating a plurality of control signals used for actuating the data transfer synchronizer circuitry disposed between the first and second circuit portions. Essentially, the clock synchronizer controller circuit 120 operates by detecting the leading and lagging of clock signals via a phase detector 314, and then adjusts the positioning of the SYNC pulse signal 108 based on the skew of the clocks using a SYNC adjuster 305, whereby cycle 0 follows the new coincident edges of the clocks.

[0031] The circuitry of the clock synchronizer controller 120 itself is clocked with CLK1 and thus belongs to CLK1 domain. Since the SYNC pulse signal 108 can be skewed with respect to CLK1, it is preferably “double-registered” or “double-sampled” by means of a flip-flop block 302 before being provided to a SYNC distributor 304 in order to prevent metastability. Preferably, one or more registers form the SYNC distributor block 304. Thereafter, the SYNC pulse signal is provided to a SYNC Correct block 306 which is operable to detect if the SYNC pulse jumped ahead or behind a predetermined clock period, e.g., one CLK1 period. Also, as the SYNC pulse may be lost or doubled due to sampling and skew, a SYNC sampling compensator (which will be described in greater detail hereinbelow) may be provided in a further exemplary embodiment of the present invention.

[0032] A Ratio Detect block 308 coupled to the SYNC Correct block 306 is operable to detect a range of frequency ratio relationships between the CLK1 and CLK2 signals so that the frequency of CLK2 can be optimized for different applications. If the number of times the SYNC pulse is sampled low between two successive high pulses using the CLK1 signal is X, the frequency ratio between CLK1 and CLK2 (which is N: (N−1)) is given as (X+1):X. As an illustration, consider the exemplary timing sequence depicted in FIG. 2. The SYNC pulse goes high in cycle 0, commencing the counting. When the SYNC pulse is sampled in cycles 1 through 4, it is low for 4 sampling instances, before it goes high in cycle 0 again. Thus, the frequency ratio of CLK1 and CLK2 signals is 5:4.

[0033] Continuing to refer to FIG. 3, a State/Correct block 310 coupled to the phase detector 314 is operable to determine a phase state of the CLKS and CLK2 signals which is indicative of the phase difference therebetween. Appropriate input (i.e., frequency ratio relationship information) is also provided by the Ratio Detect block 308 to the State/Correct block 310 for this purpose. A Skew Compensate block 312 is operable responsive to the determined state so as to re-position the SYNC pulse. In the exemplary 5:4 frequency ratio scenario, if CLK2 leads CLK1 by a quarter of CLK1, then cycle 1 is where the new coincident rising edges occur. Therefore, in order to set cycle 1 as new cycle 0 (i.e., start of the SYNC pulse cycle), the clock synchronizer controller 120 inserts an extra cycle (e.g., cycle 2 in the case of the 5:4 frequency ratio), whereby the CLK1 and CLK2 are expanded by one CLK1 cycle. This state of the clock signals is considered as [+1 State]. Similarly, if CLK2 leads CLK1 by another quarter clock, then the original cycle 2 is where the new coincident rising edges of the clock signals occur. Consequently, another extra cycle is added to the CLK1 and CLK2 cycles such that cycle 2 now becomes the new cycle 0. This state is considered as [+2 State]. To continue with the remaining states where CLK2 leads CLK1, [+3 State] (original cycle 3 becomes new cycle 0) and [+4 State] (original cycle 4 becomes new cycle 0) can be established based on the increasing skew (or, phase difference) between CLK1 and CLK2. Further, because of the periodicity of the clock signals, the positive skew states loop back to [State 0], before traversing the states again.

[0034] Analogous to the positive skew states, the clock synchronizer controller 120 is operable to compensate for the negative skew between the clock signals wherein CLK1 leads CLK2 by a phase difference. Thus, if CLK2 lags CLK1 by a quarter of CLK1, then cycle 4 is where the new coincident rising edges occur. Therefore, in order to set cycle 4 as new cycle 0 (i.e., start of the SYNC pulse cycle), the clock synchronizer controller 120 deletes an extra cycle (e.g., cycle 2 in the case of the 5:4 frequency ratio), whereby the CLK1 and CLK2 are compressed by one CLK1 cycle. This state of the clock signals is considered as [−1 State]. In similar fashion, states [−1] through [−4] are also obtained.

[0035]FIG. 4 depicts an exemplary clock state diagram including the states indicative of different amounts of phase difference between the exemplary primary and secondary clock signals having a 5:4 frequency ratio. Where there is no phase difference (i.e., normal condition), the clocks are in State 0 (reference numeral 400). Reference numerals 402, 404, 406, and 408 refer to the four positive clock states and reference numerals 403, 405, 407, and 408 refer to the four negative clock states described hereinabove. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that since a full cycle period of skew is identical to the original clock state, the SYNC adjuster 305 of the clock synchronizer controller 120 can theoretically compensate for an infinite amount of skew between CLK1 and CLK2. Moreover, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that [−1 State] is identical to [+4 State], [−2 State] is identical to [+3 State], [−3 State] is identical to [+2 State], and [+4 State] is identical to [+1 State].

[0036] Continuing to refer to FIG. 3 again, a Tapline and Selection block 316 is operably coupled to the Skew Compensate block 312, State and Correct block 310, and Ratio Detect block 308. Responsive to the skew-compensated SYNC pulse signal and appropriate frequency ratio information, the Tapline and Selection block 316 drives a plurality of control signals at appropriate times, wherein at least a portion of the signals are utilized for actuating the data transfer synchronizer circuitry disposed between CLK1 domain circuit portion 112 and CLK1 domain circuit portion 114. Because CLK1 domain circuit portion 114 is provided as a master circuit that initiates the data transfer operations, at least another portion of the control signals are provided thereto for specifying when the transfer operations are valid.

[0037] Reference numeral 318 refers to a control signal, labeled as NRSYNC, that is provided to the CLK2-TO-CLK1 synchronizer circuit 116 for controlling data receive operations (RX operations) wherein data is transferred from CLK2 domain circuitry to CLK1 domain circuitry. Similarly, reference numeral 320 refers to NDSYNC control signal that is provided to the CLK1-TO-CLK2 synchronizer circuit 118 for controlling data transmit operations (TX operations) wherein data is transferred from CLK1 domain circuitry to CLK2 domain circuitry. A CLK2-TO-CLK1_VALID signal 322 and a CLK1-TO-CLK2_VALID signal 324 are provided to the CLK1 domain circuitry to appropriately clock the data transfer operations.

[0038] In one exemplary embodiment, the Tapline and Selection block 316 may be implemented as a string of delay registers coupled to a control logic block for achieving proper timing relationships with respect to the control signals driven thereby. Further, it should be recognized by those skilled in the art that the various control signals described herein may be staged through flip-flops, clocked registers, and the like before being provided to their respective destinations.

[0039]FIG. 5A depicts a timing diagram of the various signals used in the present invention, wherein the exemplary primary and secondary clock signals have no skew therebetween. Accordingly, reference numeral 505 refers to a normal clock state (i.e., [State 0]) with respect to the primary and secondary clock signals. The CLK2-TO-CLK1_VALID signal 322, which is preferably provided as an active high signal, is driven low in cycle 1 to indicate an invalid data receive operation and thus disable it. Reference numeral 501 refers to the logic low level in the CLK2-TO-CLK1_VALID signal 322. The CLK1-TO-CLK2_VALID signal 324 is also preferably provided as an active high signal and thus have a logic low 503 in cycle 3 to indicate an invalid data transmit operation. The synchronizer control signals, NDSYNC 320 and NRSYNC 318, have logic high pulses of appropriate width (reference numerals 502 and 504, respectively) for facilitating suitable data transfer operations.

[0040]FIG. 5B depicts a timing diagram of the various signals used in the present invention as shown in FIG. 5A, but with a phase difference wherein the primary clock signal (CLK1 104) leads the secondary clock signal (CLK2 105). Reference numeral 510 refers to an exemplary phase amount by which CLK2 lags CLK1. From a normal clock state 505, the clock synchronizer controller enters a transitional phase 507 wherein appropriate skew compensation operations described in detail hereinabove take place for deleting a clock cycle (e.g., cycle 2), while data transfer operations may continue in adjusted time windows. Accordingly, the pulse widths of NDSYNC and NRSYNC signals are compressed in the compensated phase 507. After redefining the new coincident rising edges of the clock signals, the original cycle 4 becomes the new cycle 0 in [−1 State] 509 based on the new coincident rising edges.

[0041] Analogously, FIG. 5C depicts a timing diagram of the various signals of the present invention wherein the secondary clock signal (CLK2 105) leads the primary clock signal (CLK1 104). Reference numeral 514 refers to an exemplary phase amount by which CLK2 leads CLK1. From a normal clock state 505, the clock synchronizer controller enters a transitional phase 511 wherein appropriate skew compensation operations described in detail hereinabove take place for adding an extra clock cycle (e.g., cycle 2). Accordingly, the pulse widths of NDSYNC and NRSYNC signals are expanded in the compensated phase 511. Once again, upon suitably defining new coincident rising edges for the clock signals, the original cycle 1 becomes the new cycle 0 in [+1 State] 513, which re-positions the SYNC pulse.

[0042] Referring now to FIG. 6A, depicted therein is an exemplary data transfer synchronizer circuit 600A operable as CLK1-TO-CLK2 synchronizer 118 for facilitating data transmission from the circuit portion 114 clocked with the primary clock signal 104 to the circuit portion 112 clocked with the secondary clock signal 105. A pair of cross-coupled NAND gates 614, 616 are operable as an asynchronous Set/Reset (SR) flip-flop (FF) 612 wherein NAND 614 is clocked by CLK2 105 and NAND 616 is clocked by CLK1 104. The CLK1-TO-CLK2 NDSYNC control signal 320, which may have been staged through appropriate registers, is provided to a D flip-flop 610 which delays the NDSYNC pulse by a clock cycle of CLK1. The output (Q) of the D flip-flop 610 is provided as input to NAND 614 of the asynchronous SR flip-flop 612. The output of NAND 614 is ANDed with inverted CLK1 by AND 608, whose output enables a latch 604 disposed on a CLK1-TO-CLK2 data path 602. The output from the latch 604 is staged through a data path D flip-flop 606 that is clocked by CLK2. The output of D flip-flop 606 may be appropriately buffered before being provided to the second circuit portion.

[0043]FIG. 6B depicts an exemplary data transfer synchronizer circuit 600B operable as CLK2-TO-CLK1 synchronizer 116 for facilitating data transmission from the circuit portion 112 clocked with the secondary clock signal 105 to the circuit portion 114 clocked with the primary clock signal 104. Similar to the data transfer synchronizer circuit 600A above, a pair of cross-coupled NAND gates 664, 666 are operable as an asynchronous Set/Reset (SR) flip-flop (FF) 662 wherein NAND 664 is clocked by CLK1 104 and NAND 666 is clocked by CLK2 105. The CLK2-TO-CLK1 NRSYNC control signal 318, which may also have been staged through appropriate registers, is provided to a D flip-flop 658 which delays the NRSYNC pulse by a clock cycle of CLK1. The output (Q) of the D flip-flop 658 is staged through another D flip-flop 660 that is clocked on the falling edge of CLK1 104. The Q output from the D flip-flop 660 is provided as input to NAND 664 of the asynchronous SR flip-flop 662. The output of NAND 664 is ANDed with CLK2 by AND 656. Inverted CLK2 105 is also provided to a latch 652 disposed on a CLK2-TO-CLK1 data path 650. The output of the latch 652 is staged through another data path latch 654 that is enabled by the output of AND 656. Once again, the output of the latch 654 may be appropriately buffered before being provided to the first circuit portion in CLK1 domain.

[0044]FIG. 7 is a flow chart of the various steps involved in an exemplary methodology for synchronizing data transfer operations across a clock domain boundary in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. Upon providing a system or core clock (i.e., the primary clock), a secondary clock (e.g., bus interface clock) is generated by such means as a PLL or its equivalents (step 702). A SYNC pulse signal is generated based on a predetermined temporal relationship between the two clocks (step 704). As has been explained in the foregoing, the SYNC pulse is used for coordinating the timing sequence of the data transfer operations. Movement in the SYNC pulse due to any skew between the primary and secondary clocks is compensated for by a SYNC adjust mechanism depending on the detected phase difference and accordingly expanding or compressing the clocks so as to re-position the SYNC pulse (step 706). Data transfer control signals are generated thereafter based on the adjusted SYNC pulse signal at appropriate times relative to the primary and secondary clocks to control the operation of synchronizer circuitry disposed between the two clock domains (step 708).

[0045] As has been pointed out hereinbefore, although the SYNC pulse is registered by CLK1, it is generated with respect to CLK2. Accordingly, as the skew compensation mechanism redefines the coincident rising edges of the clock signals to obtain a re-positioned SYNC pulse, its position relative to an expected time window may itself have certain skew or, jitter. Further, the SYNC pulse jitter may be of such magnitude that the pulse may be “lost” (i.e., not within the expected time window) or may appear in duplicate. Where it is lost, it needs to be regenerated and where in duplicate, the pulse duplicate condition must be corrected such that only a single SYNC pulse appears. In such scenarios, the jitter effect needs to be removed from the SYNC pulse because unlike the skew compensation mechanism in which the SYNC pulse may have to be moved back and forth due to actual phase differences between the primary and secondary clocks, the jitter effect is essentially a spurious anomaly with serious negative consequences for data transfer operations. Thus, it is necessary for the clock synchronizer circuit to nullify its effect before being propagated to the Tapline/Selection block that drives the control signals with appropriate timing relationships as described hereinabove.

[0046] Referring now to FIGS. 8A and 8B which together form FIG. 8, depicted therein is a further exemplary embodiment of a clock synchronizer controller 800 having a SYNC compensator circuit 802 and jitter cycle delay compensation circuit 813 for providing SYNC pulse sampling and jitter compensation in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. Upon generating the SYNC pulse 108 and propagating it through appropriate flip-flop and distributor circuitry 302/304 as described above, it is provided to the SYNC compensator circuit 802. As the clock frequency ratio is known (due to the Ratio Detect block 308), cycle 0 as defined by the compensated/corrected SYNC pulse in State 0 is expected in the middle of a time window demarcated by a plurality of timing registers, e.g., registers 802, 806 and 810. When SYNC correct is sampled, it is thus expected to exhibit a “010” binary sequence. If, for instance, the SYNC correct is sampled to be all zeros (indicating a lost SYNC pulse), a binary “1” is inserted in the middle by activating a MUX 808 so as to restart the SYNC pulse in the appropriate timing window. When a duplicate pulse condition is signified by obtaining “011” or “110” sequence, the extra “1” at the ends is masked by activating logic such that only one properly timed SYNC pulse remains in the timing window. For example, when the “011” sequence is encountered, MUX 812 is activated so as to replace “1” at the right end with a “0”. Similarly, when the “110” sequence is encountered, MUX 804 is activated so as to replace “1” at the left end with a “0”.

[0047] If the SYNC pulse has jumped ahead or behind a clock cycle, binary sequences such as “100” or “001” are obtained upon sampling the SYNC correct. In such scenarios, the jitter cycle delay compensation circuit 813 is utilized in conjunction with the SYNC correct control block 803 of the SYNC correct 306 whereby the SYNC pulse is tapped after an appropriate string of delay registers such that the effect of the jumping ahead or behind of the SYNC pulse is effectively nullified. A pair of delay lines (not shown), preferably an ADD delay line and a SUBTRACT delay line, are provided as part of the SYNC correct control block 803. Upon determining where the SYNC pulse currently is, either the ADD delay line or the Subtract delay line is appropriately actuated to nullify the effects of the jumped SYNC pulse. In the exemplary embodiment depicted in FIG. 8, eight delay registers P0 through p7 (reference numerals 814-0 through 814-7) are provided. Selection of the tap points in the delay register sequence is effectuated by a MUX 816 that is controlled by a JITTER-STATE control signal 822 generated by the State and Correct block 310. As has been described in greater detail hereinabove with reference to FIG. 3, the State and Correct block 310 is operable responsive to the phase detector 314, SYNC Correct 306, and Ratio Detect block 308. The JITTER-STATE signal 822 may be held via a buffer flip-flop 818. When the JITTER-STATE variable is 0, the SYNC pulse signal is tapped after the P0 register. Similarly, for JITTER-STATE values of 1, 2, 3, and 4, the respective tap points are P1, P2, P3, and P4. In the case of JITTER-STATE values in the opposite direction, i.e., −1, −2, −3, and −4, the corresponding tap points are P4, P3, P2, and P1 because of the wraparound in the 5:4 cycle ratio.

[0048] It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the number of jitter cycle delay registers used depends on the number of clock ratios supported in a particular implementation. In the exemplary embodiment depicted in this FIG., up to eight cycle ratios ([N: (N−1), where N=2→8) may be supported as there are eight registers in the jitter cycle delay compensator 813.

[0049] Continuing to refer to FIG. 8A, a SUB-STATE signal 824 that is staged through a flip-flop 820 may also be generated by the State and Correct block 310 for dampening any oscillations in the detect-correct cycles of the clock synchronizer circuit 800. Since there is a finite time delay for a correction to take place after a particular state is detected, the SUB-STATE signal 824 is monitored and double-sampled such that the possibility of a particular state occurring successively in a relatively short period of time (i.e., in rapid succession) is reduced.

[0050] As shown in FIG. 8B, the compensated SYNC pulse signal from the jitter cycle delay compensator 813 is provided to the Tapline and Selection block 316 which drives a control logic block 830 operable to generate the control signals described in greater detail hereinabove. In the particular exemplary embodiment depicted in this FIG., eleven delay registers, T0 through T11, are illustrated. Outputs from each of the delay registers are provided to the control logic circuit 830 for facilitating appropriate timing relationships among the control signals generated. Further, similar to the exemplary embodiment depicted in FIG. 3, the control logic provides appropriate timing information to the State and Correct block 310.

[0051] Based upon the foregoing Detailed Description, it should be readily apparent that the present invention provides an innovative clock synchronizer controller system that allows two interfaces operating at different clock frequencies to send information back and forth at high speeds and at low latencies, even if the skew between the clocks is substantial. In fact, the loop-back clock state arrangement used in the presently preferred exemplary clock synchronizer controller implementation (wherein the number of clock states is dependent on the frequency ratio) provides the capability to tolerate virtually an infinite amount of skew by taking advantage of the circular nature of the phase difference in the clocks. In addition, the present invention advantageously provides SYNC pulse recovery (when the pulse is lost), grooming (when duplicate SYNC pulses occur) and jitter cycle delay compensation to increase the reliability of cross-domain data transfer operations.

[0052] Further, it is believed that the operation and construction of the present invention will be apparent from the foregoing Detailed Description. While the system and method shown and described have been characterized as being preferred, it should be readily understood that various changes and modifications could be made therein without departing from the scope of the present invention as set forth in the following claims.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification713/400
International ClassificationG06F1/12, H04L7/00, H03L7/06, G06F5/06
Cooperative ClassificationH04L7/0012, G06F5/06, G06F1/12, H03L7/06
European ClassificationG06F1/12, H04L7/00B2, G06F5/06, H03L7/06
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