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Publication numberUS2002171 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1935
Filing dateFeb 26, 1934
Priority dateFeb 26, 1934
Publication numberUS 2002171 A, US 2002171A, US-A-2002171, US2002171 A, US2002171A
InventorsThomas F Byron
Original AssigneeThomas F Byron
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Window curtain
US 2002171 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2l, 1935.

T. F. BYRON 2,002,171

WINDOW CURTAIN Filed Feb. 26, 1954 4 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Arrow/ys pair of my improved curtain being shown Patented May 2l, 1935 UNITED-STATES PATENT oFFIcE Application em as; No. '112,926

My invention particularly relates to window curtains made of a plurality of depending relatively hinged stiif panels. I illustrate my invention by metal and glass panels but materials other than metal and glass, such as wood, rubber, etc. of suitable stiffness and rigidity may be used. I have devised a novel curtain of this character which can be economically manufactured. easily kept clean, and conveniently manipulated, and which is of pleasing appearance. The manipulation consists in folding up the relatively hinged panels crosswise'so as to provide a clear opening, throughout ythe height of the window or window sash, of any desired width from a minimum to a maximum of substantially the full width of the window. My improved curtain construction also makes possible the economical obtaining of any desired ornamental effects; as also, different color eile'cts for the outside and the inside of the curtain to harmonize with the outside and inside environments.

'Ihe annexed drawings and the following description set forth in detail certain means embodying my invention, such disclosed means constituting, Ihowever, only a few of the various forms in which the principle of the invention may be embodied'.

In said annexed drawings:

Figure 1 is an elevational view showing'the inside of a window having upperand lower sashes, adjacent to the lower sash of which is applied a curtains each comprising a plurality of relatively hinged metal panels, one expanded to its full width covering one-half of the sash, and the other shown partially folded to provide a clear opening through the window throughout the height of the sash and for a portion of the width thereof;

Figure 2 is a fragmentary elevational view of a modified form of curtain having glass, celluloid, or other transparent or translucent material comprising the body thereof, the several panels of which are secured at their ends in relatively hinged metal holders;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary view, upon an enlarged scale, of a portion of the fully-expandedl curtain shown in Figure 1, certain parts beingv shown in vertical section;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary vertical section, taken in the plane indicated by the line 4 4, Figure 3; Figure 5 is a fragmentary vertical section, taken in the'plane indicated by the Iline 5 5, Figure 3; Figure 6 is a plan section, taken from the plane indicated by the line 6 6, Figure 3;

Figure 7 is a plan section, of a portion of the curtain 'suggested' in Fgure 6, but showing the curtain portion in partially folded position;

Figure 8 is a horizontal section', taken in-the plane indicated by the line 8 8, Figure 3;

, one of my improved Figure 9 is an elevation of a staple adapted to form the bearing or pintle portions of a hinge serving to pivotally connect the adjacent ends of adjacent curtain panels, the latter having peripheral beads adapted to be journalled or pivotally mounted at the top and bottom upon staples such as shown in this Figure 9;

Figure 10 is a view similar to Figure 8 but showing a modified form of curtain panel comprised of a pair of spaced heat-insulating and/or sound-deadening material filling the space between the two body members; A

Figure 11 is a view similar to a portion of Figure 3, showing a form of perforate curtain designed to furnish more ventilation than the substantially imperi'orate curtain shown in Figure 3; and

Figure 12 is a view similar to Figure 8 of a curtain comprised of panels made from two-ply material.

Referring to the annexed drawings in which the same parts are indicated by the same respective numbers inthe several v`iews, I show in Figure 1 a window l having an upper sash 2 and a lower sash 3. adjacent the latter of which multiple-panel metal curmetal body members with tains is applied. 'Ihe curtain which is comprised of a plurality of relatively hinged vertical panels 9 is shown for purposes of illustration as projecting slightly above the bottom of the upper rail 4 of the sash 3 and slightly below the top of the bottom rail 5 and extends, when fully expanded, across one-half of the lower sash 3, so as completely to cover one-half of the window glass 6. If desired. of course, the entire sash 3 or any portion thereof. or, in fact, the entire window l can be served by a single curtain. The several curtain panels 9 are dependingly supported by a transverse rod 1 rigidly mounted in the opposed side members of the window frame means such as the fixtures 8 secured to said side members of the window frame adjacently below the top of the upper rail I. v

Inasmuch as the several panels 9 are designed to be relatively hinged together in order to provide for the folding of the curtain to any desired extent up to the complete collapsing of the curtain so as to cause the panels to lie face to face ilat against the side of the window frame, I support the several panels 9 from the supporting rod 'l by loosely fitting means such as enlarged rings I9, Figures 3 and 4, through which the rod 1 passes, these rings defining a circle materiallygreater in cross-section than the cross-sectional area of the rod l. 'Ihe rings I 0 can adjust themselves angularly relatively to the rod l, according to the amount which the curtain is folded, by the right-hand curtain, shown in partly folded conditio The panels 9 are suspended from the rings lI0 by means of depending hooks whose eyes II are engaged by the rings III and whose stems I2 are bent at substantially right angles and secured in upwardly-extended beads I3.into which the upper edges of the respective panels 9 are formed, as clearly shown in Figure 4. The lower edges of the panels 9 are formed into downwardly-extended beads, designated I5.

In order to connect together the adjacent lateral edges of the panels 9 and yet provide for the easy relative pivotal movement jacent panels for the purpose of folding the curtain, I provide the panels with laterally-extended side beads I4 and I5, respectively, the upper and lower parts of which serve as hinge elements 2I that freely turn upon the respective legs of a staple or U-shaped hinge-element I1, these legs serving as bearings or pintles and respectively fitting within the upper ends of the adjacent beads I4 and I5 and being separated by an opening I8, Figure 9, of a width twice the thickness of the panel'material, Figure 3, so that they two panel thicknesses substantially ll the opening I8 between the legs of the hinge member I1, whereby to provide a substantially imperforate curtain. In order rmly to hold the staple hinge member I1 within the upper and lower ends of the beads I4 and I5, I form the exterior surfacesof the legs of the staples I1 with small grooved sections I9 within which I crimp corresponding parts 2Il of the beads I4 and I5, as clearly shown in Figures 5 and 9. The beads I3, I4, I5 and I6 are tubular, in the form of curtain shown, and are preferably rolled out of the panel material. v

The pivotal action between the various panels 9, when folding the curtain, is illustrated in Figure '1 wherein a part of a curtain is shown substantially half folded, and it will be noted that the journalled parts 2| of the beads I4 and I5 have turned upon the bearing legs of the hinge element I1, the latter having maintained substantially its original position, and this action can be continued, if it is so desired, until the curtain is disposed at against the window frame with the adjacent panels face to-face and spaced a distance apart substantially equal to the diameter of one of the beads I4 and I5 and slightly greater than the thickness of one of the legs of the staple I1. bottom between adjacent panels 9 is of the same construction as that described for the top connection. Within the top and bottom of the end beads I4 and I5 of a curtain I fit Stoppers 29 having rubber tips 30 which lie between the window frame and the adjacent end of 'the top bead I3.

In Figure 10 I show a modifled panel construction comprised of two lsuper-posed spaced sheet metal plates 24 and `25, having beads similar to those herein described for the panels 9, the bead of one sheet being folded withinvthe bead of the other sheet, and the space between the sheets 24 and 25 being rllled with heat-insulating and/or sound-deadening material 26, as clearly shown in Figure 10.

In Figure 2 I have shown a modified form of curtain comprised of panels whose body portions 23 are made of glass, celluloid, or other transparent or translucent material, and which are cemented or otherwise suitably secured at their ends in metallic end pieces 22. These end pieces 22 are identical in construction with the ends of the structure shown in Figure 10, except that of the ad- The hinge connection at the.

each end piece 22 is of a depth suicient only to securely hold an end of the glass body 23, which glass body end fills the space. in the end piece, instead of lling material such as shown in Figure 10. The curtain construction of Figure 2 is not providedwith side beads except on the endv pieces 22, so there are formed vertical air circulation openings 35 between adjacent panel bodies 23 even when the curtain is fully expanded. The curtain construction shown in Figure 2 serves to furnish subdued mellow light and some air circulation at all times, and can be collapsed or folded, as desired, in the same manner as can be done with the form of curtain shown i-n Figure l, to provide additional light, air and ventilation.

In Figure 11 I show a form of curtain in which the opening 32 between the legs of the staple hinge 3I is materially widerfthan the thickness of the material of the two beads I4 and I5, so as to provide vertical air-circulation openings between adjacent panels 9 even when the curtain is fully expanded.

In Figure 12 the panels 9 of the curtain are made of two metal sheets 33 and 34 disposed closely together face to face and eachhaving extended marginal beads, the beads of one sheet being rolled within the beads of the other sheet.

In addition to the economy with which my improved curtain can be made, and in addition to its permanency and ease of operation, and to the easy manner by which it can be dusted or washed :sov

in situ, I direct particular attention to the pleasvconform in the o'ne case with the decoration inside the room and in the other case to conform with the outside finish of the house. Also it is possible and of easy accomplishmentto color the entire beads I3, I4, I5, and I6 the same as that of the outside of the curtain thus to provide an inside trim 21 of a color differing from that of the color of the main inside body of the curtain, as clearly shown in Figure 3. Also, as is Well known to those versed in the sheet metal art, the metal sheets from which the panels 9 are formed can readily and economically be provided by lithographic processes with designs of any' desired character. I stamp the separate panels from such lithographed sheets, thus making available a great variety ofA ornamental eects for my improved multi-panel metal curtain, such as illustrated by one such design 2B upon the left-hand panel shown in Figure 3.

What I claim is:

1. A hinge for relatively pivoted curtain panels comprising laterally-opposed tubular members, and a U-shaped bearing whose respective legs are disposed within said members with a turning ilt.

2. A hinge for relatively pivoted curtain panels comprising laterally-opposed tubular members, and a U-shaped bearing whose respective legs are disposed within said members with a turning t, and means for preventing relative axial movement betweensaid members and said bearing.

3. A hinge for relatively pivoted curtain panels comprising laterally-opposed tubular members having their adjacent outer surfaces in contact, and a U-shaped bearing whose respective legs are disposed within said members with a turning fit.

4. A window curtain comprising a plurality of rigid panels adapted to depend from a xed supporting rod in opposed edgewise alignment, each panel being angularly adjustable relatively to the rod, adjacent panel edges having opposed extended tubular beads, hinge elements near the tops and bottoms of adjacent panel edges having bearing portions upon which the panel beads are pivoted, the outer edges of the end panels also having extended tubular beads, and Stoppers in the lastnamed beads having extended resilient enlarged heads.

5. A panel member for multi-panel collapsible curtains comprising a rigid sheet having rolled edges forming tubular beads serving as pintle receiving members of hinges by which the panel may be turned upon its edges as axes.

6. A panel member for multi-panel collapsible curtains comprising a pair of superposed sheets having edges rolled one within the other to form tubular peripheral beads serving as elements of hinges by which the panel may be turned upon its edges as axes.

7. A panel member for multi-panel collapsible curtains comprising a pair of superposed spaced sheets having edges rolled one within the other to form tubular peripheral beads serving as elements of hinges by which the panel may be turned upon its edges as axes, andinsulating material filling the space between said sheets.

8. A panel member for multi-panel collapsible curtains comprising a glass sheet, end members within which the respective ends of said sheet are contained, said end members comprising superposed spaced plates each having a lateral edge rolled one within the other so as to form beads adapted to -serve as pintle-receiving elements by which the panel may be turned upon its edges as axes.

9. A hinge for relatively pivoted curtain panels comprising laterally-opposed tubular members having their adjacent outer surfaces spacedffrom each other, and a U-shaped bearing whose respective legs are disposed within said tubular members with a turning fit. Y

10. A collapsible curtain comprising a plurality of pivotally connected panels,'each panel in cluding a rigid sheet having rolled edges forming tubular beads, and bearing members having pintle portions disposed in adjacent beads of adjacent panels with a turning t.

11. A curtain according to claim and in which the adjacent beads of adjacent panels are in contact. v

12. A curtain according to claim 10 and in which the adjacent beads of adjacent panels are spaced apart. f

13. A collapsible curtain comprising a plurality of hingedly connected panels, each panel including parallel pintle-receiving hinge elements formed integrally with the panel at two sides thereof, and at least some of the panels having supporting the curtain.

14. A collapsible curtain comprising a plurality of panels, each panel having a plurality of parallel hinge elements and the panels being formed and arranged so that adjacent panels have adjacent parallel hinge elements, and U- shaped hinge elements pivotally connected with the adjacent parallel hinge elements o1'- adjacent panels, whereby the panels are hingedly connected together.

' said beads of adjacent 3 15. A panel member for multi-panel collapsible curtains comprising a sheet having integrally formed pintle-receiving hinge elements at two of its edges and provided at a third edge with panel supporting means adapted to permit angular movement oi' the panel relative to a support for a curtain.

16. A window curtain comprising a.plurality of panels adapted to be carried dependingly from a support and means for swingably connecting the panels together so as to provide such an guiar adjustment of the panels relative to each other and relative to said support that the curtain is collapsible to a folded position of the panels and is expansible to an extended aligned position of the panels, said means including readily connectible elements adapted to permit ready connection of the panels while the curtain is carried by the support. 11. A window curtain comprising a plurality of panels adapted to be carried dependingly from a support and hinges connecting the panels together so as to provide such angular adjustment of the panels relative to each other and relative to said support that the curtain is collapsible to a folded position of the panels and is expansible to an extended aligned position of the panels, adjacent panel edges being formed with hinge elements, and said hinges including other hinge elements readily connectible to the mst-mentioned hinge elements while the curtain is carried by the support. i

18. A window curtain comprising a plurality of panels adapted to be supported dependingly from a support and hinges connecting the panels together so as to provide such angular adjustment of the panels relative to. each other and relative to said support that the curtain is collapsible to position of the panels and is expansible v panel edges having extended beads which constitute elements of said hinges, and panel edges extending substantially the full length ofthe edges and f being substantially -incontact to form a substantially imperforate curtain structure of the plurality o i' panels.`

19. In a .window curtain adaptedto be supported by rings loosely mounted upon a rod, a

plurality of panels having beads at their lateral edges, and bearing members upon which said beads are journalled so as to provide such angular adjustment of the panels relative to each other that the curtain is collapsible to a folded position of the panels and is expansible to an extended aligned position oi' the panels, the several panels being provided with hooks adapted to be supported by the several rings.

20. In a window curtain adapted to be carried on a support, a plurality of panels, means providing such angular adjustment of the panels relative to one another that the curtain is c ollapsible to a folded position of the panels and is expansible to an extended substantially aligned position of the panels, said means being adapted to provide for ready connection of the panels while the curtain is carried by the support, and means for supporting the panels for ready movement along said support.

THOMAS F. BYRON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2893483 *Mar 15, 1957Jul 7, 1959Green William TFolding doors
US2911037 *Oct 27, 1953Nov 3, 1959Acme Steel CoMetal slat folding door
US7814641Jul 21, 2006Oct 19, 2010Black & Decker Inc.Method of forming a power tool
US8203239Sep 30, 2010Jun 19, 2012Black & Decker Inc.Method of forming a power tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/199, 160/229.1
International ClassificationE06B9/262, E06B9/26
Cooperative ClassificationE06B2009/2625, E06B9/262
European ClassificationE06B9/262