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Publication numberUS2002836 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1935
Filing dateDec 4, 1933
Priority dateDec 4, 1933
Publication numberUS 2002836 A, US 2002836A, US-A-2002836, US2002836 A, US2002836A
InventorsPasquale Rossi
Original AssigneeAnastasio Petrocelli
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baggage carrier
US 2002836 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. ROSSI BAGGAGE CARRIER May 28, 1935.

F1 '.led Dec. 4, 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet l Z n 0 ll llllllll IIIIIIIIIII.

'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII/ v INVENTOR PAS QUALE ROSS! W I ATTORNEY I May 28, 1935. RQ$$| 2,002,836

BAGGAGE CARRI ER F iled Dec. 4, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 VIIIIIIIIIII/ II IIIIIIIIIIII a 11,1

35 v IN VEN TOR F BY PAsquAE R055! A TTORNEY Patented May 28, 1935 PATENT OFFICE BAGGAGE CARRIER Pasquale Rossi, New York, N. Y., asslgnor of onehalf to Anastasia Petrocelli, Hoboken, N. J.

Application December 4, 1933. Serial No. 700,763

8 Claims.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in a baggage carrier.

The invention has .foran object the construction of a baggage carrier which simulates'a grip 5 in every respect, but which is provided with the addition of castors, 'so that it j may be pushed along upon the ground.

As a further object of this invention it is proposed to so mount the castors upon the baggage carrier that they may assume a position within the carrier, when they are not needed, and assume a position outside in' position so that the baggage carrier may be pushed along theground, thereon.

Still further the invention contemplates mounting the castors on a movable member adapted to assume a position in which the castors are disposed withinthe carrier and another position in which they are outside the carrier ready for use.

Still further it is contemplated to hingedly mount the member carrying the castors in a manner so that it may assume the two positions desired.

Furthermore as another object of this invention it is proposed to mount the member hingedly upon one side and arranged so that it may move from a position along one side of the baggage carrier to a position along one end.

Still further it is proposed as a modification to arrange the member pivotal upon one of its center lines so that it may pivot from a position in which the castors aredisposed within the carrier to a position in which the castors are located outside. 7

Still further it is proposed to associate novel holding means with-the member for holding the member in either of the positions desired.

As another object of this invention it is proposed'to provide anarrangement whereby the castors may be raised and lowered to various degrees so as to adapt them .to be replaced for the convenience of the user. r '1 Still lfurther an arrangement is proposed r wherebythe castors may assume various adjusted positions upon the-member or be removed entirely.- iAnother onefof the objects of this invention is the construction of a device as mentioned which is simple and durable and which maybe manufactured and sold at a reasonable cost. a

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects'and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the append- (c1. 'iso -ss) ed claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more'particularly set'forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure: a

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a baggage carrier constructed according to this invention.

.Fig.-2is a'plan view of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 isa fragmentary perspective view of the lower corner of the baggage carrier illustrated in Fig. 1 as seen as though looking in the direction of the line 33 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is an elevational View looking rection of the line 5-5 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is an elevational view looking in the direction of the line 6-6 of Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken on the line 'I-'| of Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view of the in the diaccording to a modification of this invention.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary elevational view looking in the direction of the line 9-9 of Fig. 8.

Fig. 10 is a. side elevational view of a baggage carrier constructed according to a still further modified form.

Fig. 11 is an elevational view looking in the direction of the line ll-ll of Fig. 10.

Fig. 12 is a sectional view taken on the line l2--l-2 of Fig. 11.

Fig. 13 is a view similar to Fig. 11 but illustrating another modified form.

Fig-1! is a sectional view taken on the line l4-I4 of Fig. 13.

The baggage carrier according to this invention comprises a conventional baggage carrier l0 which is in the form of a receptacle having a hinged cover II and means for normally holding the cover closed. As illustrated straps I! are provided for this purpose. The baggage carrier is provided with a handle l3 upon one side of it which may be conveniently carried as a conventional grip. At one end the baggage carrier is provided with'a handle I4 which is hingedly mounted at one end l5 upon a bracket formed with a stop l6 so as to limit pivoting of the handle to a substantially vertical position as indicated by thedot and dash lines in Fig. 1. Several bolts ll project from the end of the baggage carrier and are engageable through openings in the end of the handle so as to' provide for locking the handle in a fixed position. When the handle is locked as shown the baggage carrier may be conveniently gripped and lifted. when the handle lower portion of the baggage carrier constructed I is pivoted tattle dot and dash position it serves as a handle by which the baggage carrier may be conveniently pushed along the ground, upon another positionof the member to be located,v outside of the carrier.

A means is provided for holding ..the member I8 in either of' its positions. A partition is formed within the baggage carrier and serves to provide a compartment into which the castors l9 may normally be disposed when the member I8 is in a position in which the castors are disposed within the baggage carrier.

The member IB is illustrated in Figs. 1, 3 and 4 and comprises a fiat member engaging over an opening formed in the side of the baggage carrier so as to close the compartment formed by the partition 20. The member I8 is hingedly mounted at one side upon the bottom corner of the baggage carrier and the hinge is arranged so that the member I 8 may assume the position illustrated by the full lines in Fig. 4 or may be pivoted to a position flat against the bottom of the baggage carrier as illustrated by the dot and dash lines in Fig. 4.

The means for holding the member IS in one or the other of its positions, comprises a latch mounted upon the member 18 consisting of a casing 22 from which a bolt 23 is resiliently projected. The spring 24 is mounted within the casing to extend the bolt. A transverse pin 25 is engaged through the bolt 23 and passes through elongated slots 26 formed in the casing 22 and in the member l8 whereby the pin 25 may be moved from either side of the member I8 to retract the bolt. The bolt 23 when the member i8 is in its closed position, acts against the inner side of the material of the baggage carrier which surrounds the opening in which the member 18 is located. When the member I8 is pivoted to its outside position then the bolt 23 engages within a keeper member 21 mounted upon the bottom of the baggage carrier. An opening 28 is also formed in the bottomof the baggage carrier through which a portion of the pin 25 may extend so that the pin does not produce an obstruction which would restrain the member l8 from as suming its correct position.

The castors or wheels l9 are arranged upon a detachable standard so that its position as re-,

gards the member 18 may be varied. The standard which supportsthe castors 19 (or wheels) comprises a pair of closely spaced parallel plates 29 having their base ends 30 turned away from each other and attached upon the member l8. Another plate is bent upon itself so as to have opposed sides 3| and a bent center 32 connecting these sides. The sides 3| engage between the plates 29 and maintain their positions due to bolts 33 which pass through the plates 29 and which are screwed tight. The bolts 33 pass through slots 34 formed in the plates 3i so that when the bolts 33 are loosened the plates 3! may be moved relative to the plate 29 to adjust the distance of the castors from the member l8." A shaft 35 is engaged through the bend 32 and the castors or wheels l9 are mounted upon the shaft.

In Figs. 8 and 9 a modified form of the invention has been disclosed in which a member I8 is illustrated for carrying the castors but arranged to pivot along the center line with the castors disposed inwards or outwards. More particularly a. transverse pintle rod 36 passes through the center of the member l3 and has its ends engaged into the sides of the material surrounding the opening in which the member l8 is set. The member l8 in this form of the invention is set into an opening formed in the bottom end of the baggage carrier. The member I8 is adapted to pivot so that either face is extended outwards. A means is provided for holding the member I3 in either of these positions and comprises a pair of latches mounted upon opposed edges but on the same side of the member l8 and adapted to engage the material immediately surrounding the opening into which the member I8 is set.

Each of these catches are identical in construction to the construction described relative to the catch in Fig. 4. Similar parts of the catches will be recognized by corresponding reference numerals. It should be noticed that the bolts 23 of the catches extend sufilciently so as to engage the edges of the material surrounding the opening in which the member i8 is set.

Each of the catches are provided with a transverse pin 25 which engages through the slots 29 so that the catches may be operated from either side of the member l8. The dot and dash circle 31 in Fig. 8 illustrates the path of the member l8 as it is turned about its pintle rod 36. The castors or wheels I9 are mounted upon standards identical in construction to those described rela tive to Figs. 4-7 inclusive. This standard is mounted upon one side of the member It as clearly illustrated in Fig. 8. In other respects this form of the invention is similar to the one previously described and other similar parts may be recognized by corresponding reference numerals.

In Figs. 10-12 inclusive another modified form of the invention has been disclosed in which the castors are mounted upon the removable piece. According to this form of the invention the baggage carrier is equipped 'with the member l8 which is provided with a pintle rod 38 and which is mounted within the baggage carrier ll! as described relative to the construction illustrated in Figs. 8 and 9. Upon one side of the member l8 there is mounted a guide member 38 which is equipped with closed flanges on the sides thereof producing a track in which a slide 39 may be moved. One end of the slide 40 of the slide 39 is bent at right angles to the slot and constitutes a handle by which it may be convenientlygripped.

The other end of the slide is provided with a catch section 4! adapted to cooperate with another catch section 42 mounted upon'the member l8. constructed that they may be engaged with each other to hold the slide 39 in place or they may be disengaged so that the slide 39 may be moved longitudinally out from the guide 38. The standard which supports the castors or wheels l9 is mounted upon the slide 39. The details of the standard and the castors are similar to those described relative to Figs. 4-7 inclusive. and similar parts may be recognized by corresponding reference numerals. Auxiliary single castors l9 are also secured to the slide 39 by standards 29' which form bends 32' in which shafts 35' are secured and the castors or wheels l9 are mounted upon this shaft. According to this form of the invention the slide 39 may be removed and the castors completely removed if desired. This-allows for a perhaps of a diflerent size, or arrangement to be substituted.

In Figs. 13 and 14 another modified form of the device has been illustrated in which the member I8 is provided with a casing 43 which is provided with end walls 44 and side walls 45. A screw 48 is rotatively mounted through the end walls 44 and has a projecting head 41 by which it may be readily turned. A follower 48 is threadedly engaged upon the screw 46 and is disposed between the side walls 45 so as to be prevented from rotating and limited to move longitudinally along within the casing 43 as the screw 46 is rotated. The standard which supports the castors or wheels I! is mounted upon the follower 48. The details of the standard and the castors are similar to those illustrated relative to Figs. 7 inclusive and the various parts may be recognized by the corresponding reference numerals.

According to this form of the invention the location oi the castors upon the member I8 should be varied by, merely turning the screw 46 which causes the follower 48 to move and correspondingly carry the castors. With this arrangement it is possible to locate the castors. It! at difierent distances from the lowermost corner of the baggage carrier and from a fixed auxiliary wheel l9 which is secured to the end wall 44 and member I8.

The operation of the device is as follows:-Normally the member should be located so that the castors are disposed within the baggage carrier. The baggage carrier maybe used in conventional manner, that is for the storing of clothes or other articles.- It may be carried about by the handles provided for it. The receptacle constituting the carrier may be opened or closed in any conventional fashion. In the event that the baggage carrier is loaded with heavy material, too heavy to allow'complete carrying by the handles then the member which supports the castors should be detached so that the castors are disposed outside upon one end of the material. -Then the baggage carrier may be rested upon the ground on these castors and pushed along similar to a hand truck. With this arrangement it is possible to carry a very heavy load for any desirable distance.

While I have shown and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise construction herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and modifications coming within the scopeof the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:-

1. A baggage carrier, comprising a receptacle for baggage and having an opening in the side wall at one corner, a member movably mounted on one end thereof upon said corner forminga closure for said opening and adapted to assume 2 A baggage carrier, comprising a receptacle for baggage and having an opening in the side wall at one corner, a member movably mounted on one end thereof upon said comer forming a closure for said opening and adapted to assume a position flat against the end of the receptacle, castorsmounted upon one side of said member, and means holding said member in a closed position with the castors disposed within the baggage carrier and in an open position with the castors extended below the end of the baggage carrier, said castors being mounted upon a plate adjustably mounted on a standard mounted on said member whereby the relative distance of the castors from the member may be adjusted.

3. A baggage carrier, comprising a receptacle for baggage and having an opening in the side wall at one corner, a member movably mounted on oneend thereof upon said corner forming a closure for said opening and adapted to assume a position flat against the end of the receptacle,

'castors mounted upon one side of said member;

ceptacle to hold the member in one or the other positions.

4. A baggage carrier, comprising a receptacle for baggage, a member movably mounted on a pivot on one endof said receptacle, castors mounted upon one side of said member, and means holding said member in one position with the castors disposed through an opening andwithin the baggage carrier and in another position with the castors extended below the end of the baggage carrier, said member being pivotally mounted by said pivot upon one of its center lines and normally disposed within said opening formed,

in the bottom end of said baggage carrier and adjustable to either of said positions.

5. A baggage carrier, comprising a receptacle for baggage, a member movably mounted on a pivot on one end of said receptacle, castors mounted upon one side of said'member, and means holding said member in one position with the castors disposed through an opening and within the baggage carrier and in anotherposition with the castors extended below the end of the baggage carrier, said member being pivotally mounted by said pivot uponone of its center lines and normally disposed within said opening formed in the bottom end of said baggage carrier and adjustable to either of said positions, said castors being mounted upon a standard attached upon one side of said member.

6. A baggage carrier, comprising a receptacle for baggage, a member movably mounted on a pivot on one end of said receptacle, castors mounted upon one side of said member, and means holding said member in one position with the castors disposed through an opening and within the baggage carrier and in another position with the castors extended below the end of the baggage carrier, said member being pivotally mounted by said pivot upon one of its center lines and normally disposed within said opening formed in the bottom end of said baggage carrier and adjustable to either of said positions, said castors .being mounted upon a standard attached upon a slide removable detachably mounted upon said member.

7. A baggage carrier, comprising a receptacle for baggage, a member movably mounted on a pivot on one end of said receptacle, castors mounted upon one side of said member, and means holding said member in one position with in the bottom end of said baggage carrier andadjustable to either of said positions, said castors being mounted upon a standard attached upon a slide removable detachably mounted upon said member, said slide being mounted upon a guide member, and a catch upon said slide and member for-detachably holding the slide in place.

8. A baggage carrier, comprising a receptacle for baggage, a member movably mounted on a pivot on one end of said receptacle, castors mounted upon one side of said member, and

means holding said member in one position with the castors disposed through an opening and within the baggage carrier and in another position with the castors extended below the end of the baggage carrier, said member being pivotally mounted by said pivot upon one of its center lines and normally disposed within said opening formed in the bottom end of said baggage carrier and'adjustable to either of said positions, said casing member being attached upon said member and formed with opposed walls, a screw rotatively mounted through opposite walls of said walls, a follower threadedly engaged upon said screw and engaging against the other of said walls, and a standard mounted upon said follower and supporting saidcastors.

* PASQUALE ROSSI.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2463391 *Mar 19, 1946Mar 1, 1949Genevieve KanaleyWheel attachment for luggage
US2468375 *Feb 19, 1947Apr 26, 1949Paddock John CTruck for transporting bobbins, quills or spools
US2510754 *Nov 18, 1947Jun 6, 1950Norlin Clarence FPortable luggage having retractable wheels
US2539993 *Jul 2, 1946Jan 30, 1951Francis W DavisRetractable wheel support for luggage
US2581417 *Jul 29, 1948Jan 8, 1952Cooley Jones WendellLuggage carrier having projectable and retractible supporting rollers
US2596578 *Mar 5, 1949May 13, 1952Malcolm McintyreWheeled suitcase
US2720911 *Sep 27, 1952Oct 18, 1955Joseph I LantzConvertible baby stroller and child's seat for automobiles
US4026570 *Sep 29, 1975May 31, 1977Presto Lock Company, Division Of Walter Kidde & Company, Inc.Caster for luggage
US4228877 *Dec 26, 1978Oct 21, 1980Cothary Walter GWheeled suitcase with extendable handle means
US4561526 *Jan 3, 1983Dec 31, 1985Samsonite CorporationSteering and support handle for wheeled luggage
US4761012 *Feb 2, 1987Aug 2, 1988Dames Peter KDevice to transport suitcases
US4838396 *Jul 14, 1988Jun 13, 1989Delsey Luggage CompanyLuggage handle
US4915402 *Oct 19, 1988Apr 10, 1990`Totes`, IncorporatedLuggage with retractable wheel system
US5048649 *Mar 2, 1990Sep 17, 1991American Tourister, Inc.Luggage with pull handle
US5181590 *Mar 14, 1991Jan 26, 1993American Tourister, Inc.Luggage frame with pull handle
US5197579 *Apr 29, 1991Mar 30, 1993American Tourister, Inc.Luggage with pull handle
US5230408 *Aug 19, 1992Jul 27, 1993Imports By Brian IncorporatedAutomatically extending anti tip-over device for wheeled luggage
US5330037 *Sep 15, 1992Jul 19, 1994Wang King ShenWheeled travel bag with adjustable handle
US5339934 *Jan 25, 1993Aug 23, 1994Joseph LiangLuggage steering device
US5379870 *Aug 12, 1993Jan 10, 1995Imports By Brian IncorporatedAnti tip-over device for wheeled luggage
US5630521 *Apr 23, 1996May 20, 1997Samsonite CorporationErgonomic upright wheeled luggage
US6604615 *Nov 7, 2001Aug 12, 2003Yi-Ming WuRoller device of luggage case
US7748508Feb 28, 2005Jul 6, 2010Paul Tee Hui LeeWheeled luggage case
US8490765Aug 31, 2006Jul 23, 2013Paul Tee Hui LeeLuggage
US8783431 *May 11, 2011Jul 22, 2014Chen-Chuan WuFast detachable side wheel device
US20120285780 *May 11, 2011Nov 15, 2012Chen-Chuan WuFast detachable side wheel device
WO1984002638A1 *Jan 3, 1984Jul 19, 1984Samsonite CorpSteering and support handle for wheeled luggage
WO1988006416A1 *Mar 3, 1988Sep 7, 1988Delsey Luggage CoLuggage handle
WO2005084481A1 *Feb 28, 2005Sep 15, 2005Lee Marc Tee HuangWheeled luggage case
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/645, 280/43.16, 280/80.1, 190/18.00A, 280/47.16, 280/37, 280/47.26, 280/38
International ClassificationA45C5/14, A45C5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C5/146
European ClassificationA45C5/14R