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Publication numberUS20030009955 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/904,985
Publication dateJan 16, 2003
Filing dateJul 12, 2001
Priority dateJul 12, 2001
Publication number09904985, 904985, US 2003/0009955 A1, US 2003/009955 A1, US 20030009955 A1, US 20030009955A1, US 2003009955 A1, US 2003009955A1, US-A1-20030009955, US-A1-2003009955, US2003/0009955A1, US2003/009955A1, US20030009955 A1, US20030009955A1, US2003009955 A1, US2003009955A1
InventorsTim Sellers
Original AssigneeAgrifab, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Clear span building structure
US 20030009955 A1
Abstract
A clear span building structure includes a first row of cantilever supporting structures and a second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures. Each of the cantilever supporting structures has (1) a post with a top end and a bottom end, the bottom end being engaged to the ground; (2) an anchor span having a haunch height from a bottom end of the anchor span to the ground; and (3) a cantilever span. The anchor span and the cantilever span are coupled to the top end of the post. The anchor span slopes downwards from the top end of the post and the cantilever span slopes upwards from the top end of the post. A first roof covers the first row of cantilever supporting structures. A second roof covers the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures. The first row of cantilever supporting structures and the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures form only two pole lines.
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Claims(31)
What is claimed is:
1. A clear span building structure, comprising:
a first row of cantilever supporting structures and a second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures, each of the cantilever supporting structures having
a post with a top end and a bottom end, the bottom end being engaged to the ground,
an anchor span having a haunch height from a bottom end of the anchor span to the ground, and
a cantilever span,
wherein the anchor span and the cantilever span are coupled to the top end of the post, the anchor span slopes downwards from the top end of the post and the cantilever span slopes upwards from the top end of the post;
a first roof covering the first row of cantilever supporting structures; and
a second roof covering the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures, wherein the first row of cantilever supporting structures and the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures form only two pole lines.
2. The clear span building structure according to claim 1, further including a central alley extending along a length of the clear span building structure.
3. The clear span building structure according to claim 1, further including a free stall area underneath the first roof.
4. The clear span building structure according to claim 1, further including a free stall area underneath the second roof.
5. The clear span building structure according to claim 1, wherein a top face of the cantilever span of the first row of cantilever supporting structures is coupled to a top face of the cantilever span of the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures.
6. The clear span building structure according to claim 1, wherein the cantilever span is longer than the anchor span.
7. The clear span building structure according to claim 1, wherein the cantilever span is coupled to the anchor span at the top end of the post.
8. The clear span building structure according to claim 1, wherein the cantilever span an d the anchor span are formed from a unitary member.
9. The clear span building structure according to claim 1, wherein the first roof and the second roof provide a top central opening along a length of the clear span building structure.
10. The clear span building structure according to claim 1, wherein an angle of slope of the anchor span and the cantilever span is approximately 15 to 20 degrees.
11. A clear span barn, comprising:
a first row of cantilever supporting structures and a second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures, each of the cantilever supporting structures having
a post with a top end and a bottom end, the bottom end being engaged to the ground,
an anchor span having a haunch height from a bottom end of the anchor span to the ground, and
a cantilever span,
wherein the anchor span and the cantilever span are coupled to the top end of the post, the anchor span slopes downwards from the top end of the post and the cantilever span slopes upwards from the top end of the post;
a first roof covering the first row of cantilever supporting structures;
a second roof covering the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures, wherein the first row of cantilever supporting structures and the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures form only two pole lines;
a first free stall area underneath the first roof;
a second free stall area underneath the second roof; and
a central alley between the first free stall area and the second free stall area and extending along a length of the clear span barn.
12. The clear span barn according to claim 11, wherein a top face of the cantilever span of the first row of cantilever supporting structures is coupled to a top face of the cantilever span of the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures.
13. The clear span barn according to claim 11, wherein the cantilever span is longer than the anchor span.
14. The clear span barn according to claim 11, wherein the cantilever span is coupled to the anchor span at the top end of the post.
15. The clear span barn according to claim 11, wherein the cantilever span and the anchor span are formed from a unitary member.
16. The clear span barn according to claim 11, wherein the first roof and the second roof provide a top central opening along the length of the clear span barn.
17. The clear span barn according to claim 11, wherein an angle of slope of the anchor span and the cantilever span is approximately 15 to 20 degrees.
18. A method of constructing a clear span building structure, comprising:
providing a first row of cantilever supporting structures and a second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures, each of the cantilever supporting structures having
a post with a top end and a bottom end, the bottom end being engaged to the ground,
an anchor span having a haunch height from a bottom end of the anchor span to the ground, and
a cantilever span;
coupling the anchor span and the cantilever span to the top end of the post for each of the first row of cantilever supporting structures and the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures, wherein the anchor span slopes downwards from the top end of the post and the cantilever span slopes upwards from the top end of the post;
providing a first roof to cover the first row of cantilever supporting structures;
providing a second roof to cover the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures, wherein the first row of cantilever supporting structures and the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures form only two pole lines.
19. The method according to claim 18, further including providing a central alley extending along a length of the clear span building structure.
20. The method according to claim 18, further including providing a free stall area underneath the first roof.
21. The method according to claim 18, further including providing a free stall area underneath the second roof.
22. The method according to claim 18, further including coupling a top face of the cantilever span of the first row of cantilever supporting structures with a top face of the cantilever span of the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures.
23. The method according to claim 18, wherein the cantilever span is longer than the anchor span.
24. The method according to claim 18, further including coupling the cantilever span to the anchor span at the top end of the post.
25. The method according to claim 18, wherein the cantilever span and the anchor span are formed from a unitary member.
26. The method according to claim 18, providing a top central opening along a length of the clear span building structure between the first roof and the second roof.
27. The method according to claim 18, wherein an angle of slope of the anchor span and the cantilever span is approximately 15 to 20 degrees.
28. A clear span barn, comprising:
a first row of cantilever supporting structures and a second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures, each of the cantilever supporting structures having
a post with a top end and a bottom end, the bottom end being engaged to the ground,
an anchor span beam having a haunch height from a bottom end of the anchor span to the ground, and
a cantilever span beam coupled to the anchor span beam,
wherein the anchor span beam and the cantilever span beam are coupled to the top end of the post, the anchor span beam slopes downwards from the top end of the post and the cantilever span slopes upwards from the top end of the post, and the cantilever span beam is coupled to the anchor span beam at the top end of the post;
a first roof covering the first row of cantilever supporting structures;
a second roof covering the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures, wherein the first row of cantilever supporting structures and the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures form only two pole lines;
a first free stall area underneath the first roof;
a second free stall area underneath the second roof;
a central alley between the first free stall area and the second free stall area and extending along a length of the clear span barn; and
a top central opening along the length of the clear span barn and between the first roof and the second roof.
29. The clear span barn according to claim 28, wherein a top face of the cantilever span beam of the first row of cantilever supporting structures is coupled to a top face of the cantilever span beam of the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures.
30. The clear span barn according to claim 28, wherein the cantilever span beam is longer than the anchor span beam.
31. The clear span barn according to claim 28, wherein an angle of slope of the anchor span and the cantilever span is approximately 15 to 20 degrees.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The present invention generally relates to a clear span building structure. More particularly, the present invention relates to a clear span building structure having two rows of supporting columns that minimizes construction and labor costs and maximizes flexibility in floor plan designs, such as for a dairy cattle housing facility.

[0003] 2. Discussion of the Related Art

[0004] Free stall dairy barns have become an attractive option for dairy farmers who want to maintain and manage a large dairy herd. The advantages of the free stall housing system over other confined herd arrangements, such as tie stall barns, are well known. These advantages include reduction of bedding per cow, less space per cow, ease of manure removal, reduced udder washing time before milking, higher milk quality, and less frequent udder injury.

[0005] A free stall barn requires a building design that is similar to conventional loose housing, but with stalls and lanes constructed to define resting areas, watering areas, feed areas, and cow lanes for the cows to walk to and from a milking center. In the resting areas, free stalls are arranged in parallel rows with adjacent concrete alleys that provide safe, convenient passages for the cows to other parts of the free stall barn and other parts of the housing system. The resting areas are often bedded with sand or organic material. The alleys have gutters or other mechanisms for collecting manure, which is flushed into a manure handling tank. Each resting area also has a feed alley where the cows feed themselves. These are normally located adjacent and parallel to a feed drive-through or feed driveway/alley. There is a barrier between the feed alley and the drive-through, which can include a row of feed stanchions.

[0006] A feed table of about two to three feet in width typically lies along the barrier on the drive-through side, and the cows place their necks and heads over or through the barrier to eat the feed that is distributed on the feed table (i.e., the sides of the feed driveway/alley). Normally, a feed vehicle is driven along the drive-through to bring the feed. The feed is spread out on the feed tables that lie along both sides of the feed drive-through. The milking of the cows is carried out at a milking parlor located outside the barn. A single milking parlor may service several free stall barns.

[0007] Various types of free stall barn building structures are utilized by dairy farmers. One type of a free stall barn structure is a hanger-type barn where the entire barn is enclosed, or mostly enclosed, much like that of an airplane hanger. In certain locales, these hanger-type barns become very hot during the summer months, ventilation is poor inside, and additional cooling fans and mist sprayers may be utilized to cool the cows housed therein.

[0008]FIG. 1 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a conventional open-air-type tiered barn structure having two opposing sloping roofs and a central-tiered roof, all of which are supported by six rows of supporting posts/columns (having first to sixth pole lines) than run along a length of the barn structure. In the tiered-roof barn structure illustrated in FIG. 1, a central alley driveway is provided in the middle and along the length of the barn structure underneath the central tiered roof, while the left roof and the right roof each have underneath a free stall area (where the cattle reside). Feed stanchions are provided as a boundary along the central alley driveway so that the cattle may stick their heads through the stanchions to eat the feed placed at each side of the central alley driveway. The central alley may be wide enough to accommodate a vehicle, such as a pickup truck, so that the dairy operator may drive down the central alley through the barn structure to drop off the feed along the length of the barn.

[0009] Existing cow housing facilities are generally supported by four, six, or more rows of supporting columns. Because of the number of rows of supporting columns, or pole lines, the layout of the dairy cattle housing facility, such as the position and location of alleys, fence lines, gate lines, and stanchion lines, etc., must be designed around the pole lines. These impediments limit the most efficient design layout of the building structure, for example, a free stall barn. Moreover, like the hanger-type barn structures, cooling fans and mist sprayers are typically still utilized to facilitate ventilation and to cool the cows housed within the barn structure, as in FIG. 1. Furthermore, it is important to ensure that the cows are dry, clean, and comfortable, as it is well documented that cows that are dry, clean, and comfortable produce significantly more milk and of higher quality.

[0010] Dairy cattle barn structures are a major investment for dairy owners and operators, as each barn structure requires significant construction costs and labor to build. Moreover, existing dairy cattle barn structures typically require cooling fans and mist sprayers to improve ventilation within the barn structure and to keep the cows cool, which require electricity to operate. Accordingly, there is a need for an aesthetically-pleasing barn structure having a simple design and lower cost, being relatively easy to construct, and having good ventilation and cooling characteristics, while still capable of providing protection from direct sunlight, wind, and rain.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0011]FIG. 1 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a prior art barn structure;

[0012]FIG. 2 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a clear span building structure according to an embodiment of the present invention;

[0013]FIG. 3 illustrates a close-up view of a cantilever supporting structure according to an embodiment of the present invention; and

[0014]FIG. 4 illustrates a close-up view of a ridge connection of two cantilever spans according to an embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0015]FIG. 2 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a clear span building structure according to an embodiment of the present invention. The clear span building structure 200 includes a first row of cantilever supporting structures 210 and a second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures 220. The first row of cantilever supporting structures 210 and the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures 220 provide the frame upon which the clear span building structure 200 is built. Each of the cantilever supporting structures have a post 212, 222, an anchor span 214, 224, and a cantilever span 216, 226. The post 212, 222 has a top end and a bottom end, the bottom end being engaged to the ground, preferably with a concrete footing or other suitable configuration. The anchor span 214, 224 has a haunch height 218, 228 that extends from a bottom end of the anchor span to the ground.

[0016] The anchor span 214, 224 and the cantilever span 216, 226 are coupled to the top end of the post 212, 222. The anchor span 214, 224 slopes downwards from the top end of the post 212, 222, while the cantilever span 216, 226 slopes upwards from the top end of the post 212, 222. The angle of slope may be of any suitable angle depending upon the particular utilization of the clear span building structure 220, but preferably between fifteen to twenty degrees. In a specific embodiment of the present invention, approximately a seventeen degree slope was found to be suitable for a clear span building structure 200.

[0017] The cantilever principle utilized for the clear span building structure 200 is similar to that of the design of cantilever bridges, except that cantilever bridges have horizontal surfaces as opposed to the sloping anchor span 214, 224 and cantilever span 216, 226, as in the present invention. In principle, the anchor span 214, 224 and the cantilever span 216, 226 are each supported at one end, at the post 212, 222, and the cantilever span 216, 226 is suspended at the center of the building structure. According to an embodiment of the present invention, the anchor span 214, 224 and the cantilever span 216, 226 may be formed from a single unitary member, such as a single steel I-beam (or any suitable material or beam), or formed from two or more members, such as steel I-beams, coupled together. The post 212, 222 is preferably formed of a steel column, but other suitable materials may also be utilized.

[0018] In the cantilever design as applied to an embodiment of the present invention, the sloped anchor span 214, 224 is acted upon by gravity in a downward direction. Because the cantilever span 216, 226 is joined with the anchor span 214, 224, the downward force of the anchor span 214, 224 acts to suspend upward the cantilever span 216, 226. By utilizing the cantilever principle in the design of the clear span building structure 200, a single post 212, 222 may be utilized to support the entire cantilever supporting structure 210, 220, and yet provide a structurally stable frame upon which the clear span building structure 200 is built. As the first row of cantilever supporting structures 210 and the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures 220 form the frame upon which the clear span building structure 200 is built, only two pole lines 265, 275 exist, which greatly reduces the number of impediments, i.e., additional pole lines, for which the layout design of the building structure may be made. Moreover, a crossbeam connecting each of the cantilever spans 216, 226 of the cantilever supporting structures 210, 220 forming typical “triangle-shaped” rooftops is not required with the cantilever design.

[0019] A first roof 230 is provided to cover the first row of cantilever supporting structures 210, and a second roof 240 is provided to cover the second row of cantilever supporting structures 220. The first roof 230 and the second roof 240 may be formed of metal, plastic, or other suitable material. The first roof 230 and the second roof 240 may be formed from a single unitary planar member, or from multiple pieces. Preferably, the first roof 230 and the second roof 240 are arranged so that a top central opening 280 is provided that runs along the length of the clear span building structure 200 to allow heat and hot air, generated by, for example, the cattle housed therein, to escape.

[0020]FIG. 3 illustrates a close-up view of a cantilever supporting structure according to an embodiment of the present invention. According to a specific embodiment of the present invention, the anchor span 214 is formed of a single steel I-beam that is coupled to the cantilever span 216, which is also formed of a single steel I-beam. However, the anchor span 214 and the cantilever span 216 may each be formed of two or more I-beams. The anchor span 214 and the cantilever span 216 are coupled together therebetween via a steel plate 310. Preferably, the anchor span 214 and the cantilever span 216 are coupled at the center of the top end of the post 212. The anchor span 214 and the cantilever span 216 may be coupled to the post 212 via a steel plate 330 fastened with bolts 350. Steel plate braces 340 may be utilized to further secure the anchor span 214 and the cantilever span 216 to the post 212.

[0021] As illustrated in FIG. 3, the first roof 230 lays above the top sides of the anchor span 214 and the cantilever span 216, covering the first row of cantilever supporting structures 210. A plurality of purlins 320 may be utilized that run down the length of the clear span building structure 200 to support the roof 230. In a specific embodiment of the present invention, ten “Ztype” purlins 320 are utilized for a row of cantilever supporting structures 210, 220, but other numbers of purlins 320 may be utilized, though. However, the roof230, 240 may be directly coupled to the top sides of the anchor span 214, 224 and cantilever span 216, 226 of the cantilever supporting structures 210, 220.

[0022]FIG. 4 illustrates a close-up view of a ridge connection of two cantilever spans according to an embodiment of the present invention. According to a specific embodiment of the present invention, the top face of the cantilever span 216 of the first row of cantilever supporting structures 210 and the top face of the cantilever span 226 of the second opposing row of cantilever supporting structures 220 may be coupled together to provide additional support to each other. However, the cantilever design does not require that the cantilever spans 216, 226 engage each other, though, and they may be freely suspended from the post 212, 222.

[0023] According to the specific embodiment in FIG. 4, the top faces of the cantilever spans 216, 226 may be joined to plates 420, which are coupled to each other by bolts 430. A beam gusset or bracket 410 coupled to the cantilever span 216, 226 and the plate 420 may be utilized to further support the structure. As illustrated in FIG. 4, a top central opening 280 running along the length of the clear span building structure 200 is provided in between the first roof 230 and the second roof 240, and more specifically in between the purlins 440 supporting the roofs 230, 240.

[0024] Referring to the embodiment in FIG. 2, a central alley 250 extending along the length of the clear span building structure 200 may be provided. The central alley 250 allows a dairy operator to drive through and drop off feed along the sides of the central alley 250 with a vehicle. The cows may stick their heads over or through the feed stanchions 290 to eat the feed. Accordingly, a free stall area 260 may be provided underneath the first roof 230, and a free stall area 270 may be provided underneath the second roof 240, with the central alley 250 in between the free stall areas 260, 270. However, any other configuration of alleys, free stall areas, fence, lines, feed stanchion lines, etc., may be utilized as long as they are designed around the two pole lines 265, 275 of the clear span building structure 200. Having only two pole lines 265, 275 to work around provides greater flexibility in the layout design of the structure, as compared to those structures having four, six, or more pole lines.

[0025] According to one specific embodiment of the present invention, the anchor span 214, 224 and the cantilever span 216, 226 combine to be approximately 55 feet in length, and the post 212, 222 is approximately 21 feet high. As mentioned above, a slope of about seventeen degrees for the anchor span 214, 224 and the cantilever span 216, 226 is preferred for a clear span barn structure. The above-described dimensions create a haunch height 218, 228 of approximately eighteen feet, which was found to be optimum for obstructing direct sunlight, and provide enough protection from wind and rain, while still allowing air to adequately flow through the clear span building structure 200. Ideally, to properly utilize the cantilever principle, the cantilever span 216, 226 is longer than the anchor span 214, 224. According to an embodiment of the present invention, the cantilever span 216, 226 is approximately 1.64 times longer than the anchor span 214, 224.

[0026] However, any other dimensions or proportions with respect to the overall length of the anchor span 214, 224 and the cantilever span 216, 226, the angle of slope of the anchor span 214, 224 and cantilever span 216, 226, the haunch height 218, 228, and the length ratio of the cantilever span 216, 226 to the anchor span 214, 224, that provide a stable cantilever supporting structure 210, 220 to form the frame upon which a clear span building structure 200 is built may be utilized.

[0027] It was found that in the clear span building structure 200 as illustrated in FIG. 2, the temperature inside is only one degree higher than that of the FIG. 1 prior art barn structure utilizing both cooling fans and misters. Accordingly, the clear span building structure 200 of the present invention may achieve even lower temperatures with optional cooling fans and misters. However, temperatures within the clear span building structure 200 are generally acceptable in that no additional cooling fans are required to maintain a comfortable temperature range for cows. Thus, electricity costs may be saved by not employing cooling fans.

[0028] Although the clear span building structure 200 has been primarily designed for use as a dairy cattle housing facility, there are numerous alternative applications. For example, the clear span building structure 200 according to an embodiment of the present invention may be built at parks and beaches, such as for picnic areas; as shelters for parking lots and structures, such as for automobile dealers; at airports for small aircraft; as shelters for outdoor “classrooms”; or even to provide shading for outdoor malls, flea markets, and hay barns.

[0029] While the description above refers to particular embodiments of the present invention, it will be understood that many modifications may be made without departing from the spirit thereof. The accompanying claims are intended to cover such modifications as would fall within the true scope and spirit of the present invention. The presently disclosed embodiments are therefore to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims, rather than the foregoing description, and all changes that come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are therefore intended to be embraced therein.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7316237 *Apr 27, 2006Jan 8, 2008Solar Dynamics CorporationChildren's play area sunshade canopy
US8091291 *Dec 15, 2004Jan 10, 2012Takehisa OdeStructure used as greenhouse roof frame, greenhouse roof frame, greenhouse framework, greenhouse, and greenhouse framework building method
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/90.1, 52/272, 52/94, 52/93.2
International ClassificationA01K1/00, E04H5/08
Cooperative ClassificationA01K1/00, E04H5/08
European ClassificationE04H5/08, A01K1/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 12, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: AGRIFAB, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SELLERS, TIM;REEL/FRAME:012010/0724
Effective date: 20010709