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Publication numberUS20030019118 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/910,932
Publication dateJan 30, 2003
Filing dateJul 24, 2001
Priority dateJul 24, 2001
Publication number09910932, 910932, US 2003/0019118 A1, US 2003/019118 A1, US 20030019118 A1, US 20030019118A1, US 2003019118 A1, US 2003019118A1, US-A1-20030019118, US-A1-2003019118, US2003/0019118A1, US2003/019118A1, US20030019118 A1, US20030019118A1, US2003019118 A1, US2003019118A1
InventorsKeith Wilson
Original AssigneeWilson Keith W.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Transparent rear bow sights
US 20030019118 A1
Abstract
A series of transparent rear bow sights having fiber optic of various configurations for adding to the bowstring having preferably at least four strands. The bowstring can be undivided or divided up to four strand groups for attachment of the bow sight. A battery can be attached to the bowstring with its cord acting as a guide equivalent to a rubber cord guide. The simplest form of a rear bow sight has a dark colored opaque base including a plastic fiber optic pin containing tritium and supporting an inclined or perpendicularly oriented circular apertured and transparent sight window with external notches for embedding the individual or grouped strands of the drawstring. Other embodiments include various arrangements of the colored fiber optic as a U-shaped tube, a singular straight tube, two parallel straight tubes, and a combination of a straight tube intersecting the U-shaped tube portion and parallel to its legs. A modification of an optic sight tube has a portion coiled on a post emerging from the base at more than one angle.
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Claims(20)
I claim:
1. A transparent rear bow sight system for a bow having a multiple stranded bowstring and a forward sight pin comprising:
a rear bow sight device comprising:
a planar opaque base;
a transparent housing positioned on and integral with said base;
at least one colored transparent fiber optic pin embedded and inclined in said transparent housing; and
a circular transparent sight window having a plurality of peripheral spaced notches and a central aperture positioned on said base;
whereby the rear bow sight device with its at least one fiber optic pin is held by strands of the bowstring in the notches of the sight window, and the rear bow sight device is aligned with the forward sight pin when the bowstring is drawn full for accuracy in dim light conditions.
2. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, including a post extending from said base.
3. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 2, including a hollow rubber tubing having its ends attached to the post and to the bow.
4. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, including a battery in a holder attached to the bow, and a coiled electrical cord extending from the battery attached electrically to the at least one colored transparent fiber optic pin in the transparent rear bow sight.
5. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 4, including an on/off switch electrically connected to the battery and selected from the group consisting of a slide switch, a rotary switch and a rocker switch for minimizing noise when energizing the colored optic pin.
6. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, wherein the at least one fiber optic pin comprises a U-shaped pin.
7. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 6, further comprising a straight fiber optic pin intersecting and parallel to said U-shaped pin.
8. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, wherein the at least one fiber optic pin includes two parallel straight pins so that the sight pin may be centered between the parallel pins when aiming.
9. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, wherein the at least one fiber optic pin includes three parallel straight pins.
10. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, wherein the sight window is positioned at one end of the base and inclined away from said base at an angle approximately 110.
11. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, wherein the sight window is positioned at one end of the base at an angle of 90.
12. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, wherein the plurality of peripheral spaced notches in said sight window consists of at least two but fewer than five notches.
13. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, wherein the at least one fiber optic pin contains tritium.
14. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, further comprising an opaque T-shaped support attached to said base, the at least one fiber optic pin and housing being mounted in the T-shaped support.
15. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 14, wherein said base has a post attached at an angle to said base and parallel to the T-shaped support.
16. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 15, wherein the base has a longitudinal groove in its bottom surface.
17. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 16, wherein said base has up to two clamp bars.
18. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, wherein said plurality of peripheral notches of said sight window includes two intersecting notches.
19. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, wherein a post extends axially from one end of the base, one end of the at least one fiber optic pin being coiled around the post, and wherein the sight window is inclined at an opposite end of the base away from the post.
20. The transparent rear bow sight system according to claim 1, wherein a post extends at an acute angle from one end of the base, one end of the at least one fiber optic pin being coiled around the post, and wherein the sight window is positioned perpendicular to the base.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The present invention relates generally to archery equipment. More specifically, the present invention is directed to a variety of colored transparent bow sights attached to the bow-strings of target practice or hunting bows, and either with or without an elastic connection such as a rubber or a battery-assisted light from the bow handle to the bowstring.

[0003] 2. Description of the Related Art

[0004] The related art of interest describes various bow sights, but none discloses the present invention. There is a need for a sighting device containing fiber optics placed on a bowstring for improving one's accuracy with or without an elastic cord connecting the bow and the rear bow sight. Alternatively, a battery-assisted light emitting diode (LED) can illuminate the fiber optics with the electrical connection acting similarly to the rubber band. The problem of visibility when aiming an arrow at a target arises in limited light conditions such as early dawn and dusk. Bow sights of the present invention aid in increasing the light without an illumination aid where a jurisdiction prohibits the use of any lighting in attracting game. When self-illumination is permitted in a State, the battery and LED embodiment can be utilized. The following patents are examples of inventions that attempt to achieve better aiming for bow hunters.

[0005] U.S. Pat. No. 5,996,569 issued on Dec. 7, 1999, to Keith W. Wilson describes a transparent rear bow sight which is improved by the present invention, and does not require an elastic cord attached to the bow and to the rear peep sight.

[0006] U.S. Pat. No. 4,011,853 issued on Mar. 15, 1977, to James D. Fletcher describes an archery peep sight comprising a disc having a central sight opening attached to the bowstring, such that the angular interval between a line normal to the bowstring receiving channels of the disc and the axis of the sight opening of the disc is 38 to 50.

[0007] U.S. Pat. No. 4,116,194 issued on Sep. 26, 1978, to Kenneth D. Topel describes a peep sight for an archery bow comprising an elastic cord attached to the bow and to a pin on the peep sight for aligning a sighting bore with a bow-mounted bow sight.

[0008] U.S. Pat. No. 4,961,264 issued on Oct. 9, 1990, to Kenneth D. Topel describes a restraint assembly for a string-mounted peepsight comprising a nylon braided cord tied to an eyelet on the peepsight and to a latex surgical tubing which is tied to an anchor pad on the rear of the compound bow.

[0009] U.S. Pat. No. 4,552,121 issued on Nov. 12, 1985, to Mahlon L. Treaster describes an archery back sight arranged to removably snap onto a bowstring and connected to a cord having an elastic portion and an inelastic portion which aims the backsight forwardly.

[0010] U.S. Pat. No. 4,928,394 issued on May 29, 1990, to James R. Sherman describes a sight device for an archery bow which includes a pair of guides on which sight pin carriers are slidably mounted. Fiber optics are carried by a base with a fiber optic end.

[0011] U.S. Pat. No. 5,137,007 issued on Aug. 11, 1992, to Robert C. Shoemake et al. describes an archery shooting control system comprising an arrow nock on the bowstring, sight inserts mounted in the strands of the bowstring, and front sight pins mounted on a side of the handle.

[0012] U.S. Pat. No. 5,148,603 issued on Sep. 22, 1992, to Robert C. Beutler describes an illuminated rear peep sight mounted on a bowstring and powered by a spiral wound conductor wire connected to a battery in a housing attached to the bow handle. The peep sight can include an oval ring, a dot and a cross hair. Alternatively, the light source can be in the housing and the light transmitted by a fiber optic cable to the peep sight. Another alternative provides that the sighting device can be a centrally located aperture formed at an angle through the body surrounded by a first plurality of locator apertures formed as a cross hair, and a second plurality of target apertures formed at an angle.

[0013] U.S. Pat. No. 5,669,146 issued on Sep. 23, 1997, to Robert C. Beutler describes a changeable insert rear peep sight assembly comprising an elliptical sighting body having slots on two sides for placing the bow strings and a post on top and a centered insert body. The sighting aperture in the rear peep sight has a narrowed opening closest to the eye. A rubber tube is attached to the post and to the bow.

[0014] U.S. Pat. No. 5,325,598 issued on Jul. 5, 1994, to David D. Hall et al. describes a four-bowstring mounted variable apertured peep sight having the ability to slidably insert aperture reducing discs in the peep sight.

[0015] U.S. Pat. No. 5,347,976 issued on Sep. 20, 1994, to Charles A. Saunders describes an octagonal-shaped peep sight for a two-bowstring bow comprising a large open sight window supporting by legs a centered small peep hole.

[0016] U.S. Pat. No. 5,379,747 issued on Jan. 10, 1995, to Eddy D. Morris et al. describes a rear peep sight with a large sight window, and a device for preventing the sight from twisting during use.

[0017] U.S. Pat. No. 5,388,336 issued on Feb. 14, 1995, to Louis F. Pomaville describes a sight system including a forward pendulum sight and a rear peep sight.

[0018] U.S. Pat. No. 5,442,861 issued on Aug. 22, 1995, to Paul F. Pomaville describes a sight system including a forward pendulum sight and a rear peep sight.

[0019] U.S. Pat. No. 5,442,861 issued on Aug. 22, 1995, to Paul M. Lorocco describes a sight unit including a pin and holder adaptable for mounting onto the sight assembly of an archery bow, and an elongated length of a light gathering fluorescent fiber defining a lens at its distal end to which gathered ambient light becomes focused to serve as an aiming indicia.

[0020] U.S. Pat. No. 5,450,673 issued on Sep. 19, 1995, to Don Denton describes a rotating disk peep sight system including a round disk with a hole punched in the center and sized to receive a bowstring. The disk has one or more holes punched near the rim used as sighting openings.

[0021] U.S. Pat. No. 5,495,675 issued on Mar. 5, 1995, to Chaochi Huang describes a laser sight that may be attached to the bow and a view hole attached to the bowstring.

[0022] U.S. Pat. No. 5,542,186 issued on Aug. 6, 1996, to Charles S. Saunders describes a bowstring mounted peep sight having a skeletal ring and an interiorly mounted and transversely extending frame which defines a peep sight. The areas within the skeletal ring, but outside of the peep sight, is used for viewing the specific target area.

[0023] U.S. Pat. No. 5,697,357 issued on Dec. 16, 1997, to Donald L. Chipman describes a peep sight installed on a divided bowstring comprising an outer barrel, a threaded carrier, an aperture piece with a tapered sighting hole, and a lens for collecting light.

[0024] None of the above inventions and patents, taken either singularly or in combination, is seen to describe the instant invention as claimed. Thus, transparent rear bow sights solving the aforementioned problems is desired.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0025] The present invention is directed to transparent rear bow sights having fiber optics of various configurations and preferably enhanced with a battery to be attached to a bowstring. These bow sights can be used with or without an elastic alignment cord attached to the bow handle and bowstring. The simplest form of a rear bow sight has a dark colored base including a colored fiber optic and supporting an inclined circular apertured sight with external notches for embedding the individual or grouped drawstrings. Other embodiments include various arrangements of the fiber optic as a U-shaped tube, a singular straight tube, two parallel straight tubes, and a combination of a straight tube between the legs of a horseshoe-shaped tube. Then, a modification of an offset colored optic sight on its base which is clamped onto the bowstring is presented. The fiber optic tubes have tritium included in the composition which enhances the light gathering ability. A second modification of an optic sight includes the alignment or misalignment of the fiber optic tube on its base. A third modification of an optic sight includes a post attached in alignment with or skewed with the base for attachment of a rubber cord. A fourth modification includes the angular positioning of the sight window on the base as inclined or perpendicular. A fifth modification includes the coiling of part of the fiber optic pin several times around a post which is in-line or skewed with the base. These modifications of the fiber optic pins, the sight windows and the addition of a post provide an assortment of sighting aids in deficient light conditions to enable the accurate shooting down of game.

[0026] Accordingly, it is a principal object of the invention to provide a rear bow sight utilizing transparent colored fiber optic pins filled with tritium and attached to a bowstring.

[0027] It is another object of the invention to provide a rear transparent colored fiber optic bow sight assortment with up to three fiber optic tubes and being either aligned or skewed on a base.

[0028] It is a further object of the invention to provide a rear transparent colored fiber optic bow sight assortment with sight windows perpendicular or inclined on its base and having a variety of external notches for embedding the individual or grouped drawstrings.

[0029] It is a further object of the invention to provide a rear transparent colored fiber optic bow sight assortment wherein the base portion is clamped onto the bowstring.

[0030] Still another object of the invention is to provide a rear transparent colored fiber optic bow sight assortment wherein a post is attached either in alignment or skewed with the base.

[0031] Yet a further object of the invention to provide a rear transparent colored fiber optic bow sight assortment wherein the fiber optic tube is initially coiled around a post extending from the base.

[0032] Yet still another object of the invention is to provide a rear transparent colored fiber optic bow sight assortment with a battery attached to the bowstring.

[0033] Yet another object of the invention is to provide a rear transparent colored fiber optic bow sight assortment with an elastic cord attached to the handle and the bowstring.

[0034] It is an object of the invention to provide improved elements and arrangements thereof for the purposes described which is inexpensive, dependable and fully effective in accomplishing its intended purposes.

[0035] These and other objects of the present invention will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0036]FIG. 1 is an environmental, perspective view of a first embodiment of a transparent rear bow sight mounted on the bowstring according to the present invention.

[0037]FIG. 2A is a front elevational view of the first embodiment of the present invention having a parallel pair of fiber optic sight pins embedded in the base which supports a sight window with four external notches for the separated bowstrings.

[0038]FIG. 2B is a rear elevational view of the first embodiment of the present invention.

[0039]FIG. 2C is a side elevational view of the first embodiment of the present invention.

[0040]FIG. 3A is a front elevational view of a second embodiment of the present invention having a U-shaped fiber optic sight pin and a sight window with four spaced notches for the separated bowstring strands.

[0041]FIG. 3B is a rear elevational view of the second embodiment of the present invention.

[0042]FIG. 3C is a side elevational view of the second embodiment of the present invention.

[0043]FIG. 4A is a front elevational view of a third embodiment of the present invention having a U-shaped fiber optic sight pin, a base post, and a sight window with three spaced notches for the bowstrings.

[0044]FIG. 4B is a rear elevational view of a third embodiment of the present invention.

[0045]FIG. 4C is a side elevational view of a third embodiment of the present invention.

[0046]FIG. 5A is a front elevational view of a fourth and preferred embodiment of the present invention having a rectangular planar opaque base with an opaque T-shaped support for a U-shaped fiber optic pin on an upper side and a groove in the bottom for securing the bowstring with a pair of clamp bars.

[0047]FIG. 5B is a rear elevational view of the fourth preferred embodiment of the present invention.

[0048]FIG. 5C is a right side elevational view of the fourth preferred embodiment of the present invention.

[0049]FIG. 5D is a left side elevational view of the fourth and preferred embodiment of the present invention.

[0050]FIG. 6A is a top plan view of a fifth embodiment of a bow sight with a single straight fiber optic sight pin.

[0051]FIG. 6B is a top plan view of a sixth embodiment of a bow sight with a single U-shaped fiber optic sight pin.

[0052]FIG. 6C is a top plan view of a seventh embodiment of a bow sight with two straight and parallel fiber optic sight pins.

[0053]FIG. 6D is a top plan view of an eighth embodiment of a bow sight with three fiber optic sight pins comprising a centered straight pin intersecting a U-shaped sight pin.

[0054]FIG. 7 is a side elevational view of a ninth embodiment of a bow sight with three parallel fiber optic sight pins with the center fiber optic sight pin not in line with the other two sight pins.

[0055]FIG. 8 is side elevational view of a tenth embodiment of a bow sight with two intersecting notches on opposite sides of the sight window.

[0056]FIG. 9A is a side elevational view of an eleventh embodiment of a bow sight having an inclined sight window and a coiled fiber optic pin around an aligned post.

[0057]FIG. 9B is a top plan view of a twelfth embodiment of a bow sight having a perpendicular sight window and a skewed post around which is coiled the fiber optic pin.

[0058] Similar reference characters denote corresponding features consistently throughout the attached drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0059] The present invention is directed to a transparent rear bow sight system with twelve embodiments utilized with or without a light source and with or without a cord attached between the bow and the bowstring. FIG. 1 illustrates a compound hunter's bow 10 with a hunter 12 drawing an arrow 14 on a bowstring 16 and sighting through the first embodiment device 18 which is illustrated more fully in FIGS. 2A, 2B and 2C and a forward sight pin 20. The device 18 is illuminated in situ with a light source 22 such as a light emitting diode (LED) energized by a battery (hidden), such as a silver oxide or lithium battery, contained in a casing 24 having an on/off switch 25 attached to the rear side of the bow 10 having a coiled electrical cord 26 attached to the device 18. A quiet turn switch 25 is preferred over a miniaturized slide switch.

[0060] Turning to FIGS. 2A to 2C, the first transparent rear bow sight 18 has a rectangular planar opaque base 28 having a longitudinal axis 30 (FIG. 2C) , a front end 32 and a rear end 34. The base 28 is preferably made from airplane aluminum coated with black paint 36 and contains partially embedded on its top surface a parallel pair of straight colored fiber optic pins 38 which are stiff clear plastic compositions containing tritium. The fiber optic pins 38 have an outside diameter of either {fraction (1/16)} inch, {fraction (3/32)} inch or ⅛ inch, but the smallest diameter is preferred. The base 28 can be another metal or any type of a composite material such as machined Delrin plastic, acrylic, and the like. The colors can vary, but red and orange is preferred because deer are color blind. However, hunters seem to prefer yellow and green in rifle sights which can be seen by deer. Alternatively, a single colored fiber optic pin could be used, but the accuracy of aiming is enhanced by using two parallel fiber optic pins.

[0061] A transparent circular sight window portion 40 made of acrylic plastic has a rim 42 enclosing an enlarged aperture 44. Sight window portion 40 is positioned proximate the front end 32 of the base 28, and inclined towards the end 32 at a specific angle in the range of 60 to 70. The opening 44 can be {fraction (7/16)} inch in diameter. The rim 42 has a plurality of spaced external notches 46 coincident with its central axis. Three notches 46 are depicted in FIGS. 4A-4C, but can number two as a minimum for equally grouping the strands of the bowstring in each notch. Furthermore, it should be noted that the notches 46 located in the FIGS. 2A-2C embodiment are spaced such that the upper two notches 48 have a wider spacing than the lower notches from the upper notches. It has been found that this arrangement enhances a more secure placement of the sight on the bowstring 16.

[0062] In FIGS. 3A, 3B and 3C, a second embodiment of a rear transparent bow sight 48 is illustrated. The aperture 50 has been shaped to dip between the colored fiber optic pins 52 which are now inclined upward toward the sight window 40 and joined to a U-shaped configuration 54. These pins are made from flexible plastic compositions. It has been found that the inclination of the pins 52 on the rectangular opaque base 28 aids in a better view without a part of the optic sight 48 obstructing the hunter's view.

[0063] In FIGS. 4A, 4B and 4C, a third embodiment of a rear transparent bow sight 56 is illustrated. The notches 46 have been reduced to three in number to accommodate a division of three strands, wherein two strands is a minimum for this type of sight. It has been found that the lesser the division of strands of a bowstring, the better the visibility through the sight. The base 58 is configured as a cylindrical rod 60 supporting a planar portion 62, and the rod 60 has been shifted to the rear end of the bow sight 56.

[0064] In FIGS. 5A, 5B, 5C, and 5D, a preferred fourth embodiment of a rear transparent offset optic fiber bow sight 64 which is clamped vertically onto the bowstring is illustrated. A substantially rectangular planar opaque base 66 has a longitudinal axis, a top end 68 and a bottom end 70. An elongated transparent housing 72 made of acrylic plastic contains a U-shaped colored fiber optic pair of pins 74 integral and aligned with a rectangular opaque T-shaped support 76 (FIG. 5D) attached to the base 66 by any fastening means such as an adhesive. The pins 74 are intentionally misaligned at an angle of approximately 45 to the horizontal longitudinal axis of the base 66 (FIGS. 5C and 5D). The T-shaped support 76 is also parallel to an opaque post 78 extending from approximately the center of the support 76. The post 78 is utilized to attach a rubber tubing (not shown) to the bow for alignment purposes as is conventional in the archery art.

[0065] A groove 80 in the bottom of the base 66 accepts the bowstring which is clamped down by a pair of clamp bars 82 fastened to the base 66 by fasteners 84. Alternatively, a single centered clamp bar 82 can be used. By routine experimentation, the best position for this bow sight 64 can be determined and the base 66 clamped securely to the bowstring.

[0066] In the fifth to eighth embodiments of FIGS. 6A through 6D, respectively, various configurations of the colored fiber optic tubes of a rear transparent bow sight are illustrated. The fifth embodiment of FIG. 6A shows a single straight colored fiber optic pin 86 encased in a transparent acrylic housing 88. The sixth embodiment of FIG. 6B depicts a U-shaped colored fiber optic pin 90 encased in a housing 88. The seventh embodiment of FIG. 6C illustrates two straight and parallel fiber optic pins 92 encased in a housing 88. Finally, the eighth embodiment of FIG. 6D shows a combination colored fiber optic 94 encased in a housing 88, wherein a U-shaped pin 96 is intersected by a straight pin 98 which is parallel to the legs of the U-shaped pin 96. In the configurations illustrated in FIGS. 6A through 6D, the hunter has a choice of which fiber optic configuration is best for him or her.

[0067] In the ninth embodiment of FIG. 7, the bow sight 100 is shown in a side elevational view as positioned on a bowstring for a right-handed archer. Bow sight 100 has three parallel colored fiber optic sight pins 102 in a transparent housing 104 with the center pin not in line with the other two outside pins. The housing 104 is attached perpendicularly to the opaque base 106. The base 106 is attached to the bowstring by a single clamp 108 and a pair of fasteners 110.

[0068] In the tenth embodiment of FIG. 8, the bow sight 112 has an inclined sight window 114 with two intersecting notches 116 on opposite sides of the sight window for attaching the bowstrings. These notches 116 allow this type of bow sight to be positioned at two different angles to be properly set for a short (more inclined notch) or a long draw length for a specific archer. A U-shaped colored fiber optic pin is inclined upward in a transparent housing 120 positioned on an opaque base 122. This arrangement enhances the stability of the bow sight 112.

[0069] In the eleventh embodiment of FIG. 9A, the bow sight 124 has a single colored fiber optic pin 126 coiled initially around an aligned post 128 approximately twice to maximize the available light. The sight window 130 has three notches 132 spaced 120 apart with the middle notch on top. The window 130 is inclined away from the coils on an opaque rectangular base 134 and includes a transparent housing 136 having the straight portion of the fiber optic pin 126 inclined upward.

[0070] In the twelfth embodiment of FIG. 9B, the bow sight 138 has a similar single colored fiber optic pin 140 coiled around a post 142 at one end which is skewed approximately 40 from a substantially rectangular primary base 144 with round corners 146 and on its bottom a groove and clamp bars similar to those shown in FIG. 5C. The sight window 148 is positioned similar to that in FIG. 9A. However, the sight window 148 is positioned perpendicularly on the primary base 144 and skewed relative to the longitudinal axis of the base 144. The transparent housing 152 is positioned on a smaller secondary opaque base 154 and houses the straight portion of the colored fiber optic pin 140 along one side.

[0071] The coiling aspect of the colored fiber optic pin can be applied to all the other aforementioned embodiments to improve their light gathering. Also, the addition of tritium gas inside each colored optic sight pin enhances the gathering of light in every embodiment.

[0072] It is to be understood that the present invention is not limited to the embodiments described above, but encompasses any and all embodiments within the scope of the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7040027 *Mar 8, 2004May 9, 2006Shaffer Alfred HRear peep sight for mounting to a bow string, having interchangeable sight ports for accommodating user preferences
US7266896May 5, 2005Sep 11, 2007Signature Enterprises, L.L.C.String-mounted bow sight
US7373723 *Sep 7, 2005May 20, 2008Tupper Jr John MBow sight
US7621055 *Sep 23, 2008Nov 24, 2009Ernest BrooksString mounted peep sight for archery
US7698824May 16, 2006Apr 20, 2010Wilson Keith WHigh performance sights
US7805847Jan 22, 2009Oct 5, 2010Behr Joseph RSighting system and range finder for an archery bow
US7895996Jun 7, 2007Mar 1, 2011Jeff GroveIlluminating rear bow sight with self contained power and light source
US8201339 *May 20, 2011Jun 19, 2012Walker James ACompound bow peep sight system
US8225517Sep 1, 2010Jul 24, 2012Behr Joseph RSighting system and range finder for an archery bow
US8453336 *Sep 30, 2011Jun 4, 2013Truglo, Inc.Peep sight assembly with removable inserts for archery bows
US20130081292 *Sep 30, 2011Apr 4, 2013Truglo, Inc.Peep Sight Assembly with Removable Inserts for Archery Bows
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/265, 124/87
International ClassificationF41G1/467
Cooperative ClassificationF41G1/467
European ClassificationF41G1/467