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Publication numberUS20030060211 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/384,686
Publication dateMar 27, 2003
Filing dateAug 27, 1999
Priority dateJan 26, 1999
Also published asUS6813502, US20010004600, US20010016500, WO2000044184A1
Publication number09384686, 384686, US 2003/0060211 A1, US 2003/060211 A1, US 20030060211 A1, US 20030060211A1, US 2003060211 A1, US 2003060211A1, US-A1-20030060211, US-A1-2003060211, US2003/0060211A1, US2003/060211A1, US20030060211 A1, US20030060211A1, US2003060211 A1, US2003060211A1
InventorsVincent Chern, William Son
Original AssigneeVincent Chern, Son William Y.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Location-based information retrieval system for wireless communication device
US 20030060211 A1
Abstract
A wireless location-based information-retrieval system includes a wireless communication device. The wireless device has a transceiver for sending and receiving communications across a wireless communication network, a position-determination device for determining the location of the wireless device, and an Internet browser. A remote server communicates with the wireless device. The server receives the location data from the wireless device over the network and maintains a web page listing information service options. The information service options are accessible to and selectable by the wireless device via the browser. The server retrieves information from a database based on the location data provided by the wireless device and on the selected service option. The retrieved information is sent to the wireless device over the network.
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Claims(20)
1. A wireless location-based information-retrieval system comprising:
a wireless communication device comprising a transceiver for sending and receiving communications across a wireless communication network, a position-determination device for determining a location of the wireless device and providing location data indicative of the location to the wireless device, and an Internet browser;
a remote server in communication with the wireless device over the network, wherein the server receives the location data from the wireless device over the network and maintains a web page listing information service options that are accessible to and selectable by the wireless device via the browser; and
a database in communication with the server, the server retrieving information from the database based on the location data provided by the wireless device and based on a selected service option, and sending the information to the wireless device over the network.
2. A system as claimed in claim 1, wherein the position determination device is a GPS receiver.
3. A system as claimed in claim 1, wherein the wireless device further comprises memory for storing user information and preferences, and wherein the user information and preferences is provided to the server to assist in information retrieval.
4. A system as claimed in claim 1, wherein the information service options are selected from a group comprising driving directions, points of interest, location monitoring and notification services.
5. A system as claimed in claim 1, wherein the information service options including a driving direction service, and wherein the server automatically determines the starting point from the location data provided by the wireless device and the destination point is entered by a user of the wireless device and sent to the server over the network, the server compiling driving directions and sending the driving directions to the wireless device.
6. A system as claimed in claim 5, and further comprising a traffic monitoring service, wherein the wireless device periodically sends the current location to the server, and the server accesses a real time database to determine whether any impediments exist between the current location and the destination point, the server calculating new driving directions if necessary and sending the new driving directions to the wireless device.
7. A system as claimed in claim 1, wherein the information service options comprise a points of interest service, wherein the server searches for points of interest to the user of the wireless device based on the location data and sends the points of interest to the wireless device for display.
8. A system as claimed in claim 1, wherein the information service options comprise a location monitoring option, wherein the wireless device periodically sends location data to the server and the server maintains a log of the location data.
9. A system as claimed in claim 1, wherein the information service options comprise a notification service, wherein the wireless device periodically sends location data to the server and the server in response searches for information corresponding to pre-selected parameters and sends notifications to the wireless device of any such information that is found.
10. A method for accommodating information requests from a user of a wireless device comprising the following steps:
presenting the user with information service options via a wireless network;
determining the location of the wireless device;
obtaining user information stored on the wireless device;
accepting a user's information service choice from the wireless device via the wireless network;
retrieving information corresponding to the service choice based on the user location and user information; and
sending retrieved information to the wireless device over the wireless network.
11. A method as claimed in claim 10, wherein the information service options are presented to the user on an Internet web page.
12. A method as claimed in claim 10, wherein the user is presented with an option for obtaining driving directions from the location of the wireless device to a destination point.
13. A method as claimed in claim 12, and comprising the additional steps of:
obtaining the destination point from the user;
determining a route from the location of the wireless device to the destination point; and
sending the route to the wireless device for display to the user.
14. A method as claimed in claim 13, and further comprising the steps of:
monitoring the route for impediments until the user reaches the destination point;
calculating a new route if an impediment is found; and
sending the new route to the wireless device for display to the user.
15. A method as claimed in claim 10, wherein the user is presented with an option for being informed of points of interest near the location of the wireless handset.
16. A method as claimed in claim 15, and comprising the additional steps of:
obtaining points of interest preference information from the user;
retrieving points of interest matching the preference information that are within a pre-determined proximity to the location of the wireless device; and
sending the retrieved points of interest to the wireless device for display to the user.
17. A method as claimed in claim 10, wherein the user is presented with an option for having the location of the wireless device monitored.
18. A method as claimed in claim 17, and comprising the additional steps of:
periodically receiving the current location of the wireless device; and
maintaining a user-accessible log of the locations of the wireless device.
19. A method as claimed in claim 10, wherein the user is presented with an option for receiving notifications about subject matter of interest to the user.
20. A method as claimed in claim 19, and comprising the additional steps of:
presenting the user with notification options;
accepting the user's chosen notification options from the wireless handset via the network;
retrieving information corresponding to the chosen notification options based on the location and user data; and
sending and notifying the user of the retrieved information.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This is a continuation-in-part of application serial no. 09/237,552, filed on Jan. 26, 1999.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention relates generally to radio or wireless communications and, more particularly, relates to a location-based information retrieval system.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] The advent of wireless personal communications devices has revolutionized the telecommunications industry. Cellular, PCS and other services provide wireless personal communications to businesses and individuals at home, in the office, on the road, and any other locations the wireless network reaches. Wireless telephone subscribers no longer have to use pay telephones along the road, or wait until they return home or to the office to check messages and return important business calls. Instead, wireless subscribers carry out their day to day business from their cars, from the jobsite, while walking along the airport concourse, and just about anywhere their signals are accessible.

[0004] Thus, it is no surprise that since the introduction of the cellular telephone service, the number of wireless telephone subscribers has increased steadily. Today, the number of wireless telephone subscribers is staggering and still growing rapidly. In fact, many households have multiple wireless telephones in addition to their conventional land-line services.

[0005] With a market of this size, there is fierce competition among hardware manufacturers and service providers. In an attempt to lure customers, most providers offer handsets with desirable features or attributes such as small size, light weight, longer battery life, speed dial, and so forth. Many recent additions to the marketplace include multifunctional handsets that even provide pocket-organizer functions integrated into the wireless handset. Most manufacturers, however, are still scrambling to add new features to their communication devices to snare a portion of this booming market.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] The present invention is directed toward a location-based information retrieval system for a wireless communication device.

[0007] In one embodiment of the invention, a wireless location-based information-retrieval system is provided. The system includes a wireless communication device. The wireless device has a transceiver for sending and receiving communications across a wireless communication network. The wireless device also has a position-determination device for determining a location of the wireless device and providing location data indicative of the location to the wireless device. Finally, the device comprises an Internet browser.

[0008] The system also includes a remote server in communication with the wireless device over the network. The server receives the location data from the wireless device over the network and maintains a web page listing information service options. The information service options are accessible to and selectable by the wireless device via the browser. The server retrieves information from a database based on the location data provided by the wireless device and on the selected service option. The retrieved information is sent to the wireless device over the network.

[0009] In another embodiment of the present invention, a method for accommodating information requests from a user of a wireless device is provided. The user is first presented with information service options via a wireless network. In one implementation, this presentation is made in the form of an Internet web page. Next, the location of the wireless device is determined, and user information stored on the wireless device is obtained. The user's information service choice is accepted from the wireless device via the wireless network, and information corresponding to the service choice is obtained based on the user location and user information. The information retrieved is sent to the wireless device over the wireless network.

[0010] Objects and advantages of the present invention include any of the foregoing, singly or in combination. Further objects and advantages will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art, or will be set forth in the following disclosure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0011] The present invention is described with reference to the accompanying drawings. In the drawings, like reference numbers indicate identical or functionally similar elements, and

[0012]FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating an example wireless communication device.

[0013]FIG. 2 is a block diagram of a wireless communication system according to the present invention.

[0014]FIG. 3 is a flowchart illustrating a method for requesting information across a wireless network according to the present invention.

[0015]FIG. 4 is a block diagram of a hands-free unit having a GPS receiver according to one embodiment of the present invention.

[0016]FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a hands-free unit having a GPS receiver and voice synthesis and recognition according to another embodiment of the invention.

[0017]FIG. 6 is a diagram of example formats for location information requests responses.

[0018]FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a processor-based system according to one embodiment of the invention.

[0019]FIG. 8 is a flowchart showing one implementation of a location-based information retrieval system according to the present invention.

[0020]FIG. 9 is a flowchart of a driving directions service portion of the information retrieval system.

[0021]FIG. 10 is a flowchart of a points of interest service portion of the information retrieval system.

[0022]FIG. 11 is a flowchart of a location monitoring service portion of the information retrieval system.

[0023]FIG. 12 is a flowchart of a notification services portion of the information retrieval system.

[0024]FIG. 13 is a flowchart of a traffic monitoring service portion of the information retrieval system.

[0025]FIG. 14 is a flowchart of a server routine for performing subscribed user services.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0026] 1. Introduction and Overview

[0027] The present invention provides a location-based information retrieval system and method for wireless communication devices. A position determination system is included with the wireless communication device to allow the location of the device to be determined. The location of the device can be used to provide additional information or features to a user of the wireless communication device. Examples of the information that may be provided include map information; driving information; location information; location of retailers, goods, services, or other points of interest near the communication device; and any other information that may be useful or valuable to a user of the communication device. The device location is sent to a remote server that accesses and compiles the requested information and sends it back to the user via the communication device.

[0028] Voice recognition and speech synthesis capability can be included to provide an enhanced user interface. This enhanced interface allows acceptance of a user's vocal commands and provides audible vocal responses. The enhanced interface may complement a conventional display and keypad interface.

[0029] 2. Example Environment

[0030] Before describing the invention in detail, it is useful to describe an example environment in which the invention can be implemented. One example environment is a handset or communication device operating within a wireless communication network such as, for example, a cellular, GSM, PCS or radio communication network. Wireless communication devices embodying the present invention can be implemented in various configurations and architectures. Typically, a wireless communication device will include a keypad for control of the device and data entry, and a display for displaying relevant information.

[0031] An example wireless communication device 100 is illustrated in FIG. 1. Communication device 100 is presented for illustrative purposes only; implementation of the invention is not dependent on any particular device architecture or communication network.

[0032] Device 100 includes a processor 104, a speaker 106, a display 108, a keypad 110, a transceiver 112, a memory 114, a microphone 116, a power source 118 and an antenna 120. Device 100 is typically a mobile device such as a handheld handset or an integrated vehicle phone. It is configured to communicate with other communications devices such as base station 112. Base station 112 is typically within a geographic area known as a “cell” and handles communications for all wireless devices within the cell.

[0033] Processor 104 directs the overall operation of device 100. A computer program or set of instructions is typically coded or otherwise implemented on the processor to enable the processor to carry out the device operation. Memory 114 interfaces with processor 104 and may store program code and provide storage space for data useful in executing the program code and carrying out the device functions. Memory 114 may be implemented as ROM, RAM or any other convenient memory format. The features and functionality of the invention described below may be implemented using hardware, software, or a combination thereof, and such software can run on a processor such as processor 104 and be stored in a memory such as memory 114.

[0034] Transceiver 112 includes a transmitter that transmits voice and data information via antenna 120 to a recipient communication device such as, for example, base station 112. Transceiver 112 also includes a receiver that receives voice and data information from another communication device (e.g., base station 112). The received voice and data information is provided to the user or used to facilitate device operation.

[0035] User interface features include speaker 106, display 108, keypad 110, and microphone 116. Microphone 116 accepts voice or other audio information from the user and converts this information into electrical signals that can be transmitted by transceiver 112. Likewise, speaker 106 converts electrical signals received by transceiver 112 into audio information that can be heard by a user of device 100. Display 108 displays information such as call information, keypad entry information, signal presence and strength information, battery life information, or any other information useful to the user. Display 108 preferably takes the form of a liquid crystal display (LCD), which have low power consumption characteristics, but could also be implemented as a light emitting diode (LED) display or any other appropriate visual indicator. Keypad 110 typically includes an alphanumeric keypad and may also include special function keys. In one embodiment, keypad 110 is backlit to permit viewing of the keys in low light or dark conditions. Device 100 may also include a flip panel (not shown) that can be closed to conceal some or all of the keypad.

[0036] Power source 118 is provides power to device 100. It can be implemented with rechargeable batteries, such as NiCad or NiMH rechargeable batteries, or with any other suitable power source.

[0037] 3. A Location-Based Information Retrieval System

[0038]FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating a wireless communication system according to the present invention. The communication system provides information to a wireless device user based on the location of the user and his device. It includes a wireless handset 130 and a hands-free unit 132. Handset 130 can be implemented in a configuration such as device 100 of FIG. 1, or in any other wireless communication device capable of communicating with remote locations via a wireless communication medium. In the description below, “handset” refers to any communication device capable of communicating with other devices via a wireless medium.

[0039] Hands-free unit 132 is optionally provided to allow the user of wireless device 130 to communicate in a hands-free mode. Hands-free unit 132 may include a microphone and speaker to provide wireless device 130 with speakerphone-like capabilities. Such capabilities are particularly desirable where wireless device 130 is utilized in an automobile or other mobile situation. In one implementation, hands-free unit 132 is configured according to conventional industry standards for a “hands-free kit”.

[0040] In addition to the conventional standards, hands-free unit 132 is equipped with a position determination system 134 to determine the location of unit 132 and handset 130. Alternatively, position determination system 134 may be directly incorporated into handset 130. Position determination system 134 determines location in terms of parameters such as latitude, longitude, height, speed of travel, and any other useful location or position parameters. In one embodiment, position determination system 134 is implemented using a GPS (global positioning system) or differential GPS. The design and configuration of GPSs is well known to those of ordinary skill in the art. Alternative position determination systems could also be utilized.

[0041] One example of an alternative position determination system is a triangulation system. In such a system, the position of handset 130 is determined by triangulating a signal from handset 130 with the fixed locations of two or more base stations. Triangulation systems, though useful and relatively inexpensive, have several drawbacks. Errors due to multipath signal transmission may occur and the systems may be inoperable in areas where only one base station is available.

[0042] Wireless device 130 preferably includes both a voice and data interface, particularly where position determination system 134 is incorporated in a hands-free unit 132. The voice interface provides hands-free operation and speakerphone-like capabilities. The data interface allows position information obtained by system 134 to be provided to handset 130 for transmission over wireless network 140. Moreover, where voice recognition or speech synthesis capabilities are provided (discussion below), the data interface provides the data to be synthesized into speech or the data received via voice recognition.

[0043] Handset 130 communicates with other entities via wireless network 140. Network 140 is typically comprised of a plurality of base stations that provide relay points for communication. Network 140 may be a cellular, PCS, GSM, or any other wireless communication network. In addition to conventional communication with other wired or wireless communication devices, as shown in FIG. 2, network 140 permits communication between handset 130 and data server(s) 136. When a user requests information, handset 130 provides the location of the handset to server 136 across wireless network 140. Server 136 retrieves relevant information from an associated database 138 and conveys the information to handset 130 over wireless network 140. The information may be displayed on the handset display or audibly rendered via speech synthesis or prerecorded scripts. Although the types of information stored in database 138 are virtually limitless, several example applications are provided for illustrative purposes.

[0044] In one example application, driving directions to a destination address are provided to a handset user. The user requests driving directions to the destination via keypad entry and/or voice command, and the request is communicated to server 136 over wireless network 140. At the time of the request, the handset location determined by position determination system 134 is also provided to server 136 to provide a starting point for the directions. Using the handset location and the destination address, server 136 calculates a route and compiles driving directions. The driving directions are transmitted to handset 130 over network 140 and are displayed or audibly rendered to the user. In addition to textual driving directions, a map showing the route may be displayed on the handset display. Options such as the shortest possible route, interstate route, safest route, most scenic route, etc. may be provided. The user's choice of options will dictate the route calculation. The options may be stored, and prompts or scripts generated, locally (in the memory of handset 130). Alternatively, the options, prompts and scripts may be stored at server 136 and provided to the user via network 140.

[0045] Another example application locates particular types of businesses or services in the user's location. Restaurants, gas stations, hotels and other businesses or services near the user's location can be identified and provided to the user. Again, the user requests the business or service type vocally or via keypad entry. The request is communicated to server 136 over wireless network 140, along with the user's current location as determined by the position determination system 134. Server 136, based on the handset location and user request, retrieves and returns relevant information to handset 130 over network 140.

[0046] Parameter limits or filters may be implemented to refine the request and selections returned. The user may set a location filter, for example, that requires returned selections be within X miles of the user's current location. If the user is seeking a restaurant, the user may request or be prompted to select parameters that refine the search results. These parameters may include cuisine type (e.g., Italian, French, American, etc.), restaurant type (e.g., fast food, casual dining, formal, etc.), price range and so on. For restaurants as well as gas stations, motels and other businesses, the user may identify a preferred national or regional chain.

[0047] As noted above, the search may be refined (the query narrowed) on the user's own initiative or based on system prompts. If the user simply requests a nearby restaurant, for example, server 136 may prompt the user with questions about parameters such as those described above. Alternatively, to conserve bandwidth over network 140, prompts can be stored locally and made by handset 130 (or hands-free unit 132) before the request is sent to server 136. In this embodiment, updated scripts and/or prompts may be downloaded from server 136 to handset 130. Preferably, memory-intensive data such as establishment locations, driving directions, etc. are stored in database 138 to minimize the amount of memory required in handset 130. The precise distribution of data storage among these devices will be influenced by factors such as available bandwidth, memory costs and airtime costs.

[0048] The user may also specify avoidance of certain areas or parts of town, such as those that have high crime rates, gang or drug activity, or other undesirable attributes. Crime statistics from law enforcement authorities or other sources can be compiled and stored in database 138. Based on these statistics, certain areas or neighborhoods may be identified as high crime rate areas or otherwise undesirable areas. The user may opt to not receive choices for establishments in, or driving directions through, those areas. This feature can be implemented automatically, as a default selection or through a user prompt. Alternatively, the system may provide an automatic warning sound or indication to alert the user of entry into a high-crime-rate area. This feature is particularly useful if the user is unfamiliar with a particular area in which he or she is travelling.

[0049] A method for requesting information across network 140 is illustrated in FIG. 3. In step 202, a user initiates a request for information. As described above, this request can be made via a keypad entry or by voice command with an appropriate voice recognition system. In step 204, the system determines whether the request requires the handset location or position. If all information is based on positional information, this step can be eliminated on the assumption that answering any request requires positional information. Since many requests may be fulfilled based on previously transmitted position information or without any position information at all, however, inclusion of step 204 is preferable to avoid unnecessary transmission of position information over network 140.

[0050] If position information is required, the method proceeds from step 204 to step 212, where position determination device 134 acquires the position of handset 130. In one implementation, position determination occurs somewhat constantly while handset 130 (or unit 132) is powered on. If position determination device 134 is situated in hands-free unit 132, unit 132 provides the position data to handset 130 for transmission to server 136 over wireless network 140 (step 214). If position information is not required, the method proceeds from step 204 directly to step 206.

[0051] In step 206, handset 130 sends the request to server 136 via wireless network 140. The request includes any position data acquired in steps 212-214. In step 208, server 136 retrieves the data or information requested from database 138. The data may be retrievable and usable in raw form, or it may need to be processed. This determination is based on the type of request, the information requested, and the manner or format in which the information is stored in database 138. The raw or processed data is communicated to handset 130 over network 140 and, in step 210, is displayed or provided to the user.

[0052] As described above, scripts or prompts may be provided to the user to refine the information request. If the scripts or prompts are stored in database 138 (as opposed to local storage in handset 130), they are retrieved by server 136 in step 208 and provided to the user in step 210. The user's answers to the prompts are sent by handset 130 to server 136, which uses the refined information to retrieve additional data or information from database 138, or to further refine the user's query. This potentially repetitive process is illustrated in FIG. 3 by flow line 222 and the repetition of steps 202, 206 and 208. During this repetitive prompting process, depending on time elapsed and distance traveled, updated position information may be provided to server 136. If the refining prompts are stored locally in device 130 or unit 132, refinement occurs before the query is sent and this repetitive process will not usually be necessary.

[0053] Once the request has been sufficiently refined, server 136 uses the refined request to retrieve data from database 138. Continuing with the examples described above, server 136 may retrieve locations of restaurants, gas stations, hotels, or other facilities or services near the user. In one implementation, the information is listed or ranked in order of best matches to the user's request and/or preferences. The listing of facilities or services matching the request is provided to handset 130 over network 140 (step 208), and the information is audibly or visually provided to the user (step 210). If the information is provided audibly, audio data can be prerecorded or synthesized by server 136 and transmitted over network 140, or data can be sent across network 140 and speech synthesized locally.

[0054] Once the user selects a facility or service from the list of options provided, server 136 can retrieve or compute driving directions to the facility or service based on the user's current position. If sufficient time has elapsed to significantly alter the user's current position, server 136 may request a position update. In one implementation, a speed of travel parameter is provided by handset 130 along with the current position. In this implementation, the determination of whether to update the position information can be based in part on this parameter. Where the user is traveling at a high rate of speed, positional updates will be required often to ensure accurate directions. Additionally, where the user is approaching a freeway exit or other waypoint in the route being computed, server 136 may request a position update to ensure that this waypoint has not been passed. If it has been passed, an alternative route may be calculated or the user may be directed to backtrack to the passed waypoint.

[0055] 4. Implementation of a Location-Based Information Retrieval System

[0056] FIGS. 8-14 depict in more detail a method 600 for location-based information retrieval using a wireless communication device such as handset 130. As in the information retrieval system described above, handset 130 communicates with a server 136 and database 138 over a wireless network 140. In method 600, a web site maintained on server 136 handles user requests for information. The web site includes a “services home page” that serves as an index to the available information services. Handset 130 is equipped with an Internet browser or minibrowser program that accesses server 136 via network 140 and pulls the services home page to handset 130. The home page is displayed on the handset display 108.

[0057] Referring to FIG. 8, the user enters the services home page via handset 130 or another appropriate portable or navigational device (step 602). Keypad 110 of handset 130 may include a special function key that permits activation of the minibrowser and loading of the services home page from server 136 in one keystroke. In step 604, as soon as the user has entered the home page, server 136 automatically attempts to retrieve from handset 130 information stored in the handset memory relating to the user, the user's preferences and handset 130 (“user information”). The user information, if available, is useful to server 136 in formatting a response to information requests based on the user's past preferences.

[0058] The user information may be stored in the handset memory as a data file or “cookie” created by server 136, and may be periodically updated by server 136. At decision node 606, if server 136 found the user information, the user information is stored on server 136 (step 608) and the method proceeds to step 610. If the user information was not found, the method proceeds directly to step 610. Though not shown in FIG. 8, if user information is not found, the method could include an additional step of creating a user data file or cookie and storing it in the handset memory.

[0059] In step 610, server 136 attempts to retrieve from handset 130 the location of handset 130 as determined by position determination system 134. At decision node 612, if server 136 was able to retrieve the location of handset 130, the location information is stored on server 136 (step 614) and the method proceeds to step 616. If server 136 was not able to retrieve the location information, the method proceeds directly to step 616.

[0060] The home page index or list of services is displayed on handset 130 in step 616. All available information retrieval services are listed for the user to choose from. A selection for ending the information services session may also be provided. If handset 130 has voice synthesis capability, the available selections could be audibly announced to the user. Although the potential types of information retrieval services are virtually limitless, for exemplary purposes, four types of information retrieval services are discussed below.

[0061] One implementation of a location-based information retrieval system includes a driving direction service, a points of interest service, a location monitoring service, and notification services. If driving directions are selected, an additional traffic monitoring service is available. In step 618, the user selects one of the listed services via the handset user interface. The selection may be made through use of a menu navigation key, by pressing a keypad number corresponding to the desired service, or if voice recognition capability exists, by stating the selection.

[0062] In steps 620-628, handset 130 sends the appropriate service choice to server 136 over network 140. If the driving directions service (step 620) is selected, the system proceeds to node 630 of FIG. 9. If the points of interest service (step 622) is selected, the system proceeds to node 660 of FIG. 10. If the location monitoring service (step 624) is selected, the system proceeds to node 680 of FIG. 11. If the notification services (step 626) are selected, the system proceeds to node 690 of FIG. 12. Finally, if the user opted to end the information services session, an appropriate termination signal is sent to server 136 (step 628) and the session is ended.

[0063] A sub-method for providing location-based driving directions in response to a user request (step 620) is shown in FIG. 9 starting at node 630. The available types of driving directions are displayed on handset 130 (step 632). In one implementation, city-to-city and door-to-door driving directions are available. The scripts and prompts related to the types of driving directions available for selection may be stored remotely on server 136 or locally on handset 130. In step 634, the user selects the desired direction type, which is sent to server 136 over network 140.

[0064] The method proceeds according to which type of directions is requested (decision node 636). If city-to-city directions are requested, the method proceeds from node 636 to step 638. At step 638, if location information was available from handset 130 (see step 610 of FIG. 8), the starting city is already known and the method proceeds to step 640. If location information was not available, the user will first be required to enter the starting city (step 639). At step 640, the user enters the destination city. If door-to-door directions were requested, the method proceeds from node 636 to node 642. At step 642, if location information was available from handset 130, the starting address is already known by server 136 and the method proceeds directly to step 644. If location information was not available, the user will first be required to enter the starting address (step 643). At step 644, the user enters the destination address.

[0065] At step 646, the city(s) or address(s) entered by the user are sent from handset 130 over network 140 to server 136. Server 136 uses the handset location and the destination address or city to calculate a route and compile driving directions. If necessary, server 136 may access database 138 or other Internet servers to assemble the route and directions. The driving directions are transmitted to handset 130 over network 140 and are displayed or audibly rendered to the user (step 648). In addition to textual driving directions, a map showing the route may be displayed on the handset display. User preferences such as the shortest possible route, interstate route, safest route, most scenic route, etc. may dictate the route calculation. If such preferences exist, they would have been retrieved by server 136 from handset 130 in steps 604-608 (FIG. 8).

[0066] If location information is available from handset 130 (decision node 650), the user is presented with the additional option of activating a traffic monitoring (TM) service (decision node 652). If location information is not available, or if it is available but the user opts not to activate the traffic monitoring service, the method returns to step 616 of FIG. 8. The home page (HP) services are listed, and the system waits for the next user selection. If location information is available and the user opts to activate the traffic monitoring service, the system proceeds to the traffic monitoring sub-method of FIG. 13 (node 720).

[0067] If the traffic monitoring service is selected, handset 130 periodically sends its location to server 136 while in transit according to the driving directions, and server 136 determines whether there are any impediments such as accidents or construction work along the calculated route. If impediments are present, the server may configure an alternate route. The traffic monitoring sub-method is illustrated in detail in FIG. 13 starting at node 720.

[0068] Referring to FIG. 13, server 136 first assesses whether the destination address or city has been reached (step 722). If the destination has been reached, the traffic monitoring service is no longer necessary. Accordingly, the server cancels the traffic monitoring service (step 738) and sends a message over network 140 instructing handset 130 to cease sending periodic location updates (step 740). The method then proceeds directly to step 742.

[0069] If the destination has not been reached, server 136 searches for any accidents, construction work or other impediments or hazards between the current handset location and the destination (step 724). In one implementation, this is accomplished through a check of real time data maintained on database 138 or elsewhere on the Internet. If no impediments are found (decision node 726), the original route is not disturbed and the method proceeds to node 736. If an impediment is found, the server determines if an alternate route is necessary (step 728). In one implementation, the user's current speed (provided by handset 130) and the estimated clearing time of the impediment are considered in determining whether an alternate route should be calculated. If these factors do not dictate an alternate route (decision node 730), the original route is again left undisturbed and the method proceeds to step 736. If a new route is necessary, it is mapped and compiled as described above with reference to FIG. 9 (step 732). The user is notified of the change and the new route and map are sent to and displayed by handset 130 (step 734). Information about the accident or impediment necessitating the route change is also preferably provided to the user.

[0070] As indicated by step 736, handset 130 continues to periodically update server 136 with location information as long as the traffic monitoring routine remains active (e.g., until the user reaches the destination). If the destination has been reached, the periodic updates are stopped. At step 742, server 136 determines whether it needs to attend to other services in addition to the traffic monitoring service. If there are additional services, the system proceeds to step 756 of FIG. 14. FIG. 14 illustrates the steps followed by server 136 each time a location or user information update is received, and will be described in more detail below.

[0071] Referring again to FIG. 8, another location-based information retrieval service identifies certain points of interest near the user's current location (step 622). The sub-method for retrieval of information about points of interest is illustrated in FIG. 10, beginning at node 660. At node 662, the user is prompted to enter the business or type of facility she would like information about. Examples include restaurants, gas stations, hotels and any other businesses, services or recreation areas or facilities the user would like information about. Again, the user may enter his request either vocally or by keypad, depending on the capabilities of handset 130. The request is communicated to server 136 over wireless network 140.

[0072] If the location of handset 130 was provided by an associated position determination system, the method proceeds directly to step 668. If the location was not provided, the user will be required to provide his current location at step 666. At step 668, server 136 searches database 138 and possibly other Internet resources for nearby businesses matching the user's request. As described above, limits or user preferences may be implemented to refine the request and selections returned. The user may set a location filter, for example, that requires returned selections be within X miles of the user's current location. If the user is seeking a restaurant, the user may set parameters such as cuisine type, restaurant type, price range and so on. Preferred national or regional chain may be set. In one implementation, server 136 in steps 606-610 (FIG. 8) automatically retrieves this information from handset 130.

[0073] In step 670, server 136 sends the retrieved information over network 140 to handset 130. The information is displayed on handset 130 (step 672), and may be listed or ranked according to proximity, price or any other user preference. The system then returns to step 616 of FIG. 8 and awaits another user selection from the home page index.

[0074] If the location monitoring service is selected, the system proceeds to node 680 of FIG. 11. Server 136 initially determines whether this service has already been activated (decision node 682). If it has, nothing further is required and the user is returned to the main listing of services on the home page. If it has not been activated, server 136 creates a user web page or file where the user's locations are periodically posted and/or stored (step 684). Essentially, the location monitoring service creates a log of the user's whereabouts and makes the log available for the user to inspect. The web page URL and password required for entry are sent to the user over network 140 (step 684), and are displayed by handset 130 to the user in step 686. Handset 130 may automatically store this information locally, or may prompt the user as to whether he desires to do so. With the web page address and password in hand, the user can review his daily activities and travels by properly directing his handset minibrowser. Step 688 notes that, while the location monitoring service is active, handset 130 periodically sends updated location information to server 136. The method returns to step 616 to display the home page index.

[0075] If notification services are selected from the home page, the information retrieval system proceeds to node 690 of FIG. 12. With this option, the user is automatically notified about selected types of news, events, promotions, etc. occurring near his location (as reported by handset 130). On the initial selection of this option, the user selects the types of events or information that he would like to subscribe to and be notified about (step 691). These selections may be later changed or deleted. At decision node 692, server 136 proceeds according to the notifications the user has subscribed to. Notifications about virtually any type of activity or event are possible. Three types of notifications—news, events and promotions—are shown in FIG. 12.

[0076] If the user has selected news notifications, the method proceeds to step 694. Server 136 obtains search parameters to define the types of news notifications provided to the user, such as the news type (i.e., politics, sports, headlines, entertainment, etc.) or region (city, county, state, national, world). These parameters may have already been retrieved by server 136 from handset 130 in steps 606-610 of FIG. 8. If not, the user may be prompted at step 694 to enter search parameters. At step 696, server 136 searches for news that falls within the search parameters.

[0077] If the user has selected event notifications, the method proceeds from node 692 to step 698. Server 136 obtains search parameters to define the types of event notifications provided to the user. Parameters may include the event type (i.e., community events, sporting events, theatre, arts, etc.), events within a certain region (city, county or state), or events occuring within a configurable mile radius of the user. These parameters may have already been retrieved by server 136 from handset 130 in steps 606-610 of FIG. 8. If not, the user may be prompted at step 698 to respond to queries to define the search parameters. At step 700, server 136 searches for events that fall within the search parameters.

[0078] If the user has selected promotion or sales notifications, the method proceeds from node 692 to step 702. Server 136 obtains search parameters to define the types of promotional or sales notifications provided to the user. Parameters may include merchant or service type (i.e., clothing, household goods, restaurants, etc.), or promotions/sales occuring within a defined region or configurable mile radius of the user. These parameters may have already been retrieved by server 136 from handset 130 in steps 606-610 of FIG. 8. If not, the user may be prompted at step 702 to respond to queries to define the search parameters. At step 704, server 136 searches for events that fall within the search parameters.

[0079] Once server 136 has retrieved all subscribed notifications matching the search parameters, it proceeds to node 706 and determines whether the notifications found in the search were already sent to the user. If the notifications were already sent, it is usually not necessary or desirable to send them to the user again, and the server proceeds directly to step 712. It should be noted, however, that the user may set her preferences to eliminate this step if she wishes to receive all notifications found, even if they were previously sent. If the notifications have not yet been sent to the user, the notifications are sent to handset 130 over network 140 (step 708). The notifications may be sorted according to the user's preferences such as, for example, by region, proximity, price, merchant-type and so on. At step 710, handset 130 displays the received and sorted notifications.

[0080] So long as the notification service is active, handset 130 periodically sends updated location and user preference information to server 136 (step 712). As will be described with reference to FIG. 14, when server 136 receives such updates, it initiates a routine to perform all services the user is subscribed to. At decision node 714, server 136 determines whether the user is subscribed to other services. If the user is subscribed to other services, the method returns to step 756 of FIG. 14 to perform the remaining services. If the user is not subscribed to other services, the user is presented with the main home page display of service options (step 616 of FIG. 8)

[0081]FIG. 14 depicts the steps followed by server 136 each time a location or user information update is received from handset 130 (step 752). Such updates are sent periodically by handset 130 whenever the location monitoring, traffic monitoring and/or notification services are active. At step 754, upon receiving an update from handset 130, server 136 determines which services handset 130 subscribes to. From node 756, server 136 performs the subscribed services. For location monitoring, at step 758, server 136 updates the user record and/or web page with the location information received from handset 130. At step 760, server 136 determines whether handset 130 is subscribed to additional services. If it is, the method loops back to step 756 to perform the additional services. If it is not, the user is returned to the home page list of options. For notification services, server 136 proceeds with step 692 of FIG. 12. For traffic monitoring services, server 136 proceeds with step 720 of FIG. 13.

[0082] As described in more detail below, the method steps of FIGS. 8-14 may be implemented as computer programs, software or hardware. The portions relating to control of handset 130 may be coded in processor 104 or could be stored in memory 114. Alternatively, the program or portions of it could be stored on server 136 and downloaded to handset 130 as needed. The portions relating to the steps carried out by server 136, such as FIG. 14, preferably reside in a processor or memory in server 136.

[0083] 5. Additional System Details

[0084] As stated above, in one embodiment, position-determination device 134 is located in hands-free unit 132. FIG. 4 illustrates one implementation of a hands-free unit 132, including a GPS receiver 304 that functions as the position determination device and an associated controller 306. Position information is exchanged with wireless handset 130 via data in-out interface 308. Antenna 310 allows GPS receiver 304 to communicate with the constellation of GPS satellites. As stated above, alternative position determination devices could be implemented if desired. Speaker 312 and microphone 314 provide speakerphone like capabilities to wireless device 130. Audio processor 316 provides A/D, D/A and echo canceling for voice digitization or synthesis. Preferably, the digitized voice is in the form of PCM (pulse code modulated) data, although other data coding techniques could be utilized.

[0085] As described above, voice synthesis and/or recognition capabilities may be provided. In one implementation, voice synthesis and recognition are provided in hands-free unit 132. Alternatively, wireless device 130 or server 136 could provide these capabilities.

[0086]FIG. 5 shows an example implementation of hands-free unit 132 with voice synthesis and recognition. In this implementation, user speech commands are received by microphone 314, digitized by audio processor 316 and processed by voice recognition algorithm 322. The processed speech commands are provided to controller 306 and sent to server 136 as data 309. Similarly, information retrieved by server 136 can be provided to controller 306 and voice synthesizer 324. Voice synthesizer 324 converts this information to digital voice data, which is processed by audio processor 316 and announced to the user via speaker 312. Additionally, audio information can be provided to audio processor 316 via audio in-out communication path 308. Where server 136 performs speech synthesis or recognition, digital voice data is sent across network 140 and is provided to, or received from, the user via audio in-out connection 308.

[0087] Where position determination device 134 is located in hands-free unit 132, wireless device 130 sends a location information request message to hands-free unit 132. Hands-free unit 132 in response sends a location information response message to the handset 130. The location information response includes parameters indicating position such as time, longitude, latitude, height, speed, and data age.

[0088]FIG. 6 is a diagram illustrating an example format for the location information request 404 and the location information response 408. Location information request 404 is a one-byte data field. Response 408 includes several fields, including time 410, longitude 412, latitude 414, height 416, speed 418 and data age 420. Time field 410 is six bytes in length, longitude field 412 is nine bytes in length, latitude 414 is eight bytes in length, height field 416 is eight bytes in length, speed field 418 is three bytes in length, and data age 420 is one byte in length. As would be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art, other message formats and field lengths could be utilized.

[0089] In one embodiment, the time is GPS time of day in seconds and is in ASCII format. Longitude, latitude and speed are also in ASCII format, with the longitude data being positive east, the latitude data being positive north and the speed being in miles per hour. The data age reflects the age of the return data and can indicate whether the data is fresh, old, or otherwise not available. Data is listed as fresh if it is less than ten seconds of age, or old if it is greater than or equal to ten seconds. Of course, alternative formats can be provided and alternative time frames established for determining if data is fresh or old.

[0090] A status request and response may be used to query the status of position determination device 134 before requesting location information. This is particularly useful if position determination device is implemented as a GPS receiver. The request message may be one byte in length and simply request the status of the GPS receiver. In this implementation, the response may be a one byte status word indicating whether the device is ready. The response could include additional information such as, for example, the reason the status is ready or not ready, or any other pertinent information.

[0091] The various embodiments and features of the invention described above may be implemented with hardware, software or a combination thereof and may be implemented using a computing system having one or more processors. In one embodiment, these elements are implemented using a processor-based system capable of carrying out the functionality described with respect thereto. An example processor-based system 502 is shown in FIG. 7. System 502 includes one or more processors, such as processor 504. Processor 504 is connected to communication bus 506.

[0092] System 502 includes main memory 508 and secondary memory 510. Main memory 508 is preferably random access memory (RAM), and secondary memory 510 preferably includes hard disk drive 512 and/or a removable storage drive 514. Removable storage drive 514 is typically a floppy disk drive, a magnetic tape drive, an optical disk drive or the like. Storage drive 514 reads from and writes to removable storage media 518 in a well known manner. Storage media 518 is typically a floppy disk, magnetic tape, optical disk or the like having stored therein computer software and/or data.

[0093] Secondary memory 510 may include additional or alternative means for allowing computer programs or other instructions to be loaded into computer system 502. A removable storage unit 522 and interface 520, for example, may be provided. Interface 520 and storage unit 522 could take the form of a program cartridge and cartridge interface (such as that found in video game devices), or a removable memory chip (such as an EPROM, or PROM) and associated socket.

[0094] Communications interface 524 allows software and data to be transferred between computer system 502 and external devices. Examples of communications interface 524 include a modem, a network interface (such as, for example, an Ethernet card), a communications port, or a PCMCIA slot and card. Software and data is transferred via communications interface 524 as electronic, electromagnetic, optical or other signals capable of being received by communications interface 524. These signals are provided to communications interface via channel 528. Channel 528 carries signals and can be implemented as a wireless medium, wire or cable, fiber optics, or other communications medium. Examples include a phone line, a cellular phone link, an RF link or a network interface.

[0095] In this document, the terms “computer program medium” and “computer usable medium” are used to generally refer to media such as removable storage device 518, a disk capable of installation in disk drive 512, and signals on channel 528. These computer program products are means for providing software or program instructions to computer system 502. Computer programs (also called computer control logic) are stored in main memory and/or secondary memory 510. Computer programs can also be received via communications interface 524. Such computer programs, when executed, enable the computer system 502 to perform the features of the present invention as discussed herein. In particular, the computer programs, when executed, enable the processor 504 to perform the features of the present invention. Accordingly, such computer programs represent controllers of the computer system 502.

[0096] In an embodiment where the elements of the invention are implemented using software, the software may be stored in, or transmitted via, a computer program product and loaded into computer system 502 using removable storage drive 514, hard drive 512 or communications interface 524. The control logic (software), when executed by the processor 504, causes processor 504 to perform the functions of the invention as described herein.

[0097] In another embodiment, the elements are implemented primarily in hardware using components such as PALs, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) or other hardware components. Implementation of a hardware state machine to perform the functions described herein will be apparent to persons skilled in the relevant art(s). In yet another embodiment, elements are implemented using a combination of both hardware and software.

[0098] While various embodiments of the present invention have been described above, it should be understood that they have been presented by way of example only, and not limitation. Thus, the breadth and scope of the present invention should not be limited by any of the above-described exemplary embodiments, but should be defined only in accordance with the following claims and their equivalents.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification455/456.2, 455/403
International ClassificationH04M1/60, H04M3/42, H04M3/493, H04W88/06, H04W88/04, H04W4/02
Cooperative ClassificationH04W88/04, H04W4/02, H04M2250/10, H04M2242/30, H04M3/493, H04M1/6075, H04W88/06
European ClassificationH04W4/02, H04M3/493, H04M1/60T2C
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Owner name: CRICKET ILLINOIS PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET INDIANA PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET KANSAS PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET KENTUCKY PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE (COLUMBUS), INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE (DENVER) INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE (MACON), INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE (NORTH CAROLINA) INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE (PITTSBURGH) INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE (REAUCTION), INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE I, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE II, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE III, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE IV, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE IX, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE V, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100323;REEL/FRAME:22804/745
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE VI, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE VII, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE VIII, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE X, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE XI, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE XII, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE XIII, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE XIV, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE XIX, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE XV, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE XVI, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE XVII, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE XVIII, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSEE XX, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICENSSE (LAKELAND) INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET LICESNSEE (ALBANY), INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET MICHIGAN PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET MINNESOTA PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: LEAP WIRELESS INTERNATIONAL, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: MCG PCS LICENSEE CORPORATION, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: TELEPHONE ENTERTAINMENT NETWORK, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET MISSISSIPPI PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET NEBRASKA PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET NEVADA PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET NEW MEXICO PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET NEW YORK PROPERTY COMPANY, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET NORTH CAROLINA PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET OHIO PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET OKLAHOMA PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET OREGON PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET PENNSYLVANIA PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET TEXAS PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET UTAH PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET WASHINGTON PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: CRICKET WISCONSIN PROPERTY COMPANY,CALIFORNIA
Owner name: LEAP PCS MEXICO, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Feb 17, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: BANK OF AMERICA N.A., NORTH CAROLINA
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:CRICKET COMMUNICATIONS, INC.;LEAP WIRELESS INTERNATIONAL, INC.;BACKWIRE.COM, INC.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:016290/0577
Effective date: 20050110
Aug 27, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS COLLATERAL AGENT, MINNE
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:LEAP WIRELESS INTERNATIONAL, INC.;REEL/FRAME:015732/0121
Effective date: 20040816
Mar 30, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: LEAP WIRELESS INTERNATIONAL, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NEOPOINT, INC.;REEL/FRAME:011662/0836
Effective date: 20001212
Mar 15, 2000ASAssignment
Owner name: NEOPOINT, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:CHERN, VINCENT;SON, WILLIAM Y.;REEL/FRAME:010613/0414
Effective date: 20000303