Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20030066145 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/969,632
Publication dateApr 10, 2003
Filing dateOct 4, 2001
Priority dateOct 4, 2001
Also published asCA2462422A1, CA2462422C, CA2772880A1, CA2772880C, CN1596086A, DE60238211D1, EP1437982A1, EP1437982B1, EP2295006A2, EP2295006A3, EP2295006B1, US7992244, US20040168272, US20050177961, US20060265825, US20110146010, WO2003028581A1
Publication number09969632, 969632, US 2003/0066145 A1, US 2003/066145 A1, US 20030066145 A1, US 20030066145A1, US 2003066145 A1, US 2003066145A1, US-A1-20030066145, US-A1-2003066145, US2003/0066145A1, US2003/066145A1, US20030066145 A1, US20030066145A1, US2003066145 A1, US2003066145A1
InventorsFrank Prineppi
Original AssigneePrineppi Frank J.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric toothbrushes
US 20030066145 A1
Abstract
In a first embodiment an electric toothbrush having a housing containing an electric motor, the motor being drivingly connected to a first brush head rotatably mounted on an end of the toothbrush remote from the motor and adjacent to at least one other rotatable brush head. In a second embodiment a packaged electric toothbrush including a “try me” facility for remotely testing the operation of the toothbrush, which “try me” feature comprises a two-sided metal strip such as aluminium foil, separated by a dielectric material, respective sides of the strip being connected at one end to respective parts used to operate the electric toothbrush and the other end of the strip being folded over and including a centrally disposed aperture onto which is a bendable metal connector such that upon bending or pressing of the connector the two sides of the strip are electrically connected together to temporarily operate the toothbrush whilst still in its packaging.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(8)
What I claim is:
1. An electric toothbrush having a housing containing an electric motor, the motor being drivingly connected to a first brush head rotatably mounted on an end of the toothbrush remote from the motor adjacent to at least one other rotatable brush head, wherein the first brush head includes a drive pin extending therefrom substantially at right angles from the axis of rotation, the free end of the drive pin being received within a guide slot in a brush head to be driven thereby, the arrangement being such that the drive pin bears against respectively opposite sides of the guide slot to thereby drive a driven brush head clockwise and anti-clockwise about its axis of rotation as the first brush head is also being oscillated.
2. An electric toothbrush according to claim 1 having first and second brush heads, the second brush head having a plane of rotation which is angled relative to the plane of rotation of the first brush head.
3. An electric toothbrush according to claim 2 wherein the second brush head is angled inwardly towards the first brush head.
4. An electric toothbrush according to any preceding claim wherein the means by which the motor is drivingly connected to the first brush head and the means by which the drive pin is received within a guide slot in a brush head to be driven thereby includes a part-spherical ball joint.
5. An electric toothbrush according to claim 4 wherein the ball joint is made of nylon.
6. A detachable brush head holder for an electric toothbrush body housing a motor, a battery and associated electrical circuitry, the detachable brush head holder including at the free end thereof when connected at the other end to the body portion, a first partly rotatable brush head and a second partly rotatable brush head, the first brush head in said position being drivingly connected to the motor and including a drive pin extending therefrom substantially at right angles from the axis of rotation of the first brush head, the free end of the drive pin being received within a guide slot in the second brush head, the arrangement being such that the drive pin bears against respectively opposite sides of the guide slot to thereby drive the second brush head clockwise and anti-clockwise about its axis of rotation as the first brush head is also being oscillated.
7. A packaged electric toothbrush including a body portion for containing a battery operated motor drivingly connected or connectable to a brush head holder including at least one brush head, wherein the toothbrush includes a “try me” facility for remotely testing the operation of the toothbrush, such as by a prospective purchaser of the toothbrush whilst the toothbrush is still in its protective sales packaging, which “try me” feature comprises a two-sided metal strip, such as aluminium foil, separated by a dielectric material such as paper or plastics, respective sides of the strip being connected at one end to respective parts of an electric circuit used to operate the electric toothbrush and, in particular, to energise the electric motor thereof, the other end of the strip being folded over and including a centrally disposed aperture onto or over which is disposed a bendable metal connector such that upon bending or pressing of the connector the two sides of the strip or foil are electrically connected together to temporarily operate the toothbrush whilst still in its packaging.
8. A toothbrush according to claim 7 in which the “try me” feature may be permanently disconnected from the toothbrush by being pulled away from the electrical circuit to which it is attached.
Description
  • [0001]
    This invention relates to electric toothbrushes including those powered by a rechargeable battery from a mains domestic electricity supply.
  • BACKGROUND TO THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 5,226,206, there is described an electric toothbrush having twin brush heads which are drivingly connected together by a rack and pinion assembly in which the rack is reciprocated via a drive shaft connected to a crank shaft mounted at one end for rotation on a gear driven by a motor. The twin brush heads are therefore able to oscillate about their respective axes either in the same direction or in opposite directions, depending upon the configuration of the rack, this being generally ‘U’ shaped so as to facilitate the use of gear teeth on the inside thereof for driving the respective heads via respective pinions in mesh therewith.
  • [0003]
    A potential problem with this arrangement is that it is relatively complex and is not easily cleanable with running water such that the moving parts may become clogged with toothpaste or debris. In addition, the complexity and number of the parts used to provide the oscillating motion for the twin heads adds to the cost and complexity of manufacture.
  • [0004]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 5,353,460 the use of a rack and pinion assembly is dispensed with in favour of a crank mechanism connecting the first brush head to the second brush head. The first brush head is directly driven by a mitre gear or crown wheel which then, in turn, drives the second brush head to oscillate in the opposite direction to that of the first brush head. This arrangement involves fewer moving parts but still depends on the presence of gears and the crank mechanism for its operation, leading to the possibility of these moving parts being difficult to clean and becoming clogged etc. In addition, because the crank arm necessarily has to connect the respective brush heads on the sides thereof remote from the bristles, it will be understood that additional space is required to provide for free movement of the crank arm when the brush is in use. This also has the disadvantage in that the working ends of the crank linkage can never be directly exposed to running water for rinsing and cleaning purposes.
  • [0005]
    In a first aspect the present invention is derived from the realisation that it would be preferable to have an electric toothbrush having multiple, such as two, rotatable brush heads but which dispenses with the need for gears or crank mechanisms for transferring oscillating rotary motion from one brush to another, typically a first brush driven by a connection to an electric motor and the second brush driven by movement of the first brush.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0006]
    According to a first aspect of the invention there is provided an electric toothbrush having a housing containing an electric motor, the motor being drivingly connected to a first brush head rotatably mounted on an end of the toothbrush remote from the motor adjacent to at least one other rotatable brush head, wherein the first brush head includes a drive pin extending therefrom substantially at right angles from the axis of rotation, the free end of the drive pin being received within a guide slot in a brush head to be driven thereby, the arrangement being such that the drive pin bears against respectively opposite sides of the guide slot to thereby drive a driven brush head clockwise and anti-clockwise about its axis of rotation as the first brush head is also being oscillated.
  • [0007]
    This arrangement has the advantage in that the connection between two or more brush heads is extremely simple and since there are no moving parts other than the free end of the or each drive pin as it rocks back and forth within the or a respective guide slot, such can be easily cleaned under running water. A further advantage is that the mechanical motion of the brush head driven by the first brush head is necessarily magnified slightly due to its displacement from the first brush head and this overcomes any backlash that may be inherent in the system.
  • [0008]
    Although a preferred embodiment of the invention uses only two brush heads, one driven directly via the drive link between the electric motor and the brush itself and the other being driven by a drive pin extending from the periphery of the first brush head, nevertheless it will be apparent that the same principle can be used to drive more than a second brush head and, in turn, the second brush head may itself drive a third brush head, and so on. Additionally, one or more of the brush heads may be of different diameter to the first brush head, although it will be appreciated that where there are differences in diameter a consideration of equivalent gear ratios then becomes necessary to determine whether the difference is too great to allow for the required movement.
  • [0009]
    The means by which the first brush head is driven back and forth about its axis may comprise a bell crank arrangement in which an elbowed end of a crankshaft, drivingly connected at its other end to the motor, is received within an elongated slot extending into the periphery of the first brush head diametrically opposite the drive pin (for a twin brush head toothbrush), the length of the slot being at least as great as the range of movement available to the elbow when the crankshaft is rotated through 360.
  • [0010]
    The use of a drive pin for driving a second brush head has a still further advantage to the linkages referred to in the preamble hereto in that the second head may have a plane of rotation which is angled relative to the plane of rotation of the first brush head, such as being angled inwardly slightly, although it will be understood that there are practical limits to the amount that a second or even more such brush heads can be angled with respect to the plane of rotation of the first brush head.
  • [0011]
    Preferably, the end of the elbowed end of the crankshaft and the or each drive pin is partly spherical and takes the form of a ball joint, each being receivable within a respective slot of substantially the same diameter so as to minimise rattle and wear. A convenient arrangement has been found to be a ball joint made of nylon where the bristle holding part of the brush heads are made of e.g. PVC or some other suitable plastics material. Preferably, the slot for receiving each ball joint is partly arcuate so as to maximise the surface area in contact between the ball joint to thereby decrease the load forces on the slot and therefore reduce wear.
  • [0012]
    According to a second embodiment of the invention, the toothbrush is packaged in e.g. a blister pack and includes a “try me” facility for remotely testing the operation of the toothbrush, such as by a prospective purchaser of the toothbrush, whilst the toothbrush is still in its protective sales packaging, which “try me” feature comprises a two-sided metal foil or strip (such as aluminium foil), separated by a di-electric material such as paper or plastics, respective sides of the foil or strip being connected at one end to respective conductors of an electric circuit used to operate the electric toothbrush and, in particular, to energise the electric motor thereof, the other end of the foil or strip being folded over and including a centrally disposed aperture onto or over which is disposed a bendable metal connector such that upon bending or pressing of the connector the two sides of the strip or foil are electrically connected together to temporarily operate the toothbrush whilst still in its packaging.
  • [0013]
    Preferably, the “try me” feature may be permanently disconnected from the toothbrush after being purchased by simply being pulled away from the electrical connectors to which it is attached.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0014]
    The invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:
  • [0015]
    [0015]FIG. 1 is a side elevation of a toothbrush according to a first embodiment of the invention having a pair of brush heads, one of which is angled inwardly slightly with respect to the other;
  • [0016]
    [0016]FIG. 2 is an enlarged and partly cut away view of the end of the toothbrush of FIG. 1 which includes the brush heads;
  • [0017]
    [0017]FIG. 3 is a schematic plan view showing the mode of operation of the toothbrush heads of FIG. 1 and 2,
  • [0018]
    [0018]FIG. 4 is an enlarged schematic view of the brush head end of a toothbrush according to a preferred embodiment of the invention, and,
  • [0019]
    [0019]FIG. 5 is a section of elevation along the line “A”-“A” of part of FIG. 5.
  • [0020]
    [0020]FIG. 6 is a perspective and partly cut away view of a second embodiment of the invention, which includes a “try me” feature,
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0021]
    Referring firstly to FIG. 1, an electric toothbrush shown generally at 1 comprises a plastics body portion 2 for housing a motor, battery and associated electrical circuitry (not shown) and a detachable generally hollow brush head holder 3 including at the free end thereof a first brush head 4 and a second brush head 5, each being partly rotatable by being drivingly connected to the motor in the housing 2 in a manner to be described. A push button 6 in the housing 2 is used to operate the toothbrush 1 and a “try me” feature shown generally at 7 can be used to temporarily operate the toothbrush 1 in accordance with a second embodiment of the invention in a manner to be described with reference to FIG. 6.
  • [0022]
    In FIGS. 2 and 3 there is shown the operable end of the brush head holder 3 in which it will be seen that the first brush head 4 includes a generally disc-shaped bristle holder 8 from which extend respective sets of bristles shown generally at 9 in FIG. 2. similarly, the second brush head 5 comprises a generally disc-shaped bristle holder 10 from which extend sets of bristles shown generally at 11. Brush head 4 is mounted for rotation on a pivot pin 12 and brush head 5 is mounted for rotation on a pivot pin 13, although the plane of rotation of brush head 5 is slightly offset to the plane of rotation of brush head 4 by about 5 such that the bristles 11 are inclined slightly inwardly towards the bristles 9. This has been found to be advantageous in that the brush heads 4,5 can collectively clean a greater surface area of teeth than would be the case if both were rotatable in the same plane, by virtue of the generally curved placement of teeth within a mouth.
  • [0023]
    Reciprocating clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation of the first brush head 4 is facilitated by means of a bell crank mechanism which includes a stainless steel crankshaft 14 secured for rotation about its major axis in a journal 15 extending from a spigot 16 on the inside of the brush head holder 3 as shown more clearly in FIG. 2. The end of the crankshaft adjacent thereto includes an elbow joint 17, the free end of which extends into a slotted region 18 within the bristle holder 8 of the brush head 4, which slotted region 18 is sufficiently long (or tall) to accommodate 360 rotation of the crankshaft 14 and in particular movement of the elbow 17 about the major axis of the crankshaft 14 so that upon rotation thereof continuously clockwise or anti-clockwise it will be apparent that the brush head 4 will be forced to oscillate back and forth about the pivot 12.
  • [0024]
    Brush head 5 is driven in a different manner by means of a drive pin 19 which extends diametrically outwardly from the bristle holder 8 of the brush 4, to which it is fixed for rotation therewith, and is received in a slotted region 20 of the bristle holder 10 of the brush head 5. In this case, the slotted region 20 is wide enough to permit the drive pin 19 to move in an arc dictated by the movement of the elbow 17 within the slotted region 18 about the major axis of the crankshaft 14 but in an opposite sense so that clockwise movement of the brush head 4 causes anticlockwise movement of the brush head 5, and vice versa.
  • [0025]
    As will be understood by those skilled in the art, the absence of any gears in this part of the electric toothbrush 1 enables it to be easily cleaned in running water and because there arc few moving parts as compared to toothbrushes which include gears or crank arms for driving the or each brush head it will be appreciated that manufacture of the toothbrush according to the first embodiment of the invention can be easily facilitated.
  • [0026]
    In FIGS. 4 and 5 there is shown a preferred embodiment of the engagement between the elbowed end 17 of the crankshaft 14 with the slot 18 in the first brush head 8 and between the drive pin 19 within the slot 20 in the second brush head 10. In each case a respective part-spherical ball joint 21, 22 made of nylon are received within the respective slots 18, 20, which in this instance are partly arcuate so as to maximise the surface area available for contact by the ball joints 21, 22. This has the advantage of minimising wear and in practice it has been found that the use of nylon in the ball joints 21, 22 gives excellent results in terms of self-lubrication properties when the brush heads 8,10 are made of a suitable plastics material, such as PVC. As well, it will be apparent that during use of the toothbrush, saliva and indeed debris from foodstuffs being cleaned will also assist in lubricating the moving parts, whereafter they may be cleaned in running water with little risk of particles of debris adhering to the generally smoothly profiled surfaces in this region of the toothbrush.
  • [0027]
    In FIGS. 4 and 5 the locus of movement of the ball joint 21 is shown in which it will be seen that as the crankshaft 14 rotates in one direction only the ball joint 21 essentially assumes maximum upper and lower positions about the central axis of the crankshaft 14 within the slot 18 as shown in FIG. 5 and left to right positions as shown in FIG. 4 to thereby drive the bristle holder 8 back and forth about its central axis in the manner shown arrowed to, in turn, drive the second bristle holder 10 via the drive shaft 14 back and forth about its own axis, but in the opposite sense so that as one brush head moves clock wise, the other always moves anti-clockwise, and so on.
  • [0028]
    In FIG. 6 there is shown a second embodiment of the invention which includes a “try me” feature shown generally at 7. This includes a twin sided metal foil strip 3, such as a double sided aluminium strip separated by a dielectric material (not shown) such as paper or plastics, respective sides of the strip 3 being electrically connected to respective parts of a printed circuit board 4 by connectors 25 and 26 forming part of a closeable circuit for operating a motor 27 to, in turn, rotate the crankshaft 14 and hence oscillate the brush heads 4, 5 in the manner as described with reference to FIGS. 2 and 3.
  • [0029]
    The free end of the strip 3 has a folded over region in the form of a ring 28 onto which can be fitted a metal disc 29 which includes a domed central region 30 which may be pressed to temporarily connect both sides of the strip 3 to complete the circuit between the connectors 25 and 26 and thereby temporarily activate the toothbrush 1. As will be appreciated, because the “try me” feature 7 includes a strip 23 by which it allows a prospective purchaser of the toothbrush to determine if and how it works prior to purchase following pressing of the metal disc 29, after purchase tho “try me” feature 7 can be effectively deactivated by simply pulling the strip 23 away from the printed circuit board 24 and hence out of engagement with the connectors 25, 26 thereon, whereafter an end cap 31 can be refitted onto the housing 2 of the toothbrush 1 in order to commence normal operation via pressing of the button 6.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5226206 *Oct 8, 1992Jul 13, 1993A To Z Technology Ltd.Toothbrush
US5353460 *Sep 24, 1993Oct 11, 1994Ohio Health Care Products, Inc.Power driven toothbrush
US5617603 *Jul 23, 1996Apr 8, 1997Mei; Tzeng J. N.Brush head assembly of an electric toothbrush
US6138310 *Apr 23, 1999Oct 31, 2000Porper; Robert P.Electric toothbrush having opposed bristle heads
US6314606 *Oct 22, 1999Nov 13, 2001Colgate-Palmolive CompanyContouring toothbrush head
US6434773 *Aug 28, 2000Aug 20, 2002Youti KuoDentifrice dispensing electrical toothbrush with snap-on dual brush unit
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6813793 *Sep 27, 2002Nov 9, 2004Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush with linear and rotary fields
US6938294 *Jul 17, 2002Sep 6, 2005Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush with movable head sections for enhanced oral care
US6966093 *Sep 27, 2002Nov 22, 2005Colgate-Polmolive CompanyToothbrush having a movable upstanding cleaning element
US7055205 *Dec 20, 2002Jun 6, 2006Yoshihiro AoyamaToothbrush and head thereof
US7094981Jan 23, 2004Aug 22, 2006Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered toothbrush with test button
US7117555Sep 2, 2005Oct 10, 2006Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush with movable head sections for enhanced oral care
US7140058 *Sep 27, 2002Nov 28, 2006Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush with kinetic plate
US7185383Sep 2, 2005Mar 6, 2007Colgate-Palmolive CompanyBrush section for a powered toothbrush
US7258747 *Sep 11, 2003Aug 21, 2007The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-motion stainbrush
US7386904 *Dec 15, 2003Jun 17, 2008Colgate-Palmolive CompanyDrive system for electric toothbrushes and the like
US7428766Oct 22, 2004Sep 30, 2008Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered toothbrush
US7430778May 17, 2005Oct 7, 2008Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered toothbrush
US7448108Nov 27, 2006Nov 11, 2008Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush with kinetic plate
US7600285 *Apr 12, 2005Oct 13, 2009Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement and method of decorating
US7681821 *Feb 13, 2008Mar 23, 2010W.C. Bradley/Zebco Holdings, Inc.Demonstration mode for electronic fishing reel
US7698771Dec 17, 2004Apr 20, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyElectric toothbrush
US7721376Dec 23, 2004May 25, 2010Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US7725973Aug 16, 2007Jun 1, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyElectric toothbrushes
US7761947 *Feb 21, 2006Jul 27, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyComplex motion toothbrush
US7784136Sep 30, 2008Aug 31, 2010Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush with kinetic plate
US7810201Dec 3, 2007Oct 12, 2010Braun GmbhToothbrushes
US7810243 *Nov 30, 2007Oct 12, 2010The Gillette CompanyRazors
US7832042Nov 4, 2008Nov 16, 2010The Gillette CompanyBrush head for toothbrush
US7861348Dec 7, 2005Jan 4, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyElectric toothbrushes
US7861350Dec 11, 2009Jan 4, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-motion toothbrush
US7900309Aug 26, 2008Mar 8, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered toothbrush
US7908699Dec 23, 2004Mar 22, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US7941924Jul 17, 2009May 17, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement and method of decorating
US7992710Mar 19, 2008Aug 9, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered toothbrush package
US8020238Aug 19, 2008Sep 20, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered toothbrush
US8079110May 26, 2010Dec 20, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8096011Dec 16, 2010Jan 17, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyElectric toothbrushes
US8281443Dec 9, 2010Oct 9, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-motion toothbrush
US8302238 *Jul 22, 2009Nov 6, 2012East Coast Medical & Dental Devices, Inc.Motorized toothbrush tip having inner and other heads counter around different axes
US8371896Jan 9, 2009Feb 12, 2013Mattel, Inc.Method and apparatus for performing try-me and normal play routines
US8393042Oct 9, 2009Mar 12, 2013Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8397910Apr 18, 2011Mar 19, 2013Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered toothbrush package
US8561247Jun 17, 2011Oct 22, 2013Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8561301Apr 12, 2012Oct 22, 2013The Gillette CompanyRazors
US8632268May 6, 2008Jan 21, 2014Colgate-Palmolive CompanyImplement having a reaction and delivery system
US8651272Feb 28, 2013Feb 18, 2014Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered toothbrush package
US8800093Dec 2, 2011Aug 12, 2014Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8806695Mar 20, 2012Aug 19, 2014Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement having flexibly supported cleaning elements extending in opposite directions
US8839481May 7, 2013Sep 23, 2014Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8876221Aug 23, 2011Nov 4, 2014Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US8943634May 2, 2012Feb 3, 2015Water Pik, Inc.Mechanically-driven, sonic toothbrush system
US8990996Oct 8, 2012Mar 31, 2015Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush
US9144477Dec 23, 2014Sep 29, 2015Water Pik, Inc.Mechanically-driven, sonic toothbrush system
US9167888Jul 10, 2014Oct 27, 2015Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement having flexibly supported cleaning elements extending in opposite directions
US9409302Aug 14, 2013Aug 9, 2016The Gillette CompanyRazors
US9468511Mar 15, 2013Oct 18, 2016Water Pik, Inc.Electronic toothbrush with vibration dampening
US9492005Jan 17, 2014Nov 15, 2016Colgate-Palmolive CompanyImplement having a reaction and delivery system
US9545148Sep 16, 2014Jan 17, 2017Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement
US9603441Feb 20, 2015Mar 28, 2017Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush
US20020120991 *Jan 12, 2002Sep 5, 2002Cacka Joe W.Toothbrush
US20030084525 *Nov 7, 2001May 8, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyComplex motion toothbrush
US20030084528 *Jul 30, 2002May 8, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-motion toothbrush
US20030115705 *Dec 20, 2002Jun 26, 2003Yoshihiro AoyamaToothbrush and head thereof
US20030140435 *Apr 9, 2002Jul 31, 2003Eyal EliavPowered toothbrush
US20030140437 *Jan 31, 2002Jul 31, 2003Eyal EliavPowered toothbrush
US20040010869 *Jul 17, 2002Jan 22, 2004Fattori Joseph EdwardToothbrush with movable head sections for enhanced oral care
US20040060133 *Sep 27, 2002Apr 1, 2004Eyal EliavToothbrush with linear and rotary fields
US20040060134 *Sep 27, 2002Apr 1, 2004Eyal EliavToothbrush having a movable upstanding cleaning element
US20040060135 *Sep 27, 2002Apr 1, 2004Gatzemeyer John J.Toothbrush with kinetic plate
US20040084063 *Sep 11, 2003May 6, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-motion stainbrush
US20050000045 *Jul 30, 2004Jan 6, 2005The Procter & Gamble CompanyComplex motion toothbrush
US20050125919 *Dec 15, 2003Jun 16, 2005Colgate-Palmolive CompanyDrive system for electric toothbrushes and the like
US20050132513 *Oct 22, 2004Jun 23, 2005Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered toothbrush
US20050155167 *Dec 17, 2004Jul 21, 2005The Procter & Gamble CompanyElectric toothbrush
US20050161313 *Jan 23, 2004Jul 28, 2005Sorrentino Alan V.Powered toothbrush with test button
US20050204491 *May 17, 2005Sep 22, 2005Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered toothbrush
US20050229339 *Jun 14, 2005Oct 20, 2005Gavney James A JrOral-care device and system
US20050268409 *Aug 10, 2005Dec 8, 2005The Procter & Gamble CompanyComplex motion toothbrush
US20060000038 *Sep 2, 2005Jan 5, 2006Gatzemeyer John JBrush section for a powered toothbrush
US20060000039 *Sep 2, 2005Jan 5, 2006Fattori Joseph EToothbrush with movable head sections for enhanced oral care
US20060117505 *Dec 7, 2005Jun 8, 2006The Procter & Gamble CompanyElectric toothbrushes
US20060137118 *Feb 21, 2006Jun 29, 2006The Procter & Gamble CompanyComplex motion toothbrush
US20060225231 *Apr 12, 2005Oct 12, 2006Colgate-Palmolive CompanyOral care implement and method of decorating
US20060254007 *Jul 20, 2006Nov 16, 2006The Procter & Gamble CompanyPower toothbrush
US20070251033 *May 8, 2007Nov 1, 2007The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti motion toothbrush
US20080016633 *Aug 16, 2007Jan 24, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyElectric toothbrushes
US20080078040 *Dec 3, 2007Apr 3, 2008The Gillette Company, A Delaware CorporationToothbrushes
US20080110034 *Nov 30, 2007May 15, 2008The Gillette CompanyRazors
US20080313830 *Aug 26, 2008Dec 25, 2008Colgate-PalmolivePowered toothbrush
US20090025157 *Sep 30, 2008Jan 29, 2009Colgate-PalmoliveToothbrush with kinetic plate
US20090025158 *Oct 7, 2008Jan 29, 2009Colgate-PalmoliveToothbrush with Kinetic Plate
US20090049626 *Aug 19, 2008Feb 26, 2009Colgate-PalmolivePowered toothbrush
US20090181598 *Jan 9, 2009Jul 16, 2009Mattel, Inc.Method and Apparatus for Performing Try-Me and Normal Play Routines
US20090199454 *Feb 13, 2008Aug 13, 2009W.C. Bradley/Zebco Holdings, IncDemonstration mode for electronic fishing reel
US20090236241 *Mar 19, 2008Sep 24, 2009Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered Toothbrush Package
US20100088832 *Dec 11, 2009Apr 15, 2010Brown Patrick WMulti-Motion Toothbrush
US20110016647 *Jul 22, 2009Jan 27, 2011Ladislau BiroMotorized toothbrush tip having inner and other heads counter around different axes
US20110056034 *May 6, 2008Mar 10, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyImplement having a reaction and delivery system
US20110072599 *Dec 9, 2010Mar 31, 2011Brown Patrick WMulti-Motion Toothbrush
US20110083287 *Dec 16, 2010Apr 14, 2011John Geoffrey ChanElectric Toothbrushes
US20110192752 *Apr 18, 2011Aug 11, 2011Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPowered toothbrush package
US20110289778 *Jul 27, 2011Dec 1, 2011Fred SchnakRazors
US20170112002 *Oct 5, 2016Apr 20, 2017The Gillette Company LlcElectronic subassembly for a personal care product
USD773192 *Jan 9, 2015Dec 6, 2016Ranir, LlcPowered toothbrush handle
EP1915103A4 *Aug 18, 2006Feb 24, 2016Eegee LlcDevice and system with moving squeegee fields
WO2004028390A3 *Sep 26, 2003Jul 14, 2005Colgate Palmolive CoToothbrush with linear and rotary fields
WO2007011758A1 *Jul 11, 2006Jan 25, 2007Colgate-Palmolive CompanyToothbrush having a movable upstanding cleaning element
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/22.1, 15/28, 206/362.2
International ClassificationA61C17/34, A46B7/08, A61C17/22, A46B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61C17/34, A61C17/22, A61C2202/00, A61C17/3436, A61C17/349
European ClassificationA61C17/22, A61C17/34B, A61C17/34