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Publication numberUS20030066938 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/235,906
Publication dateApr 10, 2003
Filing dateSep 4, 2002
Priority dateOct 9, 2001
Publication number10235906, 235906, US 2003/0066938 A1, US 2003/066938 A1, US 20030066938 A1, US 20030066938A1, US 2003066938 A1, US 2003066938A1, US-A1-20030066938, US-A1-2003066938, US2003/0066938A1, US2003/066938A1, US20030066938 A1, US20030066938A1, US2003066938 A1, US2003066938A1
InventorsArlen Zimmerman
Original AssigneeZimmerman Arlen J.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Light string bracket
US 20030066938 A1
Abstract
A decorator light string bracket for securely cradling exterior Christmas or other festive decorator light strings and rope lights to building eaves, rain gutters, walls, window and door frames, wood and ornamental iron fences and railings, and the like includes a base segment and one leg that is bent up at an appropriate angle from one end of the base segment to form with the base segment a secure cradle for holding the wire bundles and/or rope lights. Extending from an opposite end of the base segment, the bracket may have a second leg that is bent to conform with the base segment to a support object's corner or second and third legs bent to form with the base segment an inverted U-shaped mounting member to fit over a fence or railing. The bracket may also include a pair of cradles for holding two light strings.
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Claims(23)
What is claimed is:
1. A Decorator Light String Bracket for hanging decorator light strings and rope lights from rain gutters, eaves, window and door frames, exterior building walls, and other exterior building support surfaces and from fences, railings, and the like, comprising:
a base segment; the base segment having an upper end and a lower end; a first leg extending outward and upward from the lower end of the base segment and forming with the base segment an upwardly open first cradle sized for receiving and securely holding light strings and rope lights; means for securing the bracket to a support surface; and the base segment and the first leg being a single length of shape-retaining metal material.
2. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 1, wherein:
the first leg is generally straight and forms with the base segment an upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradle.
3. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 2, wherein:
the means for securing the bracket to a support surface is a hole in the base segment for receiving a mechanical fastener.
4. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 2, including:
a second leg extending from the upper end of the base segment at a substantially right angle to the base segment and away from the first cradle to act as a support arm of the bracket; and the base segment and the first and second legs being a single length of shape-retaining metal material.
5. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 4, wherein:
the means for securing the bracket to a support surface is a hole in the second leg for receiving a mechanical fastener.
6. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 2, including:
a second leg extending from the upper end of the base segment at a substantially right angle to the base segment and away from the first cradle; a third leg extending at a substantially right angle downward from the second leg; the third leg being spaced from and extending generally parallel to the base segment to form with the second leg and the base segment an inverted generally U-shaped channel that is the securing means of the bracket; and the base segment and the first, second and third legs being a single length of shape-retaining metal material.
7. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 1, wherein:
the first leg is generally C-shaped and forms with the base segment an upwardly open and generally C-shaped cradle.
8. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 7, wherein:
the means for securing the bracket to a support surface is a hole in the base segment for receiving a mechanical fastener.
9. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 7, including:
a second leg extending from the upper end of the base segment at a substantially right angle to the base segment and away from the first cradle to act as a support arm of the bracket; and the base segment and the first and second legs being a single length of shape-retaining metal material.
10. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 9, wherein:
the means for securing the bracket to a support surface is a hole in the second leg for receiving a mechanical fastener.
11. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 7, including:
a second leg extending from the upper end of the base segment at a substantially right angle to the base segment and away from the first cradle; a third leg extending at a substantially right angle downward from the second leg; the third leg being spaced from and extending generally parallel to the base segment to form with the second leg and the base segment an inverted generally U-shaped channel that is the securing means of the bracket; and the base segment and the first, second and third legs being a single length of shape-retaining metal material.
12. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 1, wherein:
the shape-retaining metal material is selected from a group consisting of: steel treated to inhibit oxidation, aluminum, anodized aluminum, copper, and clear-coated copper to inhibit oxidation.
13. A Decorator Light String Bracket for hanging decorator light strings and rope lights from rain gutters, eaves, window and door frames, exterior building walls, and other exterior building support surfaces and from fences, railings, and the like, comprising:
a base segment; the base segment having an upper portion and a lower portion;
a first leg extending outward and upward from the lower end of the lower portion of the base segment and forming with the lower portion of the base segment an upwardly open first cradle sized for receiving and securely holding light strings and rope lights; the lower portion of the base segment and the first leg being a single length of shape-retaining metal material;
a second leg extending outward and upward from the lower end of the upper portion of the base segment and forming with the upper portion of the base segment an upwardly open second cradle sized for receiving and securely holding light strings and rope lights; the second cradle being spaced above the first cradle to permit the insertion and removal of light strings and rope lights from the first cradle; the upper portion of the base segment and the second leg being a single length of shape-retaining metal material;
the lower portion of the base segment being secured to the upper portion of the base segment; and
means for securing the bracket to a support surface.
14. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 13, wherein:
at least one of the first and second legs is generally straight and forms with the base segment an upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradle.
15. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 13, wherein:
the first and second legs are each generally straight and form with the base segment upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradles.
16. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 13, wherein:
at least one of the first and second legs is generally C-shape and forms with the base segment an upwardly open and generally C-shaped cradle.
17. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 13, wherein:
the first and second legs are each generally C-shape and form with the base segment an upwardly open and generally C-shaped cradles.
18. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 13, wherein:
one of the first and second legs is generally straight and forms with the base segment an upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradle; and the other of the first and second legs is generally C-shape and forms with the base segment an upwardly open and generally C-shaped cradle.
19. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 13, wherein:
the means for securing the bracket to a support surface is a hole in the upper portion of the base segment for receiving a mechanical fastener.
20. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 13, including:
a third leg extending from the upper end of the upper portion of the base segment at a substantially right angle to the base segment and away from the first and second cradles to act as a support arm of the bracket; and the upper portion of the base segment and the second and third legs being a single length of shape-retaining metal material.
21. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 20, wherein:
the means for securing the bracket to a support surface is a hole in the third leg for receiving a mechanical fastener.
22. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 13, including:
a third leg extending from an upper end of the upper portion of the base segment at a substantially right angle to the base segment and away from the first and second cradles; a fourth leg extending at a substantially right angle downward from the third leg; the fourth leg being spaced from and extending generally parallel to the base segment to form with the third leg and the base segment an inverted generally U-shaped channel that is the securing means of the bracket; and the upper portion of the base segment and the second, third and fourth legs being a single length of shape-retaining metal material.
23. The Decorator Light String Bracket according to claim 13, wherein:
the shape-retaining metal materials of the bracket are selected from a group consisting of: steel treated to inhibit oxidation, aluminum, anodized aluminum, copper, and clear-coated copper to inhibit oxidation.
Description

[0001] This patent application is a continuation-in-part of Provisional Patent Application serial No. 60/327,921, filed Oct. 9, 2001.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The subject invention relates to a light string bracket for secure cradling of exterior Christmas, Halloween and other festive-type light strings to rain gutters, eaves, window and door frames, patio supports, wood, cement block and stucco walls, wood and ornamental iron fences, railings, and the like.

[0003] 1. Field

[0004] My invention is in the field of securing exterior festive decorator light strings, including but not limited to Christmas and Halloween lights, to: 1. Rain gutters of homes and commercial buildings; 2. Eaves, window and doorframes, and sidings of homes and commercial buildings; 3. Supports of rectangular cross-sections of fences, patios, and the like, 4. Cement block and stucco walls, and 5. Wood and ornamental iron fences, railings, and the like.

[0005] 2. State of Technology

[0006] Consumers generally purchase exterior festive decorator lights in “strings” of varying lengths. Such strings are generally, but not always, found in three variations. First, individual light sockets are spaced at intervals across the length of the wire bundle. Second, multiple light sockets are configured to hang vertically from the main horizontal wire bundle to produce an “icicle” and/or “curtain” affect. Third, the wire bundle and bulbs are encapsulated in a transparent material to produce a “rope” affect.

[0007] a. Rain Gutters: Exterior festive decorator light strings are typically stretched along the length of the rain gutter and held in place by various types of plastic clips designed to adhere to the gutter through frictional engagement. If care is not exercised during installation, one or more legs of these plastic clips may be broken, rendering the entire clip useless. In addition, many individuals opt to use their decorator lights year round to illuminate back yards, swimming and spa areas, or for general security reasons. When exposed to ultra-violet rays of the sun for extended periods, plastic tends to break down and weaken. Such deterioration can cause the frictional legs to break away, resulting in the string of lights, or portions thereof, to dangle from the rain gutter or fall to the ground altogether.

[0008] b. Eaves, Window and Door Frames, and Sidings of Homes and Commercial Buildings, and Supports of Rectangular Cross-Sections of Fences, Patios, and the Like:

[0009] 1) Exterior decorator light strings (less rope lights) are typically stretched between two points and held in place with metal staples, brass cup hooks, nails, or plastic holders inserted under the shingles of a roof. Staples can, over time, short out the light string due to wire insulation cold flow, fatigue or oxidation. In addition, if staples are hammered too tightly into the wood, immediate damage can occur to either the insulation or conductor wires, or both. Damage to the insulation or conductor wires, or both, can also occur when staples are pried from the wood in order to take down the light string. Such prying also causes unsightly damage to the wood. Brass cup hooks lack durability in that they tend to sheer off if over-torqued at installation, and over time brass oxidizes to create a somewhat obtrusive appearance. Paint does not readily adhere to brass due to an oily residue left over from the manufacturing process. Nails are generally first hammered into the wood to provide a secure footing. The light string wire bundle may be draped over the nail; however, the wind can easily cause the light string to fall to the ground. To provide a more secure cradle for the wire bundle, the nail may be bent upward. The exposed portion of the nail generally remains rigid and straight, and therefore, may “pinch” and damage the insulation or conductor wire, or both, depending on the degree of bend. Many individuals opt to use their decorator lights year round to illuminate back yards, swimming and spa areas, or for general security reasons. Metal nails, like metal staples, will rust fairly quickly. If removed, unsightly holes are left which can become home to a variety of insects. When exposed to ultra-violet rays of the sun for extended periods, plastic tends to break down and weaken. Such deterioration can cause the plastic holders to snap, thereby allowing the string of lights, or portions thereof, to dangle from the roof line or fall to the ground altogether.

[0010] 2) Rope lights are generally stretched between two points and held in place with a plastic C-shaped bracket that is attached to the wood with a screw or nail. The plastic bracket can be broken and rendered useless if the screw is over-torqued or the nail is pounded in too far. Many individuals opt to use their rope lights year round to illuminate back yards, swimming and spa areas, or for general security reasons. When exposed to ultra-violet rays of the sun for extended periods, plastic tends to break down and weaken. Such deterioration can cause the bracket to crack and break away, resulting in the rope light, or portions thereof, to dangle or fall to the ground altogether.

[0011] c. Cement Block and Stucco Walls: Strings of exterior decorator lights are typically stretched between two points and held in place by either brass cup hooks or nails. When a brass cup hook is utilized, a plastic masonry anchor is typically first inserted into the cement block or stucco wall. Paint does not readily adhere to brass due to an oily residue left over from the manufacturing process. Individuals, concerned about a wall's appearance when lights are not displayed, may purchase brass cup hooks with a colored rubber coating encapsulating the C-shaped cradle. Brass cup hooks lack durability in that they tend to sheer off when over-torqued, and over time the brass oxidizes to create a somewhat obtrusive appearance. A color-coated masonry nail eliminates the need for a plastic masonry anchor. Nails are generally first hammered into the cement block or stucco wall to provide a secure footing. The light string may be draped over the nail; however, the wind can easily cause the light string to fall to the ground. To provide a more secure cradle for the wire bundle, the nail may be bent upward, although this is difficult to accomplish with hardened steel cement nails. The exposed portion of the nail generally remains rigid and straight, and therefore, may “pinch” and damage the insulation or conductor wire, or both, depending on the degree of bend. Bending a nail in cement block or stucco tends to damage or weaken the immediate surrounding area that, in turn, can cause the nail to become loose and fall to the ground. Whether or not a colored brass cup hook or nail is utilized, individuals have a rather limited choice of colors with which to match their house paint.

[0012] d. Ornamental Iron Fence, Railings, and the Like: Strings of exterior decorator lights are typically stretched along the fence/railing top and held in place at regular intervals with rope, wire, wire ties, and the like. If the light strings are taken down, knotted rope and wire ties are normally cut and cannot be re-used. Wire strands can be removed without cutting, but it is a time consuming process to twist, and then untwist the wire. Many individuals opt to leave their lights attached to the ornamental iron fences, railings, and the like, year round to illuminate back yards, swimming and spa areas, or for general security reasons. Rope and plastic wire ties will deteriorate and break over time, thereby allowing the lights, or portions thereof, to dangle or fall to the ground altogether. Wire is more durable, but if overly tightened, can damage the insulation or conductor wires, or both. Wire will oxidize unless pretreated with a rust inhibitor. Replacement intervals and rate of oxidation are dependent on local climatic conditions. Knotted rope and rusted wire strands create a “thrown-together” and obtrusive appearance, especially when individuals entertain in their back yards. Neither rope nor plastic wire ties can be painted to match the color of the ornamental iron fences, railings, and the like. Wire strands can be pre-painted; however, paint will flake off when the wire is twisted. Painting wire strands in position on the fence/railing would prove to be impractical.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0013] The Right Angle Bracket of the subject invention may be mounted on rain gutters, window and door frames of homes and commercial buildings, supports of rectangular cross-sections of fences, patios, and the like, and ornamental iron fences, railings, and the like. One leg is either bent relative to a base segment to form with the base segment a deep and secure V-shape cradle to hold a light string wire bundle, or into a C-shape to form with the base segment a deep and secure cradle to hold a rope light. A second leg is bent at a right angle away from the base segment to conform with the base segment to the corner of the object and is secured to the object by inserting a screw, rivet or other appropriate fastener through a machined hole located in a midportion of the second leg. The Right Angle Bracket may be fabricated from steel, aluminum, copper, or other suitable metal material, and may then be coated with a rust inhibitor such as zinc, chem film, anodizing, or other suitable process. The Right Angle Bracket is durable, will not damage the light string wire bundle or rope light, is resistant to oxidation, can be painted to match the exact color of the object to which it is affixed, and will provide years of uninterrupted use.

[0014] The Straight Bracket of the subject invention may be mounted on eaves, window and door frames, and sidings of homes and commercial buildings, supports of rectangular cross-sections of fences, patios, and the like, and cement block and stucco walls. A leg is either bent relative to a base segment to form with the base segment a deep and secure V-shape cradle to hold a light string wire bundle, or into a C-shape to form with the base segment a deep and secure cradle to hold a rope light. In contrast to the Right Angle Bracket, there is no second leg. Installation consists of placing this base segment flat against an object with the cradle facing away from the object; a plastic masonry anchor is first inserted in cement block and stucco. The Straight Bracket is secured to the wood, cement block and stucco by inserting a screw, rivet or other appropriate fastener through a machined hole in the top portion of the base segment. The Straight Bracket may be fabricated from steel, aluminum, copper, or other suitable metal material, and may then be coated with a rust inhibitor such as zinc, chem film, anodizing, or other suitable process. The Straight Bracket is durable, will not damage the light string wire bundle, is resistant to oxidation, can be painted to match the exact color of the object to which it is affixed, and will provide years of uninterrupted use.

[0015] The Ornamental Iron Bracket of the subject invention is designed for attachment to ornamental iron fences, railings, and the like, without the use of a screw, or other similar means. One leg is either bent relative to a base segment to form with the base segment a deep and secure V-shape cradle to hold a light string wire bundle, or into a C-shape to form with the base segment a deep and secure cradle to hold a rope light. A second leg is bent at a right angle away from the base segment (similar to the Right Angle Bracket); however, a second right angle bend in the second leg produces a third leg and a generally inverted U-shape. Installation consists of placing the U-shaped second leg over the fence/railing with the cradle facing outwards. The Ornamental Iron Bracket may be fabricated from steel, aluminum, copper, or other suitable metal material, and may then be coated with a rust inhibitor such as zinc, chem film, anodizing, or other suitable process. The Ornamental Iron Bracket is durable, can be easily removed, will not damage the light string wire bundle, is resistant to oxidation, can be painted to match the exact color of the object to which it is affixed, and will provide years of uninterrupted use.

[0016] The Decorator Light String Bracket of the subject invention may also be formed with two cradles by spot-welding two brackets together so that there are two separate V-shaped cradles one above the other, two separate C-shape cradles one above the other, or a V-shape and a C-shape cradle one above the other. These brackets may be Right Angle Brackets, Straight Brackets, or Ornamental Iron Brackets.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0029] Referring to FIG. 1, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Right Angle is formed from a single straight length of shape-retaining metal. Bending one leg (11) at an angle (17) in relation to the base segment (12) creates an upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradle (10) to hold the wire bundle. The tip (13) of this leg (11) is itself bent slightly towards the base segment (12) to form a tab that helps to keep the wire bundle inside the V-shaped cradle (10). The second leg (14) extends from an upper end of the base segment (12) and is bent at a right angle (15) to the base segment (12) and away from the V-shaped cradle (10). Preferably, the base segment (12) is straight. Utilization consists of placing the right angle leg (14) over the corner of the object to which the bracket is attached so that the base segment (12) is flat against the surface and the V-shaped cradle (10) is facing away from the object. Typically, a screw is inserted through the mounting hole (16) and turned until the bracket fits snuggly to the object. When appropriate, a rivet or other mechanical fastener may be used in lieu of the screw to secure the bracket of FIG. 1 to the object.

[0030] Referring to FIG. 2, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Straight is formed from a single straight length of shape-retaining metal. Bending one leg (11) at an angle (17) in relation to the base segment (12) creates an upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradle (10) to hold the wire bundle. The tip (13) of this leg (11) is itself bent slightly towards the base segment (12) to form a tab that helps to keep the wire bundle inside the V-shaped cradle (10). Preferably, the base segment (12) is straight. Utilization consists of placing the base segment (12) flat against the object to which the bracket is to be attached so that the V-shaped cradle (10) is facing away from said object. A screw is inserted through the mounting hole (16) in the base segment and turned until the bracket fits snuggly to the object. When appropriate, a rivet or other mechanical fastener may be used in lieu of the screw to secure the bracket of FIG. 2 to an object.

[0031] Referring to FIG. 3, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Right Angle (Rope) is formed from a single straight length of shape-retaining metal. Bending one leg (11) in a circular manner (17) towards the base segment (12) creates an upwardly open and generally C-shaped cradle (10) to hold the rope light. There is sufficient space between the tip (13) of the circular leg (11) and the base segment (12) to allow the rope light to be laid in the C-shaped cradle (10). The second leg (14) extends from an upper end of the base segment (12) and is bent at a right angle (15) to the base segment (12) and away from the C-shaped cradle (10). Preferably, the base segment is straight. Utilization consists of placing the right angle leg (14) over the corner of the object to which the bracket is to be attached so that the base segment (12) is flat against the surface and the C-shaped cradle (10) is facing away from the object. A screw is inserted through the mounting hole (16) in the second leg and turned until the bracket fits snuggly to the object. When appropriate, a rivet or other mechanical fastener may be used in lieu of the screw to secure the bracket of FIG. 3 to an object.

[0032] Referring to FIG. 4, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Straight (Rope) is formed from a single straight length of shape-retaining metal. Bending one leg (11) in a circular manner (17) towards the base segment (12) creates an upwardly open and generally C-shaped cradle (10) to hold the rope light. There is sufficient space between the tip (13) of the circular leg (11) and the base segment (12) to allow the rope light to be laid in the C-shaped cradle (10). Preferably, the base segment (12) is straight. Utilization consists of placing the base segment (12) flat against the object to which the bracket is to be attached so that the C-shaped cradle (10) is facing away from said object. A screw is inserted through the mounting hole (16) in the base segment and turned until the bracket fits snuggly to the object. When appropriate, a rivet or other mechanical fastener may be used in lieu of the screw to secure the bracket of FIG. 4 to an object.

[0033] Referring to FIG. 5, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Ornamental Iron is formed from a single straight length of shape-retaining metal. Bending one leg (11) at an angle (17) in relation to the base segment (12) creates an upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradle (10) to hold the wire bundle. The tip (13) of this leg (11) is itself bent slightly towards the base segment (12) to form a tab that helps to keep the wire bundle inside the V-shaped cradle (10). The second leg (14) extends from an upper end of the base segment (12) and is bent at a right angle (15) to the base segment (12) and away from the V-shaped cradle (10). The third leg (18) is bent downward at a right angle (19) from an end of the second leg so that it is spaced from and extends generally parallel to the base segment (12). Preferably, the base segment is straight. Utilization consists of placing the base segment (12) and legs (14) (18) around three sides of a support object having a generally rectangular or square transverse cross section, e.g. an ornamental iron object, in such a manner that the V-shaped cradle (10) is facing away from the object. The bracket of FIG. 5 may be held in place, without the use of a mounting screw, rivet or other mechanical fastener, by the two right angle legs and the base segment.

[0034] Referring to FIG. 6, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Ornamental Iron (Rope) is formed from a single straight length of shape-retaining metal. Bending one leg (11) in a circular manner (17) towards the base segment (12) creates an upwardly open and generally C-shaped cradle (10) to hold the rope light. There is sufficient space between the tip (13) of the circular leg (11) and the base segment (12) to allow the rope light to be laid in the C-shaped cradle (10). The second leg (14) extends from an upper end of the base segment (12) and is bent at a right angle (15) to the base segment (12) and away from the C-shaped cradle (10). The third leg (18) is bent downward from an end of the second leg at a right angle (19) so that it is spaced from and extends generally parallel to the base segment (12). Preferably, the base segment is straight. Utilization consists of placing the base segment (12) and legs (14) (18) around three sides of a support object having a generally rectangular or square transverse cross section, e.g. an ornamental iron object, in such a manner that the C-shaped cradle (10) is facing away from the object. The bracket of FIG. 6 may be held in place, without the use of a mounting screw, rivet, or other mechanical fastener, by the two right angle legs and the base segment.

[0035] Referring to FIG. 7, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Duplicate Straight is formed by spot-welding two Straight brackets of FIG. 2 together at (21) so that there are two separate upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradles (10), one above the other. Although FIG. 7 depicts a pair of upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradles, by spot-welding two Straight brackets of FIG. 4 together, the bracket of FIG. 7 may have a pair of upwardly open and generally C-shape cradles one above the other. The upper cradle is spaced above the lower cradle a sufficient distance to permit the easy insertion and removal of light strings and rope lights from the lower cradle. Preferably, the extended base segment (12) is straight. Utilization consists of placing the extended base segment (12) flat against the object to which it is to be attached so that the cradles (10) are facing away from said object. A screw is inserted through the mounting hole (16) in the extended base segment and turned until the bracket fits snuggly to the object. When appropriate, a rivet or other mechanical fastener may be used in lieu of the screw to secure the bracket of FIG. 7 to an object.

[0036] Referring to FIG. 8, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Mixed Straight is formed by spot-welding a Straight bracket of FIG. 2 and a Straight (Rope) bracket of FIG. 4 together at (21) so that there are two separate cradles (10), one above the other. Although FIG. 8 depicts an upwardly open and generally C-shaped cradle above the upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradle, the location of the cradles may be reversed. The upper cradle is spaced above the lower cradle a sufficient distance to permit the easy insertion and removal of light strings and rope lights from the lower cradle. Preferably, the extended base segment (12) is straight. Utilization consists of placing the extended base segment (12) flat against the object to which it is to be attached so that the cradles (10) are facing away from said object. A screw is inserted through the mounting screw hole (16) in the extended base segment and turned until the bracket fits snuggly to the object. When appropriate, a rivet or other mechanical fastener may be used in lieu of the screw to secure the bracket of FIG. 8 to an object.

[0037] Referring to FIG. 9, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Duplicate Right Angle is formed by spot-welding a Right Angle bracket of FIG. 1 and a Straight bracket of FIG. 2 together at (21) so that there are two separate upwardly open and generally V-shape cradles (10), one above the other. Although FIG. 9 depicts a pair of upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradles, by using the brackets of FIGS. 3 and 4, the bracket of FIG. 9 may have a pair of upwardly open and generally C-shape cradles one above the other. The upper cradle is spaced above the lower cradle a sufficient distance to permit the easy insertion and removal of light strings and rope lights from the lower cradle. The leg (14) extends from the upper end of the extended base segment (12) and is bent at a right angle (15) to the extended base segment and away from the cradles (10). Preferably, the extended base segment (12) is straight. Utilization consists of placing the right angle leg (14) over the corner of the object to which it is to be attached so that the extended base segment (12) is flat against the surface, and the cradles (10) are facing away from the object. A screw is inserted through the mounting hole (16) in the second leg (14) and turned until the bracket fits snuggly to the object. When appropriate, a rivet or other mechanical fastener may be used in lieu of the screw to secure the bracket of FIG. 9 to an object.

[0038] Referring to FIG. 10, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Mixed Right Angle is formed by spot-welding a Straight bracket of FIG. 2 and a Right Angle (Rope) bracket of FIG. 3 together at (21) so that there are two separate cradles (10), one above the other. Although FIG. 10 depicts the upwardly open and generally C-shaped cradle above the upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradle, by using the brackets of FIGS. 1 and 4, the location of the cradles may be reversed. The upper cradle is spaced above the lower cradle a sufficient distance to permit the easy insertion and removal of light strings and rope lights from the lower cradle. The leg (14) extends from an upper end of the extended base segment (12) and is bent at a right angle (15) to the extended base segment (12) and away from the cradles (10). Preferably, the extended base segment (12) is straight. Utilization consists of placing the right angle leg (14) over the corner of the object to which it is to be attached so that the extended base segment (12) is flat against the surface, and the cradles (10) are facing away from the object. A screw is inserted through the mounting hole (16) in the second leg (14) and turned until the bracket fits snuggly to the object. When appropriate, a rivet or other mechanical fastener may be used in lieu of the screw to secure the bracket of FIG. 10 to an object.

[0039] Referring to FIG. 11, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Duplicate Ornamental Iron is formed by spot-welding an Ornamental Iron bracket of FIG. 5 and a Straight bracket of FIG. 2 together at (21) so that there are two separate upwardly open and generally V-shape cradles (10), one above the other. Although FIG. 11 depicts a pair of upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradles, by using the brackets of FIGS. 4 and 6, the bracket of FIG. 11 may have a pair of upwardly open and generally C-shape cradles one above the other. The upper cradle is spaced above the lower cradle a sufficient distance to permit the easy insertion and removal of light strings and rope lights from the lower cradle. The leg (14) extends from an upper end of the extended base segment (12) and is bent at a right angle (15) to the extended base segment (12) and away from the cradles (10). The leg (18) is bent downward at right angle (19) from an end of leg (14) so that it is spaced from and extends generally parallel to the extended base segment (12). Preferably, the extended base segment (12) is straight. Utilization consists of placing the extended base segment (12) and legs (14) (18) around three sides of a support object having a generally rectangular or square transverse cross section, e.g. an ornamental iron object, in such a manner that the cradles (10) are facing away from the object. The bracket of FIG. 11 may be held in place, without the use of a mounting screw, rivet or other mechanical fastener, by the two right angle legs and the extended base segment.

[0040] Referring to FIG. 12, the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Mixed Ornamental Iron is formed by spot-welding an Ornamental Iron (Rope) bracket of FIG. 6 and a Straight bracket of FIG. 2 together at (21) so that there are two separate cradles (10), one above the other. Although FIG. 12 depicts an upwardly open and generally C-shaped cradle above the upwardly open and generally V-shaped cradle, by using the brackets of FIGS. 4 and 5, the location the cradles (10) may be reversed. The upper cradle is spaced above the lower cradle a sufficient distance to permit the easy insertion and removal of light strings and rope lights from the lower cradle. The leg (14) extends from an upper end of the extended base segment (12) and is bent at a right angle (15) to the extended base segment (12) and away from the cradles (10). The leg (18) is bent downward at a right angle (19) from an end of the leg (14) so that it is spaced from and extends generally parallel to the extended base segment (12). Preferably, the extended base segment (12) is straight. Utilization consists of placing the extended base segment (12) and legs (14) (18) around three sides of a support object having a generally rectangular or square transverse cross section, e.g. an ornamental iron object, in such a manner that the cradles (10) are facing away from the object. The bracket of FIG. 12 may be held in place, without the use of a mounting screw, rivet or other mechanical fastener, by the two right angle legs and the extended base segment.

[0041] All of the Decorator Light String Brackets described above may be fabricated from steel, aluminum, copper, or other suitable metal material. Whichever type of metal is utilized, it may be plated/coated to inhibit oxidation, tarnish, or corrosion, and/or painted to match the color of the object to which it is attached. For example, a steel used to form the bracket may be zinc plated, an aluminum used to form the bracket may be anodized, and a copper used to form the bracket may be clear coated.

[0042] Whereas this invention is illustrated and described above as the best mode to carry out such invention, in actual practice, it is understood that various changes may be made in adapting the invention to different applications without departing from the broader inventive concepts disclosed herein and comprehended by the claims that follow. For example, while the decorator light string bracket of the subject invention is primarily intended for outdoor use, the decorator light string bracket of the subject invention may also be used for hanging decorator light strings and rope lights from support surfaces in the interior of a building.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0017]FIG. 1 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Right Angle.

[0018]FIG. 2 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Straight.

[0019]FIG. 3 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Right Angle (Rope).

[0020]FIG. 4 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Straight (Rope).

[0021]FIG. 5 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Ornamental Iron.

[0022]FIG. 6 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Ornamental Iron (Rope).

[0023]FIG. 7 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Duplicate Straight.

[0024]FIG. 8 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Mixed Straight.

[0025]FIG. 9 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Duplicate Right Angle.

[0026]FIG. 10 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Mixed Right Angle.

[0027]FIG. 11 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Duplicate Ornamental Iron.

[0028]FIG. 12 depicts the Decorator Light String Bracket, Multiple Mixed Ornamental Iron.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7188977 *Jul 21, 2004Mar 13, 2007Bonita LoughEZ clip it
US7309150 *Jan 13, 2005Dec 18, 2007Jack VendrickHanger for light strings
US7429259 *Nov 30, 2004Sep 30, 2008Cadeddu Jeffrey ASurgical anchor and system
US7513643 *Apr 13, 2005Apr 7, 2009Henry WilliamsLight support apparatus and associated method of use
US7909298 *Aug 18, 2005Mar 22, 2011Daimler AgChild seat fixing device
US8015755 *Oct 20, 2009Sep 13, 2011Bradley MillerIntegrated housing mounting system
US8247795 *Jul 9, 2007Aug 21, 2012Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Interfused nanocrystals and method of preparing the same
US8313215Feb 17, 2010Nov 20, 2012Wawak-Umscheid Trudy KRoof line light holder
US8556091 *Oct 11, 2011Oct 15, 2013Charlyne CutlerDevice for holding shower articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/301, 248/304, 248/215
International ClassificationF21V21/08, F21S4/00, F21V21/088
Cooperative ClassificationF21Y2101/02, F21W2121/004, F21S4/001, F21S4/007, F21V21/088
European ClassificationF21S4/00L2R, F21V21/088
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 4, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: BZ ENTERPRISES, LLC, ARIZONA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ZIMMERMAN, ARLEN J.;REEL/FRAME:013263/0183
Effective date: 20020903