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Publication numberUS20030088948 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 09/922,305
Publication dateMay 15, 2003
Filing dateAug 6, 2001
Priority dateAug 6, 2001
Publication number09922305, 922305, US 2003/0088948 A1, US 2003/088948 A1, US 20030088948 A1, US 20030088948A1, US 2003088948 A1, US 2003088948A1, US-A1-20030088948, US-A1-2003088948, US2003/0088948A1, US2003/088948A1, US20030088948 A1, US20030088948A1, US2003088948 A1, US2003088948A1
InventorsJames Cook
Original AssigneeCook James E.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Removable securing and hanging strap
US 20030088948 A1
Abstract
An elongated strap useful for bundling hoses, cables, extensions cords, and the like. One end of the strap is formed into an integral handle which the user may grasp to carry the bundled item. The handle portion also contains a boss with a through hole useful for hanging the bundled item over a screw or nail. The strap is locked around the item to be bundled by a two stage latch. While this latch provided substantial holding strength, it may also be unfastened and refastened a number of times without wearing out.
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Claims(5)
Having described my invention, I claim:
1. A bundling strap which allows a user to bundle together elongated items, carry said items, and hang said items on a hanging point, comprising:
a. a strap, having a first end, a middle portion, and a second end;
b. a first lock body, formed in said middle portion proximate said first end, wherein said first lock body opens into a first lock slot passing completely therethrough; and
c. a second lock body, formed in said middle portion proximate said second end, wherein said second lock body opens into a second lock slot passing therethrough, and wherein said first and second lock slots are sized to receive said second end of said strap, so that said user can wrap said second end of said strap around said elongated items, through said second lock slot, and through said first lock slot, thereby locking said strap so said elongated items.
2. A bundling strap as recited in claim 1, further comprising a boss, formed in said first end, wherein said boss opens into a hole passing completely therethrough and wherein said hole is sized to fit over a nail or screw so that, once having locked said strap to said elongated items, said user can place said strap on a hanging point.
3. A bundling strap as recited in claim 1, further comprising a handle, formed in said first end so that, once having locked said strap to said elongated items, said user can grasp said handle and easily carry said elongated items.
4. A bundling strap as recited in claim 1, wherein at least one surface of said second end of said strap is formed into a series of teeth configured to frictionally engage said first and second lock slots.
5. A bundling strap which allows a user to bundle together elongated items, carry said items, and hang said items on a hanging point, comprising:
a. a strap, having a first end, a middle portion, and a second end;
b. a first lock body, formed in said middle portion proximate said first end, wherein said first lock body opens into a first lock slot passing completely therethrough;
c. a second lock body, formed in said middle portion proximate said second end, wherein said second lock body opens into a second lock slot passing therethrough, and wherein said first and second lock slots are sized to receive said second end of said strap, so that said user can wrap said second end of said strap around said elongated items, through said second lock slot, and through said first lock slot, thereby locking said strap so said elongated items;
d. a boss, formed in said first end, wherein said boss opens into a hole passing completely therethrough and wherein said hole is sized to fit over said hanging point so that, once having locked said strap to said elongated items, said user can place said strap on a hanging point; and
e. a handle, formed in said first end so that, once having locked said strap to said elongated items, said user can grasp said handle and easily carry said elongated items.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    Not Applicable
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • [0002]
    Not Applicable
  • MICROFICHE APPENDIX
  • [0003]
    Not Applicable
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0004]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0005]
    This invention relates to the field of securing and storing long and thin articles such as hoses, electrical cords, and the like. More specifically, the invention comprises a securable and removable strap for locking around a coiled length of hose or cord. The invention further comprises means for hanging the secured article and an integral handle for carrying the secured article.
  • [0006]
    2. Description of the Related Art
  • [0007]
    Plastic bundling straps of various types have been in common use since at least the 1960's. These devices are particularly useful in tying individual electrical wires together into bundles. One such device is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,011,633 to Seil (1977). The Seil device has an elongated strap with transverse serrations. An interlocking flexible latch is provided to engage these serrations as the strap is pulled through a frame. Once the strap is looped around a bundle of wires, the wires may then be drawn tightly together, as shown in FIG. 3 of the disclosure.
  • [0008]
    The type of locking mechanism disclosed in Seil is strong and effective. However, it is not easily reversible. One the strap is pulled through, the only way to release it is generally to cut it. This irreversibility is not a problem for bundling operations where the articles will remain bundled. However, for temporary bundling operations—such as storing a hose or an extension cord - the irreversibility of the latch limits the use of the Seil device.
  • [0009]
    A double-sided latch is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,848,771 to Hancock-Bogese et.al (1998). It provides a bundling strap which may be pressed into a fixed location to retain the bundle. It is particularly suited to automotive wiring harnesses, where it could be installed into holes drilled or punched into automotive sheet metal. Like the Seil device, however, it features an essentially irreversible latch.
  • [0010]
    Another device intended to secure a bundle of wiring next to a fixed hole is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,147,523 to Logan (1964). The Logan device features a long strap extending from a boss with a large through hole. The through hole is large enough to receive a mounting screw, which affixes the fastener and the bundle to a fixed point. The screw is also used to secure the strap. While potentially reversible, this latching mechanism is quite complicated. It also contemplates that the excess portion of the strap—extending beyond the mounting screw—will be cut off once the device is in place. As the Logan device is intended to be a permanent installation for a wiring harness and the like, the trimming of the excess length is acceptable. It would not be acceptable, however, for a device which is to be re-used.
  • [0011]
    A device which is intended to be a reusable hanger for extension cords is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 4,752,054 to Jonsson (1988). The Jonsonn device has multiple securing straps which can encircle the loops of a coiled extension cord. It also incorporates a hole which can be used to hang the secured extension cord on a nail or screw. The latch relies on frictional engagement between some serrations on the securing straps and slots in the main body of the device. A cord or hose of substantial weight will place a significant stress on such a fastening method. This will often either cause the device to fail outright—via shearing of the serrations—or cause the serrations to wear down and become ineffective as they are repeatedly engaged and disengaged.
  • [0012]
    Accordingly, the prior art devices are limited in that they:
  • [0013]
    1. Do not provide a reversible latch;
  • [0014]
    2. Are cumbersome to engage; and;
  • [0015]
    3. May not be strong enough for heavier cords and hoses.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0016]
    The present invention is an elongated strap useful for bundling hoses, cables, extensions cords, and the like. One end of the strap is formed into an integral handle which the user may grasp to carry the bundled item. The handle portion also contains a boss with a through hole useful for hanging the bundled item over a screw or nail. The strap is locked around the item to be bundled by a two stage latch. While this latch provides substantial holding strength, it may also be unfastened and refastened a number of times without wearing out.
  • [0017]
    Accordingly, the present invention seeks to provide a bundling strap for bundling elongated articles which:
  • [0018]
    1. Has an easily reversible latch;
  • [0019]
    2. Is strong enough to hold heavy cords and hoses;
  • [0020]
    3. Provides a hanging feature so that the bundled item may be hung on a nail or screw; and
  • [0021]
    4. Provides a carrying handle.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0022]
    [0022]FIG. 1 is an isometric view, showing the proposed invention.
  • [0023]
    [0023]FIG. 2 is an isometric view, showing the handle portion in more detail.
  • [0024]
    [0024]FIG. 3 is an isometric view, showing the strap portion in more detail.
  • [0025]
    [0025]FIG. 4 is an isometric view, showing the operation of the latch mechanism.
  • [0026]
    [0026]FIG. 5 is an isometric view, showing the invention applied to a coiled extension cord.
  • REFERENCE NUMERALS IN THE DRAWINGS
  • [0027]
    [0027]
    10 handle
    12 boss
    14 first lock body
    16 second lock body
    18 strap
    20 first web
    22 second web
    24 third web
    26 hole
    28 first lock slot
    30 point
    32 teeth
    34 capture loop
    36 lock loop
    38 cord
    40 hanging point
    42 bundling strap
    44 second lock slot
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0028]
    [0028]FIG. 1 shows the invention in its flat state. Bundling strap 42 is comprised of a long and thin strap 18. One end of bundling strap 42 is formed into an integral handle 10. Bundling strap 42 is preferably injection molded as a single piece. A resilient polymer, such an nylon, is suitable.
  • [0029]
    [0029]FIG. 2 is an enlargement of the features near handle 10. First web 20 connects handle 10 to boss 12. Second web 22 connects boss 12 to first lock body 14. Third web 24 connects first lock body 14 to second lock body 16. Strap 18 is connected to second lock body 16.
  • [0030]
    The reader will observe that boss 12 has hole 26 passing completely through it. First lock body 14 has first lock slot 28 passing completely through it. Likewise, second lock body 16 has second lock slot 44 passing completely through it. The functions of these features will be explained subsequently.
  • [0031]
    [0031]FIG. 3 is an enlargement showing the features on the opposite end of bundling strap 42. The extreme end of strap 18 is formed into point 30. The upper surface of strap 18 features a series of teeth 32. Teeth 32 are intended to increase the friction between strap 18 and the two lock slots (28 and 44). Teeth 32 may be furnished on both the upper and lower surfaces of strap 18, but generally furnishing teeth 32 on one side is sufficient.
  • [0032]
    The essential purpose of bundling strap 42 is to wrap around a bundle of articles and secure these in place. Turning to FIG. 4, the locking mechanism of bundling strap 42 will be explained. Strap 18 is bent around an object to be bundled (not shown in FIG. 4). Point 30 is then pushed through second lock slot 44, forming capture loop 34. The user then continues to pull strap 18 through second lock slot 44 until capture loop 34 is pulled tightly against the object or objects to be bundled. At this point, teeth 32 on strap 18 frictionally engage the surfaces of second lock slot 44 and tend to prevent strap 18 from slipping back through. However, if a substantial tensile load is introduced on strap 18, then strap 18 may slip back through second lock slot 44. Accordingly, an additional securing step is needed. To achieve additional security, the user grasps point 18 and pushes it downward through first lock slot 28, forming lock loop 36. The user then continues to pull on strap 18 - at a position near point 30 - until strap 18 is secured.
  • [0033]
    In the position shown in FIG. 4, strap 18 is frictionally engaged by both first lock slot 28 and second lock slot 44. Tension in capture loop 34 will be introduced by pulling strap 18 tightly against the bundled articles, and by the weight of the bundled articles when handle 10 is used to lift them. The strength of the latching method employed (if properly designed) exceeds the tensile strength of strap 18; i.e., strap 18 will break before it becomes unlatched.
  • [0034]
    However, despite the strength of the latching method, it may also be easily reversed. In order to unlatch bundling strap 42, the user simply pushes point 30 back through first lock slot 28 and back through second lock slot 44. There is no need to unlatch a catch or pawl mechanism. By simple positioning the portion of strap 18 in an orientation which is parallel to the direction of the lock slot in question, strap 18 my be easily passed back through the particular lock slot. Thus, the device may be attached and removed as needed.
  • [0035]
    [0035]FIG. 5 shows a typical application for the device. Cord 36 has been wrapped into a loosely organized coil. Capture loop 34 is then formed around cord 36 and locked in place as described previously. For purposes of visual clarity, FIG. 5 shows capture loop 34 prior to its being drawn snugly against cord 36.
  • [0036]
    The reader will appreciate that once bundling strap 42 is in place and locked on cord 38, handle 10 may be used to easily lift cord 38 and carry it. In addition, hole 26 in boss 12 is sized to fit over a variety of hanging points 40 (a nail, in the view shown). This feature facilitates storing the bundled item by hanging it on a wall. Thus, the user can employ bundling strap 42 to secure the bundled object, lift it using handle 10, and hang it using hole 26.
  • [0037]
    Although cord 36 has been used in the illustration, those skilled in the art will realize that the device is equally capable of bundling garden hoses, ropes, stacks of tubing, and many other items. Accordingly, the reader will appreciate that the proposed invention provides a bundling strap which:
  • [0038]
    1. Has an easily reversible latch;
  • [0039]
    2. Is strong enough to hold heavy cords and hoses;
  • [0040]
    3. Provides a hanging feature so that the bundled item may be hung on a nail or screw; and
  • [0041]
    4. Provides a carrying handle.
  • [0042]
    Although the preceding description contains significant detail, it should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention but rather as providing illustrations of the preferred embodiment of the invention. As an example, many type of friction enhancing elements could be substitute for teeth 32, a different shape could be employed for handle 10, a hook could be used in the place of hole 26, etc. As another example—with reference to FIG. 2—boss 12, hole 26, and first lock body 14 could be formed as part of handle 10. None of these changes—or other changes of similar scope—would effect the basic nature of the invention disclosed. Thus, the scope of the invention should be fixed by the following claims, rather than by the examples given.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7263745 *Aug 2, 2005Sep 4, 2007Kenji MoriBinding band
US7766815 *Aug 3, 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electroactive polymer actuated gastric band
US7849568Dec 14, 2010Charles Ervin WilkinsonCord organizer
US7934296 *May 23, 2005May 3, 2011Nichido Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaBinding band and binding band set
US8069599 *Jun 4, 2008Dec 6, 2011Fgx International, Inc.Double bridged tag
US8132302Nov 10, 2010Mar 13, 2012Charles Ervin WilkinsonCord organizer
US8246095 *Jul 16, 2009Aug 21, 2012Actuant CorporationCable clasp
US8595904 *Jan 11, 2010Dec 3, 2013Jersey Tactical Corp.Disposable double lock restraint system
US9228679Dec 12, 2013Jan 5, 2016Covidien LpHolding a flexible elongate object
US20070027356 *Jul 28, 2005Feb 1, 2007Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electroactive polymer actuated gastric band
US20070028425 *Aug 2, 2005Feb 8, 2007Kenji MoriBinding band
US20080028576 *May 23, 2005Feb 7, 2008Isao OkamotoBinding Band And Binding Band Set
US20080083096 *Oct 4, 2006Apr 10, 2008Charles Ervin WilkinsonCord Organizer
US20080256762 *Apr 19, 2007Oct 23, 2008Ben SutherlandWire tie
US20090031603 *Jun 4, 2008Feb 5, 2009Gerald KitchenDouble Bridged Tag
US20090106948 *Oct 26, 2007Apr 30, 2009Lopez Joseph VMethod and apparatus for retaining elongated flexible articles including visual inspection apparatus inspection probes
US20090229104 *Apr 13, 2009Sep 17, 2009Beger Lawrence JTwo in one video monitor mount
US20100201144 *Aug 12, 2010Radle Patrick JCable Clasp
US20110056051 *Nov 10, 2010Mar 10, 2011Charles Ervin WilkinsonCord organizer
US20110167880 *Jan 11, 2010Jul 14, 2011Klementowicz Iii NicholasDisposable double lock restraint system
US20140020229 *Apr 21, 2010Jan 23, 2014Simon John MooreTie Strip
US20140041280 *Aug 10, 2012Feb 13, 2014Craig ERISMANBuoyant fishing device
WO2006020026A1 *Jul 13, 2005Feb 23, 2006Slank Adam ECable tie for transporting articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/16.0PB
International ClassificationF16L3/233, F16L3/14
Cooperative ClassificationY10T24/1498, F16L3/2336, F16L3/14
European ClassificationF16L3/233C, F16L3/14