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Publication numberUS20030098545 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/183,257
Publication dateMay 29, 2003
Filing dateJun 26, 2002
Priority dateNov 27, 2001
Publication number10183257, 183257, US 2003/0098545 A1, US 2003/098545 A1, US 20030098545 A1, US 20030098545A1, US 2003098545 A1, US 2003098545A1, US-A1-20030098545, US-A1-2003098545, US2003/0098545A1, US2003/098545A1, US20030098545 A1, US20030098545A1, US2003098545 A1, US2003098545A1
InventorsDaniel Webb
Original AssigneeWebb Daniel S.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gaming apparatus and method for play thereof
US 20030098545 A1
Abstract
A gaming apparatus and method for playing the same. An embodiment of the gaming apparatus may comprise a goal assembly and a weighted line. The weighted line is thrown by a player to contact the goal assembly. Points may be awarded when the weighted line contacts the goal assembly.
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Claims(24)
What is claimed is:
1. A method for playing a game, comprising:
throwing a weighted line toward a goal assembly; and
awarding at least one point if said weighted line contacts said goal assembly.
2. A method as in claim 1, wherein awarding the at least one point occurs when said weighted line engages at least one target of said goal assembly.
3. A method as in claim 2, wherein awarding the at least one point occurs when said weighted line bridges more than one target of said goal assembly.
4. A method as in claim 2, wherein awarding the at least one point increases by a multiple when said weighted line wraps around at least one target of said goal assembly.
5. A method as in claim 1, further comprising adjusting the at least one point awarded when said weighted line is moved during play of the game.
6. A gaming apparatus, comprising:
a goal assembly; and
a weighted line, said weighted line thrown by a player to contact said goal assembly.
7. The gaming apparatus of claim 6, wherein said weighted line has a cord and at least one weight attached to said cord.
8. The gaming apparatus of claim 7, wherein said cord is rope.
9. The gaming apparatus of claim 7, wherein said cord is elastic.
10. The gaming apparatus of claim 6, wherein said goal assembly comprises a platform.
11. The gaming apparatus of claim 10, wherein said platform comprises at least one base member.
12. The gaming apparatus of claim 11, wherein said at least one base member is hollow.
13. The gaming apparatus of claim 6, wherein said goal assembly comprises at least one target.
14. The gaming apparatus of claim 13, wherein said at least one target comprises a cross member.
15. The gaming apparatus of claim 14, wherein said cross member comprises a rough surface.
16. The gaming apparatus of claim 13, wherein said at least one target comprises at least one upright member.
17. The gaming apparatus of claim 13, wherein said at least one target collapses.
18. The gaming apparatus of claim 6, wherein said goal assembly comprises progressively wider targets.
19. The gaming apparatus of claim 6, wherein said goal assembly comprises progressively taller targets.
20. The gaming apparatus of claim 6, wherein said goal assembly comprises a plurality of targets positioned substantially behind one another.
21. The gaming apparatus of claim 6, wherein said goal assembly is collapsible.
22. The gaming apparatus of claim 6, further comprising an anchor operatively associated with said goal assembly, said anchor maintaining said goal assembly in a substantially fixed position.
23. A gaming apparatus, comprising:
a weighted line;
target means for receiving said weighted line when said weighted line is thrown toward said target means;
support means for supporting said target means.
24. A gaming apparatus, comprising:
a platform having first and second base members;
at least one U-shaped target having first and second ends and a cross member therebetween, said at least one U-shaped target mounted to said platform by inserting the first end into the first base member and inserting the second end into the second base member; and
a cord having weight on each end thereof, said cord thrown by a player in an attempt to contact the cross member of said at least one U-shaped target.
Description
    RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    This patent application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/333,119 filed on Nov. 27, 2001 of Daniel S. Webb for “YARDBALLZ”, hereby incorporated herein for all that it discloses.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The invention generally pertains to games, and more specifically, to gaming apparatus and method for play thereof.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0003]
    Games that test a player's skill pitching an object have been popular for many years, especially at outdoor events such as picnics, backyard barbeques, and the like. These games include the game of horseshoes, ring-toss games, and disc-golf, among others.
  • [0004]
    As is well-known in the game of horseshoes, upright posts are positioned at opposite sides of a playing field. Each player takes a turn pitching metal horseshoes at the respective upright posts in an attempt to land as many of the horseshoes around, against, or near the post. The player scores points based on the positions of the pitched horseshoes.
  • [0005]
    One variation to the game of horseshoes is a ring-toss game in which the players instead take turns tossing heavy rings toward the upright posts. The players score points when a ring lands surrounding the post.
  • [0006]
    The horseshoes or rings used to play these games are generally oversized (e.g., about 6 or 7 inches across in any given direction) and made of metal. Even plastic or foam-coated horseshoes or rings often have a metal core. In any event, the horseshoes or rings are relatively heavy. For example, the National Horseshoe Pitchers Association (NHPA) specifies that horseshoes may weigh up to 2 pounds, 10 ounces. Hence, these games may not be well-suited for the very young, the elderly, or the physically disabled.
  • [0007]
    In addition, throwing heavy horseshoes or rings against the upright post can cause the post to move. Therefore, the upright post is typically fixed in a bucket of cement or driven through a log, either of which is then buried in the ground to keep the upright post from moving during play of the game. Of course, such an arrangement makes the upright post more of a permanent or semi-permanent fixture. Furthermore, when the horseshoes or rings land, they tend to damage the surroundings (e.g., by uprooting grass).
  • [0008]
    In response to these concerns, designated playing courts may be provided at some picnic areas and parks. Of course, not all recreational destinations have designated playing courts, and even where these are provided, other players may already be using the designated playing courts.
  • [0009]
    Other games that test the player's skill throwing an object are also known. For example, in the game of disc golf, a disc or FrisbeeŽ is thrown at a metal basket mounted around the post about midway up the post. A number of metal chains are draped from the top of the post and are attached around the outer perimeter of the metal basket on the other end.
  • [0010]
    During play of disc golf, player's attempt to land a disc in the metal basket. The chains serve to stop flight of the disc and drop it into the basket. The players attempt to land the disc in the basket with the least number of throws. However, this game is also played on a designated playing field, and is thus subject to the same limitations previously described. In addition, this game requires a lot of walking and may not be suitable for some players (e.g., the very young or elderly, physically disabled, etc.).
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0011]
    Gaming apparatus may comprise a goal assembly and a weighted line. The weighted line is thrown by a player to contact the goal assembly.
  • [0012]
    A method for playing the game may comprise throwing a weighted line toward a goal assembly, and awarding points when the weighted line contacts the goal assembly.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0013]
    Illustrative and presently preferred embodiments of the invention are illustrated in the drawings, in which:
  • [0014]
    [0014]FIG. 1 is a plan view of a playing field on which one embodiment of a gaming apparatus may be played according to the invention;
  • [0015]
    [0015]FIG. 2 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a goal assembly of the gaming apparatus;
  • [0016]
    [0016]FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing one embodiment of a cross member of the goal assembly;
  • [0017]
    [0017]FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing one embodiment of an upright member of the goal assembly;
  • [0018]
    [0018]FIG. 5(a) is a perspective view showing the gaming apparatus in a collapsed arrangement showing an opening formed therein according to one embodiment of the invention;
  • [0019]
    [0019]FIG. 5(b) is another perspective view showing the gaming apparatus in a collapsed arrangement, as in FIG. 5(a) with a cap covering the opening formed therein;
  • [0020]
    [0020]FIG. 6 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a weighted line of the gaming apparatus;
  • [0021]
    [0021]FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of the weighted line shown in FIG. 6; and
  • [0022]
    FIGS. 8(a) through (c) illustrate embodiments of the weighted line in contact with the goal assembly.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0023]
    Gaming apparatus 10 is shown and described herein as it may be played on a playing field 12 (FIG. 1). Games that test a player's skill pitching an object (e.g., the game of horseshoes) are popular especially at outdoor events. Briefly, the players stand on one side of the playing field 12 (e.g., the first side “A”) and take turns pitching an object toward the opposite side of the playing field (e.g., the second side “B”). The players may both stand on one side of the playing field (e.g., first side “A”) and take turns pitching a number of objects. Although each player will typically pitch two or three objects, any number of (i.e., one or more) objects may be pitched according to variations of the game. Once the first player's turn is over, both players will walk to the opposite side of the playing field (e.g., second side “B”) and tally the score for each player. Both players remain on this side of the playing field (e.g., second side “B”) and take turns pitching one or more objects at the opposite side of the playing field (e.g., first side “B”). And so play of the game continues for the agreed upon number of iterations or until one of the players achieves an agreed-upon score. It is desirable that the game be accessible to players of all ages and abilities. It is also desirable that the game be set up on any suitable playing field, and not be limited to a designated playing field.
  • [0024]
    In one embodiment of the invention, the gaming apparatus 10 (FIG. 1) comprises at least one goal assembly 14, 14′ (see also FIG. 2), and at least one weighted line 16 (FIG. 6). The goal assembly 14 may comprise at least one target 20, 21, 22. One of the goal assemblies 14 may be positioned on one side of the playing field 12 (e.g., first side “A”) and another goal assembly 14′ may be positioned on the other side of the playing field 12 (e.g., second side “B”), although other arrangements are also possible. The players take turns throwing the weighted line 16 into the air so that it lands in the vicinity of the goal assembly 14, and preferably contacts and engages at least one of the targets 20, 21, 22, as illustrated in FIG. 8(a) through FIG. 8(c).
  • [0025]
    The gaming apparatus 10 may be played as follows according to one embodiment of the invention. The weighted line 16 is thrown into the air so that it lands in the general vicinity of the goal assembly 14. If the weighted line 16 contacts and engages at least one of the targets 20, 21, 22 of the goal assembly 14, the player is awarded points. According to one embodiment, the first player to be awarded twenty-one points wins the game.
  • [0026]
    The gaming apparatus 10 of the present invention may be played by most players regardless of their age and physical ability. In addition, the gaming apparatus 10 may be readily assembled on most playing surfaces and disassembled after use and/or for travel. The gaming apparatus 10 may be played with relatively minimum impact on the environment, and use of the gaming apparatus 10 is not limited to designated playing fields.
  • [0027]
    Having briefly described gaming apparatus 10 and play thereof according to an embodiment of the invention, as well as some of the more significant features and advantages thereof, embodiments of the invention will now be described in detail.
  • [0028]
    The playing field 12 on which the gaming apparatus 10 may be played is shown in FIG. 1 according to one embodiment of the invention. The playing field 12 may be defined on the outer perimeter by a substantially rectangular-shaped boundary 24 having opposing sides, generally designated as “A” and “B” in FIG. 1. The goal assemblies 14, 14′ are positioned on opposite sides of the playing field 12 facing one another. A throw line 26, 26′ may be indicated on the ground at a distance of about thirty-five feet from the opposing goal assembly 14, 14′.
  • [0029]
    Of course it is understood that the playing field 12 may be established on any suitable surface, including but not limited to, a concrete slab, dirt, and grass. Indeed, the playing field 12 may even be established indoors (e.g., inside a gymnasium or basement) on surfaces such as carpet, hardwood floors, and rubber matting, to name a few.
  • [0030]
    The playing field 12 may be any suitable shape. In addition, any number of goal assemblies 14, 14′ may be used according to the teachings of the invention. In another embodiment, for example, three goal assemblies may be positioned to form a substantially triangular playing field. Yet other embodiments are also contemplated as being within the scope of the invention.
  • [0031]
    According to one embodiment, the boundary 24 of the playing field 12 may be marked for the players. For example, the boundary 24 may be marked using field paint, tape, string or rope, or even “scratched” in the sand. As another example, suitable markers (not shown) such as plastic cones, stakes, or flags may be placed at various locations (e.g., at each of the corners) to indicate the boundary 24 of the playing field 12. In yet other embodiments, the boundary 24 need not be marked at all.
  • [0032]
    The throw lines 26, 26′ may also be marked on the playing field 12. For example, the throw lines 26, 26′ may be marked using similar materials to those which are used to mark the boundary 24. As another example, a suitable marker (not shown) such as a block of wood or plastic stick may be positioned at the desired distance where the players are to stand when throwing the weighted line 16 during play of the game 10.
  • [0033]
    The goal assemblies 14, 14′ may be positioned at any suitable distance from one another, and/or from the throw line 26, 26′. Considerations in arranging the goal assemblies 14, 14′ on the playing field 12 may include, by way of example, the age and/or skill level of the participants. Additional considerations may include, for example, environmental factors such as trees or bushes, fences, property lines, etc.
  • [0034]
    The foregoing description of the playing field 12 is provided in order to better understand one environment in which the gaming apparatus 10 of the present invention may be used. However, it should be understood that the gaming apparatus 10 of the present invention may also be used in conjunction with any of a wide range of other types and configurations of playing fields, and is not limited to that shown and described herein.
  • [0035]
    The goal assembly 14 of gaming apparatus 10 is shown in more detail in FIG. 2 according to one embodiment of the invention. Goal assembly 14 may be made of any suitable material. Preferably, the goal assembly 14 is made from light-weight material(s), such as plastic or aluminum metal. In addition, the goal assembly 14 is preferably made from structurally sound material(s). In any event, the goal assembly 14 may comprise one or more targets 20, 21, 22. The targets 20, 21, 22 may be mounted to a platform 28.
  • [0036]
    The goal assembly 14 may optionally be provided with one or more anchors 80 operatively associated therewith. The anchor(s) 80 may serve to maintain the goal assembly 14 in a substantially fixed position on the playing field 12. In one embodiment, anchor 80 may comprise a strap 81 on the platform 28 and a stake 82 that can be driven therethrough and into the ground on the playing field 12. However, it is understood that other suitable anchors may also be provided. For example, the anchor may comprise a non-skid surface on the bottom of the platform 28. In another embodiment, the platform 28 may be hollow or comprise at least a hollow portion (e.g., base member 30 having an opening 52 formed on at least one end as shown in FIG. 5(a)). The platform 28 may be filled with weighted material (e.g., sand, water) and is then preferably closed, thereby serving as an anchor. Yet other embodiments are also contemplated as being within the scope of the invention.
  • [0037]
    Preferably, the goal assembly 14 comprises three, generally U-shaped targets 20, 21, 22. In addition, each target is progressively taller and wider moving from the front to the back of the goal assembly 14. However, it is understood that any number of target(s) 20, 21, 22 may be provided according to the teachings of the invention. In addition, the targets 20, 21, 22 may be any suitable size and/or shape. For example, the targets 20, 21, 22 may be substantially L-shaped or circle-shaped. Other embodiments will also occur to those skilled in the art after having become familiar with the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0038]
    Any suitable platform 28 may be used according to the teachings of the invention. In one embodiment, the platform 28 may comprise base members 30, 31. The base members 30, 31 may be generally cylindrical in shape with a substantially flat bottom. In other embodiments, the base members 30, 31 may be connected or hinged at one end so that they can be opened to form a generally V-shaped platform. However it is understood that the platform 28 is not limited to these embodiments and may be any suitable shape, comprise any suitable number and/or type of members, etc.
  • [0039]
    As previously mentioned, the targets 20, 21, 22 may be generally U-shaped. According to one embodiment, each of the targets 20, 21, 22 may comprise upright members 34, 35 supporting cross member 36. Cross member 36 is shown in more detail according to one embodiment of the invention in FIG. 3, and one of the upright members 34 is shown in more detail according to one embodiment of the invention in FIG. 4.
  • [0040]
    Cross member 36 may comprise a cylindrical, elongate mid-section 38. Play of the game 10 will be explained in more detail below. For now it is enough to understand that the players attempt to land the weighted line 16 so that it contacts and engages at least one cross member 36. Preferably, the weighted line 16 lands so that it is hanging over, or even wrapped around the cross member 36. Accordingly, the elongate mid-section 38 may be provided with a rough surface 42 to enhance the probability that the weighted line 16 engages the cross member 36. Other embodiments are also contemplated as being within the scope of the invention. For example, the elongate mid-section 38 may have a different shaped cross-section (e.g., “+”, triangular, square, hexagonal).
  • [0041]
    Cross member 36 may also be provided with hinge members 40, 41 mounted to each end of the elongate midsection 38. Upright members 34 may likewise comprise corresponding hinge member 44, as shown in FIG. 4. Accordingly, cross member 36 may be pivotally connected to upright member 34 by the hinge member 40 and corresponding hinge member 44, for example, by inserting a pin (not shown) through holes 46, 47.
  • [0042]
    It is understood that cross member 36 may be mounted to upright members 34, 35 in any suitable manner and need not be mounted using hinge members. In other embodiments, for example, cross member 36 may be mounted to upright members 34, 35 using flexible tubing. Alternatively, cross member 36 need not be pivotally mounted to upright members 34, 35. Indeed, the targets 20, 21, 22 may even be fabricated as units without separate upright members 34, 35 and cross member 36. For example, the targets 20, 21, 22 may comprise a single piece of flexible tubing that can be bent to form a U-shaped curve and inserted on each end into the platform 28.
  • [0043]
    In any event, the targets 20, 21, 22 may be mounted to the platform 28 according to one embodiment as follows by an interconnect member 48 (FIG. 4). According to one embodiment, the interconnect member 48 is provided on upright member 34 and has “fins” 50. Accordingly, interconnect member 48 may be inserted into an opening 52 (FIG. 2) formed in the platform 28 so that fins 50 engage corresponding slots 54 also formed in the platform 28.
  • [0044]
    It is noted that the interconnect member 48 is not limited to the configuration described above. In other embodiments, for example, interconnect member 48 may comprise screw thread formed on each end of the targets 20, 21, 22 (e.g., on the upright members 34, 35) and a corresponding screw thread may be provided on platform 28. As another example, interconnect member 48 may comprise a “twist-and-lock” configuration. Other embodiments will also become apparent to one skilled in the art after having become familiar with the teachings of the invention, and are also contemplated as being within the scope of the invention.
  • [0045]
    According to one embodiment of the invention, the goal assembly 14 may be unassembled (e.g., when not in use for storage or transport). The targets 20, 21, 22 may be removed from the platform 28. Once removed, the targets 20, 21, 22 may be collapsed, for example, as explained above by folding the upright members 34, 35 SO that they are parallel with the cross member 36.
  • [0046]
    In a preferred embodiment, the base members 30, 31 for goal assembly 14 and base members 30′ and 31′ for goal assembly 14′ may be stacked one on top of the other as shown in FIG. 5(a). In addition, the base members 30 are preferably hollow, as previously discussed, having an opening 52 formed on at least one end. Accordingly, the folded targets 20, 21, 22 for each of the goal assemblies 14, 14′, and the weighted line(s) 16 may be inserted into one or more of the hollow base members 30.
  • [0047]
    In one embodiment, the base members 30, 31 may be strapped together. Alternatively, one or more covers 54 may be placed over the opening(s) 52, as shown in FIG. 5(b). Cover 54 may also serve to hold the base members 30, 31 together.
  • [0048]
    As previously mentioned, the gaming apparatus 10 may also comprise a plurality of weighted lines 16, such as the one shown in FIG. 6. In one embodiment, the gaming apparatus 10 may comprise two weighted lines 16 for each player. However, the invention is not limited to any particular number of weighted lines 16, and indeed, in other embodiments the game may be played using a single weighted line 16.
  • [0049]
    The weighted line 16 is shown in FIG. 6 comprising a cord 56 and weights 58 and 59 attached at each end of the cord 56. In one embodiment, each of the weights 58, 59 are about the size, weight, and shape of a standard golf ball and the cord 56 is rope. However, it is understood that the weighted line 16 is not limited to such an embodiment.
  • [0050]
    The cord 56 may be made of any suitable material (e.g., nylon, rubber). In addition, the cord may be any suitable length. For example, the cord 38 may be made from a stretchable or elastic material.
  • [0051]
    The weights 58, 59 may also be made of any suitable material (e.g., metal, plastic, rubber, a sand-filled bag). In one exemplary embodiment, the weights 58, 59 may comprise a hard plastic core surrounded by a soft rubber or foam shell. A protective, colorant, and/or lighted (e.g., luminescent or “glow-in-the-dark”) coating material may also be applied to the outer shell. The weights 58, 59 may also be provided with a light and/or sound device. For example, the weights 58, 59 may “whistle” and/or “light up” as they are thrown through the air.
  • [0052]
    The weights 58, 59 may be any suitable shape and are not limited to the spherical shape shown and described herein. For example, the weights 58, 59 may be shaped as pyramids, squares, cylinders, rings, to name just a few. Indeed, the weights 58, 59 may also be shaped as footballs, basketballs, animals, cartoon characters, numbers, and the like.
  • [0053]
    The cord 56 may be mounted to the weights 58, 59, as shown in more detail in FIG. 7 according to one embodiment of the invention. In this embodiment, the weights 58, 59 may comprise an inner core 60 residing inside an outer shell 62. The cord 38 may comprise an enlarged portion 64. The enlarged portion 64 of the cord 56 is fitted within the inner core 60 of the weight 58. The cord 56 extends outside of the weight 58 and is attached at the other end to another weight 59.
  • [0054]
    Of course it is understood that the weights 58, 59 may be attached to the cord 56 in any suitable manner and is not limited to that shown and described herein. Other embodiments will also become apparent to one skilled in the art upon becoming familiar with the teachings of the invention. In another embodiment, enlarged portion 64 of the cord may be replaced with an anchor (e.g., a metal clip). In yet another embodiment, the cord 56 may be pulled through a hole formed in the weight 58 and the cord 56 knotted on each end. Still other embodiments are also contemplated as being within the scope of the invention.
  • [0055]
    The gaming apparatus 10 has been described above according to preferred embodiments of the invention. However, it is noted that the scope of the invention is not limited to the embodiments described herein. Indeed, the particular configuration of the gaming apparatus 10 may depend, at least to some extent, on certain design considerations. These may include, but are not limited to, the throwing distance and the skill-level of the players.
  • [0056]
    The gaming apparatus 10 may be played as follows according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. The gaming apparatus 10 may be played by one or more players. A single player can play by him or herself, or with one or more other players. In addition, the players can form teams. For example, two teams of two players each may play, wherein one member from each team stands on one end of the playing field 12 and another member from each team stands on the other side of the playing field 12. The players then take turns throwing the weighted line 16 at the goal assemblies 14, 14′.
  • [0057]
    In any event, each player (or team) is provided with a set of two weighted lines 16 according to this embodiment of the invention. The players take turns throwing the weighted line 16 into the air so that it lands in the vicinity of the goal assembly 14, and preferably so that it contacts and engages the goal assembly 14. For example, the players may take turns standing at the throw line 26, 26′ and throwing the weighted line 16 in the direction of arrow 66, 67, respectively (FIG. 1).
  • [0058]
    The weighted line 16 may be thrown in any suitable manner. According to one embodiment, the player throws the weighted line 16, one at a time, using an under-handed, swinging motion similar to what a softball pitcher may use to pitch a softball. Such a technique increases rotation of the weighted line 16 as it flies through the air toward the goal assembly 14. Rotation increases the probability that the weighted line 16 will engage the goal assembly 14 upon contact.
  • [0059]
    Of course it is understood that any suitable technique for throwing the weighted line 16 may be used according to the teachings of the present invention, and will depend in large part on the player's ability, experience level, physical capabilities, etc.
  • [0060]
    The players determine who will go first by throwing a practice round at one of the goal assemblies 14, 14′. The player that has the highest score goes first. Once a starter has been selected, play of the game 10 begins.
  • [0061]
    The players stand on one side of the playing field 12 (e.g., side “A” in FIG. 1) while the first player throws one of his or her weighted lines 16 at the goal assembly 14′ on the opposite end of the playing field 12, in the direction generally designated by arrow 66. The second player then throws one of his or her weighted lines 16 at the goal assembly 14′. When the players have finished throwing all of his or her weighted lines 16, each of the players move to the other side of the playing field 12 (e.g., side “B”) where they determine the points scored by each player. The weighted lines 16 may be retrieved and the players take turns throwing their weighted lines 16 at the opposing goal assembly 14 in the direction generally designated by arrow 67.
  • [0062]
    According to one embodiment, the player that is awarded the most points during the preceding round starts the next round. If neither player is awarded points during that round, or if each player is awarded the same number of points during that round, the player who went first during that round also goes first in the next round. Play continues for a predetermined number of “rounds” or until one of the players is awarded a predetermined score (e.g., a total of twenty-one points or more).
  • [0063]
    Of course it is understood that other variations for playing the game 10 are also contemplated as being within the scope of the invention. In another embodiment, the game 10 may be played by teams of players. For example, one member from each team may throw the weighted lines for the team during one round, and the other players from the team may take turns during the following rounds. Still other embodiments are also contemplated as being within the scope of the invention. Preferably, the rules are agreed upon by the participants prior to beginning play of the game 10.
  • [0064]
    Points may be awarded as follows, according to one embodiment of the invention. Each of the targets 20, 21, 22 (FIG. 2) may be assigned different point values. The first target 20 (e.g., the smallest) may be assigned three points, the second target 21 may be assigned two points, and the third target 22 (e.g., the tallest and widest) may be assigned one point. Points are awarded when the weighted line 16 lands in contact with the respective target 20, 21, 22.
  • [0065]
    Preferably, points are awarded based on the number of times the weighted line 16 crosses over the top of the cross member(s) 36, as illustrated in FIGS. 8(a) through 8(c). For example, if the weighted line 16 lands so that the cord 56 crosses once over the top of the cross member 36, the points assigned to the respective target 20, 21, 22 are awarded to the player. Points may be multiplied for each time the cord 56 crosses over the top of the cross member 36. Accordingly, if the cord 56 wraps around the cross member 36 (e.g., crosses twice over the top of the cross member 36), the points assigned to the respective target 20, 21, 22 are doubled. If the cord 56 twice wraps around the cross member 36 (e.g., crosses three times over the top of the cross member 36), the points assigned to the respective target 20, 21, 22 are tripled.
  • [0066]
    By way of illustration, the weighted line 16 is shown in FIG. 8(a) with the cord 56 crossing once at 70 over the top of cross member 36. In FIG. 8(b), the cord 56 is shown wrapped around once, or crossing twice at 72 over the top of cross member 36. Points may be awarded according to the following illustration. When the weighted line 16 lands so that the cord 56 crosses once over the cross member 36 on the first target 20 (FIG. 8(a)), the player is awarded the points assigned to the first target (e.g., three points). When the weighted line 16 lands so that the cord 56 crosses twice over the cross member 36 on the first target 20 (FIG. 8(b)), the player is awarded double the points assigned to the first target (e.g., two times three points, for six total points).
  • [0067]
    Points may also be awarded when a player throws the weighted line 16 so that it bridges more than one of the targets 20, 21, 22, as illustrated in FIG. 8(c). According to such an embodiment, the player is awarded points for each of the targets 20, 21, 22 that the cord 56 crosses over, as described above. That is, when the cord 38 crosses once over the target 20, 21, 22, the player receives the point value assigned to each of the targets 20, 21, 22 it bridges. In addition, points may be doubled, tripled, and so forth when the cord 38 crosses more than once over the target (i.e., it wraps around the target), as previously described. Furthermore, the player may also be awarded additional point(s) for creating the “bridge” between more than one target 20, 21, 22.
  • [0068]
    As an illustration, the weighted line 16 shown bridging the first and second targets 20, 21 in FIG. 8(c) may be awarded points as follows. The cord 56 crosses once at 70 over the top of the first target 20 as is therefore awarded the point value assigned to the first target 20 (e.g., three points). The cord 56 also wrapped once at 72 around the second target 21. Therefore, the player is awarded double the point value assigned to the second target 21 (e.g., four points total). The player is also awarded an extra point because the weighted line 16 bridges the first and second targets 20, 21. Accordingly, the player is awarded a total of eight points for this weighted line 16.
  • [0069]
    In addition, points may be adjusted (i.e., increased or decreased) by events that occur during play of the game. As an illustration, one of the weighted lines 16 may be thrown so that it contacts a previously thrown weighted line 16 (i.e., already engaging the goal assembly 14). This contact may cause the previously thrown weighted line 16 to be moved (e.g., dislodged or further wrapped around one of the targets). Accordingly, the point value for the previously thrown weighted line 16 that was moved by the later thrown weighted line 16 may be increased (e.g., where it further wraps around the target), or decreased (e.g., where it becomes dislodged from the target).
  • [0070]
    It is readily apparent that a method for awarding points to the players, such as just described, may be used by parents and/or educators to teach or reinforce math skills. However, the invention is not limited to any particular method for awarding points and other methods for awarding points may also be used, preferably as determined by the players prior to beginning play of the game 10. In other embodiments the players may not be awarded any points for some throws. By way of illustration, the players may not be awarded any points when the weighted line 16 bridges two cross members, as shown in FIG. 8(c). Yet other embodiments are also contemplated as being within the scope of the invention.
  • [0071]
    Having herein set forth preferred embodiments of the present invention, it is anticipated that suitable modifications can be made thereto which will nonetheless remain within the scope of the present invention.
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/343, 273/401, 473/514
International ClassificationA63B63/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2024/005, A63B63/00
European ClassificationA63B63/00