Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20030107590 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/289,698
Publication dateJun 12, 2003
Filing dateNov 6, 2002
Priority dateNov 7, 2001
Also published asEP1311083A2, EP1311083A3, US7930376, US8316144, US9118694, US20060168203, US20110158092, US20130034093
Publication number10289698, 289698, US 2003/0107590 A1, US 2003/107590 A1, US 20030107590 A1, US 20030107590A1, US 2003107590 A1, US 2003107590A1, US-A1-20030107590, US-A1-2003107590, US2003/0107590A1, US2003/107590A1, US20030107590 A1, US20030107590A1, US2003107590 A1, US2003107590A1
InventorsPhillippe Levillain, Raymond Hanson, Lawrence Helmerich
Original AssigneePhillippe Levillain, Raymond Hanson, Helmerich Lawrence F.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Policy rule management for QoS provisioning
US 20030107590 A1
Abstract
Described herein is a policy-based Internet Protocol (IP) network wherein the Quality of Service (QoS) provisioning across various network devices is managed by policy processing via a user interface including a graphic user interface. The user interface incorporates information made available by a server, such as lightweight directory access protocol (LDAP) server, having a repository, and thereby allows for a consistent set up voice-over IP devices, video devices and network data devices with minimal entries by the user. Further, the user interfaces allows for efficient policy creation and editing.
Images(30)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(22)
We claim:
1. A policy-based Internet Protocol (IP) network comprising:
a plurality of switches;
a plurality of network devices, each having a directory supported by at least one of the plurality of switches, the plurality of network devices being operatively connected to the plurality of switches via a local area network with each of the plurality of switches supporting quality of service (QoS) and policy files for each supported network device;
a server having a repository for policy data and for receiving policy updates; and
a network policy server having policy processing for provisioning quality of service via a user interface, wherein the user interface provides a graphic user interface for a user to set up QoS provisioning across the network devices.
2. The policy-based IP network of claim 1 wherein the network devices further comprise voice-over IP (VoIP) devices wherein the graphic user interface further comprises a VoIP device set up processing.
3. The policy-based IP network of claim 1 wherein the network devices further comprise data processing devices and wherein the graphic user interface further comprises a a data device set up processing.
4. The policy-based IP network of claim 1 wherein the network devices further comprise video devices wherein the graphic user interface further comprises a video device set up processing.
5. The policy-based IP network of claim 1 wherein the network devices further comprise voice-over IP (VoIP) devices, data processing devices and video processing devices and wherein the graphic user interface further comprises a VoIP device set up processing, a data device set up processing, a video device set up processing and a network policy defining and implementing processing.
6. The policy-based IP network of claim 1 wherein the network devices further comprise a network device discovery server for retrieving directory information of each of the plurality of network devices from the respective supporting switch, the network device discovery server being operatively connected to the plurality of switches and the policy server via a network backbone.
7. The policy-based IP network of claim 1 wherein the network further comprise a trap server for receiving at least one device policy table update notice from at least one of the plurality of network devices, the trap server being operatively connected to the plurality of switches and the policy server via a network backbone.
8. A method of quality of service provisioning in a policy-based Internet Protocol (IP) network having policy processing, the method comprising the steps of:
specifying to policy processing a priority for provisioning quality of service for processing network devices via a graphic user interface (GUI), if a network device setup mode is selected; and
defining and implementing network policies for provisioning quality of service via the graphic user interface to policy processing, if a guided setup mode is selected.
9. A method of quality of service provisioning in a policy-based Internet Protocol (IP) network having policy processing, the method comprising the steps of:
specifying to policy processing a priority for provisioning quality of service for data processing network devices via a graphic user interface (GUI), if a data device setup mode is selected; and
defining and implementing network policies for provisioning quality of service via the graphic user interface to policy processing, if a guided setup mode is selected.
10. The method of claim 9 further comprising the step of specifying to policy processing a priority for provisioning quality of service for video processing network devices via the GUI, if video setup mode is selected;
11. The method of claim 9 further comprising the step of specifying to policy processing a priority for provisioning quality of service (QoS) for voice-over IP (VoIP) network devices via a graphic user interface (GUI), if a VoIP setup mode is selected.
12. The method of claim 11 further comprising, preceding the step of specifying a priority to provision quality of service for VoIP network devices via the GUI to policy processing, the steps of discovering network devices and recording the discovered data in a server having a repository.
13. The method of claim 12 further comprising the steps of:
updating network device tables according to policy specifications, definitions, and implementations;
transmitting update notifications to a trap server; and
retrieving, by the policy processing, data from the trap server.
14. The method of claim 13 further comprising the steps of retrieving, by the policy processing, data from the repository.
15. The method of claim 11 wherein the step of specifying the priority to provision quality of service for VoIP network devices via the GUI to the policy processing further comprise the steps of:
inputting IP subnet for each voice subnet requiring a desired priority;
effecting a policy rule name;
effecting a policy condition name;
effecting a policy condition set;
effecting a policy action name; and
effecting a policy action.
16. The method of claim 9 wherein the step of specifying the priority to provision quality of service for data processing network devices via the graphic user interface to the policy processing further comprises steps of:
retrieving discovered network devices from the server repository;
displaying discovered devices;
effecting a policy rule name;
effecting a policy condition name;
effecting a policy condition set;
effecting a policy action name; and
effecting a policy action.
17. The method of claim 9 wherein the steps defining and implementing network policies for provisioning quality of service via the graphic user interface to policy processing further comprise the steps of:
displaying current server repository values of policy rules;
modifying each displayed current policy rule as needed;
creating, if needed, at least one new policy rule;
displaying at least one policy condition name;
selecting at least one policy condition set;
displaying at least one valid policy action name associable with the at least one displayed condition name; and
effecting at least one policy action.
18. The method of claim 9 wherein the step of effecting policy action further comprises the steps of:
effecting the policy condition;
effecting the policy action;
effecting the policy rule;
creating a policy group, if needed;
creating a policy service, if needed;
writing to the server repository;
notifying a plurality of devices to re-cache their resident data from the server repository; and
sending, by the notified plurality of devices, trap notification indicating re-caching accomplished to trap server.
19. A method of quality of service provisioning in a policy-based Internet Protocol (IP) network having policy processing, the method comprising the steps of:
selecting at least one mode from the group consisting of voice-over IP setup mode, data device setup mode, video device setup mode and a guided set up mode;
specifying to policy processing a priority for provisioning quality of service (QoS) for voice-over IP (VoIP) network devices via a graphic user interface (GUI), if VoIP setup mode is selected and if VoIP network devices are displayed within the GUI;
specifying to policy processing a priority for provisioning quality of service for video processing network devices via the GUI, if video setup mode is selected and if video processing network devices, including video multimedia network devices, are displayed within the GUI;
specifying to policy processing a priority for provisioning quality of service for data processing network devices via the GUI, if data device setup mode is selected and if data processing network devices are displayed with the GUI; and
defining and implementing network policies for provisioning quality of service via the graphic user interface to policy processing, if guided set up mode is selected.
20. A computer program product for use with a server in a policy-based Internet Protocol network having devices, said computer program product comprising:
a computer usable medium having computer readable program code means embodied in said medium that, when used with the server, causes the server to effect policy processing for provisioning quality of service via a user interface, wherein the user interface provides a graphic user interface for the user to set up quality of service (QoS) provisioning across the network devices;
a computer readable program code means for allowing the user to specify a priority to provision quality of service for data processing network devices via the graphic user interface to policy processing; and
and a computer readable program code means for allowing a user to define and implement network policies for provisioning quality of service via the graphic user interface to the policy processing.
21. The computer program product of claim 20 further comprising a computer readable program code means for allowing the user to specify a priority to provision quality of service for voice-over IP network devices via a graphic user interface to policy processing.
22. The computer program product of claim 20 further comprising a computer readable program code means for allowing the user to specify a priority to provision quality of service for video network devices via a graphic user interface to policy processing.
Description
    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims priority from the following U.S. Provisional Patent Application, the disclosure of which, including all appendices and all attached documents, is hereby incorporated herein by reference in its entirety for all purposes: U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/336,906, of Philippe Levillain, Raymond Hanson and Lawrence F. Helmerich entitled, “POLICY RULE MANAGEMENT FOR QOS PROVISIONING,” filed Nov. 7, 2001.
  • RESERVATION OF COPYRIGHT
  • [0002]
    The disclosure of this patent document contains material that is subject to copyright protection. The copyright owner has no objection to the facsimile reproduction by anyone of the patent document or the patent disclosure, as it appears in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office patent files or records, but otherwise reserves all copyright rights whatsoever.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    This invention pertains generally to policy-based networks and particularly to policy-based networks having user interfaces for efficient provisioning of quality of service for network devices.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0004]
    Network priority is a means of network bandwidth management for data, video and voice traffic and is implemented with administrator-defined policies. This kind of management is termed Quality of Service (QoS) and is controlled using policy-based network processes. In policy-based networking for an Internet Protocol (IP)-based network, a policy refers to a formal set of statements that define the manner of resource allocation among its clients. In policy-based networking, the administrator uses policy statements in order to define a particular level of priority for each of the kinds of services according to parameters including time schedules and according to devices defined by parts or subnets of the network.
  • [0005]
    Typically, an administrator establishes the provisioning of the QoS of network policies on an ad hoc basis. This approach requires a great deal of administrative effort, particularly where provisioning for voice-over-IP (VoIP) devices, video devices, or critical servers is required. Further, this approach can yield undesired performance in the resulting network due to inconsistencies in the user set up.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0006]
    Described herein is a policy-based IP network including a plurality of network devices, each having a directory, the plurality of network devices being operatively connected to a plurality of switches via a local area network with each of the plurality of switches supporting QoS and policy files for its respective supported network devices; a network device discovery server for retrieving directory information of each of the plurality of network devices from a supportive respective switch, the network device discovery server communicating with the switches via a network backbone; a server, such as a lightweight directory access protocol (LDAP) server, having a repository for policy data and for receiving policy updates; a trap server for receiving at least one device policy table update notice from at least one of the plurality of network devices; and a network policy server having processing for provisioning QoS via a user interface, wherein the user interface provides a graphic user interface for a user to rapidly set up the network devices. Further disclosed is a method of quality of service provisioning in a policy-based IP network including the steps of: specifying a priority to provision QoS for voice-over IP network devices via a graphic user interface to policy processing; specifying a priority to provision quality of service for video and data processing network devices via the graphic user interface to policy processing; and defining and implementing network policies for provisioning quality of service via the graphic user interface to policy processing.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0007]
    The present invention is illustrated by way of example and not limitation in the figures of the accompanying drawings, and in which:
  • [0008]
    [0008]FIG. 1 is an example network architecture for embodiments of the present invention;
  • [0009]
    [0009]FIG. 2 is an initial set up process flowchart for embodiments of the present invention;
  • [0010]
    [0010]FIG. 3 is a block diagram of example modes of the management interface embodiments of the present invention;
  • [0011]
    [0011]FIG. 4 is a voice over IP set up process flowchart for embodiments of the present invention;
  • [0012]
    [0012]FIG. 5A is an example graphic user interface for voice over IP set up of the present invention;
  • [0013]
    [0013]FIG. 5B is an example graphic user interface for voice over IP set up of the present invention;
  • [0014]
    [0014]FIG. 6 is a network data device set up process flowchart for embodiments of the present invention;
  • [0015]
    [0015]FIG. 7A is an example graphic user interface for network data device set up of the present invention;
  • [0016]
    [0016]FIG. 7B is an example graphic user interface for network data device set up of the present invention;
  • [0017]
    [0017]FIG. 7C is an example graphic user interface for network data device set up of the present invention;
  • [0018]
    [0018]FIG. 7D is an example graphic user interface for network video device set up of the present invention;
  • [0019]
    [0019]FIG. 7E is an example graphic user interface for network video device set up of the present invention;
  • [0020]
    [0020]FIG. 7F is an example graphic user interface for network video device set up of the present invention;
  • [0021]
    [0021]FIG. 8 is a process flowchart for policy rule creation and modification for embodiments of the present invention;
  • [0022]
    [0022]FIG. 9 is example graphic user interface for policy rule review of the present invention;
  • [0023]
    [0023]FIG. 10 is an example graphic user interface for setting policy conditions, particularly media access control (MAC) addresses, of the present invention;
  • [0024]
    [0024]FIG. 11 is an example graphic user interface for setting policy conditions, particularly IP addresses, of the present invention;
  • [0025]
    [0025]FIG. 12 is an example graphic user interface for setting policy conditions, particularly protocol settings, of the present invention;
  • [0026]
    [0026]FIG. 13 is an example graphic user interface for setting policy conditions, particularly virtual local area network identification, of the present invention;
  • [0027]
    [0027]FIG. 14 is an example graphic user interface for setting policy conditions, particularly differentiated Services code point selection and IP type of service (TOS) selection, of the present invention;
  • [0028]
    [0028]FIG. 15 is an example graphic user interface for setting policy conditions, particularly relating to IEEE standard 802.1 priority, of the present invention;
  • [0029]
    [0029]FIG. 16 is an example graphic user interface for setting policy conditions, particularly relating to the validity period, of the present invention;
  • [0030]
    [0030]FIG. 17 is an example graphic user interface for setting policy conditions, particularly relating to the validity period by months, of the present invention;
  • [0031]
    [0031]FIG. 18 is an example graphic user interface for setting policy conditions, particularly relating to the validity period by days of the week, of the present invention;
  • [0032]
    [0032]FIG. 19 is an example graphic user interface for setting policy conditions, particularly relating to the validity period by time of day, of the present invention;
  • [0033]
    [0033]FIG. 20 is an example graphic user interface for setting policy actions, particularly provisioning quality of service priority, of the present invention;
  • [0034]
    [0034]FIG. 21 is an example graphic user interface for applying policies to devices, of the present invention; and
  • [0035]
    [0035]FIG. 22 is a process flowchart for applying policy rules to network devices for embodiments of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0036]
    The several embodiments of the present invention provide a method and a network for provisioning policies so that all voice and data QoS in a policy-based IP network may be prioritized at the highest quality of service over a user-specified range of devices with minimal user interaction. Through a graphic user interface, device selection is presented to the user or network administrator with the presentation separated according to devices, i.e., voice devices versus other networking devices and servers whose applications may require a high QoS priority.
  • [0037]
    In the several embodiments of the present invention, a policy rule, or policy, is a logical device entity comprising at least one policy condition and a policy action, used for purposes of controlling bandwidth usage by switch processing features such as quality of service. If the policy condition evaluates “TRUE,” then the device performs the policy action. Generally, in order for a policy rule to be evaluated by the device, the policy must belong to a policy group. For some device operation systems, there may be an additional level, policy service, to which a policy group belongs.
  • [0038]
    [0038]FIG. 1 illustrates a policy-based IP network 100 including a user interface 110, a policy server 130, a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) server having a repository 120, a device discovery server 140, a trap server 150, with the servers in communication via a network backbone 160 with a plurality of switches 171-173 and a plurality of devices 181-186.
  • [0039]
    The process flowchart of FIG. 2 illustrates that during installation of the policy processing, the administrator inputs the LDAP server port number 210. Preferably, this is the only LDAP server parameter over which user direct control is allowed. Thereafter, the policy processing of the policy server 130 sets the LDAP IP address, User ID, Password, and Search Base for each switch to which it writes 220. In addition to those LDAP objects and attributes used by the switch for policy management and other features, the LDAP repository is also used by the policy processing to store the mapping between policy rules and their targets.
  • [0040]
    Several embodiments of the present invention use a discovery service 140 for ping sweep discovery of networked devices, whereupon the devices are then queried 230 by the discovery service 140 through Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) for their flash file directory contents. Enhanced discovery service embodiments investigate switches for policy-supporting files, for example, policy.img and qos.img files on flash memory in supported switches to determine if devices are capable of supporting policies. The discovery service flags policy-enabled devices, and provides a list of such devices 235 to the policy processing. The policy processing subscribes to the discover service events to receive updates to the policy-enabled device lists. In addition, the discovery service uses SNMP to discover virtual local area networks (VLAN) groups, which may be used for the defining of policy conditions. Where devices are capable, the devices may identify VLAN groups as being voice-capable, allowing easier identification of voice devices for ready QoS provisioning by the policy processing.
  • [0041]
    The policy processing writes 240 policy information to the LDAP repository 120 and notifies the devices 240 against which the policies must be applied, as identified by the network administrator through the policy processing interface, that the LDAP server has been updated. This action works to ensure that each applicable network device is notified and thereby prompted to read the repository 120 discern applicable policy changes. When policy-enabled devices receive the notice 245 that the LDAP repository of policy data has been updated, the policy-enabled devices each generate a trap notification 250 signifying that they have each read the repository changes and that their internal policy tables have been updated. The policy processing uses a trap server service to subscribes to device trap events. In several embodiments of the present invention, the trap server uses SNMP to achieve trap notification. The policy processing will enhance trap notification by reading each device's policy rules table 260 (from the appropriate policy processing management information bases, or MIBs, where an MIB is a formal description of a set of network objects that can be managed using SNMP) and confirming that there is a policy rule name that matches the rules in the LDAP repository.
  • [0042]
    The policy processing uses SNMP directly to provide device notification through the serverPolicyDecision MIB object for example. In this example for a network management system (NMS), the object can be set to (0) to flush policies (“flushPolicies”) or to (1) to re-cache policies (“recachePolicies”). The MIB description for this object is expressible as: “This object allows an NMS application to influence the policy manager's treatment of existing policy decisions that were established by the policy manager. By setting recachePolicies, an NMS can cause the policy manager to reload all its policies from the current primary LDAP server. By setting flushPolicies, all the policies are deleted by the policy manager.” Policies for individual devices may be set through SNMP MIB browsers and through other interfaces for particular devices.
  • [0043]
    The Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) server information is set and stored by the policy processing during its installation process. Depending on the switch, an SNMP MIB Browser, a graphic user interface or the device user interface is used to set the LDAP Server address.
  • [0044]
    For a given device-networking feature, Policy Rules are defined that include of Policy Conditions that must be met to allow defined Policy Actions to dictate network traffic throughput. The policy processing provides the user with a mode-based management interface 300 with graphic user interfacing through which the user manages a policy-based network 310 including:
  • [0045]
    1. A policy-based network management interface for specifying a priority level (e.g., highest priority) provisioned QoS policy definition for applicable voice devices (i.e., a process for readily setting the voice mode) 320;
  • [0046]
    2. A policy-based network management interface for specifying a priority level for provisioned QoS policy definition for video devices, including multimedia devices, and data devices serving high-priority applications (i.e., a process for readily setting the data mode or the video mode) 330; and
  • [0047]
    3. For defining and implementing networking policies for defining provisioned QoS in general (i.e., a processing assisted process for rapid set up via an expert or wizard mode) 340.
  • [0048]
    For example, an embodiment of the present invention has a process that begins in a mode for providing highest-priority provisioned QoS to voice devices. FIG. 4 illustrates the steps of this mode 400 where the user enters the IP subnet for each voice subnet that requires a high priority 410. All policy rules and LDAP server updates necessary for administering this highest level QoS for the selected voice devices are created by the process 420 effecting: a Policy Rule Name 422; a Policy Condition Name 424; a Policy Condition Set 426 which is optionally a media access control (MAC) destination or an IP subnet destination per user input; a Policy Action Name 428; and a Policy Action 430. Where there are two or more ranges of MAC addresses that apply to the devices, two or more rules are created. An example of a user interface screen for this mode is illustrated in FIG. 5.
  • [0049]
    In the graphic user interface example of FIG. 5, where there are four QoS priority queues supported for the devices, voice devices are allowed the highest priority, preferably being set to this priority by adding a voice-supported subnet to an “IP Phone Subnets” table 510 and then selecting the “Apply” button 520. In order to set voice devices to any other priority, the user selects the creating and editing mode by selecting the “Expert Mode” button 530. Subnets are added by selection of the “Add Subnet” button 540 and removed by selection of the “Delete Subnet” button 550. The “Remove” button 560 removes provisioned QoS from all listed subnets. When the “IP Phone Subnets” table 510 appears on the first running of the policy processing, the table 510 will be empty and the user will have to enter all the voice subnets for IP Phones manually in the event a discovery service or manager 140 does not recognize these devices. Thereafter, a preferred embodiment has the user being allowed to restore this data upon a successive interfacing session with the policy processing.
  • [0050]
    One or more status icons are used in the graphic user interfaces of the several embodiments of the present invention. In an example embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5B, an icon 580 is displayed next to the list of devices pertaining to that service for the various modes or QoS provisioning (e.g., set up of VoIP devices, set up of data devices, and policy rule creating and editing). By way of example, the color of the icons indicates the current status of the selected operation as follows: gray indicates there is currently no QoS policy in effect for the device; green indicates there is currently a QoS policy in effect for the device; yellow indicates there is currently a QoS policy add or delete operation pending write to the LDAP server; and red indicates that a policy add or delete was written to the LDAP server that the device is has not yet been reached.
  • [0051]
    In the several embodiments of the present invention, data devices, video devices, including multimedia devices, serving high-demand application servers may be set to use any of the several QoS priority queues supported for the network devices using the data mode set up process. In the present example, four QoS priority queues are supported by devices. FIG. 6 illustrates that after displaying discovered devices in an “Add” dialog box 610; all policy rules and LDAP server updates necessary for administering the selected level of QoS for the listed data devices are created by the setup process 620, for date mode setup or video mode setup, as follows: effecting policy rule name 622; effecting policy condition name 624; effecting policy conditions set 626 (Source IP, Destination IP); effecting policy action name 628; and effecting policy action 630 (User-selected QoS Priority).
  • [0052]
    In an example embodiment of the present invention, the user interface of the data setting mode is illustrated in FIG. 7A where only one QoS priority is allowed to be selected for all the selected devices (e.g., highest) 710 and the setting maps into firmware QoS priorities of the network devices. Alternative embodiments allow for the selection of a plurality of QoS priorities for particular devices within the network data device setting mode 330. Returning to the present example data setting mode interface 700, if a different QoS is needed for other data server sets, the “Expert Mode” button 720 is selected. In an example embodiment, the QoS priority will be set for the source IP address only, which allows for high priority traffic from the user-defined servers; allotting high priority to the servers is not required in this embodiment. For ease of administration, the data mode displays the discovered devices (FIG. 7B) in the “Add” dialog box 750.
  • [0053]
    Data server IP addresses are added by selection of the “Add” button 730 and removed by selection of the “Delete” button 740. When the “Server Addresses” table 720 appears on the first execution of the policy processing, the table 720 will be empty and the user will have to enter all the data server IP addresses using the discovered devices in the “Add” dialog box 750. Thereafter, the policy processing will allow the user to restore this data upon the next invocation of the policy processing and by using the policy processing graphic user interface.
  • [0054]
    Discovered devices that are not configured using the above voice and data set up modes will remain at the default (i.e., best effort) QoS, unless they are alternatively prioritized using some other means. In several embodiments of the present invention, the policy processing using the above voice and data set up processes provides for a majority of the cases for which policy creation is typically necessary.
  • [0055]
    At the bottom of the voice set up display 500 and the data set up display 700 there is an “Expert Mode” button 530 that, when selected, allows the user to access the guiding processing for creating and editing policies. FIG. 7C illustrates that this advancing to the Expert Mode can also be effected by tab selection 730.
  • [0056]
    [0056]FIGS. 7D, 7E and 7F illustrate that the video, including multimedia, set up display 790 (FIG. 7D) and process are substantially similar to the data set up display 700. Within the display of video server addresses 722, FIG. 7E, illustrates that the user may add a video server 750. FIG. 7F illustrates the video servers with a status icon 580.
  • [0057]
    [0057]FIG. 8 illustrates that Selecting Expert Mode starts a guiding process 800 that guides the user through policy rule creation for provisioned QoS service with policy conditions and actions set by the user 820.
  • [0058]
    The guiding process 800 begins with the policy rule creation or selection for editing process 820. The graphic user interface provides an interactive means for reviewing, editing or deleting existing policy rules having current LDPA repository values and for creating new policy rules with default device values displayed 830. Thereafter, policy condition names are displayed 840. The guiding process then requires selection of the condition set 850 for display. The guiding processing then displays valid policy action names associable with the displayed conditions 860. The guiding processing prompts the user to make a selection of the action set for provisioned QoS and finishes by prompting the user to select the discovered devices against which the Policy Rule should be applied 870.
  • [0059]
    Where both Source IP and Destination IP definition is desired, two rules are required as the condition set. For example, if the logical operator AND is applied to both Source IP and Destination IP, then QoS is applied only if the traffic is both from the Source and to the Destination
  • [0060]
    The graphic user interface of the guiding processing begins by bringing up a list of existing policies as shown in FIG. 9 and allows the user to view and/or edit 910 existing policies 920, to create a new policy, or delete an existing one 830. If the user chooses to create a policy 930, interface screens will be displayed to the user with their input components reflecting the device default values; if the policy is being edited, the components will be displayed with their current LDAP repository values. In the event the LDAP repository server is not on-line at the time of creation and or editing, then the policy processing initiates a restart of the LDAP repository service.
  • [0061]
    Generally, the QoS order of precedence is determined by the device according to the level of QoS priority (e.g., 1-4, or 0-6). However, when a policy is created, all other determining factors being equal, the QoS order of precedence (e.g., 0-65535) determines the order of evaluation by the device. The QoS precedence numbering of rules created by policy process is set by the policy processing via a QoS MIB variable and is transparent to the user. The user will be allowed to move an entry in the Existing Policies table 920 up or down within the list. When this happens, the policy processing will reset the precedence of the affected policies and they will be rewritten to the LDAP server.
  • [0062]
    After the user has chosen whether the policy is to be created or edited, the graphic user interface of the guiding processing displays a screen, illustrated in FIG. 10, where the policy condition set must be defined 1000 and in particular for this display screen, information pertaining to the MAC addresses 1005. If the policy is being created, the user is required to enter a name for the new policy 1010. Otherwise, the policy is being edited and the name will not be concurrently editable. If the policy must be renamed, the policy must be deleted and recreated, since the name field is the key for the data repository. The tab selections 1020 represent the features for setting policy conditions that are valid for provisioned QoS. Only those conditions that are valid for the selected feature and any conditions that are currently in effect are presented. When the user selects the targets for the Policy, if a target is selected that cannot support the policy, then an error message will be displayed to the user and processing will continue.
  • [0063]
    [0063]FIGS. 11 through 19 depict the condition displays that will be presented when the various condition tabs 1020 are selected. These displays are capable of being enhanced to include the addition of checkboxes that must be selected in order for the corresponding GUI component to be used in policy rule, condition and action definition. FIG. 11 illustrates the policy condition for IP addresses 1110. FIG. 12 illustrates the policy condition for protocol 1210. FIG. 13 illustrates policy condition for VLAN Group ID 1310. The “Create VLAN ID . . . ” button 1320 is removable from this screen in particular embodiments. FIG. 14 illustrates the policy condition for DSCP/IP TOS 1410. FIG. 15 illustrates the policy condition 802.1 priority 1510. FIG. 16 illustrates the policy condition for the validity period date and/or time 1610. FIG. 17 illustrates the policy condition for the validity period months 1710. FIG. 18 illustrates the policy for the validity period days 1810. FIG. 19 illustrates the policy for the validity period time of day 1910. Each policy rule condition display of the guiding processing graphic user interface contains a “Next >” button 1020 that will cause the valid actions that can be associated with the condition(s) to be displayed. Together, the conditions and actions define policy rules.
  • [0064]
    An example of the provisioned QoS action screen is depicted in FIG. 20. With respect to egress values, the output flow setting 2030 and the output mapping 2040 are displayed. Each action screen associated with a feature condition set contains a “Next >” button 2010, which the user selects to take guiding processing to the screen which allows the user to apply the policy to a set of devices. In the several embodiments of the present invention, it is not necessary that the administrator with screen select the devices to which the policy will be applied because the policy is written to the LDAP server without administrator designation. However, FIG. 21, depicts the screed where, should the user seek to apply the policy immediately to one or more devices, the guiding processing presents a table 2150, of discovered devices within the graphic user interface from which the user chooses against which the policy will apply and be displayed in a second table 2160. The user uses one or more selector buttons 2170 after highlighting, if needed, one or more particular devices.
  • [0065]
    When the user selects the “Finish” button 2110 from the “Apply Policy To Devices” screen 2120, the following processing, as illustrated in FIG. 22, takes place: (a) the policy condition is created/edited 2220; (b) the policy action is created/edited 2230; (c) the policy rule is created/edited 2240; (d) in the case of create, a policy group is created 2250; (e) in the case of create, a policy service is created 2260; (f) the policy is written to the LDAP server 2270 and the icons on the list turns yellow; (g) if devices are selected, the selected devices are notified to re-cache their resident data from the LDAP servers 2280 and the icons on the list turns red; and (h) if devices are selected, each selected device sends trap notification to the policy processing to indicate they have re-cached their device-resident data from the LDAP data repository 2290 where the icons on the list turns gray if they do not support the policy and green if they do. For example, for those policy entries required by the LDAP schema, but transparent to the user, the following entries are made:
  • [0066]
    Policy Rule Name:
  • [0067]
    <User-selected policy rule name>Rule;
  • [0068]
    Policy Condition Name:
  • [0069]
    <User-selected policy rule name>Condition;
  • [0070]
    Policy Condition Set:
  • [0071]
    <User-selected condition set>;
  • [0072]
    Policy Action Name:
  • [0073]
    <User-selected policy rule name>Action;
  • [0074]
     and Policy Action:
  • [0075]
    <User-selected action set>.
  • [0076]
    If the user wishes to establish an order of precedence for this policy, other than the default precedence, the initial guiding processing graphic user interface screen depicted in FIG. 9 is used.
  • [0077]
    An appropriate error message will be displayed once the “Apply” or “Finish” button 2110 is selected, if the LDAP server cannot be updated, or if there is an error in notifying the selected devices that they should re-cache their LDAP repository data or if there is an error in the devices notifying the policy processing of their updates status.
  • [0078]
    Many alterations and modifications may be made by those having ordinary skill in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and its several embodiments disclosed herein. Therefore, it must be understood that the illustrated embodiments have been set forth only for the purposes of example and that it should not be taken as limiting the invention as defined by the following claims. For example, the services disclosed may be performed by processing hosted on one or several network devices such as servers.
  • [0079]
    The words used in this specification to describe the invention and its various embodiments are to be understood not only in the sense of their commonly defined meanings, but to include by special definition in this specification structure, material or acts beyond the scope of the commonly defined meanings. Thus if an element can be understood in the context of this specification as including more than one meaning, then its use in a claim must be understood as being generic to all possible meanings supported by the specification and by the word itself.
  • [0080]
    The definitions of the words or elements of the following claims are, therefore, defined in this specification to include not only the combination of elements which are literally set forth, but all equivalent structure, material or acts for performing substantially the same function in substantially the same way to obtain substantially the same result.
  • [0081]
    In addition to the equivalents of the claimed elements, obvious substitutions now or later known to one with ordinary skill in the art are defined to be within the scope of the defined elements. For example, the identifying colors for the icons may different that those disclosed and still achieve the function of status-by-color.
  • [0082]
    The claims are thus to be understood to include what is specifically illustrated and described above, what is conceptually equivalent, what can be obviously substituted and also what essentially incorporates the essential idea of the invention.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5485455 *Jan 28, 1994Jan 16, 1996Cabletron Systems, Inc.Network having secure fast packet switching and guaranteed quality of service
US5774667 *Mar 27, 1996Jun 30, 1998Bay Networks, Inc.Method and apparatus for managing parameter settings for multiple network devices
US5819042 *Feb 20, 1996Oct 6, 1998Compaq Computer CorporationMethod and apparatus for guided configuration of unconfigured network and internetwork devices
US6167445 *Oct 26, 1998Dec 26, 2000Cisco Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for defining and implementing high-level quality of service policies in computer networks
US6502131 *Dec 4, 1998Dec 31, 2002Novell, Inc.Directory enabled policy management tool for intelligent traffic management
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7130854 *Aug 13, 2002Oct 31, 2006Endforce, Inc.Selection and storage of policies in network management
US7149738 *Dec 16, 2002Dec 12, 2006International Business Machines CorporationResource and data administration technologies for IT non-experts
US7724703Jan 14, 2006May 25, 2010Belden, Inc.System and method for wireless network monitoring
US7724704Jul 17, 2006May 25, 2010Beiden Inc.Wireless VLAN system and method
US7840599Nov 23, 2010Sophos PlcSelection and storage of policies in network management
US7844298Nov 30, 2010Belden Inc.Tuned directional antennas
US7865213Dec 2, 2009Jan 4, 2011Trapeze Networks, Inc.Tuned directional antennas
US7865713Dec 28, 2007Jan 4, 2011Trapeze Networks, Inc.Application-aware wireless network system and method
US7873061Jan 18, 2011Trapeze Networks, Inc.System and method for aggregation and queuing in a wireless network
US7882152Feb 1, 2011Sophos PlcSelection and storage of policies in network management
US7912982Nov 22, 2006Mar 22, 2011Trapeze Networks, Inc.Wireless routing selection system and method
US7945945 *Aug 8, 2005May 17, 2011Enterasys Networks, Inc.System and method for address block enhanced dynamic network policy management
US7979549Jul 12, 2011Microsoft CorporationNetwork supporting centralized management of QoS policies
US8072952Dec 6, 2011Juniper Networks, Inc.Load balancing
US8116275May 21, 2010Feb 14, 2012Trapeze Networks, Inc.System and network for wireless network monitoring
US8116317 *Jan 31, 2006Feb 14, 2012Microsoft CorporationPreventing quality of service policy abuse in a network
US8150357Mar 28, 2008Apr 3, 2012Trapeze Networks, Inc.Smoothing filter for irregular update intervals
US8161278Apr 17, 2012Trapeze Networks, Inc.System and method for distributing keys in a wireless network
US8170021May 1, 2012Microsoft CorporationSelectively enabled quality of service policy
US8218449Jul 10, 2012Trapeze Networks, Inc.System and method for remote monitoring in a wireless network
US8238298Aug 7, 2012Trapeze Networks, Inc.Picking an optimal channel for an access point in a wireless network
US8238942Aug 7, 2012Trapeze Networks, Inc.Wireless station location detection
US8250587Oct 26, 2006Aug 21, 2012Trapeze Networks, Inc.Non-persistent and persistent information setting method and system for inter-process communication
US8270408Jun 22, 2009Sep 18, 2012Trapeze Networks, Inc.Identity-based networking
US8340110 *Aug 24, 2007Dec 25, 2012Trapeze Networks, Inc.Quality of service provisioning for wireless networks
US8446890May 21, 2013Juniper Networks, Inc.Load balancing
US8457031Jan 11, 2006Jun 4, 2013Trapeze Networks, Inc.System and method for reliable multicast
US8474023May 30, 2008Jun 25, 2013Juniper Networks, Inc.Proactive credential caching
US8509128Jan 7, 2008Aug 13, 2013Trapeze Networks, Inc.High level instruction convergence function
US8514827Feb 14, 2012Aug 20, 2013Trapeze Networks, Inc.System and network for wireless network monitoring
US8581790Oct 21, 2009Nov 12, 2013Trapeze Networks, Inc.Tuned directional antennas
US8635444Apr 16, 2012Jan 21, 2014Trapeze Networks, Inc.System and method for distributing keys in a wireless network
US8638762Feb 8, 2006Jan 28, 2014Trapeze Networks, Inc.System and method for network integrity
US8670383Jan 14, 2011Mar 11, 2014Trapeze Networks, Inc.System and method for aggregation and queuing in a wireless network
US8818322May 11, 2007Aug 26, 2014Trapeze Networks, Inc.Untethered access point mesh system and method
US8902904Sep 7, 2007Dec 2, 2014Trapeze Networks, Inc.Network assignment based on priority
US8964747Feb 12, 2009Feb 24, 2015Trapeze Networks, Inc.System and method for restricting network access using forwarding databases
US8966018Jan 6, 2010Feb 24, 2015Trapeze Networks, Inc.Automated network device configuration and network deployment
US8978105Dec 16, 2008Mar 10, 2015Trapeze Networks, Inc.Affirming network relationships and resource access via related networks
US9015790 *Jul 20, 2011Apr 21, 2015Red Hat, Inc.Integrating sudo rules with entities represented in an LDAP directory
US9112765Apr 10, 2012Aug 18, 2015Microsoft Technology Licensing, LlcSelectively enabled quality of service policy
US9191799Nov 10, 2006Nov 17, 2015Juniper Networks, Inc.Sharing data between wireless switches system and method
US9219658 *Apr 14, 2014Dec 22, 2015Verizon Patent And Licensing Inc.Quality of service optimization management tool
US9258702Jun 11, 2007Feb 9, 2016Trapeze Networks, Inc.AP-local dynamic switching
US9286489 *Oct 15, 2014Mar 15, 2016Amdocs Software Systems LimitedPolicy configuration user interface
US20030037040 *Aug 13, 2002Feb 20, 2003Smartpipes, IncorporatedSelection and storage of policies in network management
US20040117407 *Dec 16, 2002Jun 17, 2004Manoj KumarResource and data administration technologies for IT non-experts
US20050021349 *Jul 23, 2003Jan 27, 2005International Business Machines CorporationMethod and system for providing a computing resource service
US20050289219 *Jun 28, 2004Dec 29, 2005Nazzal Robert NRule based alerting in anomaly detection
US20060036730 *Aug 8, 2005Feb 16, 2006Richard GrahamSystem and method for address block enhanced dynamic network policy management
US20060248331 *Mar 15, 2006Nov 2, 2006Dan HarkinsSystem and method for distributing keys in a wireless network
US20070016591 *Sep 19, 2006Jan 18, 2007Endforce, Inc.Selection and storage of policies in network management
US20070016597 *Sep 19, 2006Jan 18, 2007Endforce, Inc.Selection and storage of policies in network management
US20070022124 *Sep 19, 2006Jan 25, 2007Endforce, Inc. (A Delaware Corporation)Selection and storage of policies in network management
US20070086378 *Jan 14, 2006Apr 19, 2007Matta Sudheer P CSystem and method for wireless network monitoring
US20070086397 *Jan 5, 2006Apr 19, 2007Ron TaylorSystem and method for remote monitoring in a wireless network
US20070086398 *Apr 5, 2006Apr 19, 2007Manish TiwariIdentity-based networking
US20070106722 *Oct 26, 2006May 10, 2007Zeldin Paul ENon-persistent and persistent information setting method and system for inter-process communication
US20070106778 *Oct 26, 2006May 10, 2007Zeldin Paul EInformation and status and statistics messaging method and system for inter-process communication
US20070124433 *Nov 30, 2005May 31, 2007Microsoft CorporationNetwork supporting centralized management of QoS policies
US20070124485 *Nov 30, 2005May 31, 2007Microsoft CorporationComputer system implementing quality of service policy
US20070160079 *Jan 6, 2006Jul 12, 2007Microsoft CorporationSelectively enabled quality of service policy
US20070177610 *Jan 31, 2006Aug 2, 2007Microsoft CorporationPreventing Quality Of Service Policy Abuse In A Network
US20070258448 *May 3, 2006Nov 8, 2007Hu Tyng J ASystem and method for restricting network access using forwarding databases
US20070260720 *May 3, 2006Nov 8, 2007Morain Gary EMobility domain
US20070268506 *May 19, 2006Nov 22, 2007Paul ZeldinAutonomous auto-configuring wireless network device
US20070268514 *May 19, 2006Nov 22, 2007Paul ZeldinMethod and business model for automated configuration and deployment of a wireless network in a facility without network administrator intervention
US20070268515 *May 19, 2006Nov 22, 2007Yun FreundSystem and method for automatic configuration of remote network switch and connected access point devices
US20070268516 *May 19, 2006Nov 22, 2007Jamsheed BugwadiaAutomated policy-based network device configuration and network deployment
US20070281711 *Jun 1, 2006Dec 6, 2007Sudheer Poorna Chandra MattaWireless load balancing across bands
US20070287500 *Jun 12, 2006Dec 13, 2007Philip RileyTuned directional antennas
US20080107077 *Nov 3, 2006May 8, 2008James MurphySubnet mobility supporting wireless handoff
US20080151844 *Dec 20, 2006Jun 26, 2008Manish TiwariWireless access point authentication system and method
US20080159319 *Dec 28, 2006Jul 3, 2008Matthew Stuart GastSystem and method for aggregation and queuing in a wireless network
US20090293106 *May 28, 2009Nov 26, 2009Trapeze Networks, Inc.Method and apparatus for controlling wireless network access privileges based on wireless client location
US20100103059 *Oct 21, 2009Apr 29, 2010Trapeze Networks, Inc.Tuned directional antennas
US20100113098 *Dec 2, 2009May 6, 2010Trapeze Networks, Inc.Tuned directional antennas
US20100157981 *Dec 24, 2008Jun 24, 2010Jeffrey William DawsonDifferentiated priority level communication
US20110191460 *Nov 14, 2006Aug 4, 2011Francoise SailhanSystem and a Method Relating to Network Management
US20140244820 *Dec 16, 2013Aug 28, 2014Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.Rule Set Orchestration Processing Method and Apparatus, and Cluster Data System
US20150058896 *Apr 1, 2013Feb 26, 2015Sony Computer Entertaiment Inc.Information processing system and media server
US20150295787 *Apr 14, 2014Oct 15, 2015Verizon Patent And Licensing Inc.Quality of service optimization management tool
US20150304228 *Aug 28, 2012Oct 22, 2015Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ)Method and system for prioritising traffic flows
EP2070344A2 *Sep 11, 2007Jun 17, 2009Trapeze Networks, Inc.Quality of service provisioning for wireless networks
WO2005094013A1 *Mar 16, 2005Oct 6, 2005Siemens AktiengesellschaftMethod for balancing status information for a network device between a policy decision point and a policy enforcement point
WO2008033321A3 *Sep 11, 2007Jul 3, 2008Trapeze Networks IncQuality of service provisioning for wireless networks
Classifications
U.S. Classification715/736
International ClassificationH04L12/56, H04L12/24, H04L29/06
Cooperative ClassificationH04L29/06027, H04L65/1069, H04L47/10, H04L65/80, H04L41/0213, H04L47/2416, H04L41/5067, H04L47/2408, H04L41/5054, H04L41/22, H04L41/5003, H04L41/0893, H04L47/13
European ClassificationH04L47/13, H04L41/08F, H04L41/22, H04L41/50A, H04L47/10, H04L41/50J2, H04L47/24B, H04L47/24A, H04L41/02B, H04L41/50G4, H04L29/06C2, H04L29/06M8, H04L29/06M2S1
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 15, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: ALCATEL INTERNETWORKING, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HANSON, RAYMOND;REEL/FRAME:013668/0933
Effective date: 20030110
Owner name: ALCATEL INTERNETWORKING, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:LEVILLAIN, PHILLIPPE;HELMERICH, LAWRENCE;REEL/FRAME:013668/0937
Effective date: 20030110
Oct 23, 2012ASAssignment
Owner name: ALCATEL-LUCENT USA INC., NEW JERSEY
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:ALCATEL USA MARKETING, INC.;REEL/FRAME:029174/0814
Effective date: 20081101
Owner name: ALCATEL USA MARKETING, INC., TEXAS
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:ALCATEL INTERNETWORKING, INC.;REEL/FRAME:029174/0706
Effective date: 20070101