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Publication numberUS20030110661 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/022,477
Publication dateJun 19, 2003
Filing dateDec 17, 2001
Priority dateDec 17, 2001
Publication number022477, 10022477, US 2003/0110661 A1, US 2003/110661 A1, US 20030110661 A1, US 20030110661A1, US 2003110661 A1, US 2003110661A1, US-A1-20030110661, US-A1-2003110661, US2003/0110661A1, US2003/110661A1, US20030110661 A1, US20030110661A1, US2003110661 A1, US2003110661A1
InventorsPony Wu
Original AssigneeWinner Shoe Co., Ltd.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shock-absorbing shoe
US 20030110661 A1
Abstract
A shock-absorbing shoe includes a vamp, an outsole, a heel cushion, and a plurality of spring coils. The outsole is connected to the vamp, and has toe and heel portions. The heel cushion is embedded in the heel portion, and has a bottom wall formed with a plurality of upstanding hollow tubes. The spring coils are respectively received in the tubes and protrude out of the tubes.
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Claims(8)
I claim:
1. A shock-absorbing shoe comprising:
a vamp;
an outsole connected to said vamp, said outsole having a toe portion, and a heel portion connected to said toe portion;
a heel cushion embedded in said heel portion, said heel cushion having a bottom wall formed with a plurality of upstanding hollow tubes; and
a plurality of spring coils respectively received in said tubes and protruding out of said tubes.
2. The shock-absorbing shoe as claimed in claim 1, wherein said heel cushion further has a side wall extending upward from a periphery of said bottom wall to surround said tubes.
3. The shock-absorbing shoe as claimed in claim 2, wherein said heel cushion further has a plurality of reinforcing ribs that are connected to said tubes and said side wall.
4. The shock-absorbing shoe as claimed in claim 3, wherein said heel cushion further has a top cover disposed on top of said side wall to cover said heel cushion, said cover abutting against said spring coils.
5. The shock-absorbing shoe as claimed in claim 4, wherein said cover is further formed with a plurality of protruding posts, each of which extends downwardly into a corresponding one of said tubes.
6. The shock-absorbing shoe as claimed in claim 4, wherein said heel portion of said outsole and said cover are respectively formed with a plurality of vent holes that are in fluid communication with each other.
7. The shock-absorbing shoe as claimed in claim 1, wherein said heel portion has a bottom recess indented from a bottom surface of said heel portion, said heel cushion being disposed in said bottom recess.
8. The shock-absorbing shoe as claimed in claim 7, wherein said outsole further has a tread member disposed beneath said bottom surface of said heel portion and closing said bottom recess.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The invention relates to a shoe, more particularly to a shock-absorbing shoe.

[0003] 2. Description of the Related Art

[0004] Generally, a conventional shock-absorbing shoe incorporates a shock-absorbing element that can absorb shock so as to lower the load of the ankle, to protect the foot, and to minimize the risk of injury due to incorrect posture or intense exercise. As such, the market is full of a variety of shock-absorbing shoes, the main feature of which lies in shock-absorbing elements, such as air-inflated insoles, biasing members, rubber pieces, and other resilient elements, incorporated therein.

[0005] Though the shoe incorporated with an air-inflated insole or rubber piece has resiliency, the extent of compression is limited by material factors, which in turn limit the shock-absorbing capacity of the shoe.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] Therefore, the main object of the present invention is to provide a shock-absorbing shoe with enhanced shock-absorbing capacity.

[0007] Accordingly, a shock-absorbing shoe of the present invention comprises a vamp, an outsole, a heel cushion, and a plurality of spring coils. The outsole is connected to the vamp, and has a toe portion and a heel portion connected to the toe portion. The heel cushion is embedded in the heel portion, and has a bottom wall formed with a plurality of upstanding hollow tubes. The spring coils are respectively received in the tubes and protrude out of the tubes.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0008] Other features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent in the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments with reference to the accompanying drawings, of which:

[0009]FIG. 1 is a schematic partly cutaway view of the first preferred embodiment of a shock-absorbing shoe according to the present invention;

[0010]FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view to illustrate a heel cushion and spring coils of the first preferred embodiment;

[0011]FIG. 3 is an assembled sectional view showing the heel cushion and the spring coils of the first preferred embodiment;

[0012]FIG. 4 is another assembled sectional view showing the heel cushion and the spring coils of the first preferred embodiment when subjected to a load;

[0013]FIG. 5 is an assembled sectional view showing the heel cushion and the spring coils of the second preferred embodiment of the shock-absorbing shoe according to the present invention; and

[0014]FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view of the third preferred embodiment of the shock-absorbing shoe according to the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0015] Before the present invention is described in greater detail, it should be noted that like elements are denoted by the same reference numerals throughout the disclosure.

[0016] Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the first preferred embodiment of a shock-absorbing shoe 100 according to the present invention is shown to comprise a vamp 10, an outsole 20, a heel cushion 40, and a plurality of spring coils 50. The vamp 10 includes a hollow cover body 11 that is configured to cover a foot.

[0017] The outsole 20 is connected to the cover body 11 of the vamp 10, and has a toe portion 21 formed at one end and a heel portion 22 formed at the other end. The heel portion 22 has a bottom surface 221 that is indented to form a bottom recess (L), and further has one end 222 integrally connected with the toe portion 21. The outsole 20 further has a tread member 23 extending from the other end 223 of the heel portion 22, beneath the bottom surface 221 of the heel portion 22 so as to close the bottom recess (L), and toward the toe portion 21.

[0018] The heel cushion 40 is made of a resilient plastic material, is embedded in the bottom recess (L) of the heel portion 22, and has a bottom wall 41, a side wall 44, a plurality of reinforcing ribs 45, and a top cover 30. The bottom wall 41 is connected securely to the tread member 23, and is formed with a plurality of upstanding hollow tubes 42. The side wall 44 extends upwardly from a periphery of the bottom wall 41 to surround the tubes 42. The reinforcing ribs 45 are connected to the tubes 42 and the side wall 44. The top cover 30 is made of a resilient plastic material, is disposed on top of the side wall 44 to cover the heel cushion 40, and has an upper surface 31 connected securely to the heel portion 22, and a lower surface 32.

[0019] Each of the spring coils 50 has one end 51 that protrudes out of the respective one of the tubes 42 and that abuts against the lower surface 32 of the top cover 30. The other end 52 of each coil spring 50 is received in the respective one of the tubes 42.

[0020] During assembly, the ends 52 of the spring coils 50 are received in the hollow tubes 42 of the heel cushion 40. The side wall 44 of the heel cushion 40 and the lower surface 32 of the top cover 30 are then adhered together by the use of an adhesive so that the ends 51 of the spring coils 50 abut against the lower surface 32 of the top cover 30. The assembled heel cushion 40, as best illustrated in FIG. 3, is then disposed in the bottom recess (L) of the heel portion 22. The upper surface 31 of the top cover 30 and the bottom wall 41 of the heel cushion 40 are respectively adhered to the heel portion 22 and the tread member 23 by the use of an adhesive. The tread member 23 is further adhered to the other end 223 of the heel portion 22 by the use of adhesive, thereby completing the shoe 100 (see FIG. 1).

[0021] In use, when the wearer's foot (not shown) applies pressure on the outsole 20 of the shoe 100 during walking or running, the spring coils 50 are compressed between the top cover 30 and the heel cushion 40 at this time (see FIG. 4). The tubes 42 are maintained in their upright position due to the reinforcing ribs 45, thereby enabling the spring coils 50 to be compressed without deflection. As such, shock produced upon ground impact can be absorbed, and injuries caused by incorrect posture or intense exercise can be minimized.

[0022] Referring to FIG. 5, the second preferred embodiment of the shock-absorbing shoe according to the present invention is shown to be substantially similar to the first preferred embodiment, except that the lower surface 32′ of the top cover 30′ is further formed with a plurality of protruding posts 33′. Each of the posts 33′ extends downwardly into a corresponding one of the hollow tubes 42′. The ends 51 of the spring coils 50 surround the posts 33′ so that the spring coils 50 are compressed along the axes of the posts 33′ and can be prevented from deflection.

[0023] The third preferred embodiment of the shock-absorbing shoe according to the present invention is shown in FIG. 6. In this embodiment, the heel portion 22″ of the outsole 20″ and the top cover 30″ of the heel cushion 40″ are respectively formed with a plurality of vent holes 24″, 34″ that are in fluid communication with each other. When the spring coils 50 are compressed between the top cover 30″ and the heel cushion 40″ or are restored to their normal states, air is released through or sucked in via the vent holes 24″, 34″, thereby permitting air circulation between the top cover 30″ and the heel portion 40″, and thereby permitting air to flow around the wearer's foot in the cover body of the vamp.

[0024] Thus, the shoe 100 of the present invention is not only shock absorbing but is air permeable as well, thereby providing comfort to the wearer's foot.

[0025] While the present invention has been described in connection with what is considered the most practical and preferred embodiments, it is understood that this invention is not limited to the disclosed embodiments but is intended to cover various arrangements included within the spirit and scope of the broadest interpretation so as to encompass all such modifications and equivalent arrangements.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7228648 *Oct 5, 2004Jun 12, 2007Teng-Jen YangHeel cushion structure for a sneaker
US7730635 *Jun 5, 2006Jun 8, 2010Nike, Inc.Impact-attenuation members and products containing such members
US7757411 *Apr 25, 2007Jul 20, 2010Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Shock absorbing footwear construction
US7841108May 29, 2007Nov 30, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with visible indicia
US8104194 *Nov 8, 2007Jan 31, 2012Suk Koung KimShoes having impact absorption part
US8146270Apr 2, 2010Apr 3, 2012Nike, Inc.Impact-attenuation members and products containing such members
US8302233Sep 11, 2007Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Method of making an article of footwear and apparatus
US8348031Sep 20, 2010Jan 8, 2013Nike, Inc.Impact attenuating and spring elements and products containing such elements
US8650774Feb 23, 2012Feb 18, 2014Nike, Inc.Impact-attenuation members and products containing such members
US8720084Jan 7, 2013May 13, 2014Nike, Inc.Impact attenuating and spring elements and products containing such elements
US8720085Jan 7, 2013May 13, 2014Nike, Inc.Impact attenuating and spring elements and products containing such elements
US8756831Oct 9, 2012Jun 24, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear
WO2008150793A2 *May 28, 2008Dec 11, 2008Nike IncArticle of footwear with visable indicia
WO2012077934A2 *Dec 1, 2011Jun 14, 2012Dong-Hyuk KwonCorrecting and balancing shoes having springs
WO2013096164A2 *Dec 17, 2012Jun 27, 2013Nike Internationa Ltd.Article of footwear having an elevated plate sole structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/27, 36/38, 36/37
International ClassificationA43B21/26, A43B21/30, A43B13/18
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/182, A43B21/30, A43B21/26
European ClassificationA43B21/30, A43B21/26, A43B13/18A1
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 15, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: WINNER SHOE CO., LTD., TAIWAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WU, PONY;REEL/FRAME:012815/0910
Effective date: 20011130