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Publication numberUS20030119135 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/245,875
Publication dateJun 26, 2003
Filing dateSep 16, 2002
Priority dateJul 20, 1999
Also published asUS7589172, US20030119113, US20030119128, US20030138896
Publication number10245875, 245875, US 2003/0119135 A1, US 2003/119135 A1, US 20030119135 A1, US 20030119135A1, US 2003119135 A1, US 2003119135A1, US-A1-20030119135, US-A1-2003119135, US2003/0119135A1, US2003/119135A1, US20030119135 A1, US20030119135A1, US2003119135 A1, US2003119135A1
InventorsKevin Baker, Dan Eaton, Ellen Filvaroff, Audrey Goddard, J. Grimaldi, Austin Gurney, Victoria Smith, Jean Stephan, Colin Watanabe, William Wood, Zemin Zhang, Sherman Fong
Original AssigneeGenentech, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Secreted and transmembrane polypeptides and nucleic acids encoding the same
US 20030119135 A1
Abstract
The present invention is directed to novel polypeptides and to nucleic acid molecules encoding those polypeptides. Also provided herein are vectors and host cells comprising those nucleic acid sequences, chimeric polypeptide molecules comprising the polypeptides of the present invention fused to heterologous polypeptide sequences, antibodies which bind to the polypeptides of the present invention and to methods for producing the polypeptides of the present invention.
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Claims(26)
What is claimed is:
1. Isolated nucleic acid having at least 80% nucleic acid sequence identity to a nucleotide sequence that encodes an amino acid sequence selected from the group consisting of the amino acid sequence shown in FIG. 2 (SEQ ID NO:2), FIG. 4 (SEQ ID NO:4), FIG. 6 (SEQ ID NO:6), FIG. 8 (SEQ ID NO:8), FIG. 10 (SEQ ID NO:10), FIG. 12 (SEQ ID NO:12), FIG. 14 (SEQ ID NO:14), FIG. 16 (SEQ ID NO:16), FIG. 18 (SEQ ID NO:18), FIG. 20 (SEQ ID NO:20), FIG. 22 (SEQ ID NO:22), FIG. 24 (SEQ ID NO:24), FIG. 26 (SEQ ID NO:26), FIG. 28 (SEQ ID NO:28), FIG. 30 (SEQ ID NO:30), FIG. 32 (SEQ ID NO:32), FIG. 34 (SEQ ID NO:34), FIG. 36 (SEQ ID NO:36), FIG. 38 (SEQ ID NO:38), FIG. 40 (SEQ ID NO:40), FIG. 42 (SEQ ID NO:42), FIG. 44 (SEQ ID NO:44), FIG. 46 (SEQ ID NO:46), FIG. 48 (SEQ ID NO:48), FIG. 50 (SEQ ID NO:50), FIG. 52 (SEQ ID NO:52), FIG. 54 (SEQ ID NO:54), FIG. 56 (SEQ ID NO:56), FIG. 58 (SEQ ID NO:58), FIG. 60 (SEQ ID NO:60), FIG. 62 (SEQ ID NO:62), FIG. 64 (SEQ ID NO:64), FIG. 66 (SEQ ID NO:66), FIG. 68 (SEQ ID NO:68), FIG. 70 (SEQ ID NO:70), FIG. 72 (SEQ ID NO:72), FIG. 74 (SEQ ID NO:74), FIG. 76 (SEQ ID NO:76), FIG. 78 (SEQ ID NO:78), FIG. 80 (SEQ ID NO:80), FIG. 82 (SEQ ID NO:82), FIG. 84 (SEQ ID NO:84), FIG. 86 (SEQ ID NO:86), FIG. 88 (SEQ ID NO:88), FIG. 90 (SEQ ID NO:90), FIG. 92 (SEQ ID NO:92), FIG. 94 (SEQ ID NO:94), FIG. 96 (SEQ ID NO:96), FIG. 98 (SEQ ID NO:98), FIG. 100 (SEQ ID NO:100), FIG. 102 (SEQ ID NO:102), FIG. 104 (SEQ ID NO:104), FIG. 106 (SEQ ID NO:106), FIG. 108 (SEQ ID NO:108), FIG. 110 (SEQ ID NO:110), FIG. 112 (SEQ ID NO:112) and FIG. 114 (SEQ ID NO:114.
2. Isolated nucleic acid having at least 80% nucleic acid sequence identity to a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of the nucleotide sequence shown in FIG. 1 (SEQ ID NO:1), FIG. 3 (SEQ ID NO:3), FIG. 5 (SEQ ID NO:5), FIG. 7 (SEQ ID NO:7), FIG. 9 (SEQ ID NO:9), FIG. 11 (SEQ ID NO:11), FIG. 13 (SEQ ID NO:13), FIG. 15 (SEQ ID NO:15), FIG. 17 (SEQ ID NO:17), FIG. 19 (SEQ ID NO:19), FIG. 21 (SEQ ID NO:21), FIG. 23 (SEQ ID NO:23), FIG. 25 (SEQ ID NO:25), FIG. 27 (SEQ ID NO:27), FIG. 29 (SEQ ID NO:29), FIG. 31 (SEQ ID NO:31), FIG. 33 (SEQ ID NO:33), FIG. 35 (SEQ ID NO:35), FIG. 37 (SEQ ID NO:37), FIG. 39 (SEQ ID NO:39), FIG. 41 (SEQ ID NO:41), FIG. 43 (SEQ ID NO:43), FIG. 45 (SEQ ID NO:45), FIG. 47 (SEQ ID NO:47), FIG. 49 (SEQ ID NO:49), FIG. 51 (SEQ ID NO:51), FIG. 53 (SEQ ID NO:53), FIG. 55 (SEQ ID NO:55), FIG. 57 (SEQ ID NO:57), FIG. 59 (SEQ ID NO:59), FIG. 61 (SEQ ID NO:61), FIG. 63 (SEQ ID NO:63), FIG. 65 (SEQ ID NO:65), FIG. 67 (SEQ ID NO:67), FIG. 69 (SEQ ID NO:69), FIG. 71 (SEQ ID NO:71), FIG. 73 (SEQ ID NO:73), FIG. 75 (SEQ ID NO:75), FIG. 77 (SEQ ID NO:77), FIG. 79 (SEQ ID NO:79), FIG. 81 (SEQ ID NO:81), FIG. 83 (SEQ ID NO:83), FIG. 85 (SEQ ID NO:85), FIG. 87 (SEQ ID NO:87), FIG. 89 (SEQ ID NO:89), FIG. 91 (SEQ ID NO:91), FIG. 93 (SEQ ID NO:93), FIGS. 95A-95B (SEQ ID NO:95), FIG. 97 (SEQ ID NO:97), FIG. 99 (SEQ ID NO:99), FIG. 101 (SEQ ID NO:101), FIG. 103 (SEQ ID NO:103), FIG. 105 (SEQ ID NO:105), FIG. 107 (SEQ ID NO:107), FIG. 109 (SEQ ID NO:109), FIG. 111 (SEQ ID NO:111) and FIG. 113 (SEQ ID NO:113).
3. Isolated nucleic acid having at least 80% nucleic acid sequence identity to a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of the full-length coding sequence of the nucleotide sequence shown in FIG. 1 (SEQ ID NO:1), FIG. 3 (SEQ ID NO:3), FIG. 5 (SEQ ID NO:5), FIG. 7 (SEQ ID NO:7), FIG. 9 (SEQ ID NO:9), FIG. 11 (SEQ ID NO:11), FIG. 13 (SEQ ID NO:13), FIG. 15 (SEQ ID NO:15), FIG. 17 (SEQ ID NO:17), FIG. 19 (SEQ ID NO:19), FIG. 21 (SEQ ID NO:21), FIG. 23 (SEQ ID NO:23), FIG. 25 (SEQ ID NO:25), FIG. 27 (SEQ ID NO:27), FIG. 29 (SEQ ID NO:29), FIG. 31 (SEQ ID NO:31), FIG. 33 (SEQ ID NO:33), FIG. 35 (SEQ ID NO:35), FIG. 37 (SEQ ID NO:37), FIG. 39 (SEQ ID NO:39), FIG. 41 (SEQ ID NO:41), FIG. 43 (SEQ ID NO:43), FIG. 45 (SEQ ID NO:45), FIG. 47 (SEQ ID NO:47), FIG. 49 (SEQ ID NO:49), FIG. 51 (SEQ ID NO:51), FIG. 53 (SEQ ID NO:53), FIG. 55 (SEQ ID NO:55), FIG. 57 (SEQ ID NO:57), FIG. 59 (SEQ ID NO:59), FIG. 61 (SEQ ID NO:61), FIG. 63 (SEQ ID NO:63), FIG. 65 (SEQ ID NO:65), FIG. 67 (SEQ ID NO:67), FIG. 69 (SEQ ID NO:69), FIG. 71 (SEQ ID NO:71), FIG. 73 (SEQ ID NO:73), FIG. 75 (SEQ ID NO:75), FIG. 77 (SEQ ID NO:77), FIG. 79 (SEQ ID NO:79), FIG. 81 (SEQ ID NO:81), FIG. 83 (SEQ ID NO:83), FIG. 85 (SEQ ID NO:85), FIG. 87 (SEQ ID NO:87), FIG. 89 (SEQ ID NO:89), FIG. 91 (SEQ ID NO:91), FIG. 93 (SEQ ID NO:93), FIGS. 95A-95B (SEQ ID NO:95), FIG. 97 (SEQ ID NO:97), FIG. 99 (SEQ ID NO:99), FIG. 101 (SEQ ID NO:101), FIG. 103 (SEQ ID NO:103), FIG. 105 (SEQ ID NO:105), FIG. 107 (SEQ ID NO:107), FIG. 109 (SEQ ID NO:109), FIG. 111 (SEQ ID NO:111) and FIG. 113 (SEQ ID NO:113).
4. Isolated nucleic acid having at least 80% nucleic acid sequence identity to the full-length coding sequence of the DNA deposited under any ATCC accession number shown in Table 7.
5. A vector comprising the nucleic acid of claim 1.
6. A host cell comprising the vector of claim 5.
7. The host cell of claim 6, wherein said cell is a CHO cell.
8. The host cell of claim 6, wherein said cell is an E. coli.
9. The host cell of claim 6, wherein said cell is a yeast cell.
10. A process for producing a PRO polypeptide comprising culturing the host cell of claim 6 under conditions suitable for expression of said PRO polypeptide and recovering said PRO polypeptide from the cell culture.
11. An isolated polypeptide having at least 80% amino acid sequence identity to an amino acid sequence selected from the group consisting of the amino acid sequence shown in FIG. 2 (SEQ ID NO:2), FIG. 4 (SEQ ID NO:4), FIG. 6 (SEQ ID NO:6), FIG. 8 (SEQ ID NO:8), FIG. 10 (SEQ ID NO:10), FIG. 12 (SEQ ID NO:12), FIG. 14 (SEQ ID NO:14), FIG. 16 (SEQ ID NO:16), FIG. 18 (SEQ ID NO:18), FIG. 20 (SEQ ID NO:20), FIG. 22 (SEQ ID NO:22), FIG. 24 (SEQ ID NO:24), FIG. 26 (SEQ ID NO:26), FIG. 28 (SEQ ID NO:28), FIG. 30 (SEQ ID NO:30), FIG. 32 (SEQ ID NO:32), FIG. 34 (SEQ ID NO:34), FIG. 36 (SEQ ID NO:36), FIG. 38 (SEQ ID NO:38), FIG. 40 (SEQ ID NO:40), FIG. 42 (SEQ ID NO:42), FIG. 44 (SEQ ID NO:44), FIG. 46 (SEQ ID NO:46), FIG. 48 (SEQ ID NO:48), FIG. 50 (SEQ ID NO:50), FIG. 52 (SEQ ID NO:52), FIG. 54 (SEQ ID NO:54), FIG. 56 (SEQ ID NO:56), FIG. 58 (SEQ ID NO:58), FIG. 60 (SEQ ID NO:60), FIG. 62 (SEQ ID NO:62), FIG. 64 (SEQ ID NO:64), FIG. 66 (SEQ ID NO:66), FIG. 68 (SEQ ID NO:68), FIG. 70 (SEQ ID NO:70), FIG. 72 (SEQ ID NO:72), FIG. 74 (SEQ ID NO:74), FIG. 76 (SEQ ID NO:76), FIG. 78 (SEQ ID NO:78), FIG. 80 (SEQ ID NO:80), FIG. 82 (SEQ ID NO:82), FIG. 84 (SEQ ID NO:84), FIG. 86 (SEQ ID NO:86), FIG. 88 (SEQ ID NO:88), FIG. 90 (SEQ ID NO:90), FIG. 92 (SEQ ID NO:92), FIG. 94 (SEQ ID NO:94), FIG. 96 (SEQ ID NO:96), FIG. 98 (SEQ ID NO:98), FIG. 100 (SEQ ID NO:100), FIG. 102 (SEQ ID NO:102), FIG. 104 (SEQ ID NO:104), FIG. 106 (SEQ ID NO:106), FIG. 108 (SEQ ID NO:108), FIG. 110 (SEQ ID NO:110), FIG. 112 (SEQ ID NO:112) and FIG. 114 (SEQ ID NO:114).
12. An isolated polypeptide having at least 80% amino acid sequence identity to an amino acid sequence encoded by the full-length coding sequence of the DNA deposited under any ATCC accession number shown in Table 7.
13. A chimeric molecule comprising a polypeptide according to claim 11 fused to a heterologous amino acid sequence.
14. The chimeric molecule of claim 13, wherein said heterologous amino acid sequence is an epitope tag sequence.
15. The chimeric molecule of claim 13, wherein said heterologous amino acid sequence is a Fc region of an immunoglobulin.
16. An antibody which specifically binds to a polypeptide according to claim 11.
17. The antibody of claim 16, wherein said antibody is a monoclonal antibody, a humanized antibody or a single-chain antibody.
18. Isolated nucleic acid having at least 80% nucleic acid sequence identity to:
(a) a nucleotide sequence encoding the polypeptide shown in FIG. 2 (SEQ ID NO:2), FIG. 4 (SEQ ID NO:4), FIG. 6 (SEQ ID NO:6), FIG. 8 (SEQ ID NO:8), FIG. 10 (SEQ ID NO:10), FIG. 12 (SEQ ID NO:12), FIG. 14 (SEQ ID NO:14), FIG. 16 (SEQ ID NO:16), FIG. 18 (SEQ ID NO:18), FIG. 20 (SEQ ID NO:20), FIG. 22 (SEQ ID NO:22), FIG. 24 (SEQ ID NO:24), FIG. 26 (SEQ ID NO:26), FIG. 28 (SEQ ID NO:28), FIG. 30 (SEQ ID NO:30), FIG. 32 (SEQ ID NO:32), FIG. 34 (SEQ ID NO:34), FIG. 36 (SEQ ID NO:36), FIG. 38 (SEQ ID NO:38), FIG. 40 (SEQ ID NO:40), FIG. 42 (SEQ ID NO:42), FIG. 44 (SEQ ID NO:44), FIG. 46 (SEQ ID NO:46), FIG. 48 (SEQ ID NO:48), FIG. 50 (SEQ ID NO:50), FIG. 52 (SEQ ID NO:52), FIG. 54 (SEQ ID NO:54), FIG. 56 (SEQ ID NO:56), FIG. 58 (SEQ ID NO:58), FIG. 60 (SEQ ID NO:60), FIG. 62 (SEQ ID NO:62), FIG. 64 (SEQ ID NO:64), FIG. 66 (SEQ ID NO:66), FIG. 68 (SEQ ID NO:68), FIG. 70 (SEQ ID NO:70), FIG. 72 (SEQ ID NO:72), FIG. 74 (SEQ ID NO:74), FIG. 76 (SEQ ID NO:76), FIG. 78 (SEQ ID NO:78), FIG. 80 (SEQ ID NO:80), FIG. 82 (SEQ ID NO:82), FIG. 84 (SEQ ID NO:84), FIG. 86 (SEQ ID NO:86), FIG. 88 (SEQ ID NO:88), FIG. 90 (SEQ ID NO:90), FIG. 92 (SEQ ID NO:92), FIG. 94 (SEQ ID NO:94), FIG. 96 (SEQ ID NO:96), FIG. 98 (SEQ ID NO:98), FIG. 100 (SEQ ID NO:100), FIG. 102 (SEQ ID NO:102), FIG. 104 (SEQ ID NO:104), FIG. 106 (SEQ ID NO:106), FIG. 108 (SEQ ID NO:108), FIG. 110 (SEQ ID NO:110), FIG. 112 (SEQ ID NO:112) or FIG. 114 (SEQ ID NO:114), lacking its associated signal peptide;
(b) a nucleotide sequence encoding an extracellular domain of the polypeptide shown in FIG. 2 (SEQ ID NO:2), FIG. 4 (SEQ ID NO:4), FIG. 6 (SEQ ID NO:6), FIG. 8 (SEQ ID NO:8), FIG. 10 (SEQ ID NO:10), FIG. 12 (SEQ ID NO:12), FIG. 14 (SEQ ID NO:14), FIG. 16 (SEQ ID NO:16), FIG. 18 (SEQ ID NO:18), FIG. 20 (SEQ ID NO:20), FIG. 22 (SEQ ID NO:22), FIG. 24 (SEQ ID NO:24), FIG. 26 (SEQ ID NO:26), FIG. 28 (SEQ ID NO:28), FIG. 30 (SEQ ID NO:30), FIG. 32 (SEQ ID NO:32), FIG. 34 (SEQ ID NO:34), FIG. 36 (SEQ ID NO:36), FIG. 38 (SEQ ID NO:38), FIG. 40 (SEQ ID NO:40), FIG. 42 (SEQ ID NO:42), FIG. 44 (SEQ ID NO:44), FIG. 46 (SEQ ID NO:46), FIG. 48 (SEQ ID NO:48), FIG. 50 (SEQ ID NO:50), FIG. 52 (SEQ ID NO:52), FIG. 54 (SEQ ID NO:54), FIG. 56 (SEQ ID NO:56), FIG. 58 (SEQ ID NO:58), FIG. 60 (SEQ ID NO:60), FIG. 62 (SEQ ID NO:62), FIG. 64 (SEQ ID NO:64), FIG. 66 (SEQ ID NO:66), FIG. 68 (SEQ ID NO:68), FIG. 70 (SEQ ID NO:70), FIG. 72 (SEQ ID NO:72), FIG. 74 (SEQ ID NO:74), FIG. 76 (SEQ ID NO:76), FIG. 78 (SEQ ID NO:78), FIG. 80 (SEQ ID NO:80), FIG. 82 (SEQ ID NO:82), FIG. 84 (SEQ ID NO:84), FIG. 86 (SEQ ID NO:86), FIG. 88 (SEQ ID NO:88), FIG. 90 (SEQ ID NO:90), FIG. 92 (SEQ ID NO:92), FIG. 94 (SEQ ID NO:94), FIG. 96 (SEQ ID NO:96), FIG. 98 (SEQ ID NO:98), FIG. 100 (SEQ ID NO:100), FIG. 102 (SEQ ID NO:102), FIG. 104 (SEQ ID NO:104), FIG. 106 (SEQ ID NO:106), FIG. 108 (SEQ ID NO:108), FIG. 110 (SEQ ID NO:110), FIG. 112 (SEQ ID NO:112) or FIG. 114 (SEQ ID NO:114), with its associated signal peptide; or
(c) a nucleotide sequence encoding an extracellular domain of the polypeptide shown in FIG. 2 (SEQ ID NO:2), FIG. 4 (SEQ ID NO:4), FIG. 6 (SEQ ID NO:6), FIG. 8 (SEQ ID NO:8), FIG. 10 (SEQ ID NO:10), FIG. 12 (SEQ ID NO:12), FIG. 14 (SEQ ID NO:14), FIG. 16 (SEQ ID NO:16), FIG. 18 (SEQ ID NO:18), FIG. 20 (SEQ ID NO:20), FIG. 22 (SEQ ID NO:22), FIG. 24 (SEQ ID NO:24), FIG. 26 (SEQ ID NO:26), FIG. 28 (SEQ ID NO:28), FIG. 30 (SEQ ID NO:30), FIG. 32 (SEQ ID NO:32), FIG. 34 (SEQ ID NO:34), FIG. 36 (SEQ ID NO:36), FIG. 38 (SEQ ID NO:38), FIG. 40 (SEQ ID NO:40), FIG. 42 (SEQ ID NO:42), FIG. 44 (SEQ ID NO:44), FIG. 46 (SEQ ID NO:46), FIG. 48 (SEQ ID NO:48), FIG. 50 (SEQ ID NO:50), FIG. 52 (SEQ ID NO:52), FIG. 54 (SEQ ID NO:54), FIG. 56 (SEQ ID NO:56), FIG. 58 (SEQ ID NO:58), FIG. 60 (SEQ ID NO:60), FIG. 62 (SEQ ID NO:62), FIG. 64 (SEQ ID NO:64), FIG. 66 (SEQ ID NO:66), FIG. 68 (SEQ ID NO:68), FIG. 70 (SEQ ID NO:70), FIG. 72 (SEQ ID NO:72), FIG. 74 (SEQ ID NO:74), FIG. 76 (SEQ ID NO:76), FIG. 78 (SEQ ID NO:78), FIG. 80 (SEQ ID NO:80), FIG. 82 (SEQ ID NO:82), FIG. 84 (SEQ ID NO:84), FIG. 86 (SEQ ID NO:86), FIG. 88 (SEQ ID NO:88), FIG. 90 (SEQ ID NO:90), FIG. 92 (SEQ ID NO:92), FIG. 94 (SEQ ID NO:94), FIG. 96 (SEQ ID NO:96), FIG. 9 8 (SEQ ID NO:9 8), FIG. 100 (SEQ ID NO:100), FIG. 102 (SEQ ID NO:102), FIG. 104 (SEQ ID NO:104), FIG. 106 (SEQ ID NO:106), FIG. 108 (SEQ ID NO:108), FIG. 110 (SEQ ID NO:110), FIG. 112 (SEQ ID NO:112) or FIG. 114 (SEQ ID NO:114), lacking its associated signal peptide.
19. An isolated polypeptide having at least 80% amino acid sequence identity to:
(a) an amino acid sequence of the polypeptide shown in FIG. 2 (SEQ ID NO:2), FIG. 4 (SEQ ID NO:4), FIG. 6 (SEQ ID NO:6), FIG. 8 (SEQ ID NO:8), FIG. 10 (SEQ ID NO:10), FIG. 12 (SEQ ID NO:12), FIG. 14 (SEQ ID NO:14), FIG. 16 (SEQ ID NO:16), FIG. 18 (SEQ ID NO:18), FIG. 20 (SEQ ID NO:20), FIG. 22 (SEQ ID NO:22), FIG. 24 (SEQ ID NO:24), FIG. 26 (SEQ ID NO:26), FIG. 28 (SEQ ID NO:28), FIG. 30 (SEQ ID NO:30), FIG. 32 (SEQ ID NO:32), FIG. 34 (SEQ ID NO:34), FIG. 36 (SEQ ID NO:36), FIG. 38 (SEQ ID NO:38), FIG. 40 (SEQ ID NO:40), FIG. 42 (SEQ ID NO:42), FIG. 44 (SEQ ID NO:44), FIG. 46 (SEQ ID NO:46), FIG. 48 (SEQ ID NO:48), FIG. 50 (SEQ ID NO:50), FIG. 52 (SEQ ID NO:52), FIG. 54 (SEQ ID NO:54), FIG. 56 (SEQ ID NO:56), FIG. 58 (SEQ ID NO:58), FIG. 60 (SEQ ID NO:60), FIG. 62 (SEQ ID NO:62), FIG. 64 (SEQ ID NO:64), FIG. 66 (SEQ ID NO:66), FIG. 68 (SEQ ID NO:68), FIG. 70 (SEQ ID NO:70), FIG. 72 (SEQ ID NO:72), FIG. 74 (SEQ ID NO:74), FIG. 76 (SEQ ID NO:76), FIG. 78 (SEQ ID NO:78), FIG. 80 (SEQ ID NO:80), FIG. 82 (SEQ ID NO:82), FIG. 84 (SEQ ID NO:84), FIG. 86 (SEQ ID NO:86), FIG. 88 (SEQ ID NO:88), FIG. 90 (SEQ ID NO:90), FIG. 92 (SEQ ID NO:92), FIG. 94 (SEQ ID NO:94), FIG. 96 (SEQ ID NO:96), FIG. 98 (SEQ ID NO:98), FIG. 100 (SEQ ID NO:100), FIG. 102 (SEQ ID NO:102), FIG. 104 (SEQ ID NO:104), FIG. 106 (SEQ ID NO:106), FIG. 108 (SEQ ID NO:108), FIG. 110 (SEQ ID NO:110), FIG. 112 (SEQ ID NO:112) or FIG. 114 (SEQ ID NO:114), lacking its associated signal peptide;
(b) an amino acid sequence of an extracellular domain of the polypeptide shown in FIG. 2 (SEQ ID NO:2), FIG. 4 (SEQ ID NO:4), FIG. 6 (SEQ ID NO:6), FIG. 8 (SEQ ID NO:8), FIG. 10 (SEQ ID NO:10), FIG. 12 (SEQ ID NO:12), FIG. 14 (SEQ ID NO:14), FIG. 16 (SEQ ID NO:16), FIG. 18 (SEQ ID NO:18), FIG. 20 (SEQ ID NO:20), FIG. 22 (SEQ ID NO:22), FIG. 24 (SEQ ID NO:24), FIG. 26 (SEQ ID NO:26), FIG. 28 (SEQ ID NO:28), FIG. 30 (SEQ ID NO:30), FIG. 32 (SEQ ID NO:32), FIG. 34 (SEQ ID NO:34), FIG. 36 (SEQ ID NO:36), FIG. 38 (SEQ ID NO:38), FIG. 40 (SEQ ID NO:40), FIG. 42 (SEQ ID NO:42), FIG. 44 (SEQ ID NO:44), FIG. 46 (SEQ ID NO:46), FIG. 48 (SEQ ID NO:48), FIG. 50 (SEQ ID NO:50), FIG. 52 (SEQ ID NO:52), FIG. 54 (SEQ ID NO:54), FIG. 56 (SEQ ID NO:56), FIG. 58 (SEQ ID NO:58), FIG. 60 (SEQ ID NO:60), FIG. 62 (SEQ ID NO:62), FIG. 64 (SEQ ID NO:64), FIG. 66 (SEQ ID NO:66), FIG. 68 (SEQ ID NO:68), FIG. 70 (SEQ ID NO:70), FIG. 72 (SEQ ID NO:72), FIG. 74 (SEQ ID NO:74), FIG. 76 (SEQ ID NO:76), FIG. 78 (SEQ ID NO:78), FIG. 80 (SEQ ID NO:80), FIG. 82 (SEQ ID NO:82), FIG. 84 (SEQ ID NO:84), FIG. 86 (SEQ ID NO:86), FIG. 88 (SEQ ID NO:88), FIG. 90 (SEQ ID NO:90), FIG. 92 (SEQ ID NO:92), FIG. 94 (SEQ ID NO:94), FIG. 96 (SEQ ID NO:96), FIG. 98 (SEQ ID NO:98), FIG. 100 (SEQ ID NO:100), FIG. 102 (SEQ ID NO:102), FIG. 104 (SEQ ID NO:104), FIG. 106 (SEQ ID NO:106), FIG. 108 (SEQ ID NO:108), FIG. 110 (SEQ ID NO:110), FIG. 112 (SEQ ID NO:112) or FIG. 114 (SEQ ID NO:114), with its associated signal peptide; or
(c) an amino acid sequence of an extracellular domain of the polypeptide shown in FIG. 2 (SEQ ID NO:2), FIG. 4 (SEQ ID NO:4), FIG. 6 (SEQ ID NO:6), FIG. 8 (SEQ ID NO:8), FIG. 10 (SEQ ID NO:10), FIG. 12 (SEQ ID NO:12), FIG. 14 (SEQ ID NO:14), FIG. 16 (SEQ ID NO:16), FIG. 18 (SEQ ID NO:18), FIG. 20 (SEQ ID NO:20), FIG. 22 (SEQ ID NO:22), FIG. 24 (SEQ ID NO:24), FIG. 26 (SEQ ID NO:26), FIG. 28 (SEQ ID NO:28), FIG. 30 (SEQ ID NO:30), FIG. 32 (SEQ ID NO:32), FIG. 34 (SEQ ID NO:34), FIG. 36 (SEQ ID NO:36), FIG. 38 (SEQ ID NO:38), FIG. 40 (SEQ ID NO:40), FIG. 42 (SEQ ID NO:42), FIG. 44 (SEQ ID NO:44), FIG. 46 (SEQ ID NO:46), FIG. 48 (SEQ ID NO:48), FIG. 50 (SEQ ID NO:50), FIG. 52 (SEQ ID NO:52), FIG. 54 (SEQ ID NO:54), FIG. 56 (SEQ ID NO:56), FIG. 58 (SEQ ID NO:58), FIG. 60 (SEQ ID NO:60), FIG. 62 (SEQ ID NO:62), FIG. 64 (SEQ ID NO:64), FIG. 66 (SEQ ID NO:66), FIG. 68 (SEQ ID NO:68), FIG. 70 (SEQ ID NO:70), FIG. 72 (SEQ ID NO:72), FIG. 74 (SEQ ID NO:74), FIG. 76 (SEQ ID NO:76), FIG. 78 (SEQ ID NO:78), FIG. 80 (SEQ ID NO:80), FIG. 82 (SEQ ID NO:82), FIG. 84 (SEQ ID NO:84), FIG. 86 (SEQ ID NO:86), FIG. 88 (SEQ ID NO:88), FIG. 90 (SEQ ID NO:90), FIG. 92 (SEQ ID NO:92), FIG. 94 (SEQ ID NO:94), FIG. 96 (SEQ ID NO:96), FIG. 98 (SEQ ID NO:98), FIG. 100 (SEQ ID NO:100), FIG. 102 (SEQ ID NO:102), FIG. 104 (SEQ ID NO:104), FIG. 106 (SEQ ID NO:106), FIG. 108 (SEQ ID NO:108), FIG. 110 (SEQ ID NO:110), FIG. 112 (SEQ ID NO:112) or FIG. 114 (SEQ ID NO:114), lacking its associated signal peptide.
20. A method for stimulating the proliferation or differentiation of chondrocyte cells, said method comprising contacting said cells with a PRO6018 polypeptide, wherein the proliferation or differentiation of said cells is stimulated.
21. A method for stimulating the proliferation of human microvascular endothelial cells, said method comprising contacting said cells with a PRO1313, PRO20080 or PRO21383 polypeptide, wherein the proliferation of said cells is stimulated.
24. A method for inhibiting the proliferation of human microvascular endothelial cells, said method comprising contacting said cells with a PRO6071, PRO4487 or PRO6006 polypeptide, wherein the proliferation of said cells is inhibited.
25. A method for detecting the presence of tumor in a mammal, said method comprising comparing the level of expression of any PRO polypeptide shown in Table 8 in (a) a test sample of cells taken from said mammal and (b) a control sample of normal cells of the same cell type, wherein a higher level of expression of said PRO polypeptide in the test sample as compared to the control sample is indicative of the presence of tumor in said mammal.
26. The method of claim 25, wherein said tumor is lung tumor, colon tumor, breast tumor, prostate tumor, rectal tumor, kidney tumor or liver tumor.
27. A method for inducing endothelial cell tube formation comprising administering to the endothelial cell a PRO281, PRO1560, PRO189, PRO4499, PRO6308, PRO6000, PRO10275, PRO21207, PRO20933 or PRO34274 polypeptide, or agonist thereof, wherein tube formation in said endothelial cell is induced.
28. An oligonucleotide probe derived from any of the nucleotide sequences shown in the accompanying figures.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates generally to the identification and isolation of novel DNA and to the recombinant production of novel polypeptides.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] Extracellular proteins play important roles in, among other things, the formation, differentiation and maintenance of multicellular organisms. The fate of many individual cells, e.g., proliferation, migration, differentiation, or interaction with other cells, is typically governed by information received from other cells and/or the immediate environment. This information is often transmitted by secreted polypeptides (for instance, mitogenic factors, survival factors, cytotoxic factors, differentiation factors, neuropeptides, and hormones) which are, in turn, received and interpreted by diverse cell receptors or membrane-bound proteins. These secreted polypeptides or signaling molecules normally pass through the cellular secretory pathway to reach their site of action in the extracellular environment.

[0003] Secreted proteins have various industrial applications, including as pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, biosensors and bioreactors. Most protein drugs available at present, such as thrombolytic agents, interferons, interleukins, erythropoietins, colony stimulating factors, and various other cytokines, are secretory proteins. Their receptors, which are membrane proteins, also have potential as therapeutic or diagnostic agents. Efforts are being undertaken by both industry and academia to identify new, native secreted proteins. Many efforts are focused on the screening of mammalian recombinant DNA libraries to identify the coding sequences for novel secreted proteins. Examples of screening methods and techniques are described in the literature [see, for example, Klein et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 93:7108-7113 (1996); U.S. Pat. No. 5,536,637)].

[0004] Membrane-bound proteins and receptors can play important roles in, among other things, the formation, differentiation and maintenance of multicellular organisms. The fate of many individual cells, e.g., proliferation, migration, differentiation, or interaction with other cells, is typically governed by information received from other cells and/or the immediate environment. This information is often transmitted by secreted polypeptides (for instance, mitogenic factors, survival factors, cytotoxic factors, differentiation factors, neuropeptides, and hormones) which are, in turn, received and interpreted by diverse cell receptors or membrane-bound proteins. Such membrane-bound proteins and cell receptors include, but are not limited to, cytokine receptors, receptor kinases, receptor phosphatases, receptors involved in cell-cell interactions, and cellular adhesin molecules like selectins and integrins. For instance, transduction of signals that regulate cell growth and differentiation is regulated in part by phosphorylation of various cellular proteins. Protein tyrosine kinases, enzymes that catalyze that process, can also act as growth factor receptors. Examples include fibroblast growth factor receptor and nerve growth factor receptor.

[0005] Membrane-bound proteins and receptor molecules have various industrial applications, including as pharmaceutical and diagnostic agents. Receptor immunoadhesins, for instance, can be employed as therapeutic agents to block receptor-ligand interactions. The membrane-bound proteins can also be employed for screening of potential peptide or small molecule inhibitors of the relevant receptor/ligand interaction.

[0006] Efforts are being undertaken by both industry and academia to identify new, native receptor or membrane-bound proteins. Many efforts are focused on the screening of mammalian recombinant DNA libraries to identify the coding sequences for novel receptor or membrane-bound proteins.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0007] In one embodiment, the invention provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes a PRO polypeptide.

[0008] In one aspect, the isolated nucleic acid molecule comprises a nucleotide sequence having at least about 80% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 81% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 82% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 83% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 84% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 85% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 86% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 87% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 88% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 89% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 90% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 91% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 92% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 93% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 94% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 95% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 96% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 97% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 98% nucleic acid sequence identity and alternatively at least about 99% nucleic acid sequence identity to (a) a DNA molecule encoding a PRO polypeptide having a full-length amino acid sequence as disclosed herein, an amino acid sequence lacking the signal peptide as disclosed herein, an extracellular domain of a transmembrane protein, with or without the signal peptide, as disclosed herein or any other specifically defined fragment of the full-length amino acid sequence as disclosed herein, or (b) the complement of the DNA molecule of (a).

[0009] In other aspects, the isolated nucleic acid molecule comprises a nucleotide sequence having at least about 80% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 81% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 82% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 83% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 84% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 85% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 86% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 87% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 88% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 89% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 90% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 91% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 92% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 93% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 94% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 95% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 96% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 97% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 98% nucleic acid sequence identity and alternatively at least about 99% nucleic acid sequence identity to (a) a DNA molecule comprising the coding sequence of a full-length PRO polypeptide cDNA as disclosed herein, the coding sequence of a PRO polypeptide lacking the signal peptide as disclosed herein, the coding sequence of an extracellular domain of a transmembrane PRO polypeptide, with or without the signal peptide, as disclosed herein or the coding sequence of any other specifically defined fragment of the full-length amino acid sequence as disclosed herein, or (b) the complement of the DNA molecule of (a).

[0010] In a further aspect, the invention concerns an isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleotide sequence having at least about 80% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 81% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 82% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 83% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 84% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 85% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 86% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 87% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 88% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 89% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 90% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 91% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 92% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 93% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 94% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 95% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 96% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 97% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 98% nucleic acid sequence identity and alternatively at least about 99% nucleic acid sequence identity to (a) a DNA molecule that encodes the same mature polypeptide encoded by any of the human protein cDNAs deposited with the ATCC as disclosed herein, or (b) the complement of the DNA molecule of (a).

[0011] Another aspect the invention provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleotide sequence encoding a PRO polypeptide which is either transmembrane domain-deleted or transmembrane domain-inactivated, or is complementary to such encoding nucleotide sequence, wherein the transmembrane domain(s) of such polypeptide are disclosed herein. Therefore, soluble extracellular domains of the herein described PRO polypeptides are contemplated.

[0012] Another embodiment is directed to fragments of a PRO polypeptide coding sequence, or the complement thereof, that may find use as, for example, hybridization probes, for encoding fragments of a PRO polypeptide that may optionally encode a polypeptide comprising a binding site for an anti-PRO antibody or as antisense oligonucleotide probes. Such nucleic acid fragments are usually at least about 10 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 15 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 20 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 30 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 40 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 50 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 60 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 70 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 80 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 90 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 100 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 110 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 120 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 130 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 140 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 150 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 160 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 170 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 180 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 190 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 200 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 250 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 300 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 350 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 400 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 450 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 500 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 600 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 700 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 800 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 900 nucleotides in length and alternatively at least about 1000 nucleotides in length, wherein in this context the term “about” means the referenced nucleotide sequence length plus or minus 10% of that referenced length. It is noted that novel fragments of a PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleotide sequence may be determined in a routine manner by aligning the PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleotide sequence with other known nucleotide sequences using any of a number of well known sequence alignment programs and determining which PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleotide sequence fragment(s) are novel. All of such PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleotide sequences are contemplated herein. Also contemplated are the PRO polypeptide fragments encoded by these nucleotide molecule fragments, preferably those PRO polypeptide fragments that comprise a binding site for an anti-PRO antibody.

[0013] In another embodiment, the invention provides isolated PRO polypeptide encoded by any of the isolated nucleic acid sequences hereinabove identified.

[0014] In a certain aspect, the invention concerns an isolated PRO polypeptide, comprising an amino acid sequence having at least about 80% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 81% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 82% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 83% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 84% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 85% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 86% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 87% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 88% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 89% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 90% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 91% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 92% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 93% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 94% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 95% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 96% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 97% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 98% amino acid sequence identity and alternatively at least about 99% amino acid sequence identity to a PRO polypeptide having a full-length amino acid sequence as disclosed herein, an amino acid sequence lacking the signal peptide as disclosed herein, an extracellular domain of a transmembrane protein, with or without the signal peptide, as disclosed herein or any other specifically defined fragment of the full-length amino acid sequence as disclosed herein.

[0015] In a further aspect, the invention concerns an isolated PRO polypeptide comprising an amino acid sequence having at least about 80% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 81% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 82% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 83% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 84% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 85% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 86% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 87% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 88% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 89% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 90% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 91% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 92% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 93% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 94% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 95% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 96% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 97% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 98% amino acid sequence identity and alternatively at least about 99% amino acid sequence identity to an amino acid sequence encoded by any of the human protein cDNAs deposited with the ATCC as disclosed herein.

[0016] In a specific aspect, the invention provides an isolated PRO polypeptide without the N-terminal signal sequence and/or the initiating methionine and is encoded by a nucleotide sequence that encodes such an amino acid sequence as hereinbefore described. Processes for producing the same are also herein described, wherein those processes comprise culturing a host cell comprising a vector which comprises the appropriate encoding nucleic acid molecule under conditions suitable for expression of the PRO polypeptide and recovering the PRO polypeptide from the cell culture.

[0017] Another aspect the invention provides an isolated PRO polypeptide which is either transmembrane domain-deleted or transmembrane domain-inactivated. Processes for producing the same are also herein described, wherein those processes comprise culturing a host cell comprising a vector which comprises the appropriate encoding nucleic acid molecule under conditions suitable for expression of the PRO polypeptide and recovering the PRO polypeptide from the cell culture.

[0018] In yet another embodiment, the invention concerns agonists and antagonists of a native PRO polypeptide as defined herein. In a particular embodiment, the agonist or antagonist is an anti-PRO antibody or a small molecule.

[0019] In a further embodiment, the invention concerns a method of identifying agonists or antagonists to a PRO polypeptide which comprise contacting the PRO polypeptide with a candidate molecule and monitoring a biological activity mediated by said PRO polypeptide. Preferably, the PRO polypeptide is a native PRO polypeptide.

[0020] In a still further embodiment, the invention concerns a composition of matter comprising a PRO polypeptide, or an agonist or antagonist of a PRO polypeptide as herein described, or an anti-PRO antibody, in combination with a carrier. Optionally, the carrier is a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier.

[0021] Another embodiment of the present invention is directed to the use of a PRO polypeptide, or an agonist or antagonist thereof as hereinbefore described, or an anti-PRO antibody, for the preparation of a medicament useful in the treatment of a condition which is responsive to the PRO polypeptide, an agonist or antagonist thereof or an anti-PRO antibody.

[0022] In other embodiments of the present invention, the invention provides vectors comprising DNA encoding any of the herein described polypeptides. Host cell comprising any such vector are also provided. By way of example, the host cells may be CHO cells, E. coli, or yeast. A process for producing any of the herein described polypeptides is further provided and comprises culturing host cells under conditions suitable for expression of the desired polypeptide and recovering the desired polypeptide from the cell culture.

[0023] In other embodiments, the invention provides chimeric molecules comprising any of the herein described polypeptides fused to a heterologous polypeptide or amino acid sequence. Example of such chimeric molecules comprise any of the herein described polypeptides fused to an epitope tag sequence or a Fe region of an immunoglobulin.

[0024] In another embodiment, the invention provides an antibody which binds, preferably specifically, to any of the above or below described polypeptides. Optionally, the antibody is a monoclonal antibody, humanized antibody, antibody fragment or single-chain antibody.

[0025] In yet other embodiments, the invention provides oligonucleotide probes which may be useful for isolating genomic and cDNA nucleotide sequences, measuring or detecting expression of an associated gene or as antisense probes, wherein those probes may be derived from any of the above or below described nucleotide sequences. Preferred probe lengths are described above.

[0026] In yet other embodiments, the present invention is directed to methods of using the PRO polypeptides of the present invention for a variety of uses based upon the functional biological assay data presented in the Examples below.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0027]FIG. 1 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:1) of a native sequence PRO281 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:1 is a clone designated herein as “DNA16422-1209”.

[0028]FIG. 2 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:2) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:1 shown in FIG. 1.

[0029]FIG. 3 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:3) of a native sequence PRO1560 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:3 is a clone designated herein as “DNA19902-1669”.

[0030]FIG. 4 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:4) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 shown in FIG. 3.

[0031]FIG. 5 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:5) of a native sequence PRO189 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:5 is a clone designated herein as “DNA21624-1391”.

[0032]FIG. 6 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:6) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 shown in FIG. 5.

[0033]FIG. 7 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:7) of a native sequence PRO240 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:7 is a clone designated herein as “DNA34387-1138”.

[0034]FIG. 8 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:8) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 shown in FIG. 7.

[0035]FIG. 9 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:9) of a native sequence PRO256 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:9 is a clone designated herein as “DNA35880-1160”.

[0036]FIG. 10 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:10) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:9 shown in FIG. 9.

[0037]FIG. 11 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:11) of a native sequence PRO306 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:11 is a clone designated herein as “DNA39984-1221”.

[0038]FIG. 12 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:12) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:11 shown in FIG. 11.

[0039]FIG. 13 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:13) of a native sequence PRO540 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:13 is a clone designated herein as “DNA44189-1322”.

[0040]FIG. 14 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:14) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:13 shown in FIG. 13.

[0041]FIG. 15 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:15) of a native sequence PRO773 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:15 is a clone designated herein as “DNA48303-2829”.

[0042]FIG. 16 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:16) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:15 shown in FIG. 15.

[0043]FIG. 17 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:17) of a native sequence PRO698 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:17 is a clone designated herein as “DNA48320-1433”.

[0044]FIG. 18 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:18) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:17 shown in FIG. 17.

[0045]FIG. 19 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:19) of a native sequence PRO3567 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:19 is a clone designated herein as “DNA56049-2543”.

[0046]FIG. 20 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:20) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:19 shown in FIG. 19.

[0047]FIG. 21 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:21) of a native sequence PRO826 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:21 is a clone designated herein as “DNA57694-1341”.

[0048]FIG. 22 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:22) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:21 shown in FIG. 21.

[0049]FIG. 23 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:23) of a native sequence PRO1002 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:23 is a clone designated herein as “DNA59208-1373”.

[0050]FIG. 24 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:24) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:23 shown in FIG. 23.

[0051]FIG. 25 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:25) of a native sequence PRO1068 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:25 is a clone designated herein as “DNA59214-1449”.

[0052]FIG. 26 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:26) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:25 shown in FIG. 25.

[0053]FIG. 27 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:27) of a native sequence PRO1030 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:27 is a clone designated herein as “DNA59485-1336”.

[0054]FIG. 28 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:28) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:27 shown in FIG. 27.

[0055]FIG. 29 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:29) of a native sequence PRO1313 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:29 is a clone designated herein as “DNA64966-1575”.

[0056]FIG. 30 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:30) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:29 shown in FIG. 29.

[0057]FIG. 31 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO :31) of a native sequence PRO6071 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:31 is a clone designated herein as “DNA82403-2959”.

[0058]FIG. 32 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:32) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:31 shown in FIG. 31.

[0059]FIG. 33 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:33) of a native sequence PRO4397 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:33 is a clone designated herein as “DNA83505-2606”.

[0060]FIG. 34 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:34) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:33 shown in FIG. 33.

[0061]FIG. 35 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:35) of a native sequence PRO4344 EDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:35 is a clone designated herein as “DNA84927-2585”.

[0062]FIG. 36 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:36) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:35 shown in FIG. 35.

[0063]FIG. 37 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:37) of a native sequence PRO4407 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:37 is a clone designated herein as “DNA92264-2616”.

[0064]FIG. 38 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:38) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:37 shown in FIG. 37.

[0065]FIG. 39 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:39) of a native sequence PRO4316 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:39 is a clone designated herein as “DNA94713-2561”.

[0066]FIG. 40 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:40) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:39 shown in FIG. 39.

[0067]FIG. 41 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO :41) of a native sequence PRO5775 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:41 is a clone designated herein as “DNA96869-2673”.

[0068]FIG. 42 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:42) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:41 shown in FIG. 41.

[0069]FIG. 43 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:43) of a native sequence PRO6016 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:43 is a clone designated herein as “DNA96881-2699”.

[0070]FIG. 44 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:44) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:43 shown in FIG. 43.

[0071]FIG. 45 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:45) of a native sequence PRO4499 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:45 is a clone designated herein as “DNA96889-2641”.

[0072]FIG. 46 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:46) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:45 shown in FIG. 45.

[0073]FIG. 47 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:47) of a native sequence PRO4487 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:47 is a clone designated herein as “DNA96898-2640”.

[0074]FIG. 48 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:48) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:47 shown in FIG. 47.

[0075]FIG. 49 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:49) of a native sequence PRO4980 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:49 is a clone designated herein as “DNA97003-2649”.

[0076]FIG. 50 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:50) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:49 shown in FIG. 49.

[0077]FIG. 51 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:51) of a native sequence PRO6018 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:51 is a clone designated herein as “DNA98565-2701”.

[0078]FIG. 52 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:52) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:51 shown in FIG. 51.

[0079]FIG. 53 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:53) of a native sequence PRO7168 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:53 is a clone designated herein as “DNA102846-2742”.

[0080]FIG. 54 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:54) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:53 shown in FIG. 53.

[0081]FIG. 55 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:55) of a native sequence PRO6308 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:55 is a clone designated herein as “DNA102847-2726”.

[0082]FIG. 56 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:56) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:55 shown in FIG. 55.

[0083]FIG. 57 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:57) of a native sequence PRO6000 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:57 is a clone designated herein as “DNA102880-2689”.

[0084]FIG. 58 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:58) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:57 shown in FIG. 57.

[0085]FIG. 59 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:59) of a native sequence PRO6006 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:59 is a clone designated herein as “DNA105782-2693”.

[0086]FIG. 60 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:60) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:59 shown in FIG. 59.

[0087]FIG. 61 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:61) of a native sequence PRO5800 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:61 is a clone designated herein as “DNA108912-2680”.

[0088]FIG. 62 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:62) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:61 shown in FIG. 61.

[0089]FIG. 63 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:63) of a native sequence PRO7476 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:63 is a clone designated herein as “DNA115253-2757”.

[0090]FIG. 64 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:64) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:63 shown in FIG. 63.

[0091]FIG. 65 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:65) of a native sequence PRO6496 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:65 is a clone designated herein as “DNA119302-2737”.

[0092]FIG. 66 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:66) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:65 shown in FIG. 65.

[0093]FIG. 67 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:67) of a native sequence PRO7422 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:67 is a clone designated herein as “DNA119536-2752”.

[0094]FIG. 68 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:68) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:67 shown in FIG. 67.

[0095]FIG. 69 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:69) of a native sequence PRO7431cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:69 is a clone designated herein as “DNA119542-2754”.

[0096]FIG. 70 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:70) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:69 shown in FIG. 69.

[0097]FIG. 71 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:71) of a native sequence PRO10275 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:71 is a clone designated herein as “DNA143498-2824”.

[0098]FIG. 72 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:72) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:71 shown in FIG. 71.

[0099]FIG. 73 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:73) of a native sequence PRO10268 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:73 is a clone designated herein as “DNA145583-2820”.

[0100]FIG. 74 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:74) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:73 shown in FIG. 73.

[0101]FIG. 75 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:75) of a native sequence PRO20080 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:75 is a clone designated herein as “DNA161000-2896”.

[0102]FIG. 76 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:76) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:75 shown in FIG. 75.

[0103]FIG. 77 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:77) of a native sequence PRO21207 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:77 is a clone designated herein as “DNA161005-2943”.

[0104]FIG. 78 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:78) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:77 shown in FIG. 77.

[0105]FIG. 79 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:79) of a native sequence PRO28633 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:79 is a clone designated herein as “DNA170245-3053”.

[0106]FIG. 80 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:80) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:79 shown in FIG. 79.

[0107]FIG. 81 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:81) of a native sequence PRO20933 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:81 is a clone designated herein as “DNA171771-2919”.

[0108]FIG. 82 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:82) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:81 shown in FIG. 81.

[0109]FIG. 83 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:83) of a native sequence PRO21383 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:83 is a clone designated herein as “DNA173157-2981”.

[0110]FIG. 84 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:84) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:83 shown in FIG. 83.

[0111]FIG. 85 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:85) of a native sequence PRO21485 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:85 is a clone designated herein as “DNA175734-2985”.

[0112]FIG. 86 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:86) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:85 shown in FIG. 85.

[0113]FIG. 87 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:87) of a native sequence PRO28700 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:87 is a clone designated herein as “DNA176108-3040”.

[0114]FIG. 88 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:88) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:87 shown in FIG. 87.

[0115]FIG. 89 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:89) of a native sequence PRO34012 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:89 is a clone designated herein as “DNA190710-3028”.

[0116]FIG. 90 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:90) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:89 shown in FIG. 89.

[0117]FIG. 91 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:91) of a native sequence PRO34003 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:91 is a clone designated herein as “DNA190803-3019”.

[0118]FIG. 92 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:92) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:91 shown in FIG. 91.

[0119]FIG. 93 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:93) of a native sequence PRO34274 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:93 is a clone designated herein as “DNA191064-3069”.

[0120]FIG. 94 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:94) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:93 shown in FIG. 93.

[0121] FIGS. 95A-95B shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:95) of a native sequence PRO34001 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:95 is a clone designated herein as “DNA194909-3013”.

[0122]FIG. 96 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:96) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:95 shown in FIGS. 95A-95B.

[0123]FIG. 97 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:97) of a native sequence PRO34009 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:97 is a clone designated herein as “DNA203532-3029”.

[0124]FIG. 98 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:98) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:97 shown in FIG. 97.

[0125]FIG. 99 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:99) of a native sequence PRO34192 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:99 is a clone designated herein as “DNA213858-3060”.

[0126]FIG. 100 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:100) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:99 shown in FIG. 99.

[0127]FIG. 101 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:101) of a native sequence PRO34564 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:101 is a clone designated herein as “DNA216676-3083”.

[0128]FIG. 102 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:102) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:101 shown in FIG. 101.

[0129]FIG. 103 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:103) of a native sequence PRO35444 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:103 is a clone designated herein as “DNA222653-3104”.

[0130]FIG. 104 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:104) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:103 shown in FIG. 103.

[0131]FIG. 105 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:105) of a native sequence PRO5998 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:105 is a clone designated herein as “DNA96897-2688”.

[0132]FIG. 106 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:106) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:105 shown in FIG. 105.

[0133]FIG. 107 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:107) of a native sequence PRO19651 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:107 is a clone designated herein as “DNA142917-3081”.

[0134]FIG. 108 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:108) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:107 shown in FIG. 107.

[0135]FIG. 109 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:109) of a native sequence PRO20221 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:109 is a clone designated herein as “DNA142930-2914”.

[0136]FIG. 110 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:110) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:109 shown in FIG. 109.

[0137]FIG. 111 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:111) of a native sequence PRO21434 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:111 is a clone designated herein as “DNA147253-2983”.

[0138]FIG. 112 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:112) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:111 shown in FIG. 111.

[0139]FIG. 113 shows a nucleotide sequence (SEQ ID NO:113) of a native sequence PRO19822 cDNA, wherein SEQ ID NO:113 is a clone designated herein as “DNA149927-2887”.

[0140]FIG. 114 shows the amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NO:114) derived from the coding sequence of SEQ ID NO:113 shown in FIG. 113.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0141] I. Definitions

[0142] The terms “PRO polypeptide” and “PRO” as used herein and when immediately followed by a numerical designation refer to various polypeptides, wherein the complete designation (i.e., PRO/number) refers to specific polypeptide sequences as described herein. The terms “PRO/number polypeptide” and “PRO/number” wherein the term “number” is provided as an actual numerical designation as used herein encompass native sequence polypeptides and polypeptide variants (which are further defined herein). The PRO polypeptides described herein may be isolated from a variety of sources, such as from human tissue types or from another source, or prepared by recombinant or synthetic methods. The term “PRO polypeptide” refers to each individual PRO/number polypeptide disclosed herein. All disclosures in this specification which refer to the “PRO polypeptide” refer to each of the polypeptides individually as well as jointly. For example, descriptions of the preparation of, purification of, derivation of, formation of antibodies to or against, administration of, compositions containing, treatment of a disease with, etc., pertain to each polypeptide of the invention individually. The term “PRO polypeptide” also includes variants of the PRO/number polypeptides disclosed herein.

[0143] A “native sequence PRO polypeptide” comprises a polypeptide having the same amino acid sequence as the corresponding PRO polypeptide derived from nature. Such native sequence PRO polypeptides can be isolated from nature or can be produced by recombinant or synthetic means. The term “native sequence PRO polypeptide” specifically encompasses naturally-occurring truncated or secreted forms of the specific PRO polypeptide (e.g., an extracellular domain sequence), naturally-occurring variant forms (e.g., alternatively spliced forms) and naturally-occurring allelic variants of the polypeptide. In various embodiments of the invention, the native sequence PRO polypeptides disclosed herein are mature or full-length native sequence polypeptides comprising the full-length amino acids sequences shown in the accompanying figures. Start and stop codons are shown in bold font and underlined in the figures. However, while the PRO polypeptide disclosed in the accompanying figures are shown to begin with methionine residues designated herein as amino acid position 1 in the figures, it is conceivable and possible that other methionine residues located either upstream or downstream from the amino acid position 1 in the figures may be employed as the starting amino acid residue for the PRO polypeptides.

[0144] The PRO polypeptide “extracellular domain” or “ECD” refers to a form of the PRO polypeptide which is essentially free of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Ordinarily, a PRO polypeptide ECD will have less than 1% of such transmembrane and/or cytoplasmic domains and preferably, will have less than 0.5% of such domains. It will be understood that any transmembrane domains identified for the PRO polypeptides of the present invention are identified pursuant to criteria routinely employed in the art for identifying that type of hydrophobic domain. The exact boundaries of a transmembrane domain may vary but most likely by no more than about 5 amino acids at either end of the domain as initially identified herein. Optionally, therefore, an extracellular domain of a PRO polypeptide may contain from about 5 or fewer amino acids on either side of the transmembrane domain/extracellular domain boundary as identified in the Examples or specification and such polypeptides, with or without the associated signal peptide, and nucleic acid encoding them, are contemplated by the present invention.

[0145] The approximate location of the “signal peptides” of the various PRO polypeptides disclosed herein are shown in the present specification and/or the accompanying figures. It is noted, however, that the C-terminal boundary of a signal peptide may vary, but most likely by no more than about 5 amino acids on either side of the signal peptide C-terminal boundary as initially identified herein, wherein the C-terminal boundary of the signal peptide may be identified pursuant to criteria routinely employed in the art for identifying that type of amino acid sequence element (e.g., Nielsen et al., Prot. Eng. 10:1-6 (1997) and von Heinje et al., Nucl. Acids. Res. 14:4683-4690 (1986)). Moreover, it is also recognized that, in some cases, cleavage of a signal sequence from a secreted polypeptide is not entirely uniform, resulting in more than one secreted species. These mature polypeptides, where the signal peptide is cleaved within no more than about 5 amino acids on either side of the C-terminal boundary of the signal peptide as identified herein, and the polynucleotides encoding them, are contemplated by the present invention.

[0146] “PRO polypeptide variant” means an active PRO polypeptide as defined above or below having at least about 80% amino acid sequence identity with a full-length native sequence PRO polypeptide sequence as disclosed herein, a PRO polypeptide sequence lacking the signal peptide as disclosed herein, an extracellular domain of a PRO polypeptide, with or without the signal peptide, as disclosed herein or any other fragment of a full-length PRO polypeptide sequence as disclosed herein. Such PRO polypeptide variants include, for instance, PRO polypeptides wherein one or more amino acid residues are added, or deleted, at the N- or C-terminus of the full-length native amino acid sequence. Ordinarily, a PRO polypeptide variant will have at least about 80% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 81% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 82% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 83% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 84% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 85% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 8 6% amino acid sequence identity, alte rnatively at least about 87% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 88% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 89% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 90% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 91% amino acid sequence identity, alte rnatively at least about 92% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 93% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 94% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 95% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 96% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 97% amino acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 98% amino acid sequence identity and alternatively at least about 99% amino acid sequence identity to a full-length native sequence PRO polypeptide sequence as disclosed here, a PRO polypeptide sequence lacking the signal peptide as disclosed herein, an extracellular domain of a PRO polypeptide, with or without the signal peptide, as disclosed herein or any other specifically defined fragment of a full-length PRO polypeptide sequence as disclosed herein. Ordinarily, PRO variant polypeptides are at least about 10 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 20 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 30 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 40 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 50 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 60 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 70 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 80 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 90 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 100 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 150 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 200 amino acids in length, alternatively at least about 300 amino acids in length, or more.

[0147] “Percent (%) amino acid sequence identity” with respect to the PRO polypeptide sequences identified herein is defined as the percentage of amino acid residues in a candidate sequence that are identical with the amino acid residues in the specific PRO polypeptide sequence, after aligning the sequences and introducing gaps, if necessary, to achieve the maximum percent sequence identity, and not considering any conservative substitutions as part of the sequence identity. Alignment for purposes of determining percent amino acid sequence identity can be achieved in various ways that are within the skill in the art, for instance, using publicly available computer software such as BLAST, BLAST-2, ALIGN or Megalign (DNASTAR) software. Those skilled in the art can determine appropriate parameters for measuring alignment, including any algorithms needed to achieve maximal alignment over the full length of the sequences being compared. For purposes herein, however, % amino acid sequence identity values are generated using the sequence comparison computer program ALIGN-2, wherein the complete source code for the ALIGN-2 program is provided in Table 1 below. The ALIGN-2 sequence comparison computer program was authored by Genentech, Inc. and the source code shown in Table 1 below has been filed with user documentation in the U.S. Copyright Office, Washington D.C., 20559, where it is registered under U.S. Copyright Registration No. TXU510087. The ALIGN-2 program is publicly available through Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, Calif. or may be compiled from the source code provided in Table 1 below. The ALIGN-2 program should be compiled for use on a UNIX operating system, preferably digital UNIX V4.0D. All sequence comparison parameters are set by the ALIGN-2 program and do not vary.

[0148] In situations where ALIGN-2 is employed for amino acid sequence comparisons, the % amino acid sequence identity of a given amino acid sequence A to, with, or against a given amino acid sequence B (which can alternatively be phrased as a given amino acid sequence A that has or comprises a certain % amino acid sequence identity to, with, or against a given amino acid sequence B) is calculated as follows:

100 times the fraction X/Y

[0149] where X is the number of amino acid residues scored as identical matches by the sequence alignment program ALIGN-2 in that program's alignment of A and B, and where Y is the total number of amino acid residues in B. It will be appreciated that where the length of amino acid sequence A is not equal to the length of amino acid sequence B, the % amino acid sequence identity of A to B will not equal the % amino acid sequence identity of B to A. As examples of % amino acid sequence identity calculations using this method, Tables 2 and 3 demonstrate how to calculate the % amino acid sequence identity of the amino acid sequence designated “Comparison Protein” to the amino acid sequence designated “PRO”, wherein “PRO” represents the amino acid sequence of a hypothetical PRO polypeptide of interest, “Comparison Protein” represents the amino acid sequence of a polypeptide against which the “PRO” polypeptide of interest is being compared, and “X, “Y” and “Z” each represent different hypothetical amino acid residues.

[0150] Unless specifically stated otherwise, all % amino acid sequence identity values used herein are obtained as described in the immediately preceding paragraph using the ALIGN-2 computer program. However, % amino acid sequence identity values may also be obtained as described below by using the WU-BLAST-2 computer program (Altschul et al., Methods in Enzymology 266:460-480 (1996)). Most of the WU-BLAST-2 search parameters are set to the default values. Those not set to default values, i.e., the adjustable parameters, are set with the following values: overlap span=1, overlap fraction=0.125, word threshold (T)=11, and scoring matrix=BLOSUM62. When WU-BLAST-2 is employed, a % amino acid sequence identity value is determined by dividing (a) the number of matching identical amino acid residues between the amino acid sequence of the PRO polypeptide of interest having a sequence derived from the native PRO polypeptide and the comparison amino acid sequence of interest (i.e., the sequence against which the PRO polypeptide of interest is being compared which may be a PRO variant polypeptide) as determined by WU-BLAST-2 by (b) the total number of amino acid residues of the PRO polypeptide of interest. For example, in the statement “a polypeptide comprising an the amino acid sequence A which has or having at least 80% amino acid sequence identity to the amino acid sequence B”, the amino acid sequence A is the comparison amino acid sequence of interest and the amino acid sequence B is the amino acid sequence of the PRO polypeptide of interest.

[0151] Percent amino acid sequence identity may also be determined using the sequence comparison program NCBI-BLAST2 (Altschul et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402 (1997)). The NCBI-BLAST2 sequence comparison program may be downloaded from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov or otherwise obtained from the National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Md. NCBI-BLAST2 uses several search parameters, wherein all of those search parameters are set to default values including, for example, unmask=yes, strand=all, expected occurrences=10, minimum low complexity length=15/5, multi-pass e-value=0.01, constant for multi-pass=25, dropoff for final gapped alignment=25 and scoring matrix=BLOSUM62.

[0152] In situations where NCBI-BLAST2 is employed for amino acid sequence comparisons, the % amino acid sequence identity of a given amino acid sequence A to, with, or against a given amino acid sequence B (which can alternatively be phrased as a given amino acid sequence A that has or comprises a certain % amino acid sequence identity to, with, or against a given amino acid sequence B) is calculated as follows:

100 times the fraction X/Y

[0153] where X is the number of amino acid residues scored as identical matches by the sequence alignment program NCBI-BLAST2 in that program's alignment of A and B, and where Y is the total number of amino acid residues in B. It will be appreciated that where the length of amino acid sequence A is not equal to the length of amino acid sequence B, the % amino acid sequence identity of A to B will not equal the % amino acid sequence identity of B to A.

[0154] “PRO variant polynucleotide” or “PRO variant nucleic acid sequence” means a nucleic acid molecule which encodes an active PRO polypeptide as defined below and which has at least about 80% nucleic acid sequence identity with a nucleotide acid sequence encoding a full-length native sequence PRO polypeptide sequence as disclosed herein, a full-length native sequence PRO polypeptide sequence lacking the signal peptide as disclosed herein, an extracellular domain of a PRO polypeptide, with or without the signal peptide, as disclosed herein or any other fragment of a full-length PRO polypeptide sequence as disclosed herein. Ordinarily, a PRO variant polynucleotide will have at least about 80% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 81% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 82% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 83% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 84% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 85% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 86% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 87% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 88% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 89% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 90% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 91% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 92% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 93% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 94% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 95% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 96% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 97% nucleic acid sequence identity, alternatively at least about 98% nucleic acid sequence identity and alternatively at least about 99% nucleic acid sequence identity with a nucleic acid sequence encoding a full-length native sequence PRO polypeptide sequence as disclosed herein, a full-length native sequence PRO polypeptide sequence lacking the signal peptide as disclosed herein, an extracellular domain of a PRO polypeptide, with or without the signal sequence, as disclosed herein or any other fragment of a full-length PRO polypeptide sequence as disclosed herein. Variants do not encompass the native nucleotide sequence.

[0155] Ordinarily, PRO variant polynucleotides are at least about 30 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 60 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 90 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 120 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 150 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 180 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 210 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 240 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 270 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 300 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 450 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 600 nucleotides in length, alternatively at least about 900 nucleotides in length, or more.

[0156] “Percent (%) nucleic acid sequence identity” with respect to PRO-encoding nucleic acid sequences identified herein is defined as the percentage of nucleotides in a candidate sequence that are identical with the nucleotides in the PRO nucleic acid sequence of interest, after aligning the sequences and introducing gaps, if necessary, to achieve the maximum percent sequence identity. Alignment for purposes of determining percent nucleic acid sequence identity can be achieved in various ways that are within the skill in the art, for instance, using publicly available computer software such as BLAST, BLAST-2, ALIGN or Megalign (DNASTAR) software. For purposes herein, however, % nucleic acid sequence identity values are generated using the sequence comparison computer program ALIGN-2, wherein the complete source code for the ALIGN-2 program is provided in Table 1 below. The ALIGN-2 sequence comparison computer program was authored by Genentech, Inc. and the source code shown in Table 1 below has been filed with user documentation in the U.S. Copyright Office, Washington D.C., 20559, where it is registered under U.S. Copyright Registration No. TXU510087. The ALIGN-2 program is publicly available through Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, California or may be compiled from the source code provided in Table 1 below. The ALIGN-2 program should be compiled for use on a UNIX operating system, preferably digital UNIX V4.0D. All sequence comparison parameters are set by the ALIGN-2 program and do not vary.

[0157] In situations where ALIGN-2 is employed for nucleic acid sequence comparisons, the % nucleic acid sequence identity of a given nucleic acid sequence C to, with, or against a given nucleic acid sequence D (which can alternatively be phrased as a given nucleic acid sequence C that has or comprises a certain % nucleic acid sequence identity to, with, or against a given nucleic acid sequence D) is calculated as follows:

100 times the fraction W/Z

[0158] where W is the number of nucleotides scored as identical matches by the sequence alignment program ALIGN-2 in that program's alignment of C and D, and where Z is the total number of nucleotides in D. It will be appreciated that where the length of nucleic acid sequence C is not equal to the length of nucleic acid sequence D, the % nucleic acid sequence identity of C to D will not equal the % nucleic acid sequence identity of D to C. As examples of % nucleic acid sequence identity calculations, Tables 4 and 5, demonstrate how to calculate the % nucleic acid sequence identity of the nucleic acid sequence designated “Comparison DNA” to the nucleic acid sequence designated “PRO-DNA”, wherein “PRO-DNA” represents a hypothetical PRO-encoding nucleic acid sequence of interest, “Comparison DNA” represents the nucleotide sequence of a nucleic acid molecule against which the “PRO-DNA” nucleic acid molecule of interest is being compared, and “N”, “L” and “V” each represent different hypothetical nucleotides.

[0159] Unless specifically stated otherwise, all % nucleic acid sequence identity values used herein are obtained as described in the immediately preceding paragraph using the ALIGN-2 computer program. However, % nucleic acid sequence identity values may also be obtained as described below by using the WU-BLAST-2 computer program (Altschul et al., Methods in Enzymology 266:460-480 (1996)). Most of the WU-BLAST-2 search parameters are set to the default values. Those not set to default values, i.e., the adjustable parameters, are set with the following values: overlap span=1, overlap fraction=0.125, word threshold (T)=11, and scoring matrix=BLOSUM62. When WU-BLAST-2 is employed, a % nucleic acid sequence identity value is determined by dividing (a) the number of matching identical nucleotides between the nucleic acid sequence of the PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid molecule of interest having a sequence derived from the native sequence PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid and the comparison nucleic acid molecule of interest (i.e., the sequence against which the PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid molecule of interest is being compared which may be a variant PRO polynucleotide) as determined by WU-BLAST-2 by (b) the total number of nucleotides of the PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid molecule of interest. For example, in the statement “an isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence A which has or having at least 80% nucleic acid sequence identity to the nucleic acid sequence B”, the nucleic acid sequence A is the comparison nucleic acid molecule of interest and the nucleic acid sequence B is the nucleic acid sequence of the PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid molecule of interest.

[0160] Percent nucleic acid sequence identity may also be determined using the sequence comparison program NCBI-BLAST2 (Altschul et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389-3402 (1997)). The NCBI-BLAST2 sequence comparison program may be downloaded from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov or otherwise obtained from the National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Md. NCBI-BLAST2 uses several search parameters, wherein all of those search parameters are set to default values including, for example, unmask=yes, strand=all, expected occurrences=10, minimum low complexity length=15/5, multi-pass e-value=0.01, constant for multi-pass=25, dropoff for final gapped alignment=25 and scoring matrix=BLOSUM62.

[0161] In situations where NCBI-BLAST2 is employed for sequence comparisons, the % nucleic acid sequence identity of a given nucleic acid sequence C to, with, or against a given nucleic acid sequence D (which can alternatively be phrased as a given nucleic acid sequence C that has or comprises a certain % nucleic acid sequence identity to, with, or against a given nucleic acid sequence D) is calculated as follows:

100 times the fraction W/Z

[0162] where W is the number of nucleotides scored as identical matches by the sequence alignment program NCBI-BLAST2 in that program's alignment of C and D, and where Z is the total number of nucleotides in D. It will be appreciated that where the length of nucleic acid sequence C is not equal to the length of nucleic acid sequence D, the % nucleic acid sequence identity of C to D will not equal the % nucleic acid sequence identity of D to C.

[0163] In other embodiments, PRO variant polynucleotides are nucleic acid molecules that encode an active PRO polypeptide and which are capable of hybridizing, preferably under stringent hybridization and wash conditions, to nucleotide sequences encoding a full-length PRO polypeptide as disclosed herein. PRO variant polypeptides may be those that are encoded by a PRO variant polynucleotide.

[0164] “Isolated,” when used to describe the various polypeptides disclosed herein, means polypeptide that has been identified and separated and/or recovered from a component of its natural environment. Contaminant components of its natural environment are materials that would typically interfere with diagnostic or therapeutic uses for the polypeptide, and may include enzymes, hormones, and other proteinaceous or non-proteinaceous solutes. In preferred embodiments, the polypeptide will be purified (1) to a degree sufficient to obtain at least 15 residues of N-terminal or internal amino acid sequence by use of a spinning cup sequenator, or (2) to homogeneity by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing or reducing conditions using Coomassie blue or, preferably, silver stain. Isolated polypeptide includes polypeptide in situ within recombinant cells, since at least one component of the PRO polypeptide natural environment will not be present. Ordinarily, however, isolated polypeptide will be prepared by at least one purification step.

[0165] An “isolated” PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid or other polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid is a nucleic acid molecule that is identified and separated from at least one contaminant nucleic acid molecule with which it is ordinarily associated in the natural source of the polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid. An isolated polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid molecule is other than in the form or setting in which it is found in nature. Isolated polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid molecules therefore are distinguished from the specific polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid molecule as it exists in natural cells. However, an isolated polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid molecule includes polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid molecules contained in cells that ordinarily express the polypeptide where, for example, the nucleic acid molecule is in a chromosomal location different from that of natural cells.

[0166] The term “control sequences” refers to DNA sequences necessary for the expression of an operably linked coding sequence in a particular host organism. The control sequences that are suitable for prokaryotes, for example, include a promoter, optionally an operator sequence, and a ribosome binding site. Eukaryotic cells are known to utilize promoters, polyadenylation signals, and enhancers.

[0167] Nucleic acid is “operably linked” when it is placed into a functional relationship with another nucleic acid sequence. For example, DNA for a presequence or secretory leader is operably linked to DNA for a polypeptide if it is expressed as a preprotein that participates in the secretion of the polypeptide; a promoter or enhancer is operably linked to a coding sequence if it affects the transcription of the sequence; or a ribosome binding site is operably linked to a coding sequence if it is positioned so as to facilitate translation. Generally, “operably linked” means that the DNA sequences being linked are contiguous, and, in the case of a secretory leader, contiguous and in reading phase. However, enhancers do not have to be contiguous. Linking is accomplished by ligation at convenient restriction sites. If such sites do not exist, the synthetic oligonucleotide adaptors or linkers are used in accordance with conventional practice.

[0168] The term “antibody” is used in the broadest sense and specifically covers, for example, single anti-PRO monoclonal antibodies (including agonist, antagonist, and neutralizing antibodies), anti-PRO antibody compositions with polyepitopic specificity, single chain anti-PRO antibodies, and fragments of anti-PRO antibodies (see below). The term “monoclonal antibody” as used herein refers to an antibody obtained from a population of substantially homogeneous antibodies, i.e., the individual antibodies comprising the population are identical except for possible naturally-occurring mutations that may be present in minor amounts.

[0169] “Stringency” of hybridization reactions is readily determinable by one of ordinary skill in the art, and generally is an empirical calculation dependent upon probe length, washing temperature, and salt concentration. In general, longer probes require higher temperatures for proper annealing, while shorter probes need lower temperatures. Hybridization generally depends on the ability of denatured DNA to reanneal when complementary strands are present in an environment below their melting temperature. The higher the degree of desired homology between the probe and hybridizable sequence, the higher the relative temperature which can be used. As a result, it follows that higher relative temperatures would tend to make the reaction conditions more stringent, while lower temperatures less so. For additional details and explanation of stringency of hybridization reactions, see Ausubel et al., Current Protocols in Molecular Biology, Wiley Interscience Publishers, (1995).

[0170] “Stringent conditions” or “high stringency conditions”, as defined herein, may be identified by those that: (1) employ low ionic strength and high temperature for washing, for example 0.015 M sodium chloride/0.0015 M sodium citrate/0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate at 50° C.; (2) employ during hybridization a denaturing agent, such as formamide, for example, 50% (v/v) formamide with 0.1% bovine serum albumin/0.1% Ficoll/0.1% polyvinylpyrrolidone/50 mM sodium phosphate buffer at pH 6.5 with 750 mM sodium chloride, 75 mM sodium citrate at 42° C.; or (3) employ 50% formamide, 5' SSC (0.75 M NaCl, 0.075 M sodium citrate), 50 mM sodium phosphate (pH 6.8), 0.1% sodium pyrophosphate, 5× Denhardt's solution, sonicated salmon sperm DNA (50 μg/ml), 0.1% SDS, and 10% dextran sulfate at 42° C., with washes at 42° C. in 0.2×SSC (sodium chloride/sodium citrate) and 50% formamide at 55° C., followed by a high-stringency wash consisting of 0.1×SSC containing EDTA at 55° C.

[0171] “Moderately stringent conditions” may be identified as described by Sambrook et al., Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, New York: Cold Spring Harbor Press, 1989, and include the use of washing solution and hybridization conditions (e.g., temperature, ionic strength and % SDS) less stringent that those described above. An example of moderately stringent conditions is overnight incubation at 37° C. in a solution comprising: 20% formamide, 5× SSC (150 mM NaCl, 15 mM trisodium citrate), 50 mM sodium phosphate (pH 7.6), 5×Denhardt's solution, 10% dextran sulfate, and 20 mg/ml denatured sheared salmon sperm DNA, followed by washing the filters in 1×SSC at about 37-50° C. The skilled artisan will recognize how to adjust the temperature, ionic strength, etc. as necessary to accommodate factors such as probe length and the like.

[0172] The term “epitope tagged” when used herein refers to a chimeric polypeptide comprising a PRO polypeptide fused to a “tag polypeptide”. The tag polypeptide has enough residues to provide an epitope against which an antibody can be made, yet is short enough such that it does not interfere with activity of the polypeptide to which it is fused. The tag polypeptide preferably also is fairly unique so that the antibody does not substantially cross-react with other epitopes. Suitable tag polypeptides generally have at least six amino acid residues and usually between about 8 and 50 amino acid residues (preferably, between about 10 and 20 amino acid residues).

[0173] As used herein, the term “immunoadhesin” designates antibody-like molecules which combine the binding specificity of a heterologous protein (an “adhesin”) with the effector functions of immunoglobulin constant domains. Structurally, the immunoadhesins comprise a fusion of an amino acid sequence with the desired binding specificity which is other than the antigen recognition and binding site of an antibody (i.e. is “heterologous”), and an immunoglobulin constant domain sequence. The adhesin part of an immunoadhesin molecule typically is a contiguous amino acid sequence comprising at least the binding site of a receptor or a ligand. The immunoglobulin constant domain sequence in the immunoadhesin may be obtained from any immunoglobulin, such as IgG-1, IgG-2, IgG-3, or IgG4 subtypes, IgA (including IgA-1 and IgA-2), IgE, IgD or IgM.

[0174] “Active” or “activity” for the purposes herein refers to form(s) of a PRO polypeptide which retain a biological and/or an immunological activity of native or naturally-occurring PRO, wherein “biological” activity refers to a biological function (either inhibitory or stimulatory) caused by a native or naturally-occurring PRO other than the ability to induce the production of an antibody against an antigenic epitope possessed by a native or naturally-occurring PRO and an “immunological” activity refers to the ability to induce the production of an antibody against an antigenic epitope possessed by a native or naturally-occurring PRO.

[0175] The term “antagonist” is used in the broadest sense, and includes any molecule that partially or fully blocks, inhibits, or neutralizes a biological activity of a native PRO polypeptide disclosed herein. In a similar manner, the term “agonist” is used in the broadest sense and includes any molecule that mimics a biological activity of a native PRO polypeptide disclosed herein. Suitable agonist or antagonist molecules specifically include agonist or antagonist antibodies or antibody fragments, fragments or amino acid sequence variants of native PRO polypeptides, peptides, antisense oligonucleotides, small organic molecules, etc. Methods for identifying agonists or antagonists of a PRO polypeptide may comprise contacting a PRO polypeptide with a candidate agonist or antagonist molecule and measuring a detectable change in one or more biological activities normally associated with the PRO polypeptide.

[0176] “Treatment” refers to both therapeutic treatment and prophylactic or preventative measures, wherein the object is to prevent or slow down (lessen) the targeted pathologic condition or disorder. Those in need of treatment include those already with the disorder as well as those prone to have the disorder or those in whom the disorder is to be prevented.

[0177] “Chronic” administration refers to administration of the agent(s) in a continuous mode as opposed to an acute mode, so as to maintain the initial therapeutic effect (activity) for an extended period of time. “Intermittent” administration is treatment that is not consecutively done without interruption, but rather is cyclic in nature.

[0178] “Mammal” for purposes of treatment refers to any animal classified as a mammal, including humans, domestic and farm animals, and zoo, sports, or pet animals, such as dogs, cats, cattle, horses, sheep, pigs, goats, rabbits, etc. Preferably, the mammal is human.

[0179] Administration “in combination with” one or more further therapeutic agents includes simultaneous (concurrent) and consecutive administration in any order.

[0180] “Carriers” as used herein include pharmaceutically acceptable carriers, excipients, or stabilizers which are nontoxic to the cell or mammal being exposed thereto at the dosages and concentrations employed. Often the physiologically acceptable carrier is an aqueous pH buffered solution. Examples of physiologically acceptable carriers include buffers such as phosphate, citrate, and other organic acids; antioxidants including ascorbic acid; low molecular weight (less than about 10 residues) polypeptide; proteins, such as serum albumin, gelatin, or immunoglobulins; hydrophilic polymers such as polyvinylpyrrolidone; amino acids such as glycine, glutamine, asparagine, arginine or lysine; monosaccharides, disaccharides, and other carbohydrates including glucose, mannose, or dextrins; chelating agents such as EDTA; sugar alcohols such as mannitol or sorbitol; salt-forming counterions such as sodium; and/or nonionic surfactants such as TWEEN™, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and PLURONICS™.

[0181] “Antibody fragments” comprise a portion of an intact antibody, preferably the antigen binding or variable region of the intact antibody. Examples of antibody fragments include Fab, Fab′, F(ab′)2, and Fv fragments; diabodies; linear antibodies (Zapata et al., Protein Eng. 8(10): 1057-1062 [1995]); single-chain antibody molecules; and multispecific antibodies formed from antibody fragments.

[0182] Papain digestion of antibodies produces two identical antigen-binding fragments, called “Fab” fragments, each with a single antigen-binding site, and a residual “Fc” fragment, a designation reflecting the ability to crystallize readily. Pepsin treatment yields an F(ab′)2 fragment that has two antigen-combining sites and is still capable of cross-linking antigen.

[0183] “Fv” is the minimum antibody fragment which contains a complete antigen-recognition and -binding site. This region consists of a dimer of one heavy- and one light-chain variable domain in tight, non-covalent association. It is in this configuration that the three CDRs of each variable domain interact to define an antigen-binding site on the surface of the VH-VL dimer. Collectively, the six CDRs confer antigen-binding specificity to the antibody. However, even a single variable domain (or half of an Fv comprising only three CDRs specific for an antigen) has the ability to recognize and bind antigen, although at a lower affinity than the entire binding site.

[0184] The Fab fragment also contains the constant domain of the light chain and the first constant domain (CH1) of the heavy chain. Fab fragments differ from Fab′ fragments by the addition of a few residues at the carboxy terminus of the heavy chain CH1 domain including one or more cysteines from the antibody hinge region. Fab′-SH is the designation herein for Fab′ in which the cysteine residue(s) of the constant domains bear a free thiol group. F(ab′)2 antibody fragments originally were produced as pairs of Fab′ fragments which have hinge cysteines between them. Other chemical couplings of antibody fragments are also known.

[0185] The “light chains” of antibodies (immunoglobulins) from any vertebrate species can be assigned to one of two clearly distinct types, called kappa and lambda, based on the amino acid sequences of their constant domains.

[0186] Depending on the amino acid sequence of the constant domain of their heavy chains, immunoglobulins can be assigned to different classes. There are five major classes of immunoglobulins: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM, and several of these may be further divided into subclasses (isotypes), e.g., IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgA, and IgA2.

[0187] “Single-chain Fv” or “sFv” antibody fragments comprise the VH and VL domains of antibody, wherein these domains are present in a single polypeptide chain. Preferably, the Fv polypeptide further comprises a polypeptide linker between the VH and VL domains which enables the sFv to form the desired structure for antigen binding. For a review of sFv, see Pluckthun in The Pharmacology of Monoclonal Antibodies, vol. 113, Rosenburg and Moore eds., Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 269-315 (1994).

[0188] The term “diabodies” refers to small antibody fragments with two antigen-binding sites, which fragments comprise a heavy-chain variable domain (VH) connected to a light-chain variable domain (VL) in the same polypeptide chain (VH-VL). By using a linker that is too short to allow pairing between the two domains on the same chain, the domains are forced to pair with the complementary domains of another chain and create two antigen-binding sites. Diabodies are described more fully in, for example, EP 404,097; WO 93/11161; and Hollinger et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 90:6444-6448 (1993).

[0189] An “isolated” antibody is one which has been identified and separated and/or recovered from a component of its natural environment. Contaminant components of its natural environment are materials which would interfere with diagnostic or therapeutic uses for the antibody, and may include enzymes, hormones, and other proteinaceous or nonproteinaceous solutes. In preferred embodiments, the antibody will be purified (1) to greater than 95% by weight of antibody as determined by the Lowry method, and most preferably more than 99% by weight, (2) to a degree sufficient to obtain at least 15 residues of N-terminal or internal amino acid sequence by use of a spinning cup sequenator, or (3) to homogeneity by SDS-PAGE under reducing or nonreducing conditions using Coomassie blue or, preferably, silver stain. Isolated antibody includes the antibody in situ within recombinant cells since at least one component of the antibody's natural environment will not be present. Ordinarily, however, isolated antibody will be prepared by at least one purification step.

[0190] An antibody that “specifically binds to” or is “specific for” a particular polypeptide or an epitope on a particular polypeptide is one that binds to that particular polypeptide or epitope on a particular polypeptide without substantially binding to any other polypeptide or polypeptide epitope.

[0191] The word “label” when used herein refers to a detectable compound or composition which is conjugated directly or indirectly to the antibody so as to generate a “labeled” antibody. The label may be detectable by itself (e.g. radioisotope labels or fluorescent labels) or, in the case of an enzymatic label, may catalyze chemical alteration of a substrate compound or composition which is detectable.

[0192] By “solid phase” is meant a non-aqueous matrix to which the antibody of the present invention can adhere. Examples of solid phases encompassed herein include those formed partially or entirely of glass (e.g., controlled pore glass), polysaccharides (e.g., agarose), polyacrylamides, polystyrene, polyvinyl alcohol and silicones. In certain embodiments, depending on the context, the solid phase can comprise the well of an assay plate; in others it is a purification column (e.g., an affinity chromatography column). This term also includes a discontinuous solid phase of discrete particles, such as those described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,275,149.

[0193] A “liposome” is a small vesicle composed of various types of lipids, phospholipids and/or surfactant which is useful for delivery of a drug (such as a PRO polypeptide or antibody thereto) to a mammal. The components of the liposome are commonly arranged in a bilayer formation, similar to the lipid arrangement of biological membranes.

[0194] A “small molecule” is defined herein to have a molecular weight below about 500 Daltons.

[0195] An “effective amount” of a polypeptide disclosed herein or an agonist or antagonist thereof is an amount sufficient to carry out a specifically stated purpose. An “effective amount” may be determined empirically and in a routine manner, in relation to the stated purpose.

TABLE 1
/*
 *
 * C—C increased from 12 to 15
 * Z is average of EQ
 * B is average of ND
 * match with stop is _M; stop—stop = 0; J (joker) match = 0
 */
#define _M −8 /* value of a match with a stop */
int _day[26][26] = {
/*  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z */
/* A */ {2, 0, −2, 0, 0, −4, 1, −1, −1, 0, −1, −2, −1, 0, _M, 1, 0, −2, 1, 1, 0, 0, −6, 0, −3, 0},
/* B */ {0, 3, −4, 3, 2, −5, 0, 1, −2, 0, 0, −3, −2, 2, _M, −1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, −2, −5, 0, −3, 1},
/* C */ {−2, −4, 15, −5, −5, −4, −3, −3, −2, 0, −5, −6, −5, −4, _M, −3, −5, −4, 0, −2, 0, −2, −8, 0, 0, −5},
/* D */ {0, 3, −5, 4, 3, −6, 1, 1, −2, 0, 0, −4, −3, 2, _M, −1, 2, −1, 0, 0, 0, −2, −7, 0, −4, 2},
/* E */ {0, 2, −5, 3, 4, −5, 0, 1, −2, 0, 0, −3, −2, 1, _M, −1, 2, −1, 0, 0, 0, −2, −7, 0, −4, 3},
/* F */ {−4, −5, −4, −6, −5, 9, −5, −2, 1, 0, −5, 2, 0, −4, _M, −5, −5, −4, −3, −3, 0, −1, 0, 0, 7, −5},
/* G */ {1, 0, −3, 1, 0, −5, 5, −2, −3, 0, −2, −4, −3, 0, _M, −1, −1, −3, 1, 0, 0, −1, −7, 0, −5, 0},
/* H */ {−1, 1, −3, 1, 1, −2, −2, 6, −2, 0, 0, −2, −2, 2, _M, 0, 3, 2, −1, −1, 0, −2, −3, 0, 0, 2},
/* I */ {−1, −2, −2, −2, −2, 1, −3, −2, 5, 0, −2, 2, 2, −2, _M, −2, −2, −2, −1, 0, 0, 4, −5, 0, −1, −2},
/* J */ {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, _M, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0},
/* K */ {−1, 0, −5, 0, 0, −5, −2, 0, −2, 0, 5, −3, 0, 1, _M, −1, 1, 3, 0, 0, 0, −2, −3, 0, −4, 0},
/* L */ {−2, −3, −6, −4, −3, 2, −4, −2, 2, 0, −3, 6, 4, −3, _M, −3, −2, −3, −3 , −1, 0, 2, −2, 0, −1, −2}
/* M */ {−1, −2, −5, −3, −2, 0, −3, −2, 2, 0, 0, 4, 6, −2, _M, −2, −1, 0, −2, −1, 0, 2, −4, 0, −2, −1},
/* N */ {0, 2, −4, 2, 1, −4, 0, 2, −2, 0, 1, −3, −2, 2, _M, −1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, −2, −4, 0, −2, 1},
/* O */ {_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M, 0,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,_M,},
/* P */ {1, −1, −3, −1, −1, −5, −1, 0, −2, 0, −1, −3, −2, −1,_M, 6, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, −1, −6, 0, −5, 0},
/* Q */ {0, 1, −5, 2, 2, −5, −1, 3, −2, 0, 1, −2, −1, 1, _M, 0, 4, 1, −1, −1, 0, −2, −5, 0, −4, 3},
/* R */ {−2, 0, −4, −1, −1, −4, −3, 2, −2, 0, 3, −3, 0, 0, _M, 0, 1, 6, 0, −1, 0, −2, 2, 0, −4, 0},
/* S */ {1, 0, 0, 0, 0, −3, 1, −1, −1, 0, 0, −3, −2, 1, _M, 1, −1, 0, 2, 1, 0, −1, −2, 0, −3, 0},
/* T */ {1, 0, −2, 0, 0, −3, 0, −1, 0, 0, 0, −1, −1, 0, _M, 0, −1, −1, 1, 3, 0, 0, −5, 0, −3, 0},
/* U */ {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,_M, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0},
/* V */ {0, −2, −2, −2, −2, −1, −1, −2, 4, 0, −2, 2, 2, −2,_M, −1, −2, −2, −1, 0, 0, 4, −6, 0, −2, −2},
/* W */ {−6, −5, −8, −7, −7, 0, −7, −3, −5, 0, −3, −2, −4, −4,_M, −6, −5, 2, −2, −5, 0, −6, 17, 0, 0, −6},
/* X */ {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, _M, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0},
/* Y */ {−3, −3, 0, −4, −4, 7, −5, 0, −1, 0, −4, −1, −2, −2, _M, −5, −4, −4, −3, −3, 0, −2, 0, 0, 10, −4},
/* Z */ {0, 1, −5, 2, 3, −5, 0, 2, −2, 0, 0, −2, −1, 1,_M, 0, 3, 0, 0, 0, 0, −2, −6, 0, −4, 4},
};
/*
 */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#define MAXJMP  16 /* max jumps in a diag */
#define MAXGAP  24 /* don't continue to penalize gaps larger than this */
#define JMPS 1024 /* max jmps in an path */
#define MX   4 /* save if there's at least MX-1 bases since last jmp */
#define DMAT   3 /* value of matching bases */
#define DMIS   0 /* penalty for mismatched bases */
#define DINS0   8 /* penalty for a gap */
#define DINS1   1 /* penalty per base */
#define PINS0   8 /* penalty for a gap */
#define PINS1   4 /* penalty per residue */
struct jmp {
short n[MAXJMP]; /* size of jmp (neg for dely) */
unsigned short x[MAXJMP]; /* base no. of jmp in seq x */
/* limits seq to 2{circumflex over ( )}16 −1 */
};
struct diag {
int score; /* score at last jmp */
long offset; /* offset of prev block */
short ijmp; /* current jmp index */
struct jmp jp; /* list of jmps */
};
struct path {
int spc; /* number of leading spaces */
short n[JMPS]; /* size of jmp (gap) */
int x[JMPS]; /* loc of jmp (last elem before gap) */
};
char *ofile; /* output file name */
char *namex[2]; /* seq names: getseqs() */
char *prog; /* prog name for err msgs */
char *seqx[2]; /* seqs: getseqs() */
int dmax; /* best diag: nw() */
int dmax0; /* final diag */
int dna; /* set if dna: main() */
int endgaps; /* set if penalizing end gaps */
int gapx, gapy; /* total gaps in seqs */
int len0, len1; /* seq lens */
int ngapx, ngapy; /* total size of gaps */
int smax; /* max score: nw() */
int *xbm; /* bitmap for matching */
long offset; /* current offset in jmp file */
struct diag *dx; /* holds diagonals */
struct path pp[2]; /* holds path for seqs */
char *calloc(), *malloc(), *index(), *strcpy();
char *getseq(), *g_calloc();
/* Needleman-Wunsch alignment program
 *
 * usage: progs file1 file2
 *  where file1 and file2 are two dna or two protein sequences.
 *  The sequences can be in upper- or lower-case an may contain ambiguity
 *  Any lines beginning with ‘;’, ‘>’ or ‘<’ are ignored
 *  Max file length is 65535 (limited by unsigned short x in the jmp struct)
 *  A sequence with ⅓ or more of its elements ACGTU is assumed to be DNA
 *  Output is in the file “align.out”
 *
 * The program may create a tmp file in /tmp to hold info about traceback.
 * Original version developed under BSD 4.3 on a vax 8650
 */
#include “nw.h”
#include “day.h”
static _dbval[26] = {
1,14,2,13,0,0,4,11,0,0,12,0,3,15,0,0,0,5,6,8,8,7,9,0,10,0
};
static _pbval[26] = {
1, 2|(1<<(‘D’-‘A’))|(1<<(‘N’-‘A’)), 4, 8, 16, 32, 64,
128, 256, 0×FFFFFFF, 1<<10, 1<<11, 1<<12, 1<<13, 1<<14,
1<<15, 1<<16, 1< <17, 1<<18, 1<<19, 1<<20, 1<<21, 1<<22,
1<<23, 1<<24, 1<<25|(1<<(‘E’-‘A’))|(1<<(‘Q’-‘A’))
};
main(ac, av) main
int ac;
char *av[];
{
prog = av[0];
if(ac != 3) {
fprintf(stderr, “usage: %s file1 file2\n”, prog);
fprintf(stderr, “where file1 and file2 are two dna or two protein sequences.\n”);
fprintf(stderr, “The sequences can be in upper- or lower-case\n”);
fprintf(stderr, “Any lines beginning with ‘;’ or ‘<’ are ignored\n”);
fprintf(stderr, “Output is in the file \“align.out\”\n”);
exit(1);
}
namex[0] = av[1];
namex[1] = av[2];
seqx[0] = getseq(namex[0], &len0);
seqx[1] = getseq(namex[1], &len1);
xbm = (dna)? _dbval : _pbval;
endgaps = 0; /* 1 to penalize endgaps */
ofile = “align.out”; /* output file */
nw(); /* fill in the matrix, get the possible jmps */
readjmps(); /* get the actual jmps */
print(); /* print stats, alignment */
cleanup(0); /* unlink any tmp files */
}
/* do the alignment, return best score: main()
 * dna: values in Fitch and Smith, PNAS, 80, 1382-1386, 1983
 * pro: PAM 250 values
 * When scores are equal, we prefer mismatches to any gap, prefer
 * a new gap to extending an ongoing gap, and prefer a gap in seqx
 * to a gap in seq y.
 */
nw() nw
{
char *px, *py; /* seqs and ptrs */
int *ndely, *dely; /* keep track of dely */
int ndelx, delx; /* keep track of delx */
int *tmp; /* for swapping row0, row1 */
int mis; /* score for each type */
int ins0, ins1; /* insertion penalties */
register id; /* diagonal index */
register ij; /* jmp index */
register *col0, *col1; /* score for curr, last row */
register xx, yy; /* index into seqs */
dx = (struct diag *)g_calloc(“to get diags”, len0+len1+1, sizeof(struct diag));
ndely = (int *)g_calloc(“to get ndely”, len1+1, sizeof(int));
dely = (int *)g_calloc(“to get dely”, len1+1, sizeof(int));
col0 = (int *)g_calloc(“to get col0”, len1+1, sizeof(int));
col1 = (int *)g_calloc(“to get col1”, len1+1, sizeof(int));
ins0 = (dna)? DINS0 : PINS0;
ins1 = (dna)? DINS1 : PlNS1;
smax = −10000;
if (endgaps) {
for (col0[0] = dely[0] = −ins0, yy = 1; yy <= len1; yy++) {
col0[yy] = dely[yy] = col0[yy−1] − ins1;
ndely[yy] = yy;
}
col0[0] = 0; /* Waterman Bull Math Biol 84 */
}
else
for (yy = 1; yy <= len1; yy++)
dely[yy] = −ins0;
/* fill in match matrix
 */
for (px = seqx[0], xx = 1; xx <= len0; px++, xx++) {
/* initialize first entry in col
 */
if (endgaps) {
if (xx == 1)
col1[0] = delx = −(ins0+ins1);
else
col1[0] = delx = col0[0]−ins1;
ndelx = xx;
}
else {
col1[0] = 0;
delx = −ins0;
ndelx = 0;
}
...nw
for (py = seqx[1], yy = 1; yy <= len1; py++, yy++) {
mis = col0[yy−1];
if (dna)
mis += (xbm[*px−‘A’]&xbm[*py−‘A’])? DMAT : DMIS;
else
mis += _day[*px−‘A’][*py−‘A’];
/* update penalty for del in x seq;
 * favor new del over ongong del
 * ignore MAXGAP if weighting endgaps
 */
if (endgaps || ndely[yy] < MAXGAP) {
if (col0[yy] − ins0 >= dely[yy]) {
dely[yy] = col0[yy] − (ins0+ins1);
ndely[yy] = 1;
} else {
dely[yy] −= ins1;
ndely[yy]++;
}
} else {
if (col0[yy] − (ins0+ins1) >= dely[yy]) {
dely[yy] = col0[yy] − (ins0+ins1);
ndely[yy] = 1;
} else
ndely[yy]++;
}
/* update penalty for del in y seq;
 * favor new del over ongong del
 */
if (endgaps || ndelx < MAXGAP) {
if(col1[yy−1] − ins0 >= delx) {
delx = col1[yy−1] − (ins0+ins1);
ndelx = 1;
} else {
delx −= ins1;
ndelx++;
}
} else {
if (col1[yy−1] − (ins0+ins1) >= delx) {
delx = col1[yy−1] − (ins0+ins1);
ndelx = 1;
} else
ndelx++;
}
/* pick the maximum score; we're favoring
 * mis over any del and delx over dely
 */
...nw
id = xx − yy + len1 − 1;
if (mis >= delx && mis >= dely[yy])
col1[yy] = mis;
else if (delx >= dely[yy]) {
col1[yy] = delx;
ij = dx[id].ijmp;
if (dx[id].jp.n[0] && (!dna || (ndelx >= MAXJMP
&& xx > dx[id].jp.x[ij]+MX) || mis > dx[id].score+DINS0)) {
dx[id].ijmp++;
if (++ij >= MAXJMP) {
writejmps(id);
ij = dx[id].ijmp = 0;
dx[id].offset = offset;
offset += sizeof(struct jmp) + sizeof(offset);
}
}
dx[id].jp.n[ij] = ndelx;
dx[id].jp.x[ij] = xx;
dx[id].score = delx;
}
else {
col1[yy] = dely[yy];
ij = dx[id].ijmp;
if (dx[id].jp.n[0] && (!dna || (ndely[yy] >= MAXJMP
&& xx > dx[id].jp.x[ij]+MX) || mis > dx[id].score+DINS0)) {
dx[id].ijmp++;
if (++ij >= MAXJMP) {
writejmps(id);
ij = dx[id].ijmp = 0;
dx[id].offset = offset;
offset += sizeof(struct jmp) + sizeof(offset);
}
}
dx[id].jp.n[ij] =− ndely[yy];
dx[id].jp.x[ij] = xx;
dx[id].score = dely[yy];
}
if (xx == len0 && yy < len1) {
/* last col
 */
if (endgaps)
col1[yy] −= ins0+ins1*(len1−yy);
if(col1[yy] > smax) {
smax = col1[yy];
dmax = id;
}
}
}
if (endgaps && xx < len0)
col1[yy−1] −= ins0+ins1*(len0−xx);
if (col1[yy−1] > smax) {
smax = col1[yy−1];
dmax = id;
}
tmp = col0; col0 = col1; col1 = tmp;
}
(void) free((char *)ndely);
(void) free((char *)dely);
(void) free((char *)col0);
(void) free((char *)col1);
}
/*
 *
 * print() -- only routine visible outside this module
 *
 * static:
 * getmat() -- trace back best path, count matches: print()
 * pr_align() -- print alignment of described in array p[]: print()
 * dumpblock() -- dump a block of lines with numbers, stars: pr_align()
 * nums() -- put out a number line: dumpblock()
 * putline() -- put out a line (name, [num], seq, [num]): dumpblock()
 * stars() - -put a line of stars: dumpblock()
 * stripname() -- strip any path and prefix from a seqname
 */
#include “nw.h”
#define SPC  3
#define P_LINE 256 /* maximum output line */
#define P_SPC  3 /* space between name or num and seq */
extern _day[26][26];
int olen; /* set output line length */
FILE *fx; /* output file */
print() print
{
int lx, ly, firstgap, lastgap;  /* overlap */
if ((fx = fopen(ofile, “w”)) == 0) {
fprintf(stderr, “%s: can't write %s\n”, prog, ofile);
cleanup(1);
}
fprintf(fx, “<first sequence: %s (length = %d)\n”, namex[0], len0);
fprintf(fx, “<second sequence: %s (length = %d)\n”, namex[1], len1);
olen = 60;
lx = len0;
ly = len1;
firstgap = lastgap = 0;
if (dmax < len1 − 1) { /* leading gap in x */
pp[0].spc = firstgap = len1 − dmax − 1;
ly −= pp[0].spc;
}
else if (dmax > len1 − 1) { /* leading gap in y */
pp[1].spc = firstgap = dmax − (len1 − 1);
lx −= pp[1].spc;
}
if (dmax0 < len0 − 1) { /* trailing gap in x */
lastgap = len0 − dmax0 −1;
lx −= lastgap;
}
else if (dmax0 > len0 − 1) { /* trailing gap in y */
lastgap = dmax0 − (len0 − 1);
ly −= lastgap;
}
getmat(lx, ly, firstgap, lastgap);
pr_align();
}
/*
 * trace back the best path, count matches
 */
static
getmat(lx, ly, firstgap, lastgap) getmat
int lx, ly; /* “core” (minus endgaps) */
int firstgap, lastgap; /* leading trailing overlap */
{
int nm, i0, i1, siz0, siz1;
char outx[32];
double pct;
register n0, n1;
register char *p0, *p1;
/* get total matches, score
 */
i0 = i1 = siz0 = siz1 = 0;
p0 = seqx[0] + pp[1].spc;
p1 = seqx[1] + pp[0].spc;
n0 = pp[1].spc + 1;
n1 = pp[0].spc + 1;
nm = 0;
while ( *p0 && *p1 ) {
if (siz0) {
p1++;
n1++;
siz0−−;
}
else if (siz1) {
p0++;
n0++;
siz1−−;
}
else {
if (xbm[*p0−‘A’]&xbm[*p1−‘A’])
nm++;
if (n0++ == pp[0].x[i0])
siz0 = pp[0].n[i0++];
if (nl++ == pp[1].x[i1])
siz1 = pp[1].n[il++];
p0++;
p1++;
}
}
/* pct homology:
 * if penalizing endgaps, base is the shorter seq
 * else, knock off overhangs and take shorter core
 */
if (endgaps)
lx = (len0 < len1)? len0 : len1;
else
lx = (lx < ly)? lx : ly;
pct = 100.*(double)nm/(double)lx;
fprintf(fx, “\n”);
fprintf(fx, “<%d match%s in an overlap of %d: %.2f percent similarity\n”,
nm, (nm == 1)? “” : “es”, lx, pct);
fprintf(fx, “<gaps in first sequence: %d”, gapx); ...getmat
if (gapx) {
(void) sprintf(outx, “(%d %s%s)”,
ngapx, (dna)? “base”: “residue”, (ngapx == 1)? “”:“s”);
fprintf(fx, “%s”, outx);
fprintf(fx, “, gaps in second sequence: %d”, gapy);
if (gapy) {
(void) sprintf(outx, “(%d %s%s)”,
ngapy, (dna)? “base”:“residue”, (ngapy == 1)? “”:“s”);
fprintf(fx, “%s”, outx);
}
if (dna)
fprintf(fx,
“\n<score: %d (match = %d, mismatch = %d, gap penalty = %d + %d per base)\n”,
smax, DMAT, DMIS, DINS0, DINS1);
else
fprintf(fx,
“\n<score: %d (Dayhoff PAM 250 matrix, gap penalty = %d + %d per residue)\n”,
smax, PINS0, PINS1);
if (endgaps)
fprintf(fx,
“<endgaps penalized. left endgap: %d %s%s, right endgap: %d %s%s\n”,
firstgap, (dna)? “base” : “residue”, (firstgap == 1)? “” : “s”,
lastgap, (dna)? “base” : “residue”, (lastgap == 1)? “” : “s”);
else
fprintf(fx, “<endgaps not penalized\n”);
}
static nm; /* matches in core -- for checking */
static lmax; /* lengths of stripped file names */
static ij[2]; /* jmp index for a path */
static nc[2]; /* number at start of current line */
static ni[2]; /* current elem number -- for gapping */
static siz[2];
static char *ps[2]; /* ptr to current element */
static char *po[2]; /* ptr to next output char slot */
static char out[2][P_LINE]; /* output line */
static char star[P_LINE]; /* set by stars() */
/*
 * print alignment of described in struct path pp[]
 */
static
pr_align() pr_align
{
int nn; /* char count */
int more;
register i;
for (i = 0, lmax = 0; i < 2;i++) {
nn = stripname(namex[i]);
if (nn > lmax)
lmax = nn;
nc[i] = 1;
ni[i] = 1;
siz[i] = ij[i] = 0;
ps[i] = seqx[i];
po[i] = out[i];
}
for (nn = nm = 0, more = 1; more;) { ...pr_align
for (i = more = 0; i < 2; i++) {
/*
 * do we have more of this sequence?
 */
if (!*ps[i])
continue;
more++;
if (pp[i].spc) { /* leading space */
*po[i]++ = ‘ ’;
pp[i].spc−−;
}
else if (siz[i]) { /* in a gap */
*po[i]++ = ‘−’;
siz[i]−−;
}
else { /* we're putting a seq element
*/
*po[i] = *ps[i];
if (islower(*ps[i]))
   *ps[i] = toupper(*ps[i]);
po[i]++;
ps[i]++;
/*
 * are we at next gap for this seq?
 */
if (ni[i] == pp[i].x[ij[i]]) {
/*
 * we need to merge all gaps
 * at this location
 */
siz[i] == pp[i].n[ij[i]++];
while (ni[i] == pp[i].x[ij[i]])
siz[i] += pp[i].n[ij[i]++];
}
ni[i]++;
}
}
if (++nn == olen || !more && nn) {
dumpblock();
for (i = 0; i < 2; i++)
po[i] = out[i];
nn = 0;
}
}
}
/*
 * dump a block of lines, including numbers, stars: pr_align()
 */
static
dumpblock() dumpblock
{
register i;
for(i = 0; i < 2; i++)
*po[i]−− = ‘\0’;
...dumpblock
(void) putc(‘\n’, fx);
for (i = 0; i < 2; i++) {
if (*out[i] && (*out[i] != ‘ ’ || *(po[i]) != ‘ ’)) {
if (i == 0)
nums(i);
if (i == 0 && *out[1])
stars();
putline(i);
if (i == 0 && *out[1])
fprintf(fx, star);
if (i == 1)
nums(i);
}
}
}
/*
* put out a number line: dumpblock()
 */
static
nums(ix) nums
int  ix; /* index in out[] holding seq line */
{
char nline[P_LINE];
register i, j;
register char *pn, *px, *py;
for(pn = nline, i = 0; i < lmax+P_SPC; i++, pn++)
*pn = ‘ ’;
for (i = nc[ix], py = out[ix]; *py; py++, pn++) {
if (*py == ‘ ’ || *py == ‘−’)
*pn = ‘ ’;
else {
if (i%10 == 0 || (i == 1 && nc[ix] != 1)) {
j = (i < 0)? −i : i;
for (px = pn; j; j/= 10, px−−)
*px = j%10 + ‘0’;
if (i < 0)
*px = ‘−’;
}
else
*pn = ‘ ’;
i++;
}
}
*pn = ‘\0’;
nc[ix] = i;
for (pn = nline; *pn; pn++)
(void) putc(*pn, fx);
(void) putc(‘\n’, fx);
}
/*
 * put out a line (name, [num], seq. [num]): dumpblock()
 */
static
putline(ix) putline
int   ix; {
...putline
int i;
register char *px;
for (px = namex[ix], i = 0; *px && *px != ‘:’; px++, i++)
(void) putc(*px, fx);
for (;i < lmax+P_SPC; i++)
(void) putc(‘ ’, fx);
/* these count from 1:
 * ni[] is current element (from 1)
 * nc[] is number at start of current line
 */
for (px = out[ix]; *px; px++)
(void) putc(*px&0x7F, fx);
(void) putc(‘\n’, fx);
}
/*
 * put a line of stars (seqs always in out[0], out[1]): dumpblock()
 */
static
stars() stars
{
int i;
register char *p0, *p1, cx, *px;
if (!*out[0] || (*out[0] == ‘ ’ && *(p0[0]) == ‘ ’) ||
!*out[1] || (*out[1] == ‘ ’ && *(po[1]) == ‘ ’))
return;
px = star;
for (i = lmax+P_SPC; i; i−−)
*px++ = ‘ ’;
for (p0 = out[0], p1 = out[1]; *p0 && *p1; p0++, p1++) {
if (isalpha(*p0) && isalpha(*p1)) {
if (xbm[*p0−‘A’]&xbm[*p1−‘A’]) {
cx = ‘*’;
nm++;
}
else if (!dna && _day[*p0− ‘A’][*p1−‘A’] > 0)
cx = ‘.’;
else
cx = ‘ ’;
}
else
cx = ‘ ’;
*px++ = cx;
}
*px++ = ‘\n’;
*px = ‘\0’;
}
/*
 * strip path or prefix from pn, return len: pr_align()
 */
static
stripname(pn) stripname
char *pn; /* file name (may be path) */
{
register char *px, *py;
py = 0;
for (px = pn; *px; px++)
if (*px == ‘/’)
py = px + 1;
if (py)
(void) strcpy(pn, py);
return(strlen(pn));
}
/*
 * cleanup() -- cleanup any tmp file
 * getseq() -- read in seq, set dna, len, maxlen
 * g_calloc() -- calloc() with error checkin
 * readjmps() -- get the good jmps, from tmp file if necessary
 * writejmps() -- write a filled array of jmps to a tmp file: nw()
 */
#include “nw.h”
#include <sys/file.h>
char *jname = “/tmp/homgXXXXXX”; /* tmp file for jmps */
FILE *fj;
int cleanup(); /* cleanup tmp file */
long lseek();
/*
 * remove any tmp file if we blow
 */
cleanup(i) cleanup
int i;
{
if (fj)
(void) unlink(jname);
exit(i);
}
/*
 * read, return ptr to seq, set dna, len, maxlen
 * skip lines starting with ‘;’, ‘<’, or ‘>’
 * seq in upper or lower case
 */
char *
getseq(file, len) getseq
char *file; /* file name */
int *len; /* seq len */
{
char line[1024], *pseq;
register char *px, *py;
int natgc, tlen;
FILE *fp;
if ((fp = fopen(file, “r”)) == 0) {
fprintf(stderr, “%s: can't read %s\n”, prog, file);
exit(1);
}
tlen = natgc = 0;
while (fgets(line, 1024, fp)) {
if (*line == ‘;’ || *line == ‘<’ || *line == ‘>’)
continue;
for (px = line; *px != ‘\n’; px++)
if (isupper(*px) || islower(*px))
tlen++;
}
if ((pseq = malloc((unsigned)(tlen+6))) == 0) {
fprintf(stderr, “%s: malloc() failed to get %d bytes for %s\n”, prog, tlen+6, file);
exit(1);
}
pseq[0] = pseq[1] = pseq[2] = pseq[3] = ‘\0’;
...getseq
py = pseq + 4;
*len = tlen;
rewind(fp);
while (fgets(line, 1024, fp)) {
if (*line == ‘;’ || *line == ‘<’ || *line == ‘>’)
continue;
for (px = line; *px != ‘\n’; px++) {
if (isupper(*px))
*py++ = *px;
else if (islower(*px))
*py++ = toupper(*px);
if (index(“ATGCU”, *(py−1)))
natgc++;
}
}
*py++ = ‘\0’;
*py = ‘\0’;
(void) fclose(fp);
dna = natgc > (tlen/3);
return(pseq+4);
}
char *
g_calloc(msg, nx, sz) g_calloc
char *msg; /* program, calling routine */
int nx, sz; /* number and size of elements */
{
char *px, *calloc();
if ((px = calloc((unsigned)nx, (unsigned)sz)) == 0) {
if (*msg) {
fprintf(stderr, “%s: g_calloc() failed %s (n= %d, sz= %d)\n”, prog, msg, nx, sz);
exit(1);
}
}
return(px);
}
/*
 * get final jmps from dx[] or tmp file, set pp[], reset dmax: main()
 */
readjmps() readjmps
{
int fd = −1;
int siz, i0, i1;
register i, j, xx;
if (fj) {
(void) fclose(fj);
if ((fd = open(jname, O_RDONLY, 0)) < 0) {
fprintf(stderr, “%s: can't open() %s\n”, prog, jname);
cleanup(1);
}
}
for (i = i0 = i1 = 0, dmax0 = dmax, xx = len0; ;i++) {
while (1) {
for (j = dx[dmax].ijmp; j >= 0 && dx[dmax].jp.x[j] >= xx; j−−)
;
...readjmps
if (j < 0 && dx[dmax].offset && fj) {
(void) lseek(fd, dx[dmax].offset, 0);
(void) read(fd, (char *)&dx[dmax].jp, sizeof(struct jmp));
(void) read(fd, (char *)&dx[dmax].offset, sizeof(dx[dmax].offset));
dx[dmax].ijmp = MAXJMP−1;
}
else
break;
}
if (i >= JMPS) {
fprintf(stderr, “%s: too many gaps in alignment\n”, prog);
cleanup(1);
}
if (j >= 0) {
siz = dx[dmax].jp.n[j];
xx = dx[dmax].jp.x[j];
dmax += siz;
if (siz < 0) { /* gap in second seq */
pp[1].n[il] = −siz;
xx += siz;
/* id = xx − yy + len1 − 1
 */
pp[1].x[il] = xx − dmax + len1 − 1;
gapy++;
ngapy −= siz;
/* ignore MAXGAP when doing endgaps */
siz = (−siz < MAXGAP || endgaps)? −siz : MAXGAP;
il++;
}
else if (siz > 0) { /* gap in first seq */
pp[0] .n[i0] = siz;
pp[0] .x[i0] = xx;
gapx++;
ngapx += siz;
/* ignore MAXGAP when doing endgaps */
siz = (siz < MAXGAP || endgaps)? siz : MAXGAP;
i0++;
}
}
else
break;
}
/* reverse the order of jmps
 */
for (j = 0, i0−−; j < i0; j++, i0−−) {
i = pp[0].n[j]; pp[0].n[j] = pp[0].n[i0]; pp[0].n[i0] = i;
i = pp[0].x[j]; pp[0].x[j] = pp[0].x[i0]; pp[0].x[i0] = i;
}
for (j = 0, i1−−; j < i1; j++, i1−−) {
i = pp[1].n[j]; pp[1].n[j] = pp[1].n[i1]; pp[1].n[i1] = i;
i = pp[1].x[j]; pp[1].x[j] = pp[1].x[i1]; pp[1].x[i1] = i;
}
if (fd >= 0)
(void) close(fd);
if (fj) {
(void) unlink(jname);
fj = 0;
offset = 0;
} }
/*
 * write a filled jmp struct offset of the prev one (if any): nw()
 */
writejmps(ix) writejmps
int ix;
{
char *mktemp();
if (!fj) {
if (mktemp(jname) < 0) {
fprintf(stderr, “%s: can't mktemp() %s\n”, prog, jname);
cleanup(1);
}
if ((fj = fopen(jname, “w”)) == 0) {
fprintf(stderr, “%s: can't write %s\n”, prog, jname);
exit(1);
}
}
(void) fwrite((char *)&dx[ix].jp, sizeof(struct jmp), 1, fj);
(void) fwrite((char *)&dx[ix].offset, sizeof(dx[ix].offset), 1, fj);
}

[0196]

TABLE 2
PRO XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (Length = 15 amino acids)
Comparison XXXXXYYYYYYY (Length = 12 amino acids)
Protein

[0197]

TABLE 3
PRO XXXXXXXXXX (Length = 10 amino acids)
Comparison XXXXXYYYYYYZZYZ (Length = 15 amino acids)
Protein

[0198]

TABLE 4
PRO-DNA NNNNNNNNNNNNNN (Length = 14 nucleotides)
Comparison NNNNNNLLLLLLLLLL (Length = 16 nucleotides)
DNA

[0199]

TABLE 5
PRO-DNA NNNNNNNNNNNN (Length = 12 nucleotides)
Comparison NNNNLLLVV (Length = 9 nucleotides)
DNA

[0200] II. Compositions and Methods of the Invention

[0201] A. Full-Length PRO Polypeptides

[0202] The present invention provides newly identified and isolated nucleotide sequences encoding polypeptides referred to in the present application as PRO polypeptides. In particular, cDNAs encoding various PRO polypeptides have been identified and isolated, as disclosed in further detail in the Examples below. It is noted that proteins produced in separate expression rounds may be given different PRO numbers but the UNQ number is unique for any given DNA and the encoded protein, and will not be changed. However, for sake of simplicity, in the present specification the protein encoded by the full length native nucleic acid molecules disclosed herein as well as all further native homologues and variants included in the foregoing definition of PRO, will be referred to as “PRO/number”, regardless of their origin or mode of preparation.

[0203] As disclosed in the Examples below, various cDNA clones have been deposited with the ATCC. The actual nucleotide sequences of those clones can readily be determined by the skilled artisan by sequencing of the deposited clone using routine methods in the art. The predicted amino acid sequence can be determined from the nucleotide sequence using routine skill. For the PRO polypeptides and encoding nucleic acids described herein, Applicants have identified what is believed to be the reading frame best identifiable with the sequence information available at the time.

[0204] B. PRO Polypeptide Variants

[0205] In addition to the full-length native sequence PRO polypeptides described herein, it is contemplated that PRO variants can be prepared. PRO variants can be prepared by introducing appropriate nucleotide changes into the PRO DNA, and/or by synthesis of the desired PRO polypeptide. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that amino acid changes may alter post-translational processes of the PRO, such as changing the number or position of glycosylation sites or altering the membrane anchoring characteristics.

[0206] Variations in the native full-length sequence PRO or in various domains of the PRO described herein, can be made, for example, using any of the techniques and guidelines for conservative and non-conservative mutations set forth, for instance, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,364,934. Variations may be a substitution, deletion or insertion of one or more codons encoding the PRO that results in a change in the amino acid sequence of the PRO as compared with the native sequence PRO. Optionally the variation is by substitution of at least one amino acid with any other amino acid in one or more of the domains of the PRO. Guidance in determining which amino acid residue may be inserted, substituted or deleted without adversely affecting the desired activity may be found by comparing the sequence of the PRO with that of homologous known protein molecules and minimizing the number of amino acid sequence changes made in regions of high homology. Amino acid substitutions can be the result of replacing one amino acid with another amino acid having similar structural and/or chemical properties, such as the replacement of a leucine with a serine, i.e., conservative amino acid replacements. Insertions or deletions may optionally be in the range of about 1 to 5 amino acids. The variation allowed may be determined by systematically making insertions, deletions or substitutions of amino acids in the sequence and testing the resulting variants for activity exhibited by the full-length or mature native sequence.

[0207] PRO polypeptide fragments are provided herein. Such fragments may be truncated at the N-terminus or C-terminus, or may lack internal residues, for example, when compared with a full length native protein. Certain fragments lack amino acid residues that are not essential for a desired biological activity of the PRO polypeptide.

[0208] PRO fragments may be prepared by any of a number of conventional techniques. Desired peptide fragments may be chemically synthesized. An alternative approach involves generating PRO fragments by enzymatic digestion, e.g., by treating the protein with an enzyme known to cleave proteins at sites defined by particular amino acid residues, or by digesting the DNA with suitable restriction enzymes and isolating the desired fragment. Yet another suitable technique involves isolating and amplifying a DNA fragment encoding a desired polypeptide fragment, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Oligonucleotides that define the desired termini of the DNA fragment are employed at the 5′ and 3′ primers in the PCR. Preferably, PRO polypeptide fragments share at least one biological and/or immunological activity with the native PRO polypeptide disclosed herein.

[0209] In particular embodiments, conservative substitutions of interest are shown in Table 6 under the heading of preferred substitutions. If such substitutions result in a change in biological activity, then more substantial changes, denominated exemplary substitutions in Table 6, or as further described below in reference to amino acid classes, are introduced and the products screened.

TABLE 6
Original Exemplary Preferred
Residue Substitutions Substitutions
Ala (A) val; leu; ile val
Arg (R) lys; gln; asn lys
Asn (N) gln; his; lys; arg gln
Asp (D) glu glu
Cys (C) ser ser
Gln (Q) asn asn
Glu (E) asp asp
Gly (G) pro; ala ala
His (H) asn; gln; lys; arg arg
Ile (I) leu; val; met; ala; phe; leu
norleucine
Leu (L) norleucine; ile; val; ile
met; ala; phe
Lys (K) arg; gln; asn arg
Met (M) leu; phe; ile leu
Phe (F) leu; val; ile; ala; tyr leu
Pro (P) ala ala
Ser (S) thr thr
Thr (T) ser ser
Trp (W) tyr; phe tyr
Tyr (Y) trp; phe; thr; ser phe
Val (V) ile; leu; met; phe; leu
ala; norleucine

[0210] Substantial modifications in function or immunological identity of the PRO polypeptide are accomplished by selecting substitutions that differ significantly in their effect on maintaining (a) the structure of the polypeptide backbone in the area of the substitution, for example, as a sheet or helical conformation, (b) the charge or hydrophobicity of the molecule at the target site, or (c) the bulk of the side chain. Naturally occurring residues are divided into groups based on common side-chain properties:

[0211] (1) hydrophobic: norleucine, met, ala, val, leu, ile;

[0212] (2) neutral hydrophilic: cys, ser, thr;

[0213] (3) acidic: asp, glu;

[0214] (4) basic: asn, gin, his, lys, arg;

[0215] (5) residues that influence chain orientation: gly, pro; and

[0216] (6) aromatic: trp, tyr, phe.

[0217] Non-conservative substitutions will entail exchanging a member of one of these classes for another class. Such substituted residues also may be introduced into the conservative substitution sites or, more preferably, into the remaining (non-conserved) sites.

[0218] The variations can be made using methods known in the art such as oligonucleotide-mediated (site-directed) mutagenesis, alanine scanning, and PCR mutagenesis. Site-directed mutagenesis [Carter et al., Nucl. Acids Res., 13:4331 (1986); Zoller et al., Nucl. Acids Res., 10:6487 (1987)], cassette mutagenesis [Wells et al., Gene, 34:315 (1985)], restriction selection mutagenesis [Wells et al., Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London SerA, 317:415 (1986)] or other known techniques can be performed on the cloned DNA to produce the PRO variant DNA.

[0219] Scanning amino acid analysis can also be employed to identify one or more amino acids along a contiguous sequence. Among the preferred scanning amino acids are relatively small, neutral amino acids. Such amino acids include alanine, glycine, serine, and cysteine. Alanine is typically a preferred scanning amino acid among this group because it eliminates the side-chain beyond the beta-carbon and is less likely to alter the main-chain conformation of the variant [Cunningham and Wells, Science, 244: 1081-1085 (1989)]. Alanine is also typically preferred because it is the most common amino acid. Further, it is frequently found in both buried and exposed positions [Creighton, The Proteins, (W. H. Freeman & Co., N.Y.); Chothia, J. Mol. Biol., 150:1 (1976)]. If alanine substitution does not yield adequate amounts of variant, an isoteric amino acid can be used.

[0220] C. Modifications of PRO

[0221] Covalent modifications of PRO are included within the scope of this invention. One type of covalent modification includes reacting targeted amino acid residues of a PRO polypeptide with an organic derivatizing agent that is capable of reacting with selected side chains or the N- or C-terminal residues of the PRO. Derivatization with bifunctional agents is useful, for instance, for crosslinking PRO to a water-insoluble support matrix or surface for use in the method for purifying anti-PRO antibodies, and vice-versa. Commonly used crosslinking agents include, e.g., 1,1-bis(diazoacetyl)-2-phenylethane, glutaraldehyde, N-hydroxysuccinimide esters, for example, esters with 4-azidosalicylic acid, homobifunctional imidoesters, including disuccinimidyl esters such as 3,3′-dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate), bifunctional maleimides such as bis-N-maleimido-1,8-octane and agents such as methyl-3-[(p-azidophenyl)dithio]propioimidate.

[0222] Other modifications include deamidation of glutaminyl and asparaginyl residues to the corresponding glutamyl and aspartyl residues, respectively, hydroxylation of proline and lysine, phosphorylation of hydroxyl groups of seryl or threonyl residues, methylation of the α-amino groups of lysine, arginine, and histidine side chains [T. E. Creighton, Proteins: Structure and Molecular Properties, W. H. Freeman & Co., San Francisco, pp. 79-86 (1983)], acetylation of the N-terminal amine, and amidation of any C-terminal carboxyl group.

[0223] Another type of covalent modification of the PRO polypeptide included within the scope of this invention comprises altering the native glycosylation pattern of the polypeptide. “Altering the native glycosylation pattern” is intended for purposes herein to mean deleting one or more carbohydrate moieties found in native sequence PRO (either by removing the underlying glycosylation site or by deleting the glycosylation by chemical and/or enzymatic means), and/or adding one or more glycosylation sites that are not present in the native sequence PRO. In addition, the phrase includes qualitative changes in the glycosylation of the native proteins, involving a change in the nature and proportions of the various carbohydrate moieties present.

[0224] Addition of glycosylation sites to the PRO polypeptide may be accomplished by altering the amino acid sequence. The alteration may be made, for example, by the addition of, or substitution by, one or more serine or threonine residues to the native sequence PRO (for O-linked glycosylation sites). The PRO amino acid sequence may optionally be altered through changes at the DNA level, particularly by mutating the DNA encoding the PRO polypeptide at preselected bases such that codons are generated that will translate into the desired amino acids.

[0225] Another means of increasing the number of carbohydrate moieties on the PRO polypeptide is by chemical or enzymatic coupling of glycosides to the polypeptide. Such methods are described in the art, e.g., in WO 87/05330 published Sep. 11, 1987, and in Aplin and Wriston, CRC Crit. Rev. Biochem., pp. 259-306 (1981).

[0226] Removal of carbohydrate moieties present on the PRO polypeptide may be accomplished chemically or enzymatically or by mutational substitution of codons encoding for amino acid residues that serve as targets for glycosylation. Chemical deglycosylation techniques are known in the art and described, for instance, by Hakimuddin, et al., Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 259:52 (1987) and by Edge et al., Anal. Biochem., 118:131 (1981). Enzymatic cleavage of carbohydrate moieties on polypeptides can be achieved by the use of a variety of endo- and exo-glycosidases as described by Thotakura et al., Meth. Enzymol., 138:350 (1987).

[0227] Another type of covalent modification of PRO comprises linking the PRO polypeptide to one of a variety of nonproteinaceous polymers, e.g., polyethylene glycol (PEG), polypropylene glycol, or polyoxyalkylenes, in the manner set forth in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,640,835; 4,496,689; 4,301,144; 4,670,417; 4,791,192 or 4,179,337.

[0228] The PRO of the present invention may also be modified in a way to form a chimeric molecule comprising PRO fused to another, heterologous polypeptide or amino acid sequence.

[0229] In one embodiment, such a chimeric molecule comprises a fusion of the PRO with a tag polypeptide which provides an epitope to which an anti-tag antibody can selectively bind. The epitope tag is generally placed at the amino- or carboxyl-terminus of the PRO. The presence of such epitope-tagged forms of the PRO can be detected using an antibody against the tag polypeptide. Also, provision of the epitope tag enables the PRO to be readily purified by affinity purification using an anti-tag antibody or another type of affinity matrix that binds to the epitope tag. Various tag polypeptides and their respective antibodies are well known in the art. Examples include poly-histidine (poly-his) or poly-histidine-glycine (poly-his-gly) tags; the flu HA tag polypeptide and its antibody 12CA5 [Field et al., Mol. Cell. Biol., 8:2159-2165 (1988)]; the c-myc tag and the 8F9, 3C7, 6E10, G4, B7 and 9E10 antibodies thereto [Evan et al., Molecular and Cellular Biology, 5:3610-3616 (1985)]; and the Herpes Simplex virus glycoprotein D (gD) tag and its antibody [Paborsky et al., Protein Engineering, 3(6):547-553 (1990)]. Other tag polypeptides include the Flag-peptide [Hopp et al., BioTechnology, 6:1204-1210 (1988)]; the KT3 epitope peptide [Martin et al., Science, 255:192-194 (1992)]; an α-tubulin epitope peptide [Skinner et al., J. Biol. Chem., 266:15163-15166 (1991)]; and the T7 gene 10 protein peptide tag [Lutz-Freyermuth et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 87:6393-6397 (1990)].

[0230] In an alternative embodiment, the chimeric molecule may comprise a fusion of the PRO with an immunoglobulin or a particular region of an immunoglobulin. For a bivalent form of the chimeric molecule (also referred to as an “immunoadhesin”), such a fusion could be to the Fc region of an IgG molecule. The Ig fusions preferably include the substitution of a soluble (transmembrane domain deleted or inactivated) form of a PRO polypeptide in place of at least one variable region within an Ig molecule. In a particularly preferred embodiment, the immunoglobulin fusion includes the hinge, CH2 and CH3, or the hinge, CH1, CH2 and CH3 regions of an IgG1 molecule. For the production of immunoglobulin fusions see also U.S. Pat. No. 5,428,130 issued Jun. 27, 1995.

[0231] D. Preparation of PRO

[0232] The description below relates primarily to production of PRO by culturing cells transformed or transfected with a vector containing PRO nucleic acid. It is, of course, contemplated that alternative methods, which are well known in the art, may be employed to prepare PRO. For instance, the PRO sequence, or portions thereof, may be produced by direct peptide synthesis using solid-phase techniques [see, e.g., Stewart et al., Solid-Phase Peptide Synthesis, W. H. Freeman Co., San Francisco, Calif. (1969); Merrifield, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 85:2149-2154 (1963)]. In vitro protein synthesis may be performed using manual techniques or by automation. Automated synthesis may be accomplished, for instance, using an Applied Biosystems Peptide Synthesizer (Foster City, Calif.) using manufacturer's instructions. Various portions of the PRO may be chemically synthesized separately and combined using chemical or enzymatic methods to produce the full-length PRO.

[0233] 1. Isolation of DNA Encoding PRO

[0234] DNA encoding PRO may be obtained from a cDNA library prepared from tissue believed to possess the PRO mRNA and to express it at a detectable level. Accordingly, human PRO DNA can be conveniently obtained from a cDNA library prepared from human tissue, such as described in the Examples. The PRO-encoding gene may also be obtained from a genomic library or by known synthetic procedures (e.g., automated nucleic acid synthesis).

[0235] Libraries can be screened with probes (such as antibodies to the PRO or oligonucleotides of at least about 20-80 bases) designed to identify the gene of interest or the protein encoded by it. Screening the cDNA or genomic library with the selected probe may be conducted using standard procedures, such as described in Sambrook et al., Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual (New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 1989). An alternative means to isolate the gene encoding PRO is to use PCR methodology [Sambrook et al., supra; Dieffenbach et al., PCR Primer: A Laboratory Manual (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 1995)].

[0236] The Examples below describe techniques for screening a cDNA library. The oligonucleotide sequences selected as probes should be of sufficient length and sufficiently unambiguous that false positives are minimized. The oligonucleotide is preferably labeled such that it can be detected upon hybridization to DNA in the library being screened. Methods of labeling are well known in the art, and include the use of radiolabels like 32P-labeled ATP, biotinylation or enzyme labeling. Hybridization conditions, including moderate stringency and high stringency, are provided in Sambrook et al., supra.

[0237] Sequences identified in such library screening methods can be compared and aligned to other known sequences deposited and available in public databases such as GenBank or other private sequence databases. Sequence identity (at either the amino acid or nucleotide level) within defined regions of the molecule or across the full-length sequence can be determined using methods known in the art and as described herein.

[0238] Nucleic acid having protein coding sequence may be obtained by screening selected cDNA or genomic libraries using the deduced amino acid sequence disclosed herein for the first time, and, if necessary, using conventional primer extension procedures as described in Sambrook et al., supra, to detect precursors and processing intermediates of mRNA that may not have been reverse-transcribed into cDNA.

[0239] 2. Selection and Transformation of Host Cells

[0240] Host cells are transfected or transformed with expression or cloning vectors described herein for PRO production and cultured in conventional nutrient media modified as appropriate for inducing promoters, selecting transformants, or amplifying the genes encoding the desired sequences. The culture conditions, such as media, temperature, pH and the like, can be selected by the skilled artisan without undue experimentation. In general, principles, protocols, and practical techniques for maximizing the productivity of cell cultures can be found in Mammalian Cell Biotechnology: a Practical Approach, M. Butler, ed. (IRL Press, 1991) and Sambrook et al., supra.

[0241] Methods of eukaryotic cell transfection and prokaryotic cell transformation are known to the ordinarily skilled artisan, for example, CaCl2, CaPO4, liposome-mediated and electroporation. Depending on the host cell used, transformation is performed using standard techniques appropriate to such cells. The calcium treatment employing calcium chloride, as described in Sambrook et al., supra, or electroporation is generally used for prokaryotes. Infection with Agrobacterium tumefaciens is used for transformation of certain plant cells, as described by Shaw et al., Gene, 23:315 (1983) and WO 89/05859 published 29 June 1989. For mammalian cells without such cell walls, the calcium phosphate precipitation method of Graham and van der Eb, Virology, 52:456-457 (1978) can be employed. General aspects of mammalian cell host system transfections have been described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,399,216. Transformations into yeast are typically carried out according to the method of Van Solingen et al., J. Bact., 130:946 (1977) and Hsiao et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (USA), 76:3829 (1979). However, other methods for introducing DNA into cells, such as by nuclear microinjection, electroporation, bacterial protoplast fusion with intact cells, or polycations, e.g., polybrene, polyornithine, may also be used. For various techniques for transforming mammalian cells, see Keown et al., Methods in Enzymology, 185:527-537 (1990) and Mansour et al., Nature, 336:348-352 (1988).

[0242] Suitable host cells for cloning or expressing the DNA in the vectors herein include prokaryote, yeast, or higher eukaryote cells. Suitable prokaryotes include but are not limited to eubacteria, such as Gram-negative or Gram-positive organisms, for example, Enterobacteriaceae such as E. coli. Various E. coli strains are publicly available, such as E. coli K12 strain MM294 (ATCC 31,446); E. coli X1776 (ATCC 31,537); E. coli strain W3110 (ATCC 27,325) and K5772 (ATCC 53,635). Other suitable prokaryotic host cells include Enterobacteriaceae such as Escherichia, e.g., E. coli, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Salmonella, e.g., Salmonella typhimurium, Serratia, e.g., Serratia marcescans, and Shigella, as well as Bacilli such as B. subtilis and B. licheniformis (e.g., B. licheniformis 41P disclosed in DD 266,710 published Apr. 12, 1989), Pseudomonas such as P. aeruginosa, and Streptomyces. These examples are illustrative rather than limiting. Strain W3110 is one particularly preferred host or parent host because it is a common host strain for recombinant DNA product fermentations. Preferably, the host cell secretes minimal amounts of proteolytic enzymes. For example, strain W3110 may be modified to effect a genetic mutation in the genes encoding proteins endogenous to the host, with examples of such hosts including E. coli W3110 strain 1A2, which has the complete genotype tonA; E. coli W3110 strain 9E4, which has the complete genotype tonA ptr3; E. coli W3110 strain 27C7 (ATCC 55,244), which has the complete genotype tonA ptr3 phoA E15 (argF-lac)169 degp ompT kanr; E. coli W3110 strain 37D6, which has the complete genotype tonA ptr3 phoA E15 (argF-lac)169 degP ompT rbs7 ilvG kanr ; E. coli W3110 strain 40B4, which is strain 37D6 with a non-kanamycin resistant degP deletion mutation; and an E. coli strain having mutant periplasmic protease disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,946,783 issued Aug. 7, 1990. Alternatively, in vitro methods of cloning, e.g., PCR or other nucleic acid polymerase reactions, are suitable.

[0243] In addition to prokaryotes, eukaryotic microbes such as filamentous fungi or yeast are suitable cloning or expression hosts for PRO-encoding vectors. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a commonly used lower eukaryotic host microorganism. Others include Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Beach and Nurse, Nature, 290: 140 [1981]; EP 139,383 published May 2, 1985); Kluyveromyces hosts (U.S. Pat. No. 4,943,529; Fleer et al., Bio/Technology, 9:968-975 (1991)) such as, e.g., K. lactis (MW98-8C, CBS683, CBS4574; Louvencourt et al., J. Bacteriol., 154(2):737-742 [1983]), K. fragilis (ATCC 12,424), K. bulgaricus (ATCC 16,045), K. wickeramii (ATCC 24,178), K. waltii (ATCC 56,500), K. drosophilarum (ATCC 36,906; Van den Berg et al., Bio/Technology, 8:135 (1990)), K. thermotolerans, and K. marxianus; yarrowia (EP 402,226); Pichia pastoris (EP 183,070; Sreekrishna et al., J. Basic Microbiol., 28:265-278 [1988]); Candida; Trichoderma reesia (EP 244,234); Neurospora crassa (Case et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 76:5259-5263 [1979]); Schwanniomyces such as Schwanniomyces occidentalis (EP 394,538 published Oct. 31, 1990); and filamentous fungi such as, e.g., Neurospora, Penicillium, Tolypocladium (WO 91/00357 published Jan. 10, 1991), and Aspergillus hosts such as A. nidulans (Ballance et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 112:284-289 [1983]; Tilburn et al., Gene, 26:205-221 [1983]; Yelton et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 81: 1470-1474 [1984]) and A. niger (Kelly and Hynes, EMBO J., 4:475-479 [1985]). Methylotropic yeasts are suitable herein and include, but are not limited to, yeast capable of growth on methanol selected from the genera consisting of Hansenula, Candida, Kloeckera, Pichia, Saccharomyces, Torulopsis, and Rhodotorula. A list of specific species that are exemplary of this class of yeasts may be found in C. Anthony, The Biochemistry of Methylotrophs, 269 (1982).

[0244] Suitable host cells for the expression of glycosylated PRO are derived from multicellular organisms. Examples of invertebrate cells include insect cells such as Drosophila S2 and Spodoptera Sf9, as well as plant cells. Examples of useful mammalian host cell lines include Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and COS cells. More specific examples include monkey kidney CV1 line transformed by SV40 (COS-7, ATCC CRL 1651); human embryonic kidney line (293 or 293 cells subcloned for growth in suspension culture, Graham et al., J. Gen Virol., 36:59 (1977)); Chinese hamster ovary cells/-DHFR (CHO, Urlaub and Chasin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 77:4216 (1980)); mouse sertoli cells (TM4, Mather, Biol. Reprod., 23:243-251 (1980)); human lung cells (W138, ATCC CCL 75); human liver cells (Hep G2, HB 8065); and mouse mammary tumor (MMT 060562, ATCC CCL51). The selection of the appropriate host cell is deemed to be within the skill in the art.

[0245] 3. Selection and Use of a Replicable Vector

[0246] The nucleic acid (e.g., cDNA or genomic DNA) encoding PRO may be inserted into a replicable vector for cloning (amplification of the DNA) or for expression. Various vectors are publicly available. The vector may, for example, be in the form of a plasmid, cosmid, viral particle, or phage. The appropriate nucleic acid sequence may be inserted into the vector by a variety of procedures. In general, DNA is inserted into an appropriate restriction endonuclease site(s) using techniques known in the art. Vector components generally include, but are not limited to, one or more of a signal sequence, an origin of replication, one or more marker genes, an enhancer element, a promoter, and a transcription termination sequence. Construction of suitable vectors containing one or more of these components employs standard ligation techniques which are known to the skilled artisan.

[0247] The PRO may be produced recombinantly not only directly, but also as a fusion polypeptide with a heterologous polypeptide, which may be a signal sequence or other polypeptide having a specific cleavage site at the N-terminus of the mature protein or polypeptide. In general, the signal sequence may be a component of the vector, or it may be a part of the PRO-encoding DNA that is inserted into the vector. The signal sequence may be a prokaryotic signal sequence selected, for example, from the group of the alkaline phosphatase, penicillinase, lpp, or heat-stable enterotoxin II leaders. For yeast secretion the signal sequence may be, e.g., the yeast invertase leader, alpha factor leader (including Saccharomyces and Kluyveromyces α-factor leaders, the latter described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,010,182), or acid phosphatase leader, the C. albicans glucoamylase leader (EP 362,179 published Apr. 4, 1990), or the signal described in WO 90/13646 published Nov. 15, 1990. In mammalian cell expression, mammalian signal sequences may be used to direct secretion of the protein, such as signal sequences from secreted polypeptides of the same or related species, as well as viral secretory leaders.

[0248] Both expression and cloning vectors contain a nucleic acid sequence that enables the vector to replicate in one or more selected host cells. Such sequences are well known for a variety of bacteria, yeast, and viruses. The origin of replication from the plasmid pBR322 is suitable for most Gram-negative bacteria, the 2μ plasmid origin is suitable for yeast, and various viral origins (SV40, polyoma, adenovirus, VSV or BPV) are useful for cloning vectors in mammalian cells.

[0249] Expression and cloning vectors will typically contain a selection gene, also termed a selectable marker. Typical selection genes encode proteins that (a) confer resistance to antibiotics or other toxins, e.g., ampicillin, neomycin, methotrexate, or tetracycline, (b) complement auxotrophic deficiencies, or (c) supply critical nutrients not available from complex media, e.g., the gene encoding D-alanine racemase for Bacilli.

[0250] An example of suitable selectable markers for mammalian cells are those that enable the identification of cells competent to take up the PRO-encoding nucleic acid, such as DHFR or thymidine kinase. An appropriate host cell when wild-type DHFR is employed is the CHO cell line deficient in DHFR activity, prepared and propagated as described by Urlaub et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 77:4216 (1980). A suitable selection gene for use in yeast is the trp1 gene present in the yeast plasmid YRp7 [Stinchcomb et al., Nature, 282:39 (1979); Kingsman et al., Gene, 7:141 (1979); Tschemper et al., Gene, 10:157 (1980)]. The trp1 gene provides a selection marker for a mutant strain of yeast lacking the ability to grow in tryptophan, for example, ATCC No. 44076 or PEP4-1 [Jones, Genetics, 85:12 (1977)].

[0251] Expression and cloning vectors usually contain a promoter operably linked to the PRO-encoding nucleic acid sequence to direct mRNA synthesis. Promoters recognized by a variety of potential host cells are well known. Promoters suitable for use with prokaryotic hosts include the β-lactamase and lactose promoter systems [Chang et al., Nature, 275:615 (1978); Goeddel et al., Nature, 281:544 (1979)], alkaline phosphatase, a tryptophan (trp) promoter system [Goeddel, Nucleic Acids Res., 8:4057 (1980); EP 36,776], and hybrid promoters such as the tac promoter [deBoer et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 80:21-25 (1983)]. Promoters for use in bacterial systems also will contain a Shine-Dalgarno (S.D.) sequence operably linked to the DNA encoding PRO.

[0252] Examples of suitable promoting sequences for use with yeast hosts include the promoters for 3-phosphoglycerate kinase [Hitzeman et al., J. Biol. Chem., 255:2073 (1980)] or other glycolytic enzymes [Hess et al., J. Adv. Enzyme Reg., 7:149 (1968); Holland, Biochemistry, 17:4900 (1978)], such as enolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, hexokinase, pyruvate decarboxylase, phosphofructokinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, 3-phosphoglycerate mutase, pyruvate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase, phosphoglucose isomerase, and glucokinase.

[0253] Other yeast promoters, which are inducible promoters having the additional advantage of transcription controlled by growth conditions, are the promoter regions for alcohol dehydrogenase 2, isocytochrome C, acid phosphatase, degradative enzymes associated with nitrogen metabolism, metallothionein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and enzymes responsible for maltose and galactose utilization. Suitable vectors and promoters for use in yeast expression are further described in EP 73,657.

[0254] PRO transcription from vectors in mammalian host cells is controlled, for example, by promoters obtained from the genomes of viruses such as polyoma virus, fowlpox virus (UK 2,211,504 published Jul. 5, 1989), adenovirus (such as Adenovirus 2), bovine papilloma virus, avian sarcoma virus, cytomegalovirus, a retrovirus, hepatitis-B virus and Simian Virus 40 (SV40), from heterologous mammalian promoters, e.g., the actin promoter or an immunoglobulin promoter, and from heat-shock promoters, provided such promoters are compatible with the host cell systems.

[0255] Transcription of a DNA encoding the PRO by higher eukaryotes may be increased by inserting an enhancer sequence into the vector. Enhancers are cis-acting elements of DNA, usually about from 10 to 300 bp, that act on a promoter to increase its transcription. Many enhancer sequences are now known from mammalian genes (globin, elastase, albumin, α-fetoprotein, and insulin). Typically, however, one will use an enhancer from a eukaryotic cell virus. Examples include the SV40 enhancer on the late side of the replication origin (bp 100-270), the cytomegalovirus early promoter enhancer, the polyoma enhancer on the late side of the replication origin, and adenovirus enhancers. The enhancer may be spliced into the vector at a position 5′ or 3′ to the PRO coding sequence, but is preferably located at a site 5′ from the promoter.

[0256] Expression vectors used in eukaryotic host cells (yeast, fungi, insect, plant, animal, human, or nucleated cells from other multicellular organisms) will also contain sequences necessary for the termination of transcription and for stabilizing the mRNA. Such sequences are commonly available from the 5′ and, occasionally 3′, untranslated regions of eukaryotic or viral DNAs or cDNAs. These regions contain nucleotide segments transcribed as polyadenylated fragments in the untranslated portion of the mRNA encoding PRO.

[0257] Still other methods, vectors, and host cells suitable for adaptation to the synthesis of PRO in recombinant vertebrate cell culture are described in Gething et al., Nature, 293:620-625 (1981); Mantei et al., Nature, 281:40-46 (1979); EP 117,060; and EP 117,058.

[0258] 4. Detecting Gene Amplification/Expression

[0259] Gene amplification and/or expression may be measured in a sample directly, for example, by conventional Southern blotting, Northern blotting to quantitate the transcription of mRNA [Thomas, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 77:5201-5205 (1980)], dot blotting (DNA analysis), or in situ hybridization, using an appropriately labeled probe, based on the sequences provided herein. Alternatively, antibodies may be employed that can recognize specific duplexes, including DNA duplexes, RNA duplexes, and DNA-RNA hybrid duplexes or DNA-protein duplexes. The antibodies in turn may be labeled and the assay may be carried out where the duplex is bound to a surface, so that upon the formation of duplex on the surface, the presence of antibody bound to the duplex can be detected.

[0260] Gene expression, alternatively, may be measured by immunological methods, such as immunohistochemical staining of cells or tissue sections and assay of cell culture or body fluids, to quantitate directly the expression of gene product. Antibodies useful for immunohistochemical staining and/or assay of sample fluids may be either monoclonal or polyclonal, and may be prepared in any mammal. Conveniently, the antibodies may be prepared against a native sequence PRO polypeptide or against a synthetic peptide based on the DNA sequences provided herein or against exogenous sequence fused to PRO DNA and encoding a specific antibody epitope.

[0261] 5. Purification of Polypeptide

[0262] Forms of PRO may be recovered from culture medium or from host cell lysates. If membrane-bound, it can be released from the membrane using a suitable detergent solution (e.g. Triton-X 100) or by enzymatic cleavage. Cells employed in expression of PRO can be disrupted by various physical or chemical means, such as freeze-thaw cycling, sonication, mechanical disruption, or cell lysing agents.

[0263] It may be desired to purify PRO from recombinant cell proteins or polypeptides. The following procedures are exemplary of suitable purification procedures: by fractionation on an ion-exchange column; ethanol precipitation; reverse phase HPLC; chromatography on silica or on a cation-exchange resin such as DEAE; chromatofocusing; SDS-PAGE; ammonium sulfate precipitation; gel filtration using, for example, Sephadex G-75; protein A Sepharose columns to remove contaminants such as IgG; and metal chelating columns to bind epitope-tagged forms of the PRO. Various methods of protein purification may be employed and such methods are known in the art and described for example in Deutscher, Methods in Enzymology, 182 (1990); Scopes, Protein Purification: Principles and Practice, Springer-Verlag, New York (1982). The purification step(s) selected will depend, for example, on the nature of the production process used and the particular PRO produced.

[0264] E. Uses for PRO

[0265] Nucleotide sequences (or their complement) encoding PRO have various applications in the art of molecular biology, including uses as hybridization probes, in chromosome and gene mapping and in the generation of anti-sense RNA and DNA. PRO nucleic acid will also be useful for the preparation of PRO polypeptides by the recombinant techniques described herein.

[0266] The full-length native sequence PRO gene, or portions thereof, may be used as hybridization probes for a cDNA library to isolate the full-length PRO cDNA or to isolate still other cDNAs (for instance, those encoding naturally-occurring variants of PRO or PRO from other species) which have a desired sequence identity to the native PRO sequence disclosed herein. Optionally, the length of the probes will be about 20 to about 50 bases. The hybridization probes may be derived from at least partially novel regions of the full length native nucleotide sequence wherein those regions may be determined without undue experimentation or from genomic sequences including promoters, enhancer elements and introns of native sequence PRO. By way of example, a screening method will comprise isolating the coding region of the PRO gene using the known DNA sequence to synthesize a selected probe of about 40 bases. Hybridization probes may be labeled by a variety of labels, including radionucleotides such as 32p or 35S, or enzymatic labels such as alkaline phosphatase coupled to the probe via avidin/biotin coupling systems. Labeled probes having a sequence complementary to that of the PRO gene of the present invention can be used to screen libraries of human cDNA, genomic DNA or mRNA to determine which members of such libraries the probe hybridizes to. Hybridization techniques are described in further detail in the Examples below.

[0267] Any EST sequences disclosed in the present application may similarly be employed as probes, using the methods disclosed herein.

[0268] Other useful fragments of the PRO nucleic acids include antisense or sense oligonucleotides comprising a singe-stranded nucleic acid sequence (either RNA or DNA) capable of binding to target PRO mRNA (sense) or PRO DNA (antisense) sequences. Antisense or sense oligonucleotides, according to the present invention, comprise a fragment of the coding region of PRO DNA. Such a fragment generally comprises at least about 14 nucleotides, preferably from about 14 to 30 nucleotides. The ability to derive an antisense or a sense oligonucleotide, based upon a cDNA sequence encoding a given protein is described in, for example, Stein and Cohen (Cancer Res. 48:2659, 1988) and van der Krol et al. (BioTechniques 6:958, 1988).

[0269] Binding of antisense or sense oligonucleotides to target nucleic acid sequences results in the formation of duplexes that block transcription or translation of the target sequence by one of several means, including enhanced degradation of the duplexes, premature termination of transcription or translation, or by other means. The antisense oligonucleotides thus may be used to block expression of PRO proteins. Antisense or sense oligonucleotides further comprise oligonucleotides having modified sugar-phosphodiester backbones (or other sugar linkages, such as those described in WO 91/06629) and wherein such sugar linkages are resistant to endogenous nucleases. Such oligonucleotides with resistant sugar linkages are stable in vivo (i.e., capable of resisting enzymatic degradation) but retain sequence specificity to be able to bind to target nucleotide sequences.

[0270] Other examples of sense or antisense oligonucleotides include those oligonucleotides which are covalently linked to organic moieties, such as those described in WO 90/10048, and other moieties that increases affinity of the oligonucleotide for a target nucleic acid sequence, such as poly-(L-lysine). Further still, intercalating agents, such as ellipticine, and alkylating agents or metal complexes may be attached to sense or antisense oligonucleotides to modify binding specificities of the antisense or sense oligonucleotide for the target nucleotide sequence.

[0271] Antisense or sense oligonucleotides may be introduced into a cell containing the target nucleic acid sequence by any gene transfer method, including, for example, CaPO4-mediated DNA transfection, electroporation, or by using gene transfer vectors such as Epstein-Barr virus. In a preferred procedure, an antisense or sense oligonucleotide is inserted into a suitable retroviral vector. A cell containing the target nucleic acid sequence is contacted with the recombinant retroviral vector, either in vivo or ex vivo. Suitable retroviral vectors include, but are not limited to, those derived from the murine retrovirus M-MuLV, N2 (a retrovirus derived from M-MuLV), or the double copy vectors designated DCT5A, DCT5B and DCT5C (see WO 90/13641).

[0272] Sense or antisense oligonucleotides also may be introduced into a cell containing the target nucleotide sequence by formation of a conjugate with a ligand binding molecule, as described in WO 91/04753. Suitable ligand binding molecules include, but are not limited to, cell surface receptors, growth factors, other cytokines, or other ligands that bind to cell surface receptors. Preferably, conjugation of the ligand binding molecule does not substantially interfere with the ability of the ligand binding molecule to bind to its corresponding molecule or receptor, or block entry of the sense or antisense oligonucleotide or its conjugated version into the cell.

[0273] Alternatively, a sense or an antisense oligonucleotide may be introduced into a cell containing the target nucleic acid sequence by formation of an oligonucleotide-lipid complex, as described in WO 90/10448. The sense or antisense oligonucleotide-lipid complex is preferably dissociated within the cell by an endogenous lipase.

[0274] Antisense or sense RNA or DNA molecules are generally at least about 5 bases in length, about 10 bases in length, about 15 bases in length, about 20 bases in length, about 25 bases in length, about 30 bases in length, about 35 bases in length, about 40 bases in length, about 45 bases in length, about 50 bases in length, about 55 bases in length, about 60 bases in length, about 65 bases in length, about 70 bases in length, about 75 bases in length, about 80 bases in length, about 85 bases in length, about 90 bases in length, about 95 bases in length, about 100 bases in length, or more.

[0275] The probes may also be employed in PCR techniques to generate a pool of sequences for identification of closely related PRO coding sequences.

[0276] Nucleotide sequences encoding a PRO can also be used to construct hybridization probes for mapping the gene which encodes that PRO and for the genetic analysis of individuals with genetic disorders. The nucleotide sequences provided herein may be mapped to a chromosome and specific regions of a chromosome using known techniques, such as in situ hybridization, linkage analysis against known chromosomal markers, and hybridization screening with libraries.

[0277] When the coding sequences for PRO encode a protein which binds to another protein (example, where the PRO is a receptor), the PRO can be used in assays to identify the other proteins or molecules involved in the binding interaction. By such methods, inhibitors of the receptor/ligand binding interaction can be identified. Proteins involved in such binding interactions can also be used to screen for peptide or small molecule inhibitors or agonists of the binding interaction. Also, the receptor PRO can be used to isolate correlative ligand(s). Screening assays can be designed to find lead compounds that mimic the biological activity of a native PRO or a receptor for PRO. Such screening assays will include assays amenable to high-throughput screening of chemical libraries, making them particularly suitable for identifying small molecule drug candidates. Small molecules contemplated include synthetic organic or inorganic compounds. The assays can be performed in a variety of formats, including protein-protein binding assays, biochemical screening assays, imnmunoassays and cell based assays, which are well characterized in the art.

[0278] Nucleic acids which encode PRO or its modified forms can also be used to generate either transgenic animals or “knock out” animals which, in turn, are useful in the development and screening of therapeutically useful reagents. A transgenic animal (e.g., a mouse or rat) is an animal having cells that contain a transgene, which transgene was introduced into the animal or an ancestor of the animal at a prenatal, e.g., an embryonic stage. A transgene is a DNA which is integrated into the genome of a cell from which a transgenic animal develops. In one embodiment, cDNA encoding PRO can be used to clone genomic DNA encoding PRO in accordance with established techniques and the genomic sequences used to generate transgenic animals that contain cells which express DNA encoding PRO. Methods for generating transgenic animals, particularly animals such as mice or rats, have become conventional in the art and are described, for example, in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,736,866 and 4,870,009. Typically, particular cells would be targeted for PRO transgene incorporation with tissue-specific enhancers. Transgenic animals that include a copy of a transgene encoding PRO introduced into the germ line of the animal at an embryonic stage can be used to examine the effect of increased expression of DNA encoding PRO. Such animals can be used as tester animals for reagents thought to confer protection from, for example, pathological conditions associated with its overexpression. In accordance with this facet of the invention, an animal is treated with the reagent and a reduced incidence of the pathological condition, compared to untreated animals bearing the transgene, would indicate a potential therapeutic intervention for the pathological condition.

[0279] Alternatively, non-human homologues of PRO can be used to construct a PRO “knock out” animal which has a defective or altered gene encoding PRO as a result of homologous recombination between the endogenous gene encoding PRO and altered genomic DNA encoding PRO introduced into an embryonic stem cell of the animal. For example, cDNA encoding PRO can be used to clone genomic DNA encoding PRO in accordance with established techniques. A portion of the genomic DNA encoding PRO can be deleted or replaced with another gene, such as a gene encoding a selectable marker which can be used to monitor integration. Typically, several kilobases of unaltered flanking DNA (both at the 5′ and 3′ ends) are included in the vector [see e.g., Thomas and Capecchi, Cell, 51:503 (1987) for a description of homologous recombination vectors]. The vector is introduced into an embryonic stem cell line (e.g., by electroporation) and cells in which the introduced DNA has homologously recombined with the endogenous DNA are selected [see e.g., Li et al., Cell, 69:915 (1992)]. The selected cells are then injected into a blastocyst of an animal (e.g., a mouse or rat) to form aggregation chimeras [see e.g., Bradley, in Teratocarcinomas and Embryonic Stem Cells: A Practical Approach, E. J. Robertson, ed. (IRL, Oxford, 1987), pp. 113-152]. A chimeric embryo can then be implanted into a suitable pseudopregnant female foster animal and the embryo brought to term to create a “knock out” animal. Progeny harboring the homologously recombined DNA in their germ cells can be identified by standard techniques and used to breed animals in which all cells of the animal contain the homologously recombined DNA. Knockout animals can be characterized for instance, for their ability to defend against certain pathological conditions and for their development of pathological conditions due to absence of the PRO polypeptide.

[0280] Nucleic acid encoding the PRO polypeptides may also be used in gene therapy. In gene therapy applications, genes are introduced into cells in order to achieve in vivo synthesis of a therapeutically effective genetic product, for example for replacement of a defective gene. “Gene therapy” includes both conventional gene therapy where a lasting effect is achieved by a single treatment, and the administration of gene therapeutic agents, which involves the one time or repeated administration of a therapeutically effective DNA or mRNA. Antisense RNAs and DNAs can be used as therapeutic agents for blocking the expression of certain genes in vivo. It has already been shown that short antisense oligonucleotides can be imported into cells where they act as inhibitors, despite their low intracellular concentrations caused by their restricted uptake by the cell membrane. (Zamecnik et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:4143-4146 [1986]). The oligonucleotides can be modified to enhance their uptake, e.g. by substituting their negatively charged phosphodiester groups by uncharged groups.

[0281] There are a variety of techniques available for introducing nucleic acids into viable cells. The techniques vary depending upon whether the nucleic acid is transferred into cultured cells in vitro, or in vivo in the cells of the intended host. Techniques suitable for the transfer of nucleic acid into mammalian cells in vitro include the use of liposomes, electroporation, microinjection, cell fusion, DEAE-dextran, the calcium phosphate precipitation method, etc. The currently preferred in vivo gene transfer techniques include transfection with viral (typically retroviral) vectors and viral coat protein-liposome mediated transfection (Dzau et al., Trends in Biotechnology 11, 205-210 [19931). In some situations it is desirable to provide the nucleic acid source with an agent that targets the target cells, such as an antibody specific for a cell surface membrane protein or the target cell, a ligand for a receptor on the target cell, etc. Where liposomes are employed, proteins which bind to a cell surface membrane protein associated with endocytosis may be used for targeting and/or to facilitate uptake, e.g. capsid proteins or fragments thereof tropic for a particular cell type, antibodies for proteins which undergo internalization in cycling, proteins that target intracellular localization and enhance intracellular half-life. The technique of receptor-mediated endocytosis is described, for example, by Wu et al., J. Biol. Chem. 262, 4429-4432 (1987); and Wagner et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87, 3410-3414 (1990). For review of gene marking and gene therapy protocols see Anderson et al., Science 256, 808-813 (1992).

[0282] The PRO polypeptides described herein may also be employed as molecular weight markers for protein electrophoresis purposes and the isolated nucleic acid sequences may be used for recombinantly expressing those markers.

[0283] The nucleic acid molecules encoding the PRO polypeptides or fragments thereof described herein are useful for chromosome identification. In this regard, there exists an ongoing need to identify new chromosome markers, since relatively few chromosome marking reagents, based upon actual sequence data are presently available. Each PRO nucleic acid molecule of the present invention can be used as a chromosome marker.

[0284] The PRO polypeptides and nucleic acid molecules of the present invention may also be used diagnostically for tissue typing, wherein the PRO polypeptides of the present invention may be differentially expressed in one tissue as compared to another, preferably in a diseased tissue as compared to a normal tissue of the same tissue type. PRO nucleic acid molecules will find use for generating probes for PCR, Northern analysis, Southern analysis and Western analysis.

[0285] The PRO polypeptides described herein may also be employed as therapeutic agents. The PRO polypeptides of the present invention can be formulated according to known methods to prepare pharmaceutically useful compositions, whereby the PRO product hereof is combined in admixture with a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier vehicle. Therapeutic formulations are prepared for storage by mixing the active ingredient having the desired degree of purity with optional physiologically acceptable carriers, excipients or stabilizers (Remington's Pharmaceutical Sciences 16th edition, Osol, A. Ed. (1980)), in the form of lyophilized formulations or aqueous solutions. Acceptable carriers, excipients or stabilizers are nontoxic to recipients at the dosages and concentrations employed, and include buffers such as phosphate, citrate and other organic acids; antioxidants including ascorbic acid; low molecular weight (less than about 10 residues) polypeptides; proteins, such as serum albumin, gelatin or immunoglobulins; hydrophilic polymers such as polyvinylpyrrolidone, amino acids such as glycine, glutamine, asparagine, arginine or lysine; monosaccharides, disaccharides and other carbohydrates including glucose, mannose, or dextrins; chelating agents such as EDTA; sugar alcohols such as mannitol or sorbitol; salt-forming counterions such as sodium; and/or nonionic surfactants such as TWEEN™, PLURONICS™ or PEG.

[0286] The formulations to be used for in vivo administration must be sterile. This is readily accomplished by filtration through sterile filtration membranes, prior to or following lyophilization and reconstitution.

[0287] Therapeutic compositions herein generally are placed into a container having a sterile access port, for example, an intravenous solution bag or vial having a stopper pierceable by a hypodermic injection needle.

[0288] The route of administration is in accord with known methods, e.g. injection or infusion by intravenous, intraperitoneal, intracerebral, intramuscular, intraocular, intraarterial or intralesional routes, topical administration, or by sustained release systems.

[0289] Dosages and desired drug concentrations of pharmaceutical compositions of the present invention may vary depending on the particular use envisioned. The determination of the appropriate dosage or route of administration is well within the skill of an ordinary physician. Animal experiments provide reliable guidance for the determination of effective doses for human therapy. Interspecies scaling of effective doses can be performed following the principles laid down by Mordenti, J. and Chappell, W. “The use of interspecies scaling in toxicokinetics” In Toxicokinetics and New Drug Development, Yacobi et al., Eds., Pergamon Press, New York 1989, pp. 42-96.

[0290] When in vivo administration of a PRO polypeptide or agonist or antagonist thereof is employed, normal dosage amounts may vary from about 10 ng/kg to up to 100 mg/kg of mammal body weight or more per day, preferably about 1 μg/kg/day to 10 mg/kg/day, depending upon the route of administration. Guidance as to particular dosages and methods of delivery is provided in the literature; see, for example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,657,760; 5,206,344; or 5,225,212. It is anticipated that different formulations will be effective for different treatment compounds and different disorders, that administration targeting one organ or tissue, for example, may necessitate delivery in a manner different from that to another organ or tissue.

[0291] Where sustained-release administration of a PRO polypeptide is desired in a formulation with release characteristics suitable for the treatment of any disease or disorder requiring administration of the PRO polypeptide, microencapsulation of the PRO polypeptide is contemplated. Microencapsulation of recombinant proteins for sustained release has been successfully performed with human growth hormone (rhGH), interferon-(rhIFN-), interleukin-2, and MN rgp120. Johnson et al., Nat. Med., 2:795-799 (1996); Yasuda, Biomed. Ther., 27:1221-1223 (1993); Hora et al., Bio/Technology, 8:755-758 (1990); Cleland, “Design and Production of Single Immunization Vaccines Using Polylactide Polyglycolide Microsphere Systems,” in Vaccine Design: The Subunit and Adjuvant Approach, Powell and Newman, eds, (Plenum Press: New York, 1995), pp. 439-462; WO 97/03692, WO 96/40072, WO 96/07399; and U.S. Pat. No. 5,654,010.

[0292] The sustained-release formulations of these proteins were developed using poly-lactic-coglycolic acid (PLGA) polymer due to its biocompatibility and wide range of biodegradable properties. The degradation products of PLGA, lactic and glycolic acids, can be cleared quickly within the human body. Moreover, the degradability of this polymer can be adjusted from months to years depending on its molecular weight and composition. Lewis, “Controlled release of bioactive agents from lactide/glycolide polymer,” in: M. Chasin and R. Langer (Eds.), Biodegradable Polymers as Drug Delivery Systems (Marcel Dekker: New York, 1990), pp. 1-41.

[0293] This invention encompasses methods of screening compounds to identify those that mimic the PRO polypeptide (agonists) or prevent the effect of the PRO polypeptide (antagonists). Screening assays for antagonist drug candidates are designed to identify compounds that bind or complex with the PRO polypeptides encoded by the genes identified herein, or otherwise interfere with the interaction of the encoded polypeptides with other cellular proteins. Such screening assays will include assays amenable to high-throughput screening of chemical libraries, making them particularly suitable for identifying small molecule drug candidates.

[0294] The assays can be performed in a variety of formats, including protein-protein binding assays, biochemical screening assays, immunoassays, and cell-based assays, which are well characterized in the art.

[0295] All assays for antagonists are common in that they call for contacting the drug candidate with a PRO polypeptide encoded by a nucleic acid identified herein under conditions and for a time sufficient to allow these two components to interact.

[0296] In binding assays, the interaction is binding and the complex formed can be isolated or detected in the reaction mixture. In a particular embodiment, the PRO polypeptide encoded by the gene identified herein or the drug candidate is immobilized on a solid phase, e.g., on a microtiter plate, by covalent or non-covalent attachments. Non-covalent attachment generally is accomplished by coating the solid surface with a solution of the PRO polypeptide and drying. Alternatively, an immobilized antibody, e.g., a monoclonal antibody, specific for the PRO polypeptide to be immobilized can be used to anchor it to a solid surface. The assay is performed by adding the non-immobilized component, which may be labeled by a detectable label, to the immobilized component, e.g., the coated surface containing the anchored component. When the reaction is complete, the non-reacted components are removed, e.g., by washing, and complexes anchored on the solid surface are detected. When the originally non-immobilized component carries a detectable label, the detection of label immobilized on the surface indicates that complexing occurred. Where the originally non-immobilized component does not carry a label, complexing can be detected, for example, by using a labeled antibody specifically binding the immobilized complex.

[0297] If the candidate compound interacts with but does not bind to a particular PRO polypeptide encoded by a gene identified herein, its interaction with that polypeptide can be assayed by methods well known for detecting protein-protein interactions. Such assays include traditional approaches, such as, e.g., cross-linking, co-immunoprecipitation, and co-purification through gradients or chromatographic columns. In addition, protein-protein interactions can be monitored by using a yeast-based genetic system described by Fields and co-workers (Fields and Song, Nature (London), 340:245-246(1989); Chien et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 88:9578-9582 (1991)) as disclosed by Chevray and Nathans, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 89: 5789-5793 (1991). Many transcriptional activators, such as yeast GAL4, consist of two physically discrete modular domains, one acting as the DNA-binding domain, the other one functioning as the transcription-activation domain. The yeast expression system described in the foregoing publications (generally referred to as the “two-hybrid system”) takes advantage of this property, and employs two hybrid proteins, one in which the target protein is fused to the DNA-binding domain of GALA, and another, in which candidate activating proteins are fused to the activation domain. The expression of a GAL1-lacZ reporter gene under control of a GAL4-activated promoter depends on reconstitution of GAL4 activity via protein-protein interaction. Colonies containing interacting polypeptides are detected with a chromogenic substrate for β-galactosidase. A complete kit (MATCHMAKER™) for identifying protein-protein interactions between two specific proteins using the two-hybrid technique is commercially available from Clontech. This system can also be extended to map protein domains involved in specific protein interactions as well as to pinpoint amino acid residues that are crucial for these interactions.

[0298] Compounds that interfere with the interaction of a gene encoding a PRO polypeptide identified herein and other intra- or extracellular components can be tested as follows: usually a reaction mixture is prepared containing the product of the gene and the intra- or extracellular component under conditions and for a time allowing for the interaction and binding of the two products. To test the ability of a candidate compound to inhibit binding, the reaction is run in the absence and in the presence of the test compound. In addition, a placebo may be added to a third reaction mixture, to serve as positive control. The binding (complex formation) between the test compound and the intra- or extracellular component present in the mixture is monitored as described hereinabove. The formation of a complex in the control reaction(s) but not in the reaction mixture containing the test compound indicates that the test compound interferes with the interaction of the test compound and its reaction partner.

[0299] To assay for antagonists, the PRO polypeptide may be added to a cell along with the compound to be screened for a particular activity and the ability of the compound to inhibit the activity of interest in the presence of the PRO polypeptide indicates that the compound is an antagonist to the PRO polypeptide. Alternatively, antagonists may be detected by combining the PRO polypeptide and a potential antagonist with membrane-bound PRO polypeptide receptors or recombinant receptors under appropriate conditions for a competitive inhibition assay. The PRO polypeptide can be labeled, such as by radioactivity, such that the number of PRO polypeptide molecules bound to the receptor can be used to determine the effectiveness of the potential antagonist. The gene encoding the receptor can be identified by numerous methods known to those of skill in the art, for example, ligand panning and FACS sorting. Coligan et al., Current Protocols in Immun., 1(2): Chapter 5 (1991). Preferably, expression cloning is employed wherein polyadenylated RNA is prepared from a cell responsive to the PRO polypeptide and a cDNA library created from this RNA is divided into pools and used to transfect COS cells or other cells that are not responsive to the PRO polypeptide. Transfected cells that are grown on glass slides are exposed to labeled PRO polypeptide. The PRO polypeptide can be labeled by a variety of means including iodination or inclusion of a recognition site for a site-specific protein kinase. Following fixation and incubation, the slides are subjected to autoradiographic analysis. Positive pools are identified and sub-pools are prepared and re-transfected using an interactive sub-pooling and re-screening process, eventually yielding a single clone that encodes the putative receptor.

[0300] As an alternative approach for receptor identification, labeled PRO polypeptide can be photoaffinity-linked with cell membrane or extract preparations that express the receptor molecule. Cross-linked material is resolved by PAGE and exposed to X-ray film. The labeled complex containing the receptor can be excised, resolved into peptide fragments, and subjected to protein micro-sequencing. The amino acid sequence obtained from micro- sequencing would be used to design a set of degenerate oligonucleotide probes to screen a cDNA library to identify the gene encoding the putative receptor.

[0301] In another assay for antagonists, mammalian cells or a membrane preparation expressing the receptor would be incubated with labeled PRO polypeptide in the presence of the candidate compound. The ability of the compound to enhance or block this interaction could then be measured.

[0302] More specific examples of potential antagonists include an oligonucleotide that binds to the fusions of immunoglobulin with PRO polypeptide, and, in particular, antibodies including, without limitation, poly- and monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments, single-chain antibodies, anti-idiotypic antibodies, and chimeric or humanized versions of such antibodies or fragments, as well as human antibodies and antibody fragments. Alternatively, a potential antagonist may be a closely related protein, for example, a mutated form of the PRO polypeptide that recognizes the receptor but imparts no effect, thereby competitively inhibiting the action of the PRO polypeptide.

[0303] Another potential PRO polypeptide antagonist is an antisense RNA or DNA construct prepared using antisense technology, where, e.g., an antisense RNA or DNA molecule acts to block directly the translation of mRNA by hybridizing to targeted mRNA and preventing protein translation. Antisense technology can be used to control gene expression through triple-helix formation or antisense DNA or RNA, both of which methods are based on binding of a polynucleotide to DNA or RNA. For example, the 5′ coding portion of the polynucleotide sequence, which encodes the mature PRO polypeptides herein, is used to design an antisense RNA oligonucleotide of from about 10 to 40 base pairs in length. A DNA oligonucleotide is designed to be complementary to a region of the gene involved in transcription (triple helix—see Lee et al., Nucl. Acids Res., 6:3073 (1979); Cooney et al., Science, 241: 456(1988); Dervanet al., Science, 251:1360(1991)), thereby preventing transcription and the production of the PRO polypeptide. The antisense RNA oligonucleotide hybridizes to the mRNA in vivo and blocks translation of the mRNA molecule into the PRO polypeptide (antisense—Okano, Neurochem., 56:560 (1991); Oligodeoxynucleotides as Antisense Inhibitors of Gene Expression (CRC Press: Boca Raton, Fla., 1988). The oligonucleotides described above can also be delivered to cells such that the antisense RNA or DNA may be expressed in vivo to inhibit production of the PRO polypeptide. When antisense DNA is used, oligodeoxyribonucleotides derived from the translation-initiation site, e.g., between about −10 and +10 positions of the target gene nucleotide sequence, are preferred.

[0304] Potential antagonists include small molecules that bind to the active site, the receptor binding site, or growth factor or other relevant binding site of the PRO polypeptide, thereby blocking the normal biological activity of the PRO polypeptide. Examples of small molecules include, but are not limited to, small peptides or peptide-like molecules, preferably soluble peptides, and synthetic non-peptidyl organic or inorganic compounds.

[0305] Ribozymes are enzymatic RNA molecules capable of catalyzing the specific cleavage of RNA. Ribozymes act by sequence-specific hybridization to the complementary target RNA, followed by endonucleolytic cleavage. Specific ribozyme cleavage sites within a potential RNA target can be identified by known techniques. For further details see, e.g., Rossi, Current Biology, 4:469-471 (1994), and PCT publication No. WO 97/33551 (published Sep. 18, 1997).

[0306] Nucleic acid molecules in triple-helix formation used to inhibit transcription should be single-stranded and composed of deoxynucleotides. The base composition of these oligonucleotides is designed such that it promotes triple-helix formation via Hoogsteen base-pairing rules, which generally require sizeable stretches of purines or pyrimidines on one strand of a duplex. For further details see, e.g., PCT publication No. WO 97/33551, supra.

[0307] These small molecules can be identified by any one or more of the screening assays discussed hereinabove and/or by any other screening techniques well known for those skilled in the art.

[0308] Diagnostic and therapeutic uses of the herein disclosed molecules may also be based upon the positive functional assay hits disclosed and described below.

[0309] F. Anti-PRO Antibodies

[0310] The present invention further provides anti-PRO antibodies. Exemplary antibodies include polyclonal, monoclonal, humanized, bispecific, and heteroconjugate antibodies.

[0311] 1. Polyclonal Antibodies

[0312] The anti-PRO antibodies may comprise polyclonal antibodies. Methods of preparing polyclonal antibodies are known to the skilled artisan. Polyclonal antibodies can be raised in a mammal, for example, by one or more injections of an immunizing agent and, if desired, an adjuvant. Typically, the immunizing agent and/or adjuvant will be injected in the mammal by multiple subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injections. The immunizing agent may include the PRO polypeptide or a fusion protein thereof. It may be useful to conjugate the immunizing agent to a protein known to be immunogenic in the mammal being immunized. Examples of such immunogenic proteins include but are not limited to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, serum albumin, bovine thyroglobulin, and soybean trypsin inhibitor. Examples of adjuvants which may be employed include Freund's complete adjuvant and MPL-TDM adjuvant (monophosphoryl Lipid A, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate). The immunization protocol may be selected by one skilled in the art without undue experimentation.

[0313] 2. Monoclonal Antibodies

[0314] The anti-PRO antibodies may, alternatively, be monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies may be prepared using hybridoma methods, such as those described by Kohler and Milstein, Nature, 256:495 (1975). In a hybridoma method, a mouse, hamster, or other appropriate host animal, is typically immunized with an immunizing agent to elicit lymphocytes that produce or are capable of producing antibodies that will specifically bind to the immunizing agent. Alternatively, the lymphocytes may be immunized in vitro.

[0315] The immunizing agent will typically include the PRO polypeptide or a fusion protein thereof. Generally, either peripheral blood lymphocytes (“PBLs”) are used if cells of human origin are desired, or spleen cells or lymph node cells are used if non-human mammalian sources are desired. The lymphocytes are then fused with an immortalized cell line using a suitable fusing agent, such as polyethylene glycol, to form a hybridoma cell [Goding, Monoclonal Antibodies: Principles and Practice, Academic Press, (1986) pp. 59-103]. Immortalized cell lines are usually transformed mammalian cells, particularly myeloma cells of rodent, bovine and human origin. Usually, rat or mouse myeloma cell lines are employed. The hybridoma cells may be cultured in a suitable culture medium that preferably contains one or more substances that inhibit the growth or survival of the unfused, immortalized cells. For example, if the parental cells lack the enzyme hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT or HPRT), the culture medium for the hybridomas typically will include hypoxanthine, aminopterin, and thymidine (“HAT medium”), which substances prevent the growth of HGPRT-deficient cells.

[0316] Preferred immortalized cell lines are those that fuse efficiently, support stable high level expression of antibody by the selected antibody-producing cells, and are sensitive to a medium such as HAT medium. More preferred immortalized cell lines are murine myeloma lines, which can be obtained, for instance, from the Salk Institute Cell Distribution Center, San Diego, Calif. and the American Type Culture Collection, Manassas, Va. Human myeloma and mouse-human heteromyeloma cell lines also have been described for the production of human monoclonal antibodies [Kozbor, J. Immunol., 133:3001 (1984); Brodeur et al., Monoclonal Antibody Production Techniques and Applications, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, (1987) pp. 51-63].

[0317] The culture medium in which the hybridoma cells are cultured can then be assayed for the presence of monoclonal antibodies directed against PRO. Preferably, the binding specificity of monoclonal antibodies produced by the hybridoma cells is determined by immunoprecipitation or by an in vitro binding assay, such as radioimmunoassay (RIA) or enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). Such techniques and assays are known in the art. The binding affinity of the monoclonal antibody can, for example, be determined by the Scatchard analysis of Munson and Pollard, Anal. Biochem., 107:220 (1980).

[0318] After the desired hybridoma cells are identified, the clones may be subcloned by limiting dilution procedures and grown by standard methods [Goding, supra]. Suitable culture media for this purpose include, for example, Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium and RPMI-1640 medium. Alternatively, the hybridoma cells may be grown in vivo as ascites in a mammal.

[0319] The monoclonal antibodies secreted by the subclones may be isolated or purified from the culture medium or ascites fluid by conventional immunoglobulin purification procedures such as, for example, protein A-Sepharose, hydroxylapatite chromatography, gel electrophoresis, dialysis, or affinity chromatography.

[0320] The monoclonal antibodies may also be made by recombinant DNA methods, such as those described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,816,567. DNA encoding the monoclonal antibodies of the invention can be readily isolated and sequenced using conventional procedures (e.g., by using oligonucleotide probes that are capable of binding specifically to genes encoding the heavy and light chains of murine antibodies). The hybridoma cells of the invention serve as a preferred source of such DNA. Once isolated, the DNA may be placed into expression vectors, which are then transfected into host cells such as simian COS cells, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, or myeloma cells that do not otherwise produce immunoglobulin protein, to obtain the synthesis of monoclonal antibodies in the recombinant host cells. The DNA also may be modified, for example, by substituting the coding sequence for human heavy and light chain constant domains in place of the homologous murine sequences [U.S. Pat. No. 4,816,567; Morrison et al., supra] or by covalently joining to the immunoglobulin coding sequence all or part of the coding sequence for a non-immunoglobulin polypeptide. Such a non-immunoglobulin polypeptide can be substituted for the constant domains of an antibody of the invention, or can be substituted for the variable domains of one antigen-combining site of an antibody of the invention to create a chimeric bivalent antibody.

[0321] The antibodies may be monovalent antibodies. Methods for preparing monovalent antibodies are well known in the art. For example, one method involves recombinant expression of immunoglobulin light chain and modified heavy chain. The heavy chain is truncated generally at any point in the Fc region so as to prevent heavy chain crosslinking. Alternatively, the relevant cysteine residues are substituted with another amino acid residue or are deleted so as to prevent crosslinking.

[0322] In vitro methods are also suitable for preparing monovalent antibodies. Digestion of antibodies to produce fragments thereof, particularly, Fab fragments, can be accomplished using routine techniques known in the art.

[0323] 3. Human and Humanized Antibodies

[0324] The anti-PRO antibodies of the invention may further comprise humanized antibodies or human antibodies. Humanized forms of non-human (e.g., murine) antibodies are chimeric immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin chains or fragments thereof (such as Fv, Fab, Fab′, F(ab′)2 or other antigen-binding subsequences of antibodies) which contain minimal sequence derived from non-human immunoglobulin. Humanized antibodies include human immunoglobulins (recipient antibody) in which residues from a complementary determining region (CDR) of the recipient are replaced by residues from a CDR of a non-human species (donor antibody) such as mouse, rat or rabbit having the desired specificity, affinity and capacity. In some instances, Fv framework residues of the human immunoglobulin are replaced by corresponding non-human residues. Humanized antibodies may also comprise residues which are found neither in the recipient antibody nor in the imported CDR or framework sequences. In general, the humanized antibody will comprise substantially all of at least one, and typically two, variable domains, in which all or substantially all of the CDR regions correspond to those of a non-human immunoglobulin and all or substantially all of the FR regions are those of a human immunoglobulin consensus sequence. The humanized antibody optimally also will comprise at least a portion of an immunoglobulin constant region (Fc), typically that of a human immunoglobulin [Jones et al., Nature, 321:522-525(1986); Riechmannetal., Nature, 332:323-329(1988); and Presta, Curr. Op. Struct. Biol., 2:593-596 (1992)].

[0325] Methods for humanizing non-human antibodies are well known in the art. Generally, a humanized antibody has one or more amino acid residues introduced into it from a source which is non-human. These non-human amino acid residues are often referred to as “import” residues, which are typically taken from an “import” variable domain. Humanization can be essentially performed following the method of Winter and co-workers [Jones et al., Nature, 321:522-525 (1986); Riechmann et al., Nature, 332:323-327 (1988); Verhoeyen et al., Science, 239:1534-1536 (1988)], by substituting rodent CDRs or CDR sequences for the corresponding sequences of a human antibody. Accordingly, such “humanized” antibodies are chimeric antibodies (U.S. Pat. No. 4,816,567), wherein substantially less than an intact human variable domain has been substituted by the corresponding sequence from a non-human species. In practice, humanized antibodies are typically human antibodies in which some CDR residues and possibly some FR residues are substituted by residues from analogous sites in rodent antibodies.

[0326] Human antibodies can also be produced using various techniques known in the art, including phage display libraries [Hoogenboom and Winter, J. Mol. Biol., 227:381 (1991); Marks et al., J. Mol. Biol., 222:581 (1991)]. The techniques of Cole et al. and Boerner et al. are also available for the preparation of human monoclonal antibodies (Cole et al., Monoclonal Antibodies and Cancer Therapy, Alan R. Liss, p. 77 (1985) and Boerner et al., J. Immunol., 147(l):86-95 (1991)]. Similarly, human antibodies can be made by introducing of human immunoglobulin loci into transgenic animals, e.g., mice in which the endogenous inmunoglobulin genes have been partially or completely inactivated. Upon challenge, human antibody production is observed, which closely resembles that seen in humans in all respects, including gene rearrangement, assembly, and antibody repertoire. This approach is described, for example, in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,545,807; 5,545,806; 5,569,825; 5,625,126; 5,633,425; 5,661,016, and in the following scientific publications: Marks et al., Bio/Technology 10, 779-783 (1992); Lonberg et al., Nature 368 856-859 (1994); Morrison, Nature 368, 812-13 (1994); Fishwild et al., Nature Biotechnology 14, 845-51 (1996); Neuberger, Nature Biotechnology 14, 826 (1996); Lonberg and Huszar, Intern. Rev. Immunol. 13 65-93 (1995).

[0327] The antibodies may also be affinity matured using known selection and/or mutagenesis methods as described above. Preferred affinity matured antibodies have an affinity which is five times, more preferably 10 times, even more preferably 20 or 30 times greater than the starting antibody (generally murine, humanized or human) from which the matured antibody is prepared.

[0328] 4. Bispecific Antibodies

[0329] Bispecific antibodies are monoclonal, preferably human or humanized, antibodies that have binding specificities for at least two different antigens. In the present case, one of the binding specificities is for the PRO, the other one is for any other antigen, and preferably for a cell-surface protein or receptor or receptor subunit.

[0330] Methods for making bispecific antibodies are known in the art. Traditionally, the recombinant production of bispecific antibodies is based on the co-expression of two immunoglobulin heavy-chain/light-chain pairs, where the two heavy chains have different specificities [Milstein and Cuello, Nature, 305:537-539 (1983)]. Because of the random assortment of immunoglobulin heavy and light chains, these hybridomas (quadromas) produce a potential mixture of ten different antibody molecules, of which only one has the correct bispecific structure. The purification of the correct molecule is usually accomplished by affinity chromatography steps. Similar procedures are disclosed in WO 93/08829, published May 13, 1993, and in Traunecker et al., EMBO J., 10:3655-3659 (1991).

[0331] Antibody variable domains with the desired binding specificities (antibody-antigen combining sites) can be fused to immunoglobulin constant domain sequences. The fusion preferably is with an immunoglobulin heavy-chain constant domain, comprising at least part of the hinge, CH2, and CH3 regions. It is preferred to have the first heavy-chain constant region (CH1) containing the site necessary for light-chain binding present in at least one of the fusions. DNAs encoding the immunoglobulin heavy-chain fusions and, if desired, the immunoglobulin light chain, are inserted into separate expression vectors, and are co-transfected into a suitable host organism. For further details of generating bispecific antibodies see, for example, Suresh et al., Methods in Enzymology, 121:210 (1986).

[0332] According to another approach described in WO 96/27011, the interface between a pair of antibody molecules can be engineered to maximize the percentage of heterodimers which are recovered from recombinant cell culture. The preferred interface comprises at least a part of the CH3 region of an antibody constant domain. In this method, one or more small amino acid side chains from the interface of the first antibody molecule are replaced with larger side chains (e.g. tyrosine or tryptophan). Compensatory “cavities” of identical or similar size to the large side chain(s) are created on the interface of the second antibody molecule by replacing large amino acid side chains with smaller ones (e.g. alanine or threonine). This provides a mechanism for increasing the yield of the heterodimer over other unwanted end-products such as homodimers.

[0333] Bispecific antibodies can be prepared as full length antibodies or antibody fragments (e.g. F(ab′)2 bispecific antibodies). Techniques for generating bispecific antibodies from antibody fragments have been described in the literature. For example, bispecific antibodies can be prepared can be prepared using chemical linkage. Brennan et al., Science 229:81 (1985) describe a procedure wherein intact antibodies are proteolytically cleaved to generate F(ab′)2 fragments. These fragments are reduced in the presence of the dithiol complexing agent sodium arsenite to stabilize vicinal dithiols and prevent intermolecular disulfide formation. The Fab′ fragments generated are then converted to thionitrobenzoate (TNB) derivatives. One of the Fab′-TNB derivatives is then reconverted to the Fab′-thiol by reduction with mercaptoethylamine and is mixed with an equimolar amount of the other Fab′-TNB derivative to form the bispecific antibody. The bispecific antibodies produced can be used as agents for the selective immobilization of enzymes.

[0334] Fab′ fragments may be directly recovered from E. coli and chemically coupled to form bispecific antibodies. Shalaby et al., J. Exp. Med. 175:217-225 (1992) describe the production of a fully humanized bispecific antibody F(ab′)2 molecule. Each Fab′ fragment was separately secreted from E. coli and subjected to directed chemical coupling in vitro to form the bispecific antibody. The bispecific antibody thus formed was able to bind to cells overexpressing the ErbB2 receptor and normal human T cells, as well as trigger the lytic activity of human cytotoxic lymphocytes against human breast tumor targets.

[0335] Various technique for making and isolating bispecific antibody fragments directly from recombinant cell culture have also been described. For example, bispecific antibodies have been produced using leucine zippers. Kostelny et al., J. Immunol. 148(5):1547-1553 (1992). The leucine zipper peptides from the Fos and Jun proteins were linked to the Fab′ portions of two different antibodies by gene fusion. The antibody homodimers were reduced at the hinge region to form monomers and then re-oxidized to form the antibody heterodimers. This method can also be utilized for the production of antibody homodimers. The “diabody” technology described by Hollinger et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:6444-6448 (1993) has provided an alternative mechanism for making bispecific antibody fragments. The fragments comprise a heavy-chain variable domain (VH) connected to a light-chain variable domain (VL) by a linker which is too short to allow pairing between the two domains on the same chain. Accordingly, the VH and VL domains of one fragment are forced to pair with the complementary VL and VH domains of another fragment, thereby forming two antigen-binding sites. Another strategy for making bispecific antibody fragments by the use of single-chain Fv (sFv) dimers has also been reported. See, Gruber et al., J. Immunol. 152:5368 (1994).

[0336] Antibodies with more than two valencies are contemplated. For example, trispecific antibodies can be prepared. Tutt et al., J. Immunol. 147:60 (1991).

[0337] Exemplary bispecific antibodies may bind to two different epitopes on a given PRO polypeptide herein. Alternatively, an anti-PRO polypeptide arm may be combined with an arm which binds to a triggering molecule on a leukocyte such as a T-cell receptor molecule (e.g. CD2, CD3, CD28, or B7), or Fc receptors for IgG (FcγR), such as FcγRI (CD64), FcγRII (CD32) and FcγRIII (CD16) so as to focus cellular defense mechanisms to the cell expressing the particular PRO polypeptide. Bispecific antibodies may also be used to localize cytotoxic agents to cells which express a particular PRO polypeptide. These antibodies possess a PRO-binding arm and an arm which binds a cytotoxic agent or a radionuclide chelator, such as EOTUBE, DPTA, DOTA, or TETA. Another bispecific antibody of interest binds the PRO polypeptide and further binds tissue factor (TF).

[0338] 5. Heteroconjugate Antibodies

[0339] Heteroconjugate antibodies are also within the scope of the present invention. Heteroconjugate antibodies are composed of two covalently joined antibodies. Such antibodies have, for example, been proposed to target immune system cells to unwanted cells [U.S. Pat. No. 4,676,980], and for treatment of HIV infection [WO 91/00360; WO 92/200373; EP 03089]. It is contemplated that the antibodies may be prepared in vitro using known methods in synthetic protein chemistry, including those involving crosslinking agents. For example, immunotoxins may be constructed using a disulfide exchange reaction or by forming a thioether bond. Examples of suitable reagents for this purpose include iminothiolate and methyl-4-mercaptobutyrimidate and those disclosed, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 4,676,980.

[0340] 6. Effector Function Engineering

[0341] It may be desirable to modify the antibody of the invention with respect to effector function, so as to enhance, e.g., the effectiveness of the antibody in treating cancer. For example, cysteine residue(s) may be introduced into the Fc region, thereby allowing interchain disulfide bond formation in this region. The homodimeric antibody thus generated may have improved internalization capability and/or increased complement-mediated cell killing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). See Caron et al., J. Exp Med., 176: 1191-1195 (1992) and Shopes, J. Immunol., 148: 2918-2922 (1992). Homodimeric antibodies with enhanced anti-tumor activity may also be prepared using heterobifunctional cross-linkers as described in Wolff et al. Cancer Research, 53: 2560-2565 (1993). Alternatively, an antibody can be engineered that has dual Fc regions and may thereby have enhanced complement lysis and ADCC capabilities. See Stevenson et al., Anti-Cancer Drug Design, 3: 219-230 (1989).

[0342] 7. Immunoconiujates

[0343] The invention also pertains to immunoconjugates comprising an antibody conjugated to a cytotoxic agent such as a chemotherapeutic agent, toxin (e.g., an enzymatically active toxin of bacterial, fungal, plant, or animal origin, or fragments thereof), or a radioactive isotope (i.e., a radioconjugate).

[0344] Chemotherapeutic agents useful in the generation of such immunoconjugates have been described above. Enzymatically active toxins and fragments thereof that can be used include diphtheria A chain, nonbinding active fragments of diphtheria toxin, exotoxin A chain (from Pseudomonas aeruginosa), ricin A chain, abrin A chain, modeccin A chain, alpha-sarcin, Aleurites fordii proteins, dianthin proteins, Phytolaca ameticana proteins (PAPI, PAPII, and PAP-S), momordica charantia inhibitor, curcin, crotin, sapaonaria officinalis inhibitor, gelonin, mitogellin, restrictocin, phenomycin, enomycin, and the tricothecenes. A variety of radionuclides are available for the production of radioconjugated antibodies. Examples include 212Bi, 131I, 131In, 90Y, and 186Re. Conjugates of the antibody and cytotoxic agent are made using a variety of bifunctional protein-coupling agents such as N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiol) propionate (SPDP), iminothiolane (IT), biftnctional derivatives of imidoesters (such as dimethyl adipimidate HCL), active esters (such as disuccinimidyl suberate), aldehydes (such as glutareldehyde), bis-azido compounds (such as bis (p-azidobenzoyl) hexanediamine), bis-diazonium derivatives (such as bis-(p-diazoniumbenzoyl)-ethylenediamnine), diisocyanates (such as tolyene 2,6-diisocyanate), and bis-active fluorine compounds (such as 1,5-difluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene). For example, a ricin immunotoxin can be prepared as described in Vitetta et al., Science, 238: 1098 (1987). Carbon-14-labeled 1-isothiocyanatobenzyi-3-methyldiethylene triaminepentaacetic acid (MX-DTPA) is an exemplary chelating agent for conjugation of radionucleotide to the antibody. See WO94/11026.

[0345] In another embodiment, the antibody may be conjugated to a “receptor” (such streptavidin) for utilization in tumor pretargeting wherein the antibody-receptor conjugate is administered to the patient, followed by removal of unbound conjugate from the circulation using a clearing agent and then administration of a “ligand” (e.g., avidin) that is conjugated to a cytotoxic agent (e.g., a radionucleotide).

[0346] 8. Immunoliposomes

[0347] The antibodies disclosed herein may also be formulated as immunoliposomes. Liposomes containing the antibody are prepared by methods known in the art, such as described in Epstein et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 82: 3688 (1985); Hwang et al., Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 77: 4030 (1980); and U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,485,045 and 4,544,545. Liposomes with enhanced circulation time are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,013,556.

[0348] Particularly useful liposomes can be generated by the reverse-phase evaporation method with a lipid composition comprising phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and PEG-derivatized phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE). Liposomes are extruded through filters of defined pore size to yield liposomes with the desired diameter. Fab′ fragments of the antibody of the present invention can be conjugated to the liposomes as described in Martin et al., J. Biol. Chem., 257: 286-288 (1982) via a disulfide-interchange reaction. A chemotherapeutic agent (such as Doxorubicin) is optionally contained within the liposome. See Gabizon et al., J. National Cancer Inst., 81(19): 1484 (1989).

[0349] 9. Pharmaceutical Compositions of Antibodies

[0350] Antibodies specifically binding a PRO polypeptide identified herein, as well as other molecules identified by the screening assays disclosed hereinbefore, can be administered for the treatment of various disorders in the form of pharmaceutical compositions.

[0351] If the PRO polypeptide is intracellular and whole antibodies are used as inhibitors, internalizing antibodies are preferred. However, lipofections or liposomes can also be used to deliver the antibody, or an antibody fragment, into cells. Where antibody fragments are used, the smallest inhibitory fragment that specifically binds to the binding domain of the target protein is preferred. For example, based upon the variable-region sequences of an antibody, peptide molecules can be designed that retain the ability to bind the target protein sequence. Such peptides can be synthesized chemically and/or produced by recombinant DNA technology. See, e.g., Marasco et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 90: 7889-7893 (1993). The formulation herein may also contain more than one active compound as necessary for the particular indication being treated, preferably those with complementary activities that do not adversely affect each other. Alternatively, or in addition, the composition may comprise an agent that enhances its function, such as, for example, a cytotoxic agent, cytokine, chemotherapeutic agent, or growth-inhibitory agent. Such molecules are suitably present in combination in amounts that are effective for the purpose intended.

[0352] The active ingredients may also be entrapped in microcapsules prepared, for example, by coacervation techniques or by interfacial polymerization, for example, hydroxymethylcellulose or gelatin-microcapsules and poly-(methylmethacylate) microcapsules, respectively, in colloidal drug delivery systems (for example, liposomes, albumin microspheres, microemulsions, nano-particles, and nanocapsules) or in macroemulsions. Such techniques are disclosed in Remington's Pharmaceutical Sciences, supra.

[0353] The formulations to be used for in vivo administration must be sterile. This is readily accomplished by filtration through sterile filtration membranes.

[0354] Sustained-release preparations may be prepared. Suitable examples of sustained-release preparations include semipermeable matrices of solid hydrophobic polymers containing the antibody, which matrices are in the form of shaped articles, e.g., films, or microcapsules. Examples of sustained-release matrices include polyesters, hydrogels (for example, poly(2-hydroxyethyl-methacrylate), or poly(vinylalcohol)), polylactides (U.S. Pat. No. 3,773,919), copolymers of L-glutamic acid and γ ethyl-L-glutamate, non-degradable ethylene-vinyl acetate, degradable lactic acid-glycolic acid copolymers such as the LUPRON DEPOT™ (injectable microspheres composed of lactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer and leuprolide acetate), and poly-D-(−)-3-hydroxybutyric acid. While polymers such as ethylene-vinyl acetate and lactic acid-glycolic acid enable release of molecules for over 100 days, certain hydrogels release proteins for shorter time periods. When encapsulated antibodies remain in the body for a long time, they may denature or aggregate as a result of exposure to moisture at 37° C., resulting in a loss of biological activity and possible changes in immunogenicity. Rational strategies can be devised for stabilization depending on the mechanism involved. For example, if the aggregation mechanism is discovered to be intermolecular S-S bond formation through thio-disulfide interchange, stabilization may be achieved by modifying sulfhydryl residues, lyophilizing from acidic solutions, controlling moisture content, using appropriate additives, and developing specific polymer matrix compositions.

[0355] G. Uses for anti-PRO Antibodies

[0356] The anti-PRO antibodies of the invention have various utilities. For example, anti-PRO antibodies may be used in diagnostic assays for PRO, e.g., detecting its expression (and in some cases, differential expression) in specific cells, tissues, or serum. Various diagnostic assay techniques known in the art may be used, such as competitive binding assays, direct or indirect sandwich assays and immunoprecipitation assays conducted in either heterogeneous or homogeneous phases [Zola, Monoclonal Antibodies: A Manual of Techniques, CRC Press, Inc. (1987) pp. 147-158]. The antibodies used in the diagnostic assays can be labeled with a detectable moiety. The detectable moiety should be capable of producing, either directly or indirectly, a detectable signal. For example, the detectable moiety may be a radioisotope, such as 3H, 14C, 32p, 35S, or 125I, a fluorescent or chemiluminescent compound, such as fluorescein isothiocyanate, rhodamine, or luciferin, or an enzyme, such as alkaline phosphatase, beta-galactosidase or horseradish peroxidase. Any method known in the art for conjugating the antibody to the detectable moiety may be employed, including those methods described by Hunter et al., Nature, 144:945 (1962); David et al., Biochemistry, 13:1014 (1974); Pain et al., J. Immunol. Meth., 40:219 (1981); and Nygren, J. Histochem. and Cytochem., 30:407 (1982).

[0357] Anti-PRO antibodies also are useful for the affinity purification of PRO from recombinant cell culture or natural sources. In this process, the antibodies against PRO are immobilized on a suitable support, such a Sephadex resin or filter paper, using methods well known in the art. The immobilized antibody then is contacted with a sample containing the PRO to be purified, and thereafter the support is washed with a suitable solvent that will remove substantially all the material in the sample except the PRO, which is bound to the immobilized antibody. Finally, the support is washed with another suitable solvent that will release the PRO from the antibody.

[0358] The following examples are offered for illustrative purposes only, and are not intended to limit the scope of the present invention in any way.

[0359] All patent and literature references cited in the present specification are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.

EXAMPLES

[0360] Commercially available reagents referred to in the examples were used according to manufacturer's instructions unless otherwise indicated. The source of those cells identified in the following examples, and throughout the specification, by ATCC accession numbers is the American Type Culture Collection, Manassas, Va.

Example 1 Extracellular Domain Homology Screening to Identify Novel Polypeptides and cDNA Encoding Therefor

[0361] The extracellular domain (ECD) sequences (including the secretion signal sequence, if any) from about 950 known secreted proteins from the Swiss-Prot public database were used to search EST databases. The EST databases included public databases (e.g., Dayhoff, GenBank), and proprietary databases (e.g. LIFESEQ™, Incyte Pharmaceuticals, Palo Alto, Calif.). The search was performed using the computer program BLAST or BLAST-2 (Altschul et al., Methods in Enzymology, 266:460-480 (1996)) as a comparison of the ECD protein sequences to a 6 frame translation of the EST sequences. Those comparisons with a BLAST score of 70 (or in some cases 90) or greater that did not encode known proteins were clustered and assembled into consensus DNA sequences with the program “phrap” (Phil Green, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.).

[0362] Using this extracellular domain homology screen, consensus DNA sequences were assembled relative to the other identified EST sequences using phrap. In addition, the consensus DNA sequences obtained were often (but not always) extended using repeated cycles of BLAST or BLAST-2 and phrap to extend the consensus sequence as far as possible using the sources of EST sequences discussed above.

[0363] Based upon the consensus sequences obtained as described above, oligonucleotides were then synthesized and used to identify by PCR a cDNA library that contained the sequence of interest and for use as probes to isolate a clone of the full-length coding sequence for a PRO polypeptide. Forward and reverse PCR primers generally range from 20 to 30 nucleotides and are often designed to give a PCR product of about 100-1000 bp in length. The probe sequences are typically 40-55 bp in length. In some cases, additional oligonucleotides are synthesized when the consensus sequence is greater than about 1-1.5kbp. In order to screen several libraries for a full-length clone, DNA from the libraries was screened by PCR amplification, as per Ausubel et al., Current Protocols in Molecular Biology, with the PCR primer pair. A positive library was then used to isolate clones encoding the gene of interest using the probe oligonucleotide and one of the primer pairs.

[0364] The cDNA libraries used to isolate the cDNA clones were constructed by standard methods using commercially available reagents such as those from Invitrogen, San Diego, Calif.. The cDNA was primed with oligo dT containing a NotI site, linked with blunt to SalI hemikinased adaptors, cleaved with NotI, sized appropriately by gel electrophoresis, and cloned in a defined orientation into a suitable cloning vector (such as pRKB or pRKD; pRK5B is a precursor of pRK5D that does not contain the SfiI site; see, Holmes et al., Science, 253:1278-1280 (1991)) in the unique XhoI and NotI sites.

Example 2 Isolation of cDNA clones by Amylase Screening

[0365] 1. Preparation of Oligo dT Primed cDNA Library

[0366] mRNA was isolated from a human tissue of interest using reagents and protocols from Invitrogen, San Diego, Calif. (Fast Track 2). This RNA was used to generate an oligo dT primed cDNA library in the vector pRK5D using reagents and protocols from Life Technologies, Gaithersburg, Md. (Super Script Plasmid System). In this procedure, the double stranded cDNA was sized to greater than 1000 bp and the SalI/NotI linkered cDNA was cloned into XhoI/NotI cleaved vector. pRK5D is a cloning vector that has an sp6 transcription initiation site followed by an SfiI restriction enzyme site preceding the XhoI/NotI cDNA cloning sites.

[0367] 2. Preparation of Random Primed cDNA Library

[0368] A secondary cDNA library was generated in order to preferentially represent the 5′ ends of the primary cDNA clones. Sp6 RNA was generated from the primary library (described above), and this RNA was used to generate a random primed cDNA library in the vector pSST-AMY.0 using reagents and protocols from Life Technologies (Super Script Plasmid System, referenced above). In this procedure the double stranded cDNA was sized to 500-1000 bp, linkered with blunt to NotI adaptors, cleaved with SfiI, and cloned into SfiI/NotI cleaved vector. pSST-AMY.0 is a cloning vector that has a yeast alcohol dehydrogenase promoter preceding the cDNA cloning sites and the mouse amylase sequence (the mature sequence without the secretion signal) followed by the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase terminator, after the cloning sites. Thus, cDNAs cloned into this vector that are fused in frame with amylase sequence will lead to the secretion of amylase from appropriately transfected yeast colonies.

[0369] 3. Transformation and Detection

[0370] DNA from the library described in paragraph 2 above was chilled on ice to which was added electrocompetent DHIOB bacteria (Life Technologies, 20 ml). The bacteria and vector mixture was then electroporated as recommended by the manufacturer. Subsequently, SOC media (Life Technologies, 1 ml) was added and the mixture was incubated at 37° C. for 30 minutes. The transformants were then plated onto 20 standard 150 mm LB plates containing ampicillin and incubated for 16 hours (37° C.). Positive colonies were scraped off the plates and the DNA was isolated from the bacterial pellet using standard protocols, e.g. CsCl-gradient. The purified DNA was then carried on to the yeast protocols below.

[0371] The yeast methods were divided into three categories: (1) Transformation of yeast with the plasmid/cDNA combined vector; (2) Detection and isolation of yeast clones secreting amylase; and (3) PCR amplification of the insert directly from the yeast colony and purification of the DNA for sequencing and further analysis.

[0372] The yeast strain used was HD56-5A (ATCC-90785). This strain has the following genotype: MAT alpha, ura3-52, leu2-3, leu2-112, his3-11, his3-15, MAL+, SUC+, GAL+. Preferably, yeast mutants can be employed that have deficient post-translational pathways. Such mutants may have translocation deficient alleles in sec71, sec72, sec62, with truncated sec71 being most preferred. Alternatively, antagonists (including antisense nucleotides and/or ligands) which interfere with the normal operation of these genes, other proteins implicated in this post translation pathway (e.g., SEC61p, SEC72p, SEC62p, SEC63p, TDJ1p or SSA1p-4p) or the complex formation of these proteins may also be preferably employed in combination with the amylase-expressing yeast.

[0373] Transformation was performed based on the protocol outlined by Gietz et al., Nucl. Acid. Res., 20:1425 (1992). Transformed cells were then inoculated from agar into YEPD complex media broth (100 ml) and grown overnight at 30° C. The YEPD broth was prepared as described in Kaiser et al., Methods in Yeast Genetics, Cold Spring Harbor Press, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y., p. 207 (1994). The overnight culture was then diluted to about 2×106 cells/ml (approx. OD600=0.1) into fresh YEPD broth (500 ml) and regrown to 1×107 cells/ml (approx. OD600=0.4-0.5).

[0374] The cells were then harvested and prepared for transformation by transfer into GS3 rotor bottles in a Sorval GS3 rotor at 5,000 rpm for 5 minutes, the supernatant discarded, and then resuspended into sterile water, and centrifuged again in 50 ml falcon tubes at 3,500 rpm in a Beckman GS-6KR centrifuge. The supernatant was discarded and the cells were subsequently washed with LiAc/TE (10 ml, 10 mM Tris-HCl, 1 mM EDTA pH 7.5, 100 mM Li2OOCCH3), and resuspended into LiAc/TE (2.5 ml).

[0375] Transformation took place by mixing the prepared cells (100 μl) with freshly denatured single stranded salmon testes DNA (Lofstrand Labs, Gaithersburg, Md.) and transforming DNA (1 μg, vol.<10 μl) in microfuge tubes. The mixture was mixed briefly by vortexing, then 40% PEG/TE (600 μl, 40% polyethylene glycol-4000, 10 mM Tris-HCl, 1 mM EDTA, 100 mM Li2OOCCH3, pH 7.5) was added. This mixture was gently mixed and incubated at 30° C. while agitating for 30 minutes. The cells were then heat shocked at 42° C. for 15 minutes, and the reaction vessel centrifuged in a microfuge at 12,000 rpm for 5-10 seconds, decanted and resuspended into TE (500 μl, 10 mM Tris-HCl, 1 mM EDTA pH 7.5) followed by recentrifugation. The cells were then diluted into TE (1 ml) and aliquots (200 μl) were spread onto the selective media previously prepared in 150 mm growth plates (VWR).

[0376] Alternatively, instead of multiple small reactions, the transformation was performed using a single, large scale reaction, wherein reagent amounts were scaled up accordingly.

[0377] The selective media used was a synthetic complete dextrose agar lacking uracil (SCD-Ura) prepared as described in Kaiser et al., Methods in Yeast Genetics, Cold Spring Harbor Press, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y., p. 208-210 (1994). Transformants were grown at 30° C. for 2-3 days.

[0378] The detection of colonies secreting amylase was performed by including red starch in the selective growth media. Starch was coupled to the red dye (Reactive Red-120, Sigma) as per the procedure described by Biely et al., Anal. Biochem., 172:176-179 (1988). The coupled starch was incorporated into the SCD-Ura agar plates at a final concentration of 0.15% (w/v), and was buffered with potassium phosphate to a pH of 7.0 (50-100 mM final concentration).

[0379] The positive colonies were picked and streaked across fresh selective media (onto 150 mm plates) in order to obtain well isolated and identifiable single colonies. Well isolated single colonies positive for amylase secretion were detected by direct incorporation of red starch into buffered SCD-Ura agar. Positive colonies were determined by their ability to break down starch resulting in a clear halo around the positive colony visualized directly.

[0380] 4. Isolation of DNA by PCR Amplification

[0381] When a positive colony was isolated, a portion of it was picked by a toothpick and diluted into sterile water (30 μl) in a 96 well plate. At this time, the positive colonies were either frozen and stored for subsequent analysis or immediately amplified. An aliquot of cells (5 μl) was used as a template for the PCR reaction in a 25 μl volume containing: 0.5 μl Klentaq (Clontech, Palo Alto, Calif.); 4.0 μl 10 mM dNTP's (Perkin Elmer-Cetus); 2.5 μl Kentaq buffer (Clontech); 0.25 μl forward oligo 1; 0.25 μl reverse oligo 2; 12.5 μl distilled water. The sequence of the forward oligonucleotide 1 was:

[0382] 5′-TGTAAAACGACGGCCAGTTAAATAGACCTGCAATTATTAATCT-3′ (SEQ ID NO:115)

[0383] The sequence of reverse oligonucleotide 2 was:

[0384] 5′-CAGGAAACAGCTATGACCACCTGCACACCTGCAAATCCATT-3′ (SEQ ID NO:116)

[0385] PCR was then performed as follows:

a. Denature 92° C.,  5 minutes
b.  3 cycles of: Denature 92° C., 30 seconds
Anneal 59° C., 30 seconds
Extend 72° C., 60 seconds
c.  3 cycles of: Denature 92° C., 30 seconds
Anneal 57° C., 30 seconds
Extend 72° C., 60 seconds
d. 25 cycles of: Denature 92° C., 30 seconds
Anneal 55° C., 30 seconds
Extend 72° C., 60 seconds
e. Hold  4° C.

[0386] The underlined regions of the oligonucleotides annealed to the ADH promoter region and the amylase region, respectively, and amplified a 307 bp region from vector pSST-AMY.0 when no insert was present. Typically, the first 18 nucleotides of the 5′ end of these oligonucleotides contained annealing sites for the sequencing primers. Thus, the total product of the PCR reaction from an empty vector was 343 bp. However, signal sequence-fused cDNA resulted in considerably longer nucleotide sequences.

[0387] Following the PCR, an aliquot of the reaction (5 μl) was examined by agarose gel electrophoresis in a 1% agarose gel using a Tris-Borate-EDTA (TBE) buffering system as described by Sambrook et al., supra. Clones resulting in a single strong PCR product larger than 400 bp were further analyzed by DNA sequencing after purification with a 96 Qiaquick PCR clean-up column (Qiagen Inc., Chatsworth, Calif.).

Example 3 Isolation of cDNA Clones Using Signal Algorithm Analysis

[0388] Various polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid sequences were identified by applying a proprietary signal sequence finding algorithm developed by Genentech, Inc. (South San Francisco, Calif.) upon ESTs as well as clustered and assembled EST fragments from public (e.g., GenBank) and/or private (LIFESEQ®, Incyte Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Palo Alto, Calif.) databases. The signal sequence algorithm computes a secretion signal score based on the character of the DNA nucleotides surrounding the first and optionally the second methionine codon(s) (ATG) at the 5′-end of the sequence or sequence fragment under consideration. The nucleotides following the first ATG must code for at least 35 unambiguous amino acids without any stop codons. If the first ATG has the required amino acids, the second is not examined. If neither meets the requirement, the candidate sequence is not scored. In order to determine whether the EST sequence contains an authentic signal sequence, the DNA and corresponding amino acid sequences surrounding the ATG codon are scored using a set of seven sensors (evaluation parameters) known to be associated with secretion signals. Use of this algorithm resulted in the identification of numerous polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid sequences.

Example 4 Isolation of cDNA Clones Encoding Human PRO Polypeptides

[0389] Using the techniques described in Examples 1 to 3 above, numerous full-length cDNA clones were identified as encoding PRO polypeptides as disclosed herein. These cDNAs were then deposited under the terms of the Budapest Treaty with the American Type Culture Collection, 10801 University Blvd., Manassas, Va. 20110-2209, USA (ATCC) as shown in Table 7 below.

TABLE 7
Material ATCC Dep. No. Deposit Date
DNA16422-1209 209929 Jun. 2, 1998
DNA19902-1669 203454 Nov. 3, 1998
DNA21624-1391 209917 Jun. 2, 1998
DNA34387-1138 209260 Sep. 16, 1997
DNA35880-1160 209379 Oct. 16, 1997
DNA39984-1221 209435 Nov. 7, 1997
DNA44189-1322 209699 Mar. 26, 1998
DNA48303-2829 PTA-1342 Feb. 8, 2000
DNA48320-1433 209904 May 27, 1998
DNA56049-2543 203662 Feb. 9, 1999
DNA57694-1341 203017 Jun. 23, 1998
DNA59208-1373 209881 May 20, 1998
DNA59214-1449 203046 Jul. 1, 1998
DNA59485-1336 203015 Jun. 23, 1998
DNA64966-1575 203575 Jan. 12, 1999
DNA82403-2959 PTA-2317 Aug. 1, 2000
DNA83505-2606 PTA-132 May 25, 1999
DNA84927-2585 203865 Mar. 23, 1999
DNA92264-2616 203969 Apr. 27, 1999
DNA94713-2561 203835 Mar. 9, 1999
DNA96869-2673 PTA-255 Jun. 22, 1999
DNA96881-2699 PTA-553 Aug. 17, 1999
DNA96889-2641 PTA-119 May 25, 1999
DNA96898-2640 PTA-122 May 25, 1999
DNA97003-2649 PTA-43 May 11, 1999
DNA98565-2701 PTA-481 Aug. 3, 1999
DNA102846-2742 PTA-545 Aug. 17, 1999
DNA102847-2726 PTA-517 Aug. 10, 1999
DNA102880-2689 PTA-383 Jul. 20, 1999
DNA105782-2683 PTA-387 Jul. 20, 1999
DNA108912-2680 PTA-124 May, 25, 1999
DNA115253-2757 PTA-612 Aug. 31, 1999
DNA119302-2737 PTA-520 Aug. 10, 1999
DNA119536-2752 PTA-551 Aug. 17, 1999
DNA119542-2754 PTA-619 Aug. 31, 1999
DNA143498-2824 PTA-1263 Feb. 2, 2000
DNA145583-2820 PTA-1179 Jan. 11, 2000
DNA161000-2896 PTA-1731 Apr. 18, 2000
DNA161005-2943 PTA-2243 Jun. 27, 2000
DNA170245-3053 PTA-2952 Jan. 23, 2001
DNA171771-2919 PTA-1902 May 23, 2000
DNA173157-2981 PTA-2388 Aug. 8, 2000
DNA175734-2985 PTA-2455 Sep. 12, 2000
DNA176108-3040 PTA-2824 Dec. 19, 2000
DNA190710-3028 PTA-2822 Dec. 19, 2000
DNA190803-3019 PTA-2785 Dec. 12, 2000
DNA191064-3069 PTA-3016 Feb. 6, 2001
DNA194909-3013 PTA-2779 Dec. 12, 2000
DNA203532-3029 PTA-2823 Dec. 19, 2000
DNA213858-3060 PTA-2958 Jan. 23, 2001
DNA216676-3083 PTA-3157 Mar. 6, 2001
DNA222653-3104 PTA-3330 Apr. 24, 2001
DNA96897-2688 PTA-379 Jul. 20, 1999
DNA142917-3081 PTA-3155 Mar. 6, 2001
DNA142930-2914 PTA-1901 May 23, 2000
DNA147253-2983 PTA-2405 Aug. 22, 2000
DNA149927-2887 PTA-1782 Apr. 25, 2000

[0390] These deposits were made under the provisions of the Budapest Treaty on the International Recognition of the Deposit of Microorganisms for the Purpose of Patent Procedure and the Regulations thereunder (Budapest Treaty). This assures maintenance of a viable culture of the deposit for 30 years from the date of deposit. The deposits will be made available by ATCC under the terms of the Budapest Treaty, and subject to an agreement between Genentech, Inc. and ATCC, which assures permanent and unrestricted availability of the progeny of the culture of the deposit to the public upon issuance of the pertinent U.S. patent or upon laying open to the public of any U.S. or foreign patent application, whichever comes first, and assures availability of the progeny to one determined by the U.S. Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks to be entitled thereto according to 35 USC § 122 and the Commissioner's rules pursuant thereto (including 37 CFR § 1.14 with particular reference to 886 OG 638).

[0391] The assignee of the present application has agreed that if a culture of the materials on deposit should die or be lost or destroyed when cultivated under suitable conditions, the materials will be promptly replaced on notification with another of the same. Availability of the deposited material is not to be construed as a license to practice the invention in contravention of the rights granted under the authority of any government in accordance with its patent laws.

Example 5 Use of PRO as a Hybridization Probe

[0392] The following method describes use of a nucleotide sequence encoding PRO as a hybridization probe.

[0393] DNA comprising the coding sequence of full-length or mature PRO as disclosed herein is employed as a probe to screen for homologous DNAs (such as those encoding naturally-occurring variants of PRO) in human tissue cDNA libraries or human tissue genomic libraries.

[0394] Hybridization and washing of filters containing either library DNAs is performed under the following high stringency conditions. Hybridization of radiolabeled PRO-derived probe to the filters is performed in a solution of 50% formamide, 5× SSC, 0.1% SDS, 0.1% sodium pyrophosphate, 50 mM sodium phosphate, pH 6.8, 2× Denhardt's solution, and 10% dextran sulfate at 42° C. for 20 hours. Washing of the filters is performed in an aqueous solution of 0.1× SSC and 0.1% SDS at 42° C.

[0395] DNAs having a desired sequence identity with the DNA encoding full-length native sequence PRO can then be identified using standard techniques known in the art.

Example 6 Expression of PRO in E. coli

[0396] This example illustrates preparation of an unglycosylated form of PRO by recombinant expression in E. coli.

[0397] The DNA sequence encoding PRO is initially amplified using selected PCR primers. The primers should contain restriction enzyme sites which correspond to the restriction enzyme sites on the selected expression vector. A variety of expression vectors may be employed. An example of a suitable vector is pBR322 (derived from E. coli; see Bolivar et al., Gene, 2:95 (1977)) which contains genes for ampicillin and tetracycline resistance. The vector is digested with restriction enzyme and dephosphorylated. The PCR amplified sequences are then ligated into the vector. The vector will preferably include sequences which encode for an antibiotic resistance gene, a trp promoter, a polyhis leader (including the first six STII codons, polyhis sequence, and enterokinase cleavage site), the PRO coding region, lambda transcriptional terminator, and an argu gene.

[0398] The ligation mixture is then used to transform a selected E. coli strain using the methods described in Sambrook et al., supra. Transformants are identified by their ability to grow on LB plates and antibiotic resistant colonies are then selected. Plasmid DNA can be isolated and confirmed by restriction analysis and DNA sequencing.

[0399] Selected clones can be grown overnight in liquid culture medium such as LB broth supplemented with antibiotics. The overnight culture may subsequently be used to inoculate a larger scale culture. The cells are then grown to a desired optical density, during which the expression promoter is turned on.

[0400] After culturing the cells for several more hours, the cells can be harvested by centrifugation. The cell pellet obtained by the centrifugation can be solubilized using various agents known in the art, and the solubilized PRO protein can then be purified using a metal chelating column under conditions that allow tight binding of the protein.

[0401] PRO may be expressed in E. coli in a poly-His tagged form, using the following procedure. The DNA encoding PRO is initially amplified using selected PCR primers. The primers will contain restriction enzyme sites which correspond to the restriction enzyme sites on the selected expression vector, and other useful sequences providing for efficient and reliable translation initiation, rapid purification on a metal chelation column, and proteolytic removal with enterokinase. The PCR-amplified, poly-His tagged sequences are then ligated into an expression vector, which is used to transform an E. coli host based on strain 52 (W3110 fuhA(tonA) Ion galE rpoHts(htpRts) clpP(laclq). Transformants are first grown in LB containing 50 mg/ml carbenicillin at 30° C. with shaking until an O.D.600 of 3-5 is reached. Cultures are then diluted 50-100 fold into CRAP media (prepared by mixing 3.57 g (NH4)2SO4, 0.71 g sodium citrate-2H2O, 1.07 g KCl, 5.36 g Difco yeast extract, 5.36 g Sheffield hycase SF in 500 mL water, as well as 110 mM MPOS, pH 7.3, 0.55% (w/v) glucose and 7 mM MgSO4) and grown for approximately 20-30 hours at 30° C. with shaking. Samples are removed to verify expression by SDS-PAGE analysis, and the bulk culture is centrifuged to pellet the cells. Cell pellets are frozen until purification and refolding.

[0402]E. coli paste from 0.5 to 1 L fermentations (6-10 g pellets) is resuspended in 10 volumes (w/v) in 7 M guanidine, 20 mM Tris, pH 8 buffer. Solid sodium sulfite and sodium tetrathionate is added to make final concentrations of 0.1M and 0.02 M, respectively, and the solution is stirred overnight at 4° C. This step results in a denatured protein with all cysteine residues blocked by sulfitolization. The solution is centrifuged at 40,000 rpm in a Beckman Ultracentifuge for 30 min. The supernatant is diluted with 3-5 volumes of metal chelate column buffer (6 M guanidine, 20 mM Tris, pH 7.4) and filtered through 0.22 micron filters to clarify. The clarified extract is loaded onto a 5 ml Qiagen Ni-NTA metal chelate column equilibrated in the metal chelate column buffer. The column is washed with additional buffer containing 50 mM imidazole (Calbiochem, Utrol grade), pH 7.4. The protein is eluted with buffer containing 250 mM imidazole. Fractions containing the desired protein are pooled and stored at 4° C. Protein concentration is estimated by its absorbance at 280 nm using the calculated extinction coefficient based on its amino acid sequence.

[0403] The proteins are refolded by diluting the sample slowly into freshly prepared refolding buffer consisting of: 20 mM Tris, pH 8.6, 0.3 M NaCl, 2.5 M urea, 5 mM cysteine, 20 mM glycine and 1 mM EDTA. Refolding volumes are chosen so that the final protein concentration is between 50 to 100 micrograms/ml. The refolding solution is stirred gently at 4° C. for 12-36 hours. The refolding reaction is quenched by the addition of TFA to a final concentration of 0.4% (pH of approximately 3). Before further purification of the protein, the solution is filtered through a 0.22 micron filter and acetonitrile is added to 2-10% final concentration. The refolded protein is chromatographed on a Poros R1/H reversed phase column using a mobile buffer of 0.1% TFA with elution with a gradient of acetonitrile from 10 to 80%. Aliquots of fractions with A280 absorbance are analyzed on SDS polyacrylamide gels and fractions containing homogeneous refolded protein are pooled. Generally, the properly refolded species of most proteins are eluted at the lowest concentrations of acetonitrile since those species are the most compact with their hydrophobic interiors shielded from interaction with the reversed phase resin. Aggregated species are usually eluted at higher acetonitrile concentrations. In addition to resolving misfolded forms of proteins from the desired form, the reversed phase step also removes endotoxin from the samples.

[0404] Fractions containing the desired folded PRO polypeptide are pooled and the acetonitrile removed using a gentle stream of nitrogen directed at the solution. Proteins are formulated into 20 mM Hepes, pH 6.8 with 0.14 M sodium chloride and 4% mannitol by dialysis or by gel filtration using G25 Superfine (Pharmacia) resins equilibrated in the formulation buffer and sterile filtered.

[0405] Many of the PRO polypeptides disclosed herein were successfully expressed as described above.

Example 7 Expression of PRO in Mammalian Cells

[0406] This example illustrates preparation of a potentially glycosylated form of PRO by recombinant expression in mammalian cells.

[0407] The vector, pRK5 (see EP 307,247, published Mar. 15, 1989), is employed as the expression vector. Optionally, the PRO DNA is ligated into pRK5 with selected restriction enzymes to allow insertion of the PRO DNA using ligation methods such as described in Sambrook et al., supra. The resulting vector is called pRK5-PRO.

[0408] In one embodiment, the selected host cells may be 293 cells. Human 293 cells (ATCC CCL 1573) are grown to confluence in tissue culture plates in medium such as DMEM supplemented with fetal calf serum and optionally, nutrient components and/or antibiotics. About 10 μg pRK5-PRO DNA is mixed with about 1 μg DNA encoding the VA RNA gene [Thimmappaya et al., Cell, 31:543 (1982)] and dissolved in 500 μl of 1 mM Tris-HCl, 0.1 mM EDTA, 0.227 M CaCl2. To this mixture is added, dropwise, 500 μl of 50 mM HEPES (pH 7.35), 280 mM NaCl, 1.5 mM NaPO4, and a precipitate is allowed to form for 10 minutes at 25° C. The precipitate is suspended and added to the 293 cells and allowed to settle for about four hours at 37° C. The culture medium is aspirated off and 2 ml of 20% glycerol in PBS is added for 30 seconds. The 293 cells are then washed with serum free medium, fresh medium is added and the cells are incubated for about 5 days.

[0409] Approximately 24 hours after the transfections, the culture medium is removed and replaced with culture medium (alone) or culture medium containing 200 μCi/ml 35S-cysteine and 200 μCi/ml 35S-methionine. After a 12 hour incubation, the conditioned medium is collected, concentrated on a spin filter, and loaded onto a 15% SDS gel. The processed gel may be dried and exposed to film for a selected period of time to reveal the presence of PRO polypeptide. The cultures containing transfected cells may undergo further incubation (in serum free medium) and the medium is tested in selected bioassays.

[0410] In an alternative technique, PRO may be introduced into 293 cells transiently using the dextran sulfate method described by Somparyrac et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 12:7575 (1981). 293 cells are grown to maximal density in a spinner flask and 700 μg pRK5-PRO DNA is added. The cells are first concentrated from the spinner flask by centrifugation and washed with PBS. The DNA-dextran precipitate is incubated on the cell pellet for four hours. The cells are treated with 20% glycerol for 90 seconds, washed with tissue culture medium, and re-introduced into the spinner flask containing tissue culture medium, 5 μg/ml bovine insulin and 0.1 μg/ml bovine transferrin. After about four days, the conditioned media is centrifuged and filtered to remove cells and debris. The sample containing expressed PRO can then be concentrated and purified by any selected method, such as dialysis and/or column chromatography.

[0411] In another embodiment, PRO can be expressed in CHO cells. The pRK5-PRO can be transfected into CHO cells using known reagents such as CaPO4 or DEAE-dextran. As described above, the cell cultures can be incubated, and the medium replaced with culture medium (alone) or medium containing a radiolabel such as 35S-methionine. After determining the presence of PRO polypeptide, the culture medium may be replaced with serum free medium. Preferably, the cultures are incubated for about 6 days, and then the conditioned medium is harvested. The medium containing the expressed PRO can then be concentrated and purified by any selected method.

[0412] Epitope-tagged PRO may also be expressed in host CHO cells. The PRO may be subcloned out of the pRK5 vector. The subclone insert can undergo PCR to fuse in frame with a selected epitope tag such as a poly-his tag into a Baculovirus expression vector. The poly-his tagged PRO insert can then be subcloned into a SV40 driven vector containing a selection marker such as DHFR for selection of stable clones. Finally, the CHO cells can be transfected (as described above) with the SV40 driven vector. Labeling may be performed, as described above, to verify expression. The culture medium containing the expressed poly-His tagged PRO can then be concentrated and purified by any selected method, such as by Ni2+-chelate affinity chromatography.

[0413] PRO may also be expressed in CHO and/or COS cells by a transient expression procedure or in CHO cells by another stable expression procedure.

[0414] Stable expression in CHO cells is performed using the following procedure. The proteins are expressed as an IgG construct (immunoadhesin), in which the coding sequences for the soluble forms (e.g. extracellular domains) of the respective proteins are fused to an IgG1 constant region sequence containing the hinge, CH2 and CH2 domains and/or is a poly-His tagged form.

[0415] Following PCR amplification, the respective DNAs are subcloned in a CHO expression vector using standard techniques as described in Ausubel et al., Current Protocols of Molecular Biology, Unit 3.16, John Wiley and Sons (1997). CHO expression vectors are constructed to have compatible restriction sites 5′ and 3′ of the DNA of interest to allow the convenient shuttling of cDNA's. The vector used expression in CHO cells is as described in Lucas et al., Nucl. Acids Res. 24:9 (1774-1779 (1996), and uses the SV40 early promoter/enhancer to drive expression of the cDNA of interest and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). DHFR expression permits selection for stable maintenance of the plasmid following transfection.

[0416] Twelve micrograms of the desired plasmid DNA is introduced into approximately 10 million CHO cells using commercially available transfection reagents Superfect® (Qiagen), Dosper® or Fugene® (Boehringer Mannheim). The cells are grown as described in Lucas et al., supra. Approximately 3×107 cells are frozen in an ampule for further growth and production as described below.

[0417] The ampules containing the plasmid DNA are thawed by placement into water bath and mixed by vortexing. The contents are pipetted into a centrifuge tube containing 10 mLs of media and centrifuged at 1000 rpm for 5 minutes. The supernatant is aspirated and the cells are resuspended in 10 mL of selective media (0.2 μm filtered PS20 with 5% 0.2 μm diafiltered fetal bovine serum). The cells are then aliquoted into a 100 mL spinner containing 90 mL of selective media. After 1-2 days, the cells are transferred into a 250 mL spinner filled with 150 mL selective growth medium and incubated at 37° C. After another 2-3 days, 250 mL, 500 mL and 2000 mL spinners are seeded with 3×105 cells/mL. The cell media is exchanged with fresh media by centrifugation and resuspension in production medium. Although any suitable CHO media may be employed, a production medium described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,122,469, issued Jun. 16, 1992 may actually be used. A 3L production spinner is seeded at 1.2×106 cells/mL. On day 0, the cell number pH ie determined. On day 1, the spinner is sampled and sparging with filtered air is commenced. On day 2, the spinner is sampled, the temperature shifted to 33° C., and 30 mL of 500 g/L glucose and 0.6 mL of 10% antifoam (e.g., 35% polydimethylsiloxane emulsion, Dow Corning 365 Medical Grade Emulsion) taken. Throughout the production, the pH is adjusted as necessary to keep it at around 7.2. After 10 days, or until the viability dropped below 70%, the cell culture is harvested by centrifugation and filtering through a 0.22 μm filter. The filtrate was either stored at 4° C. or immediately loaded onto columns for purification.

[0418] For the poly-His tagged constructs, the proteins are purified using a Ni-NTA column (Qiagen). Before purification, imidazole is added to the conditioned media to a concentration of 5 mM. The conditioned media is pumped onto a 6 ml Ni-NTA column equilibrated in 20 mM Hepes, pH 7.4, buffer containing 0.3 M NaCl and 5 mM imidazole at a flow rate of 4-5 ml/min. at 4° C. After loading, the column is washed with additional equilibration buffer and the protein eluted with equilibration buffer containing 0.25 M imidazole. The highly purified protein is subsequently desalted into a storage buffer containing 10 mM Hepes, 0.14 M NaCl and 4% mannitol, pH 6.8, with a 25 ml G25 Superfine (Pharmacia) column and stored at −80° C.

[0419] Immunoadhesin (Fc-containing) constructs are purified from the conditioned media as follows. The conditioned medium is pumped onto a 5 ml Protein A column (Pharmacia) which had been equilibrated in 20 mM Na phosphate buffer, pH 6.8. After loading, the column is washed extensively with equilibration buffer before elution with 100 mM citric acid, pH 3.5. The eluted protein is immediately neutralized by collecting 1 ml fractions into tubes containing 275 μL of 1 M Tris buffer, pH 9. The highly purified protein is subsequently desalted into storage buffer as described above for the poly-His tagged proteins. The homogeneity is assessed by SDS polyacrylamide gels and by N-terminal amino acid sequencing by Edman degradation.

[0420] Many of the PRO polypeptides disclosed herein were successfully expressed as described above.

Example 8 Expression of PRO in Yeast

[0421] The following method describes recombinant expression of PRO in yeast.

[0422] First, yeast expression vectors are constructed for intracellular production or secretion of PRO from the ADH2/GAPDH promoter. DNA encoding PRO and the promoter is inserted into suitable restriction enzyme sites in the selected plasmid to direct intracellular expression of PRO. For secretion, DNA encoding PRO can be cloned into the selected plasmid, together with DNA encoding the ADH2/GAPDH promoter, a native PRO signal peptide or other mammalian signal peptide, or, for example, a yeast alpha-factor or invertase secretory signal/leader sequence, and linker sequences (if needed) for expression of PRO.

[0423] Yeast cells, such as yeast strain AB 110, can then be transformed with the expression plasmids described above and cultured in selected fermentation media. The transformed yeast supernatants can be analyzed by precipitation with 10% trichloroacetic acid and separation by SDS-PAGE, followed by staining of the gels with Coomassie Blue stain.

[0424] Recombinant PRO can subsequently be isolated and purified by removing the yeast cells from the fermentation medium by centrifugation and then concentrating the medium using selected cartridge filters. The concentrate containing PRO may further be purified using selected column chromatography resins.

[0425] Many of the PRO polypeptides disclosed herein were successfully expressed as described above.

Example 9 Expression of PRO in Baculovirus-Infected Insect Cells

[0426] The following method describes recombinant expression of PRO in Baculovirus-infected insect cells.

[0427] The sequence coding for PRO is fused upstream of an epitope tag contained within a baculovirus expression vector. Such epitope tags include poly-his tags and immunoglobulin tags (like Fc regions of IgG). A variety of plasmids may be employed, including plasmids derived from commercially available plasmids such as pVL1393 (Novagen). Briefly, the sequence encoding PRO or the desired portion of the coding sequence of PRO such as the sequence encoding the extracellular domain of a transmembrane protein or the sequence encoding the mature protein if the protein is extracellular is amplified by PCR with primers complementary to the 5′ and 3′ regions. The 5′ primer may incorporate flanking (selected) restriction enzyme sites. The product is then digested with those selected restriction enzymes and subcloned into the expression vector.

[0428] Recombinant baculovirus is generated by co-transfecting the above plasmid and BaculoGold™ virus DNA (Pharmingen) into Spodoptera frugiperda (“Sf9”) cells (ATCC CRL 1711) using lipofectin (commercially available from GIBCO-BRL). After 4-5 days of incubation at 28° C., the released viruses are harvested and used for further amplifications. Viral infection and protein expression are performed as described by O'Reilley et al., Baculovirus expression vectors: A Laboratory Manual, Oxford: Oxford University Press (1994).

[0429] Expressed poly-his tagged PRO can then be purified, for example, by Ni2+-chelate affinity chromatography as follows. Extracts are prepared from recombinant virus-infected Sf9 cells as described by Rupert et al., Nature, 362:175-179 (1993). Briefly, Sf9 cells are washed, resuspended in sonication buffer (25 mL Hepes, pH 7.9; 12.5 mM MgCl2; 0.1 mM EDTA; 10% glycerol; 0.1% NP-40; 0.4 M KCl), and sonicated ′ twice for 20 seconds on ice. The sonicates are cleared by centrifugation, and the supernatant is diluted 50-fold in loading buffer (50 mM phosphate, 300 mM NaCl, 10% glycerol, pH 7.8) and filtered through a 0.45 μm filter. A Ni2+-NTA agarose column (commercially available from Qiagen) is prepared with a bed volume of 5 mL, washed with 25 mL of water and equilibrated with 25 mL of loading buffer. The filtered cell extract is loaded onto the column at 0.5 mL per minute. The column is washed to baseline A280 with loading buffer, at which point fraction collection is started. Next, the column is washed with a secondary wash buffer (50 mM phosphate; 300 mM NaCl, 10% glycerol, pH 6.0), which elutes nonspecifically bound protein. After reaching A280 baseline again, the column is developed with a 0 to 500 mM Imidazole gradient in the secondary wash buffer. One mL fractions are collected and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and silver staining or Western blot with Ni2+-NTA-conjugated to alkaline phosphatase (Qiagen). Fractions containing the eluted His10-tagged PRO are pooled and dialyzed against loading buffer.

[0430] Alternatively, purification of the IgG tagged (or Fc tagged) PRO can be performed using known chromatography techniques, including for instance, Protein A or protein G column chromatography.

[0431] Many of the PRO polypeptides disclosed herein were successfully expressed as described above.

Example 10 Preparation of Antibodies that Bind PRO

[0432] This example illustrates preparation of monoclonal antibodies which can specifically bind PRO.

[0433] Techniques for producing the monoclonal antibodies are known in the art and are described, for instance, in Goding, supra. Immunogens that may be employed include purified PRO, fusion proteins containing PRO, and cells expressing recombinant PRO on the cell surface. Selection of the immunogen can be made by the skilled artisan without undue experimentation.

[0434] Mice, such as Balb/c, are immunized with the PRO immunogen emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant and injected subcutaneously or intraperitoneally in an amount from 1-100 micrograms. Alternatively, the immunogen is emulsified in MPL-TDM adjuvant (Ribi Immunochemical Research, Hamilton, Mont.) and injected into the animal's hind foot pads. The immunized mice are then boosted 10 to 12 days later with additional immunogen emulsified in the selected adjuvant. Thereafter, for several weeks, the mice may also be boosted with additional immunization injections. Serum samples may be periodically obtained from the mice by retro-orbital bleeding for testing in ELISA assays to detect anti-PRO antibodies.

[0435] After a suitable antibody titer has been detected, the animals “positive” for antibodies can be injected with a final intravenous injection of PRO. Three to four days later, the mice are sacrificed and the spleen cells are harvested. The spleen cells are then fused (using 35% polyethylene glycol) to a selected murine myeloma cell line such as P3X63AgU.1, available from ATCC, No. CRL 1597. The fusions generate hybridoma cells which can then be plated in 96 well tissue culture plates containing HAT (hypoxanthine, aminopterin, and thymidine) medium to inhibit proliferation of non-fused cells, myeloma hybrids, and spleen cell hybrids.

[0436] The hybridoma cells will be screened in an ELISA for reactivity against PRO. Determination of “positive” hybridoma cells secreting the desired monoclonal antibodies against PRO is within the skill in the art.

[0437] The positive hybridoma cells can be injected intraperitoneally into syngeneic Balb/c mice to produce ascites containing the anti-PRO monoclonal antibodies. Alternatively, the hybridoma cells can be grown in tissue culture flasks or roller bottles. Purification of the monoclonal antibodies produced in the ascites can be accomplished using ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel exclusion chromatography. Alternatively, affinity chromatography based upon binding of antibody to protein A or protein G can be employed.

Example 11 Purification of PRO Polypeptides Using Specific Antibodies

[0438] Native or recombinant PRO polypeptides may be purified by a variety of standard techniques in the art of protein purification. For example, pro-PRO polypeptide, mature PRO polypeptide, or pre-PRO polypeptide is purified by immunoaffinity chromatography using antibodies specific for the PRO polypeptide of interest. In general, an immunoaffinity column is constructed by covalently coupling the anti-PRO polypeptide antibody to an activated chromatographic resin.

[0439] Polyclonal immunoglobulins are prepared from immune sera either by precipitation with ammonium sulfate or by purification on immobilized Protein A (Pharmacia LKB Biotechnology, Piscataway, N.J.). Likewise, monoclonal antibodies are prepared from mouse ascites fluid by ammonium sulfate precipitation or chromatography on immobilized Protein A. Partially purified immunoglobulin is covalently attached to a chromatographic resin such as CnBr-activated SEPHAROSE™ (Pharmacia LKB Biotechnology). The antibody is coupled to the resin, the resin is blocked, and the derivative resin is washed according to the manufacturer's instructions.

[0440] Such an immunoaffinity column is utilized in the purification of PRO polypeptide by preparing a fraction from cells containing PRO polypeptide in a soluble form. This preparation is derived by solubilization of the whole cell or of a subcellular fraction obtained via differential centrifugation by the addition of detergent or by other methods well known in the art. Alternatively, soluble PRO polypeptide containing a signal sequence may be secreted in useful quantity into the medium in which the cells are grown.

[0441] A soluble PRO polypeptide-containing preparation is passed over the immunoaffinity column, and the column is washed under conditions that allow the preferential absorbance of PRO polypeptide (e.g., high ionic strength buffers in the presence of detergent). Then, the column is eluted under conditions that disrupt antibody/PRO polypeptide binding (e.g., a low pH buffer such as approximately pH 2-3, or a high concentration of a chaotrope such as urea or thiocyanate ion), and PRO polypeptide is collected.

Example 12 Drug Screening

[0442] This invention is particularly useful for screening compounds by using PRO polypeptides or binding fragment thereof in any of a variety of drug screening techniques. The PRO polypeptide or fragment employed in such a test may either be free in solution, affixed to a solid support, borne on a cell surface, or located intracellularly. One method of drug screening utilizes eukaryotic or prokaryotic host cells which are stably transformed with recombinant nucleic acids expressing the PRO polypeptide or fragment. Drugs are screened against such transformed cells in competitive binding assays. Such cells, either in viable or fixed form, can be used for standard binding assays. One may measure, for example, the formation of complexes between PRO polypeptide or a fragment and the agent being tested. Alternatively, one can examine the diminution in complex formation between the PRO polypeptide and its target cell or target receptors caused by the agent being tested.

[0443] Thus, the present invention provides methods of screening for drugs or any other agents which can affect a PRO polypeptide-associated disease or disorder. These methods comprise contacting such an agent with an PRO polypeptide or fragment thereof and assaying (I) for the presence of a complex between the agent and the PRO polypeptide or fragment, or (ii) for the presence of a complex between the PRO polypeptide or fragment and the cell, by methods well known in the art. In such competitive binding assays, the PRO polypeptide or fragment is typically labeled. After suitable incubation, free PRO polypeptide or fragment is separated from that present in bound form, and the amount of free or uncomplexed label is a measure of the ability of the particular agent to bind to PRO polypeptide or to interfere with the PRO polypeptide/cell complex.

[0444] Another technique for drug screening provides high throughput screening for compounds having suitable binding affinity to a polypeptide and is described in detail in WO 84/03564, published on Sep. 13, 1984. Briefly stated, large numbers of different small peptide test compounds are synthesized on a solid substrate, such as plastic pins or some other surface. As applied to a PRO polypeptide, the peptide test compounds are reacted with PRO polypeptide and washed. Bound PRO polypeptide is detected by methods well known in the art. Purified PRO polypeptide can also be coated directly onto plates for use in the aforementioned drug screening techniques. In addition, non-neutralizing antibodies can be used to capture the peptide and immobilize it on the solid support.

[0445] This invention also contemplates the use of competitive drug screening assays in which neutralizing antibodies capable of binding PRO polypeptide specifically compete with a test compound for binding to PRO polypeptide or fragments thereof. In this manner, the antibodies can be used to detect the presence of any peptide which shares one or more antigenic determinants with PRO polypeptide.

Example 13 Rational Drug Design

[0446] The goal of rational drug design is to produce structural analogs of biologically active polypeptide of interest (i.e., a PRO polypeptide) or of small molecules with which they interact, e.g., agonists, antagonists, or inhibitors. Any of these examples can be used to fashion drugs which are more active or stable forms of the PRO polypeptide or which enhance or interfere with the function of the PRO polypeptide in vivo (cf., Hodgson, Bio/Technology, 9: 19-21 (1991)).

[0447] In one approach, the three-dimensional structure of the PRO polypeptide, or of an PRO polypeptide-inhibitor complex, is determined by x-ray crystallography, by computer modeling or, most typically, by a combination of the two approaches. Both the shape and charges of the PRO polypeptide must be ascertained to elucidate the structure and to determine active site(s) of the molecule. Less often, useful information regarding the structure of the PRO polypeptide may be gained by modeling based on the structure of homologous proteins. In both cases, relevant structural information is used to design analogous PRO polypeptide-like molecules or to identify efficient inhibitors. Useful examples of rational drug design may include molecules which have improved activity or stability as shown by Braxton and Wells, Biochemistry, 31:7796-7801 (1992) or which act as inhibitors, agonists, or antagonists of native peptides as shown by Athauda et al., J. Biochem., 113:742-746 (1993).

[0448] It is also possible to isolate a target-specific antibody, selected by functional assay, as described above, and then to solve its crystal structure. This approach, in principle, yields a pharmacore upon which subsequent drug design can be based. It is possible to bypass protein crystallography altogether by generating anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-ids) to a functional, pharmacologically active antibody. As a mirror image of a mirror image, the binding site of the anti-ids would be expected to be an analog of the original receptor. The anti-id could then be used to identify and isolate peptides from banks of chemically or biologically produced peptides. The isolated peptides would then act as the pharmacore.

[0449] By virtue of the present invention, sufficient amounts of the PRO polypeptide may be made available to perform such analytical studies as X-ray crystallography. In addition, knowledge of the PRO polypeptide amino acid sequence provided herein will provide guidance to those employing computer modeling techniques in place of or in addition to x-ray crystallography.

Example 14 Ability of PRO Polypeptides to Stimulate the Release of Proteoglycans from Cartilage (Assay 97)

[0450] The ability of various PRO polypeptides to stimulate the release of proteoglycans from cartilage tissue was tested as follows.

[0451] The metacarphophalangeal joint of 4-6 month old pigs was aseptically dissected, and articular cartilage was removed by free hand slicing being careful to avoid the underlying bone. The cartilage was minced and cultured in bulk for 24 hours in a humidified atmosphere of 95% air, 5% CO2 in serum free (SF) media (DME/F12 1:1) with 0.1% BSA and 100 μg/ml penicillin and 100 μg/ml streptomycin. After washing three times, approximately 100 mg of articular cartilage was aliquoted into micronics tubes and incubated for an additional 24 hours in the above SF media. PRO polypeptides were then added at 1% either alone or in combination with 18 ng/ml interleukin-1α, a known stimulator of proteoglycan release from cartilage tissue. The supernatant was then harvested and assayed for the amount of proteoglycans using the 1,9-dimethyl-methylene blue (DMB) colorimetric assay (Farndale and Buttle, Biochem. Biophys. Acta 883:173-177 (1985)). A positive result in this assay indicates that the test polypeptide will find use, for example, in the treatment of sports-related joint problems, articular cartilage defects, osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.

[0452] When various PRO polypeptides were tested in the above assay, the polypeptides demonstrated a marked ability to stimulate release of proteoglycans from cartilage tissue both basally and after stimulation with interleukin-la and at 24 and 72 hours after treatment, thereby indicating that these PRO polypeptides are useful for stimulating proteoglycan release from cartilage tissue. As such, these PRO polypeptides are useful for the treatment of sports-related joint problems, articular cartilage defects, osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. PRO6018 polypeptide testing positive in this assay.

Example 15 Human Microvascular Endothelial Cell Proliferation (Assay 146)

[0453] This assay is designed to determine whether PRO polypeptides of the present invention show the ability to induce proliferation of human microvascular endothelial cells in culture and, therefore, function as useful growth factors.

[0454] On day 0, human microvascular endothelial cells were plated in 96-well plates at 1000 cells/well per 100 microliter and incubated overnight in complete media [EBM-2 growth media, plus supplements: IGF-1; ascorbic acid; VEGF; hEGF; hFGF; hydrocortisone, gentamicin (GA-1000), and fetal bovine serum (FBS, Clonetics)]. On day 1, complete media was replaced by basal media [EBM-2 plus 1% FBS] and addition of PRO polypeptides at 1%, 0.1% and 0.01%. On day 7, an assessment of cell proliferation was performed using the ViaLight HS kit [ATP/luciferase Lumitech]. Results are expressed as % of the cell growth observed with control buffer.

[0455] The following PRO polypeptides stimulated human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation in this assay: PRO1313, PRO20080, and PRO21383.

[0456] The following PRO polypeptides inhibited human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation in this assay: PRO6071, PRO4487, and PRO6006.

Example 16 Microarray Analysis to Detect Overexpression of PRO Polypeptides in Cancerous Tumors

[0457] Nucleic acid microarrays, often containing thousands of gene sequences, are useful for identifying differentially expressed genes in diseased tissues as compared to their normal counterparts. Using nucleic acid microarrays, test and control mRNA samples from test and control tissue samples are reverse transcribed and labeled to generate cDNA probes. The cDNA probes are then hybridized to an array of nucleic acids immobilized on a solid support. The array is configured such that the sequence and position of each member of the array is known. For example, a selection of genes known to be expressed in certain disease states may be arrayed on a solid support. Hybridization of a labeled probe with a particular array member indicates that the sample from which the probe was derived expresses that gene. If the hybridization signal of a probe from a test (disease tissue) sample is greater than hybridization signal of a probe from a control (normal tissue) sample, the gene or genes overexpressed in the disease tissue are identified. The implication of this result is that an overexpressed protein in a diseased tissue is useful not only as a diagnostic marker for the presence of the disease condition, but also as a therapeutic target for treatment of the disease condition.

[0458] The methodology of hybridization of nucleic acids and microarray technology is well known in the art. In the present example, the specific preparation of nucleic acids for hybridization and probes, slides, and hybridization conditions are all detailed in U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 60/193,767, filed on Mar. 31, 2000 and which is herein incorporated by reference.

[0459] In the present example, cancerous tumors derived from various human tissues were studied for PRO polypeptide-encoding gene expression relative to non-cancerous human tissue in an attempt to identify those PRO polypeptides which are overexpressed in cancerous tumors. Cancerous human tumor tissue from any of a variety of different human tumors was obtained and compared to a “universal” epithelial control sample which was prepared by pooling non-cancerous human tissues of epithelial origin, including liver, kidney, and lung. mRNA isolated from the pooled tissues represents a mixture of expressed gene products from these different tissues. Microarray hybridization experiments using the pooled control samples generated a linear plot in a 2-color analysis. The slope of the line generated in a 2-color analysis was then used to normalize the ratios of (test:control detection) within each experiment. The normalized ratios from various experiments were then compared and used to identify clustering of gene expression. Thus, the pooled “universal control” sample not only allowed effective relative gene expression determinations in a simple 2-sample comparison, it also allowed multi-sample comparisons across several experiments.

[0460] In the present experiments, nucleic acid probes derived from the herein described PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid sequences were used in the creation of the microarray and RNA from a panel of nine different tumor tissues (listed below) were used for the hybridization thereto. A value based upon the normalized ratio:experimental ratio was designated as a “cutoff ratio”. Only values that were above this cutoff ratio were determined to be significant. Table 8 below shows the results of these experiments, demonstrating that various PRO polypeptides of the present invention are significantly overexpressed in various human tumor tissues, as compared to a non-cancerous human tissue control or other human tumor tissues. As described above, these data demonstrate that the PRO polypeptides of the present invention are useful not only as diagnostic markers for the presence of one or more cancerous tumors, but also serve as therapeutic targets for the treatment of those tumors.

TABLE 8
Molecule is overexpressed in: as compared to normal control:
PRO240 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO240 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO256 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO256 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO256 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO306 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO306 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO540 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO540 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO773 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO773 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO698 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO698 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO698 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO698 prostate tumor universal normal control
PRO698 rectal tumor universal normal control
PRO3567 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO3567 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO3567 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO826 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO826 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO826 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO826 rectal tumor universal normal control
PRO826 liver tumor universal normal control
PRO1002 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO1002 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO1068 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO1068 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO1030 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO1030 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO1030 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO1030 prostate tumor universal normal control
PRO1030 rectal tumor universal normal control
PRO4397 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO4397 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO4344 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO4344 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO4344 rectal tumor universal normal control
PRO4407 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO4407 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO4407 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO4407 liver tumor universal normal control
PRO4407 rectal tumor universal normal control
PRO4316 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO5775 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO6016 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO4980 breast tumor universal nonnal control
PRO4980 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO4980 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO6018 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO7168 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO6000 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO6006 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO5800 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO5800 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO5800 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO5800 rectal tumor universal normal control
PRO7476 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO10268 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO6496 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO6496 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO6496 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO7422 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO7431 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO28633 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO28633 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO28633 liver tumor universal normal control
PRO21485 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO28700 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO28700 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO28700 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO34012 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO34012 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO34003 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO34003 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO34001 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO34009 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO34009 breast tumor universal normal control
PRO34009 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO34009 rectal tumor universal normal control
PRO34192 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO34564 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO35444 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO5998 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO5998 lung tumor universal normal control
PRO5998 kidney tumor universal normal control
PRO19651 colon tumor universal normal control
PRO20221 liver tumor universal normal control
PRO21434 liver tumor universal normal control

Example 17 Fetal Hemoglobin Induction in an Erythroblastic Cell Line (Assay 107)

[0461] This assay is useful for screening PRO polypeptides for the ability to induce the switch from adult hemoglobin to fetal hemoglobin in an erythroblastic cell line. Molecules testing positive in this assay are expected to be useful for therapeutically treating various mammalian hemoglobin-associated disorders such as the various thalassemias. The assay is performed as follows. Erythroblastic cells are plated in standard growth medium at 1000 cells/well in a 96 well format. PRO polypeptides are added to the growth medium at a concentration of 0.2% or 2% and the cells are incubated for 5 days at 37° C. As a positive control, cells are treated with 100 μM hemin and as a negative control, the cells are untreated. After 5 days, cell lysates are prepared and analyzed for the expression of gamma globin (a fetal marker). A positive in the assay is a gamma globin level at least 2-fold above the negative control.

[0462] PRO20080 polypeptide tested positive in this assay.

Example 18 Microarray Analysis to Detect Overexpression of PRO Polypeptides in HUVEC Cells Treated with Growth Factors

[0463] This assay is designed to determine whether PRO polypeptides of the present invention show the ability to induce angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial cell tube formation in HUVEC cells.

[0464] Nucleic acid microarrays, often containing thousands of gene sequences, are useful for identifying differentially expressed genes in tissues exposed to various stimuli (e.g., growth factors) as compared to their normal, unexposed counterparts. Using nucleic acid microarrays, test and control mRNA samples from test and control tissue samples are reverse transcribed and labeled to generate cDNA probes. The cDNA probes are then hybridized to an array of nucleic acids immobilized on a solid support. The array is configured such that the sequence and position of each member of the array is known. Hybridization of a labeled probe with a particular array member indicates that the sample from which the probe was derived expresses that gene. If the hybridization signal of a probe from a test (exposed tissue) sample is greater than hybridization signal of a probe from a control (normal, unexposed tissue) sample, the gene or genes overexpressed in the exposed tissue are identified. The implication of this result is that an overexpressed protein in an exposed tissue may be involved in the functional changes within the tissue following exposure to the stimuli (e.g., tube formation).

[0465] The methodology of hybridization of nucleic acids and microarray technology is well known in the art. In the present example, the specific preparation of nucleic acids for hybridization and probes, slides, and hybridization conditions are all detailed in U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 60/193,767, filed on Mar. 31, 2000 and which is herein incorporated by reference.

[0466] In the present example, HUVEC cells grown in either collagen gels or fibrin gels were induced to form tubes by the addition of various growth factors. Specifically, collagen gels were prepared as described previously in Yang et al., American J. Pathology, 1999, 155(3):887-895 and Xin et al., American J. Pathology, 2001, 158(3):1111-1120. Following gelation of the HUVEC cells, 1× basal medium containing M199 supplemented with 1% FBS, 1× ITS, 2 mM L-glutamine, 50 μg/ml ascorbic acid, 26.5 mM NaHCO3, 100 U/ml penicillin and 100 U/ml streptomycin was added. Tube formation was elicited by the inclusion in the culture media of either a mixture of phorbol myrsitate acetate (50 nM), vascular endothelial cell growth factor (40 ng/ml) and basic fibroblast growth factor (40 ng/ml) (“PMA growth factor mix”) or hepatocyte growth factor (40 ng/ml) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (40 ng/ml) (HGF/VEGF mix) for the indicated period of time. Fibrin Gels were prepared by suspending Huvec (4×105 cells/ml) in M199 containing 1% fetal bovine serum (Hyclone) and human fibrinogen (2.5 mg/ml). Thrombin (50 U/ml) was then added to the fibrinogen suspension at a ratio of I part thrombin solution: 30 parts fibrinogen suspension. The solution was then layered onto 10 cm tissue culture plates (total volume: 15 ml/plate) and allowed to solidify at 37° C. for 20 min. Tissue culture media (10 ml of BM containing PMA (50 nM), bFGF (40 ng/ml) and VEGF (40 ng/ml)) was then added and the cells incubated at 37° C. in 5% CO2 in air for the indicated period of time.

[0467] Total RNA was extracted from the HUVEC cells incubated for 0, 4, 8, 24, 40 and 50 hours in the different matrix and media combinations using a TRIzol extraction followed by a second purification using RNAeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen). The total RNA was used to prepare cRNA which was then hybridized to the microarrays.

[0468] In the present experiments, nucleic acid probes derived from the herein described PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid sequences were used in the creation of the microarray and RNA from the HUVEC cells described above were used for the hybridization thereto. Pairwise comparisons were made using time 0 chips as a baseline. Three replicate samples were analyzed for each experimental condition and time. Hence there were 3 time 0 samples for each treatment and 3 replicates of each successive time point. Therefore, a 3 by 3 comparison was performed for each time point compared against each time 0 point. This resulted in 9 comparisons per time point. Only those genes that had increased expression in all three non-time-0 replicates in each of the different matrix and media combinations as compared to any of the three time zero replicates were considered positive. Although this stringent method of data analysis does allow for false negatives, it minimizes false positives.

[0469] PRO281, PRO1560, PRO189, PRO4499, PRO6308, PRO6000, PRO10275, PRO21207, PRO20933,and PRO34274 tested positive in this assay.

Example 19 Tumor Versus Normal Differential Tissue Expression Distribution

[0470] Oligonucleotide probes were constructed from some of the PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleotide sequences shown in the accompanying figures for use in quantitative PCR amplification reactions. The oligonucleotide probes were chosen so as to give an approximately 200-600 base pair amplified fragment from the 3′ end of its associated template in a standard PCR reaction. The oligonucleotide probes were employed in standard quantitative PCR amplification reactions with cDNA libraries isolated from different human tumor and normal human tissue samples and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis so as to obtain a quantitative determination of the level of expression of the PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid in the various tumor and normal tissues tested. β-actin was used as a control to assure that equivalent amounts of nucleic acid was used in each reaction. Identification of the differential expression of the PRO polypeptide-encoding nucleic acid in one or more tumor tissues as compared to one or more normal tissues of the same tissue type renders the molecule useful diagnostically for the determination of the presence or absence of tumor in a subject suspected of possessing a tumor as well as therapeutically as a target for the treatment of a tumor in a subject possessing such a tumor. These assays provided the following results:

[0471] (1) DNA161005-2943 molecule is very highly expressed in human umblilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), substantia niagra, hippocampus and dendrocytes; highly expressed in lymphoblasts; expressed in spleen, prostate, uterus and macrophages; and is weakly expressed in cartilage and heart. Among a panel of normal and tumor tissues examined, it is expressed in esophageal tumor, and is not expressed in normal esophagus, normal stomach, stomach tumor, normal kidney, kidney tumor, normal lung, lung tumor, normal rectum, rectal tumor, normal liver and liver tumor.

[0472] (2) DNA170245-3053 molecule is highly expressed in cartilage, testis, adrenal gland, and uterus, and not expressed in HUVEC, colon tumor, heart, placenta, bone marrow, spleen and aortic endothelial cells. In a panel of tumor and normal tissue samples examined, the DNA170245-3053 molecule was found to be expressed in normal esophagus and esophagial tumor, expressed in normal stomach and in stomach tumor, not expressed in normal kidney, but expressed in kidney tumor, not expressed in normal lung, but expressed in lung tumor, not expressed in normal rectum nor in rectal tumor, and not expressed in normal liver, but is expressed in liver tumor.

[0473] (3) DNA173157-2981 molecule is significantly expressed in the following tissues: cartilage, testis, HUVEC, heart, placenta, bone marrow, adrenal gland, prostate, spleen, aortic endothelial cells, and uterus. When these assays were conducted on a tumor tissue panel, it was found that the DNA173157-2981 molecule is significantly expressed in the following tissues: normal esophagus and esophagial tumor, normal stomach and stomach tumor, normal kidney and kidney tumor, normal lung and lung tumor, normal rectum and rectal tumor, normal liver and liver tumor, and colon tumor.

[0474] (4) DNA175734-2985 molecule is significantly expressed in the adrenal gland and the uterus. The DNA175734-2985 molecule is not significantly expressed in the following tissues: cartilage, testis, HUVEC, colon tumor, heart, placenta, bone marrow, prostate, spleen and aortic endothelial cells. Screening of a tumor panel revealed that DNA175734-2985 is significantly expressed in normal esophagus but not in esophagial tumor. Similarly, while highly expressed in normal rectum, DNA175734-2985 is expressed to a lesser extent in rectal tumor. DNA175734-2985 is expressed equally in normal stomach and stomach tumor as well as normal liver and liver tumor. While not expressed in normal kidney, DNA175734-2985 is highly expressed in kidney tumor.

[0475] (5) DNA176108-3040 molecule is highly expressed in prostate and uterus, expressed in cartilage, testis, heart, placenta, bone marrow, adrenal gland and spleen, and not significantly expressed in HUVEC, colon tumor, and aortic endothelial cells. In a panel of tumor and normal tissue samples examined, the DNA176108-3040 molecule was found to be highly expressed in normal esophagus, but expressed at lower levels in esophagial tumor, highly expressed in normal stomach, and expressed at a lower level in stomach tumor, expressed in kidney and in kidney tumor, expressed in normal rectum and at a lower level in rectal tumor, and expressed in normal liver and not expressed in liver tumor.

[0476] (6) DNA191064-3069 molecule is significantly expressed in the following tissues: cartilage, testis, HUVEC, heart, placenta, bone marrow, adrenal gland, prostate, spleen, aortic endothelial cells, and uterus and not significantly expressed in colon tumor. In a panel of tumor and normal tissue samples, the DNA191064-3069 molecule was found to be expressed in normal esophagus and in esophagial tumors, expressed in normal stomach and in stomach tumors, expressed in normal kidney and in kidney tumors, expressed in normal lung and in lung tumors, expressed in normal rectum and in rectal tumors, expressed in normal liver and in liver tumors.

[0477] (7) DNA194909-3013 molecule is highly expressed in placenta, and expressed in cartilage, testis, HUVEC, colon tumor, heart, bone marrow, adrenal gland, prostate, spleen, aortic endothelial cells and uterus. In a panel of tumor and normal tissue samples examined, the DNA194909-3013 molecule was found to be expressed in normal esophagus and expressed at a lower level in esophagial tumor, not expressed in normal stomach nor stomach tumor, expressed in normal kidney and kidney tumor, expressed in normal lung and lung tumor, expressed in normal rectum and rectal tumor, and not expressed in normal liver, but is expressed in liver tumor.

[0478] (8) The PRO34009 encoding genes of the invention (DNA203532-3029) were screened in normal tissues and the following primary tumors and the resulting values are reported below.

[0479] Tumor Panel:

[0480] PRO34009 encoding genes were expressed 39.3 fold higher in lung tumor than normal lung. It is expressed 9.5 fold higher in esophagial tumors than normal esophagus. It is expressed 6.7 fold higher in kidney tumor than normal kidney. It is expressed 4.0 fold higher in colon tumor than normal colon. It is expressed 2.7 fold higher in stomach tumor than normal stomach. It is expressed at similar levels in normal rectum and rectal tumor, normal liver and liver tumor, normal uterus and uterine tumor.

[0481] Normal Panel:

[0482] For the normal tissue values, the normal tissue with the highest expression, in this case normal thymus, was given a value of 1 and all other normal tissues were given a value of less than 1, and described as expressed, weakly expressed or not expressed, based on their expression relative to thymus. PRO34009 encoding genes were expressed in normal thymus. It is weakly expressed in lymphoblast, spleen, heart, fetal limb, fetal lung, placenta, HUVEC, testis, fetal kidney, uterus, prostate, macrophage, substantia nigra, hippocampus, liver, skin, esophagus, stomach, rectum, kidney, thyroid, skeletal muscle, or fetal articular cartilage.

[0483] It is not expressed in bone marrow, fetal liver, colon, lung or dendrocytes.

[0484] (9) DNA213858-3060 molecule is not significantly expressed in cartilage, testis, HUVEC, colon tumor, heart, placenta, bone marrow, adrenal gland, prostate, spleen, aortic endothelial cells or uterus. In a panel of tumor and normal tissue samples examined, the DNA213858-3060 molecule was found to be expressed in normal esophagus and esophagial tumor, expressed in normal stomach and in stomach tumor, expressed in normal kidney and and kidney tumor, expressed in normal lung and in lung tumor, expressed in normal rectum and in rectal tumor, and expressed in normal liver and in liver tumor.

[0485] (10) DNA216676-3083 molecule is significantly expressed in the following tissues: testis, heart, bone marrow, and uterus, and not significantly expressed in the following tissues: cartilage, HUVEC, colon tumor, placenta, adrenal gland, prostate, spleen, or aortic endothelial cells In a panel of tumor and normal tissues samples examined, the DNA216676-3083 molecule was found to be expressed in normal esophagus and esophagial tumor, not expressed in normal stomach, but is expressed in stomach tumor, not expressed in normal kidney nor in kidney tumor, not expressed in normal lung, but is expressed in lung tumor, not expressed in normal rectum, but is expressed in rectal tumor, and not expressed in normal liver nor in liver tumor.

[0486] (10) DNA222653-3104 molecule is significantly expressed testis, and not significantly expressed in cartilage, HUVEC, colon tumor, heart, placenta, bone marrow, adrenal gland, prostate, spleen, aortic endothelial cells and uterus. In a panel of tumor and normal tissue samples examined, the DNA22653-3104 molecule was not expressed in normal esophagus, esophagial tumor, normal stomach, stomach tumor, normal kidney, kidney tumor, normal lung, lung tumor, normal rectum, rectal tumor, normal liver and liver tumor.

Example 20 Guinea Pig Vascular Leak (Assay 51)

[0487] This assay is designed to determine whether PRO polypeptides of the present invention show the ability to induce vascular permeability. Polypeptides testing positive in this assay are expected to be useful for the therapeutic treatment of conditions which would benefit from enhanced vascular permeability including, for example, conditions which may benefit from enhanced local immune system cell infiltration.

[0488] Hairless guinea pigs weighing 350 grams or more were anesthetized with Ketamine (75-80 mg/kg) and 5 mg/kg Xylazine intramuscularly. Test samples containing the PRO polypeptide or a physiological buffer without the test polypeptide are injected into skin on the back of the test animals with 100 μl per injection site intradermally. There were approximately 16-24 injection sites per animal. One ml of Evans blue dye (1% in PBS) is then injected intracardially. Skin vascular permeability responses to the compounds (i.e., blemishes at the injection sites of injection) are visually scored by measuring the diameter (in mm) of blue-colored leaks from the site of injection at 1 and 6 hours post administration of the test materials. The mm diameter of blueness at the site of injection is observed and recorded as well as the severity of the vascular leakage. Blemishes of at least 5 mm in diameter are considered positive for the assay when testing purified proteins, being indicative of the ability to induce vascular leakage or permeability. A response greater than 7 mm diameter is considered positive for conditioned media samples. Human VEGF at 0.1 μg/100 μl is used as a positive control, inducing a response of 15-23 mm diameter.

[0489] PRO19822 polypeptides tested positive in this assay.

Example 21 Skin Vascular Permeability Assay (Assay 64)

[0490] This assay shows that certain polypeptides of the invention stimulate an immune response and induce inflammation by inducing mononuclear cell, eosinophil and PMN infiltration at the site of injection of the animal. Compounds which stimulate an immune response are useful therapeutically where stimulation of an immune response is beneficial. This skin vascular permeability assay is conducted as follows. Hairless guinea pigs weighing 350 grams or more are anesthetized with ketamine (75-80 mg/Kg) and 5 mg/Kg xylazine intramuscularly (IM). A sample of purified polypeptide of the invention or a conditioned media test sample is injected intradermally onto the backs of the test animals with 100 μl per injection site: It is possible to have about 10-30, preferably about 16-24, injection sites per animal. One μl of Evans blue dye (1% in physiologic buffered saline) is injected intracardially. Blemishes at the injection sites are then measured (mm diameter) at 1 hr and 6 hr post injection. Animals were sacrificed at 6 hrs after injection. Each skin injection site is biopsied and fixed in formalin. The skins are then prepared for histopathologic evaluation. Each site is evaluated for inflammatory cell infiltration into the skin. Sites with visible inflammatory cell inflammation are scored as positive. Inflammatory cells may be neutrophilic, eosinophilic, monocytic or lymphocytic. At least a minimal perivascular infiltrate at the injection site is scored as positive, no infiltrate at the site of injection is scored as negative.

[0491] PRO19822 polypeptide tested positive in this assay.

1 116 1 1943 DNA Homo Sapien 1 cggacgcgtg ggtgcgaggc gaaggtgacc ggggaccgag catttcagat 50 ctgctcggta gacctggtgc accaccacca tgttggctgc aaggctggtg 100 tgtctccgga cactaccttc tagggttttc cacccagctt tcaccaaggc 150 ctcccctgtt gtgaagaatt ccatcacgaa gaatcaatgg ctgttaacac 200 ctagcaggga atatgccacc aaaacaagaa ttgggatccg gcgtgggaga 250 actggccaag aactcaaaga ggcagcattg gaaccatcga tggaaaaaat 300 atttaaaatt gatcagatgg gaagatggtt tgttgctgga ggggctgctg 350 ttggtcttgg agcattgtgc tactatggct tgggactgtc taatgagatt 400 ggagctattg aaaaggctgt aatttggcct cagtatgtca aggatagaat 450 tcattccacc tatatgtact tagcagggag tattggttta acagctttgt 500 ctgccatagc aatcagcaga acgcctgttc tcatgaactt catgatgaga 550 ggctcttggg tgacaattgg tgtgaccttt gcagccatgg ttggagctgg 600 aatgctggta cgatcaatac catatgacca gagcccaggc ccaaagcatc 650 ttgcttggtt gctacattct ggtgtgatgg gtgcagtggt ggctcctctg 700 acaatattag ggggtcctct tctcatcaga gctgcatggt acacagctgg 750 cattgtggga ggcctctcca ctgtggccat gtgtgcgccc agtgaaaagt 800 ttctgaacat gggtgcaccc ctgggagtgg gcctgggtct cgtctttgtg 850 tcctcattgg gatctatgtt tcttccacct accaccgtgg ctggtgccac 900 tctttactca gtggcaatgt acggtggatt agttcttttc agcatgttcc 950 ttctgtatga tacccagaaa gtaatcaagc gtgcagaagt atcaccaatg 1000 tatggagttc aaaaatatga tcccattaac tcgatgctga gtatctacat 1050 ggatacatta aatatattta tgcgagttgc aactatgctg gcaactggag 1100 gcaacagaaa gaaatgaagt gactcagctt ctggcttctc tgctacatca 1150 aatatcttgt ttaatggggc agatatgcat taaatagttt gtacaagcag 1200 ctttcgttga agtttagaag ataagaaaca tgtcatcata tttaaatgtt 1250 ccggtaatgt gatgcctcag gtctgccttt ttttctggag aataaatgca 1300 gtaatcctct cccaaataag cacacacatt ttcaattctc atgtttgagt 1350 gattttaaaa tgttttggtg aatgtgaaaa ctaaagtttg tgtcatgaga 1400 atgtaagtct tttttctact ttaaaattta gtaggttcac tgagtaacta 1450 aaatttagca aacctgtgtt tgcatatttt tttggagtgc agaatattgt 1500 aattaatgtc ataagtgatt tggagctttg gtaaagggac cagagagaag 1550 gagtcacctg cagtcttttg tttttttaaa tacttagaac ttagcacttg 1600 tgttattgat tagtgaggag ccagtaagaa acatctgggt atttggaaac 1650 aagtggtcat tgttacattc atttgctgaa cttaacaaaa ctgttcatcc 1700 tgaaacaggc acaggtgatg cattctcctg ctgttgcttc tcagtgctct 1750 ctttccaata tagatgtggt catgtttgac ttgtacagaa tgttaatcat 1800 acagagaatc cttgatggaa ttatatatgt gtgttttact tttgaatgtt 1850 acaaaaggaa ataactttaa aactattctc aagagaaaat attcaaagca 1900 tgaaatatgt tgctttttcc agaatacaaa cagtatactc atg 1943 2 345 PRT Homo Sapien 2 Met Leu Ala Ala Arg Leu Val Cys Leu Arg Thr Leu Pro Ser Arg 1 5 10 15 Val Phe His Pro Ala Phe Thr Lys Ala Ser Pro Val Val Lys Asn 20 25 30 Ser Ile Thr Lys Asn Gln Trp Leu Leu Thr Pro Ser Arg Glu Tyr 35 40 45 Ala Thr Lys Thr Arg Ile Gly Ile Arg Arg Gly Arg Thr Gly Gln 50 55 60 Glu Leu Lys Glu Ala Ala Leu Glu Pro Ser Met Glu Lys Ile Phe 65 70 75 Lys Ile Asp Gln Met Gly Arg Trp Phe Val Ala Gly Gly Ala Ala 80 85 90 Val Gly Leu Gly Ala Leu Cys Tyr Tyr Gly Leu Gly Leu Ser Asn 95 100 105 Glu Ile Gly Ala Ile Glu Lys Ala Val Ile Trp Pro Gln Tyr Val 110 115 120 Lys Asp Arg Ile His Ser Thr Tyr Met Tyr Leu Ala Gly Ser Ile 125 130 135 Gly Leu Thr Ala Leu Ser Ala Ile Ala Ile Ser Arg Thr Pro Val 140 145 150 Leu Met Asn Phe Met Met Arg Gly Ser Trp Val Thr Ile Gly Val 155 160 165 Thr Phe Ala Ala Met Val Gly Ala Gly Met Leu Val Arg Ser Ile 170 175 180 Pro Tyr Asp Gln Ser Pro Gly Pro Lys His Leu Ala Trp Leu Leu 185 190 195 His Ser Gly Val Met Gly Ala Val Val Ala Pro Leu Thr Ile Leu 200 205 210 Gly Gly Pro Leu Leu Ile Arg Ala Ala Trp Tyr Thr Ala Gly Ile 215 220 225 Val Gly Gly Leu Ser Thr Val Ala Met Cys Ala Pro Ser Glu Lys 230 235 240 Phe Leu Asn Met Gly Ala Pro Leu Gly Val Gly Leu Gly Leu Val 245 250 255 Phe Val Ser Ser Leu Gly Ser Met Phe Leu Pro Pro Thr Thr Val 260 265 270 Ala Gly Ala Thr Leu Tyr Ser Val Ala Met Tyr Gly Gly Leu Val 275 280 285 Leu Phe Ser Met Phe Leu Leu Tyr Asp Thr Gln Lys Val Ile Lys 290 295 300 Arg Ala Glu Val Ser Pro Met Tyr Gly Val Gln Lys Tyr Asp Pro 305 310 315 Ile Asn Ser Met Leu Ser Ile Tyr Met Asp Thr Leu Asn Ile Phe 320 325 330 Met Arg Val Ala Thr Met Leu Ala Thr Gly Gly Asn Arg Lys Lys 335 340 345 3 1110 DNA Homo Sapien 3 ccaatcgccc ggtgcggtgg tgcagggtct cgggctagtc atggcgtccc 50 cgtctcggag actgcagact aaaccagtca ttacttgttt caagagcgtt 100 ctgctaatct acacttttat tttctggatc actggcgtta tccttcttgc 150 agttggcatt tggggcaagg tgagcctgga gaattacttt tctcttttaa 200 atgagaaggc caccaatgtc cccttcgtgc tcattgctac tggtaccgtc 250 attattcttt tgggcacctt tggttgtttt gctacctgcc gagcttctgc 300 atggatgcta aaactgtatg caatgtttct gactctcgtt tttttggtcg 350 aactggtcgc tgccatcgta ggatttgttt tcagacatga gattaagaac 400 agctttaaga ataattatga gaaggctttg aagcagtata actctacagg 450 agattataga agccatgcag tagacaagat ccaaaatacg ttgcattgtt 500 gtggtgtcac cgattataga gattggacag atactaatta ttactcagaa 550 aaaggatttc ctaagagttg ctgtaaactt gaagattgta ctccacagag 600 agatgcagac aaagtaaaca atgaaggttg ttttataaag gtgatgacca 650 ttatagagtc agaaatggga gtcgttgcag gaatttcctt tggagttgct 700 tgcttccaac tgattggaat ctttctcgcc tactgccwct ctcgtgccat 750 aacaaataac cagtatgaga tagtgtaacc caatgtatct gtgggcctat 800 tcctctctac ctttaaggac atttagggtc ccccctgtga attagaaagt 850 tgcttggctg gagaactgac aacactactt actgatagac caaaaaacta 900 caccagtagg ttgattcaat caagatgtat gtagacctaa aactacacca 950 ataggctgat tcaatcaaga tccgtgctcg cagtgggctg attcaatcaa 1000 gatgtatgtt tgctatgttc taagtccacc ttctatccca ttcatgttag 1050 atcgttgaaa ccctgtatcc ctctgaaaca ctggaagagc tagtaaattg 1100 taaatgaagt 1110 4 245 PRT Homo Sapien unsure 233 unknown amino acid 4 Met Ala Ser Pro Ser Arg Arg Leu Gln Thr Lys Pro Val Ile Thr 1 5 10 15 Cys Phe Lys Ser Val Leu Leu Ile Tyr Thr Phe Ile Phe Trp Ile 20 25 30 Thr Gly Val Ile Leu Leu Ala Val Gly Ile Trp Gly Lys Val Ser 35 40 45 Leu Glu Asn Tyr Phe Ser Leu Leu Asn Glu Lys Ala Thr Asn Val 50 55 60 Pro Phe Val Leu Ile Ala Thr Gly Thr Val Ile Ile Leu Leu Gly 65 70 75 Thr Phe Gly Cys Phe Ala Thr Cys Arg Ala Ser Ala Trp Met Leu 80 85 90 Lys Leu Tyr Ala Met Phe Leu Thr Leu Val Phe Leu Val Glu Leu 95 100 105 Val Ala Ala Ile Val Gly Phe Val Phe Arg His Glu Ile Lys Asn 110 115 120 Ser Phe Lys Asn Asn Tyr Glu Lys Ala Leu Lys Gln Tyr Asn Ser 125 130 135 Thr Gly Asp Tyr Arg Ser His Ala Val Asp Lys Ile Gln Asn Thr 140 145 150 Leu His Cys Cys Gly Val Thr Asp Tyr Arg Asp Trp Thr Asp Thr 155 160 165 Asn Tyr Tyr Ser Glu Lys Gly Phe Pro Lys Ser Cys Cys Lys Leu 170 175 180 Glu Asp Cys Thr Pro Gln Arg Asp Ala Asp Lys Val Asn Asn Glu 185 190 195 Gly Cys Phe Ile Lys Val Met Thr Ile Ile Glu Ser Glu Met Gly 200 205 210 Val Val Ala Gly Ile Ser Phe Gly Val Ala Cys Phe Gln Leu Ile 215 220 225 Gly Ile Phe Leu Ala Tyr Cys Xaa Ser Arg Ala Ile Thr Asn Asn 230 235 240 Gln Tyr Glu Ile Val 245 5 1373 DNA Homo Sapien 5 ggggccgcgg tctagggcgg ctacgtgtgt tgccatagcg accattttgc 50 attaactggt tggtagcttc tatcctgggg gctgagcgac tgcgggccag 100 ctcttcccct actccctctc ggctccttgt ggcccaaagg cctaaccggg 150 gtccggcggt ctggcctagg gatcttcccc gttgcccctt tggggcggga 200 tggctgcgga agaagaagac gaggtggagt gggtagtgga gagcatcgcg 250 gggttcctgc gaggcccaga ctggtccatc cccatcttgg actttgtgga 300 acagaaatgt gaagttaact gcaaaggagg gcatgtgata actccaggaa 350 gcccagagcc ggtgattttg gtggcctgtg ttccccttgt ttttgatgat 400 gaagaagaaa gcaaattgac ctatacagag attcatcagg aatacaaaga 450 actagttgaa aagctgttag aaggttacct caaagaaatt ggaattaatg 500 aagatcaatt tcaagaagca tgcacttctc ctcttgcaaa gacccataca 550 tcacaggcca ttttgcaacc tgtgttggca gcagaagatt ttactatctt 600 taaagcaatg atggtccaga aaaacattga aatgcagctg caagccattc 650 gaataattca agagagaaat ggtgtattac ctgactgctt aaccgatggc 700 tctgatgtgg tcagtgacct tgaacacgaa gagatgaaaa tcctgaggga 750 agttcttaga aaatcaaaag aggaatatga ccaggaagaa gaaaggaaga 800 ggaaaaaaca gttatcagag gctaaaacag aagagcccac agtgcattcc 850 agtgaagctg caataatgaa taattcccaa ggggatggtg aacattttgc 900 acacccaccc tcagaagtta aaatgcattt tgctaatcag tcaatagaac 950 ctttgggaag aaaagtggaa aggtctgaaa cttcctccct cccacaaaaa 1000 ggcctgaaga ttcctggctt agagcatgcg agcattgaag gaccaatagc 1050 aaacttatca gtacttggaa cagaagaact tcggcaacga gaacactatc 1100 tcaagcagaa gagagataag ttgatgtcca tgagaaagga tatgaggact 1150 aaacagatac aaaatatgga gcagaaagga aaacccactg gggaggtaga 1200 ggaaatgaca gagaaaccag aaatgacagc agaggagaag caaacattac 1250 taaagaggag attgcttgca gagaaactca aagaagaagt tattaataag 1300 taataattaa gaacaattta acaaaatgga agttcaaatt gtcttaaaaa 1350 taaattattt agtccttaca ctg 1373 6 367 PRT Homo Sapien 6 Met Ala Ala Glu Glu Glu Asp Glu Val Glu Trp Val Val Glu Ser 1 5 10 15 Ile Ala Gly Phe Leu Arg Gly Pro Asp Trp Ser Ile Pro Ile Leu 20 25 30 Asp Phe Val Glu Gln Lys Cys Glu Val Asn Cys Lys Gly Gly His 35 40 45 Val Ile Thr Pro Gly Ser Pro Glu Pro Val Ile Leu Val Ala Cys 50 55 60 Val Pro Leu Val Phe Asp Asp Glu Glu Glu Ser Lys Leu Thr Tyr 65 70 75 Thr Glu Ile His Gln Glu Tyr Lys Glu Leu Val Glu Lys Leu Leu 80 85 90 Glu Gly Tyr Leu Lys Glu Ile Gly Ile Asn Glu Asp Gln Phe Gln 95 100 105 Glu Ala Cys Thr Ser Pro Leu Ala Lys Thr His Thr Ser Gln Ala 110 115 120 Ile Leu Gln Pro Val Leu Ala Ala Glu Asp Phe Thr Ile Phe Lys 125 130 135 Ala Met Met Val Gln Lys Asn Ile Glu Met Gln Leu Gln Ala Ile 140 145 150 Arg Ile Ile Gln Glu Arg Asn Gly Val Leu Pro Asp Cys Leu Thr 155 160 165 Asp Gly Ser Asp Val Val Ser Asp Leu Glu His Glu Glu Met Lys 170 175 180 Ile Leu Arg Glu Val Leu Arg Lys Ser Lys Glu Glu Tyr Asp Gln 185 190 195 Glu Glu Glu Arg Lys Arg Lys Lys Gln Leu Ser Glu Ala Lys Thr 200 205 210 Glu Glu Pro Thr Val His Ser Ser Glu Ala Ala Ile Met Asn Asn 215 220 225 Ser Gln Gly Asp Gly Glu His Phe Ala His Pro Pro Ser Glu Val 230 235 240 Lys Met His Phe Ala Asn Gln Ser Ile Glu Pro Leu Gly Arg Lys 245 250 255 Val Glu Arg Ser Glu Thr Ser Ser Leu Pro Gln Lys Gly Leu Lys 260 265 270 Ile Pro Gly Leu Glu His Ala Ser Ile Glu Gly Pro Ile Ala Asn 275 280 285 Leu Ser Val Leu Gly Thr Glu Glu Leu Arg Gln Arg Glu His Tyr 290 295 300 Leu Lys Gln Lys Arg Asp Lys Leu Met Ser Met Arg Lys Asp Met 305 310 315 Arg Thr Lys Gln Ile Gln Asn Met Glu Gln Lys Gly Lys Pro Thr 320 325 330 Gly Glu Val Glu Glu Met Thr Glu Lys Pro Glu Met Thr Ala Glu 335 340 345 Glu Lys Gln Thr Leu Leu Lys Arg Arg Leu Leu Ala Glu Lys Leu 350 355 360 Lys Glu Glu Val Ile Asn Lys 365 7 932 DNA Homo Sapien unsure 911 unknown base 7 gggaacggaa aatggcgcct cacggcccgg gtagtcttac gaccctggtg 50 ccctgggctg ccgccctgct cctcgctctg ggcgtggaaa gggctctggc 100 gctacccgag atatgcaccc aatgtccagg gagcgtgcaa aatttgtcaa 150 aagtggcctt ttattgtaaa acgacacgag agctaatgct gcatgcccgt 200 tgctgcctga atcagaaggg caccatcttg gggctggatc tccagaactg 250 ttctctggag gaccctggtc caaactttca tcaggcacat accactgtca 300 tcatagacct gcaagcaaac cccctcaaag gtgacttggc caacaccttc 350 cgtggcttta ctcagctcca gactctgata ctgccacaac atgtcaactg 400 tcctggagga attaatgcct ggaatactat cacctcttat atagacaacc 450 aaatctgtca agggcaaaag aacctttgca ataacactgg ggacccagaa 500 atgtgtcctg agaatggatc ttgtgtacct gatggtccag gtcttttgca 550 gtgtgtttgt gctgatggtt tccatggata caagtgtatg cgccagggct 600 cgttctcact gcttatgttc ttcgggattc tgggagccac cactctatcc 650 gtctccattc tgctttgggc gacccagcgc cgaaaagcca agacttcatg 700 aactacatag gtcttaccat tgacctaaga tcaatctgaa ctatcttagc 750 ccagtcaggg agctctgctt cctagaaagg catctttcgc cagtggattc 800 gcctcaaggt tgaggccgcc attggaagat gaaaaattgc actcccttgg 850 tgtagacaaa taccagttcc cattggtgtt gttgcctata ataaacactt 900 tttctttttt naaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aa 932 8 229 PRT Homo Sapien 8 Met Ala Pro His Gly Pro Gly Ser Leu Thr Thr Leu Val Pro Trp 1 5 10 15 Ala Ala Ala Leu Leu Leu Ala Leu Gly Val Glu Arg Ala Leu Ala 20 25 30 Leu Pro Glu Ile Cys Thr Gln Cys Pro Gly Ser Val Gln Asn Leu 35 40 45 Ser Lys Val Ala Phe Tyr Cys Lys Thr Thr Arg Glu Leu Met Leu 50 55 60 His Ala Arg Cys Cys Leu Asn Gln Lys Gly Thr Ile Leu Gly Leu 65 70 75 Asp Leu Gln Asn Cys Ser Leu Glu Asp Pro Gly Pro Asn Phe His 80 85 90 Gln Ala His Thr Thr Val Ile Ile Asp Leu Gln Ala Asn Pro Leu 95 100 105 Lys Gly Asp Leu Ala Asn Thr Phe Arg Gly Phe Thr Gln Leu Gln 110 115 120 Thr Leu Ile Leu Pro Gln His Val Asn Cys Pro Gly Gly Ile Asn 125 130 135 Ala Trp Asn Thr Ile Thr Ser Tyr Ile Asp Asn Gln Ile Cys Gln 140 145 150 Gly Gln Lys Asn Leu Cys Asn Asn Thr Gly Asp Pro Glu Met Cys 155 160 165 Pro Glu Asn Gly Ser Cys Val Pro Asp Gly Pro Gly Leu Leu Gln 170 175 180 Cys Val Cys Ala Asp Gly Phe His Gly Tyr Lys Cys Met Arg Gln 185 190 195 Gly Ser Phe Ser Leu Leu Met Phe Phe Gly Ile Leu Gly Ala Thr 200 205 210 Thr Leu Ser Val Ser Ile Leu Leu Trp Ala Thr Gln Arg Arg Lys 215 220 225 Ala Lys Thr Ser 9 2482 DNA Homo Sapien 9 gggggagaag gcggccgagc cccagctctc cgagcaccgg gtcggaagcc 50 gcgacccgag ccgcgcagga agctgggacc ggaacctcgg cggacccggc 100 cccacccaac tcacctgcgc aggtcaccag caccctcgga acccagaggc 150 ccgcgctctg aaggtgaccc ccctggggag gaaggcgatg gcccctgcga 200 ggacgatggc ccgcgcccgc ctcgccccgg ccggcatccc tgccgtcgcc 250 ttgtggcttc tgtgcacgct cggcctccag ggcacccagg ccgggccacc 300 gcccgcgccc cctgggctgc ccgcgggagc cgactgcctg aacagcttta 350 ccgccggggt gcctggcttc gtgctggaca ccaacgcctc ggtcagcaac 400 ggagctacct tcctggagtc ccccaccgtg cgccggggct gggactgcgt 450 gcgcgcctgc tgcaccaccc agaactgcaa cttggcgcta gtggagctgc 500 agcccgaccg cggggaggac gccatcgccg cctgcttcct catcaactgc 550 ctctacgagc agaacttcgt gtgcaagttc gcgcccaggg agggcttcat 600 caactacctc acgagggaag tgtaccgctc ctaccgccag ctgcggaccc 650 agggctttgg agggtctggg atccccaagg cctgggcagg catagacttg 700 aaggtacaac cccaggaacc cctggtgctg aaggatgtgg aaaacacaga 750 ttggcgccta ctgcggggtg acacggatgt cagggtagag aggaaagacc 800 caaaccaggt ggaactgtgg ggactcaagg aaggcaccta cctgttccag 850 ctgacagtga ctagctcaga ccacccagag gacacggcca acgtcacagt 900 cactgtgctg tccaccaagc agacagaaga ctactgcctc gcatccaaca 950 aggtgggtcg ctgccggggc tctttcccac gctggtacta tgaccccacg 1000 gagcagatct gcaagagttt cgtttatgga ggctgcttgg gcaacaagaa 1050 caactacctt cgggaagaag agtgcattct agcctgtcgg ggtgtgcaag 1100 gtgggccttt gagaggcagc tctggggctc aggcgacttt cccccagggc 1150 ccctccatgg aaaggcgcca tccagtgtgc tctggcacct gtcagcccac 1200 ccagttccgc tgcagcaatg gctgctgcat cgacagtttc ctggagtgtg 1250 acgacacccc caactgcccc gacgcctccg acgaggctgc ctgtgaaaaa 1300 tacacgagtg gctttgacga gctccagcgc atccatttcc ccagtgacaa 1350 agggcactgc gtggacctgc cagacacagg actctgcaag gagagcatcc 1400 cgcgctggta ctacaacccc ttcagcgaac actgcgcccg ctttacctat 1450 ggtggttgtt atggcaacaa gaacaacttt gaggaagagc agcagtgcct 1500 cgagtcttgt cgcggcatct ccaagaagga tgtgtttggc ctgaggcggg 1550 aaatccccat tcccagcaca ggctctgtgg agatggctgt cacagtgttc 1600 ctggtcatct gcattgtggt ggtggtagcc atcttgggtt actgcttctt 1650 caagaaccag agaaaggact tccacggaca ccaccaccac ccaccaccca 1700 cccctgccag ctccactgtc tccactaccg aggacacgga gcacctggtc 1750 tataaccaca ccacccggcc cctctgagcc tgggtctcac cggctctcac 1800 ctggccctgc ttcctgcttg ccaaggcaga ggcctgggct gggaaaaact 1850 ttggaaccag actcttgcct gtttcccagg cccactgtgc ctcagagacc 1900 agggctccag cccctcttgg agaagtctca gctaagctca cgtcctgaga 1950 aagctcaaag gtttggaagg agcagaaaac ccttgggcca gaagtaccag 2000 actagatgga cctgcctgca taggagtttg gaggaagttg gagttttgtt 2050 tcctctgttc aaagctgcct gtccctaccc catggtgcta ggaagaggag 2100 tggggtggtg tcagaccctg gaggccccaa ccctgtcctc ccgagctcct 2150 cttccatgct gtgcgcccag ggctgggagg aaggacttcc ctgtgtagtt 2200 tgtgctgtaa agagttgctt tttgtttatt taatgctgtg gcatgggtga 2250 agaggagggg aagaggcctg tttggcctct ctgtcctctc ttcctcttcc 2300 cccaagattg agctctctgc ccttgatcag ccccaccctg gcctagacca 2350 gcagacagag ccaggagagg ctcagctgca ttccgcagcc cccaccccca 2400 aggttctcca acatcacagc ccagcccacc cactgggtaa taaaagtggt 2450 ttgtggaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aa 2482 10 529 PRT Homo Sapien 10 Met Ala Pro Ala Arg Thr Met Ala Arg Ala Arg Leu Ala Pro Ala 1 5 10 15 Gly Ile Pro Ala Val Ala Leu Trp Leu Leu Cys Thr Leu Gly Leu 20 25 30 Gln Gly Thr Gln Ala Gly Pro Pro Pro Ala Pro Pro Gly Leu Pro 35 40 45 Ala Gly Ala Asp Cys Leu Asn Ser Phe Thr Ala Gly Val Pro Gly 50 55 60 Phe Val Leu Asp Thr Asn Ala Ser Val Ser Asn Gly Ala Thr Phe 65 70 75 Leu Glu Ser Pro Thr Val Arg Arg Gly Trp Asp Cys Val Arg Ala 80 85 90 Cys Cys Thr Thr Gln Asn Cys Asn Leu Ala Leu Val Glu Leu Gln 95 100 105 Pro Asp Arg Gly Glu Asp Ala Ile Ala Ala Cys Phe Leu Ile Asn 110 115 120 Cys Leu Tyr Glu Gln Asn Phe Val Cys Lys Phe Ala Pro Arg Glu 125 130 135 Gly Phe Ile Asn Tyr Leu Thr Arg Glu Val Tyr Arg Ser Tyr Arg 140 145 150 Gln Leu Arg Thr Gln Gly Phe Gly Gly Ser Gly Ile Pro Lys Ala 155 160 165 Trp Ala Gly Ile Asp Leu Lys Val Gln Pro Gln Glu Pro Leu Val 170 175 180 Leu Lys Asp Val Glu Asn Thr Asp Trp Arg Leu Leu Arg Gly Asp 185 190 195 Thr Asp Val Arg Val Glu Arg Lys Asp Pro Asn Gln Val Glu Leu 200 205 210 Trp Gly Leu Lys Glu Gly Thr Tyr Leu Phe Gln Leu Thr Val Thr 215 220 225 Ser Ser Asp His Pro Glu Asp Thr Ala Asn Val Thr Val Thr Val 230 235 240 Leu Ser Thr Lys Gln Thr Glu Asp Tyr Cys Leu Ala Ser Asn Lys 245 250 255 Val Gly Arg Cys Arg Gly Ser Phe Pro Arg Trp Tyr Tyr Asp Pro 260 265 270 Thr Glu Gln Ile Cys Lys Ser Phe Val Tyr Gly Gly Cys Leu Gly 275 280 285 Asn Lys Asn Asn Tyr Leu Arg Glu Glu Glu Cys Ile Leu Ala Cys 290 295 300 Arg Gly Val Gln Gly Gly Pro Leu Arg Gly Ser Ser Gly Ala Gln 305 310 315 Ala Thr Phe Pro Gln Gly Pro Ser Met Glu Arg Arg His Pro Val 320 325 330 Cys Ser Gly Thr Cys Gln Pro Thr Gln Phe Arg Cys Ser Asn Gly 335 340 345 Cys Cys Ile Asp Ser Phe Leu Glu Cys Asp Asp Thr Pro Asn Cys 350 355 360 Pro Asp Ala Ser Asp Glu Ala Ala Cys Glu Lys Tyr Thr Ser Gly 365 370 375 Phe Asp Glu Leu Gln Arg Ile His Phe Pro Ser Asp Lys Gly His 380 385 390 Cys Val Asp Leu Pro Asp Thr Gly Leu Cys Lys Glu Ser Ile Pro 395 400 405 Arg Trp Tyr Tyr Asn Pro Phe Ser Glu His Cys Ala Arg Phe Thr 410 415 420 Tyr Gly Gly Cys Tyr Gly Asn Lys Asn Asn Phe Glu Glu Glu Gln 425 430 435 Gln Cys Leu Glu Ser Cys Arg Gly Ile Ser Lys Lys Asp Val Phe 440 445 450 Gly Leu Arg Arg Glu Ile Pro Ile Pro Ser Thr Gly Ser Val Glu 455 460 465 Met Ala Val Thr Val Phe Leu Val Ile Cys Ile Val Val Val Val 470 475 480 Ala Ile Leu Gly Tyr Cys Phe Phe Lys Asn Gln Arg Lys Asp Phe 485 490 495 His Gly His His His His Pro Pro Pro Thr Pro Ala Ser Ser Thr 500 505 510 Val Ser Thr Thr Glu Asp Thr Glu His Leu Val Tyr Asn His Thr 515 520 525 Thr Arg Pro Leu 11 1899 DNA Homo Sapien 11 gtgctgggct ttttcagaca agtgcatctc ctaaccaggt cacatttcag 50 ccgcgaccca ctctccgcca gtcaccggag gcagaccgcg ggaggagagc 100 tgaggacagc cgcgtgcgct tcgccagcag cggggtggga ggaaggacat 150 taaaatactg cagaagtcaa gaccccccca ggtcgaaccc agaccacgat 200 gcgcgccccg ggctgcgggc ggctggtgct gccgctgctg ctcctggccg 250 cggcagccct ggccgaaggc gacgccaagg ggctcaagga gggcgagacc 300 cccggcaatt tcatggagga cgagcaatgg ctgtcgtcca tctcgcagta 350 cagcggcaag atcaagcact ggaaccgctt ccgagacgaa gtggaggatg 400 actatatcaa gagctgggag gacaatcagc aaggagatga agccctggat 450 accaccaagg acccctgcca gaaggtgaag tgcagccgcc acaaggtgtg 500 cattgcccag ggctaccagc gggccatgtg catcagtcgc aagaagctgg 550 agcacaggat caagcagccg accgtgaaac tccatggaaa caaagactcc 600 atctgcaagc cctgccacat ggcccagctt gcctctgtct gcggctcaga 650 tggccacact tacagctctg tgtgtaagct ggagcaacag gcgtgcctga 700 gcagcaagca gctggcggtg cgatgcgagg gcccctgccc ctgccccacg 750 gagcaggctg ccacctccac cgccgatggc aaaccagaga cttgcaccgg 800 tcaggacctg gctgacctgg gagatcggct gcgggactgg ttccagctcc 850 ttcatgagaa ctccaagcag aatggctcag ccagcagtgt agccggcccg 900 gccagcgggc tggacaagag cctgggggcc agctgcaagg actccattgg 950 ctggatgttc tccaagctgg acaccagtgc tgacctcttc ctggaccaga 1000 cggagctggc cgccatcaac ctggacaagt acgaggtctg catccgtccc 1050 ttcttcaact cctgtgacac ctacaaggat ggccgggtct ctactgctga 1100 gtggtgcttc tgcttctgga gggagaagcc cccctgcctg gcagagctgg 1150 agcgcatcca gatccaggag gccgccaaga agaagccagg catcttcatc 1200 ccgagctgcg acgaggatgg ctactaccgg aagatgcagt gtgaccagag 1250 cagcggtgac tgctggcgtg tggaccagct gggcctggag ctgactggca 1300 cgcgcacgca tgggagcccc gactgcgatg acatcgtggg cttctcgggg 1350 gactttggaa gcggtgtcgg ctgggaggat gaggaggaga aggagacgga 1400 ggaagcaggc gaggaggccg aggaggagga gggcgaggca ggcgaggctg 1450 acgacggggg ctacatctgg tagacgccct caggagccgg ctgccggggg 1500 ggactcaaca gcagagctct gagcagcagc aggcaacttc gagaacggat 1550 ccagaaatgc agtcagaagg accctgctcc acctgggggg actgggagtg 1600 tgagtgtgca tggcatgtgt gtggcacaga tggctgggac gggtgacagt 1650 gtgagtgcat gtgtgcatgc atgtgtgtat gtgtgtgtgt gtgtggcatg 1700 cgctgacaaa tgtgtccttg atccacactg ctcctggcag agtgagtcac 1750 ccaaaggccc cttcggcctc cttgtagctg ttttctttcc ttttgttgtt 1800 ggttttaaaa tacattcaca cacaaataca aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 1850 aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaa 1899 12 424 PRT Homo Sapien 12 Met Arg Ala Pro Gly Cys Gly Arg Leu Val Leu Pro Leu Leu Leu 1 5 10 15 Leu Ala Ala Ala Ala Leu Ala Glu Gly Asp Ala Lys Gly Leu Lys 20 25 30 Glu Gly Glu Thr Pro Gly Asn Phe Met Glu Asp Glu Gln Trp Leu 35 40 45 Ser Ser Ile Ser Gln Tyr Ser Gly Lys Ile Lys His Trp Asn Arg 50 55 60 Phe Arg Asp Glu Val Glu Asp Asp Tyr Ile Lys Ser Trp Glu Asp 65 70 75 Asn Gln Gln Gly Asp Glu Ala Leu Asp Thr Thr Lys Asp Pro Cys 80 85 90 Gln Lys Val Lys Cys Ser Arg His Lys Val Cys Ile Ala Gln Gly 95 100 105 Tyr Gln Arg Ala Met Cys Ile Ser Arg Lys Lys Leu Glu His Arg 110 115 120 Ile Lys Gln Pro Thr Val Lys Leu His Gly Asn Lys Asp Ser Ile 125 130 135 Cys Lys Pro Cys His Met Ala Gln Leu Ala Ser Val Cys Gly Ser 140 145 150 Asp Gly His Thr Tyr Ser Ser Val Cys Lys Leu Glu Gln Gln Ala 155 160 165 Cys Leu Ser Ser Lys Gln Leu Ala Val Arg Cys Glu Gly Pro Cys 170 175 180 Pro Cys Pro Thr Glu Gln Ala Ala Thr Ser Thr Ala Asp Gly Lys 185 190 195 Pro Glu Thr Cys Thr Gly Gln Asp Leu Ala Asp Leu Gly Asp Arg 200 205 210 Leu Arg Asp Trp Phe Gln Leu Leu His Glu Asn Ser Lys Gln Asn 215 220 225 Gly Ser Ala Ser Ser Val Ala Gly Pro Ala Ser Gly Leu Asp Lys 230 235 240 Ser Leu Gly Ala Ser Cys Lys Asp Ser Ile Gly Trp Met Phe Ser 245 250 255 Lys Leu Asp Thr Ser Ala Asp Leu Phe Leu Asp Gln Thr Glu Leu 260 265 270 Ala Ala Ile Asn Leu Asp Lys Tyr Glu Val Cys Ile Arg Pro Phe 275 280 285 Phe Asn Ser Cys Asp Thr Tyr Lys Asp Gly Arg Val Ser Thr Ala 290 295 300 Glu Trp Cys Phe Cys Phe Trp Arg Glu Lys Pro Pro Cys Leu Ala 305 310 315 Glu Leu Glu Arg Ile Gln Ile Gln Glu Ala Ala Lys Lys Lys Pro 320 325 330 Gly Ile Phe Ile Pro Ser Cys Asp Glu Asp Gly Tyr Tyr Arg Lys 335 340 345 Met Gln Cys Asp Gln Ser Ser Gly Asp Cys Trp Arg Val Asp Gln 350 355 360 Leu Gly Leu Glu Leu Thr Gly Thr Arg Thr His Gly Ser Pro Asp 365 370 375 Cys Asp Asp Ile Val Gly Phe Ser Gly Asp Phe Gly Ser Gly Val 380 385 390 Gly Trp Glu Asp Glu Glu Glu Lys Glu Thr Glu Glu Ala Gly Glu 395 400 405 Glu Ala Glu Glu Glu Glu Gly Glu Ala Gly Glu Ala Asp Asp Gly 410 415 420 Gly Tyr Ile Trp 13 2680 DNA Homo Sapien 13 tgcggcgacc gtcgtacacc atgggcctcc acctccgccc ctaccgtgtg 50 gggctgctcc cggatggcct cctgttcctc ttgctgctgc taatgctgct 100 cgcggaccca gcgctcccgg ccggacgtca ccccccagtg gtgctggtcc 150 ctggtgattt gggtaaccaa ctggaagcca agctggacaa gccgacagtg 200 gtgcactacc tctgctccaa gaagaccgaa agctacttca caatctggct 250 gaacctggaa ctgctgctgc ctgtcatcat tgactgctgg attgacaata 300 tcaggctggt ttacaacaaa acatccaggg ccacccagtt tcctgatggt 350 gtggatgtac gtgtccctgg ctttgggaag accttctcac tggagttcct 400 ggaccccagc aaaagcagcg tgggttccta tttccacacc atggtggaga 450 gccttgtggg ctggggctac acacggggtg aggatgtccg aggggctccc 500 tatgactggc gccgagcccc aaatgaaaac gggccctact tcctggccct 550 ccgcgagatg atcgaggaga tgtaccagct gtatgggggc cccgtggtgc 600 tggttgccca cagtatgggc aacatgtaca cgctctactt tctgcagcgg 650 cagccgcagg cctggaagga caagtatatc cgggccttcg tgtcactggg 700 tgcgccctgg gggggcgtgg ccaagaccct gcgcgtcctg gcttcaggag 750 acaacaaccg gatcccagtc atcgggcccc tgaagatccg ggagcagcag 800 cggtcagctg tctccaccag ctggctgctg ccctacaact acacatggtc 850 acctgagaag gtgttcgtgc agacacccac aatcaactac acactgcggg 900 actaccgcaa gttcttccag gacatcggct ttgaagatgg ctggctcatg 950 cggcaggaca cagaagggct ggtggaagcc acgatgccac ctggcgtgca 1000 gctgcactgc ctctatggta ctggcgtccc cacaccagac tccttctact 1050 atgagagctt ccctgaccgt gaccctaaaa tctgctttgg tgacggcgat 1100 ggtactgtga acttgaagag tgccctgcag tgccaggcct ggcagagccg 1150 ccaggagcac caagtgttgc tgcaggagct gccaggcagc gagcacatcg 1200 agatgctggc caacgccacc accctggcct atctgaaacg tgtgctcctt 1250 gggccctgac tcctgtgcca caggactcct gtggctcggc cgtggacctg 1300 ctgttggcct ctggggctgt catggcccac gcgttttgca aagtttgtga 1350 ctcaccattc aaggccccga gtcttggact gtgaagcatc tgccatgggg 1400 aagtgctgtt tgttatcctt tctctgtggc agtgaagaag gaagaaatga 1450 gagtctagac tcaagggaca ctggatggca agaatgctgc tgatggtgga 1500 actgctgtga ccttaggact ggctccacag ggtggactgg ctgggccctg 1550 gtcccagtcc ctgcctgggg ccatgtgtcc ccctattcct gtgggctttt 1600 catacttgcc tactgggccc tggccccgca gccttcctat gagggatgtt 1650 actgggctgt ggtcctgtac ccagaggtcc cagggatcgg ctcctggccc 1700 ctcgggtgac ccttcccaca caccagccac agataggcct gccactggtc 1750 atgggtagct agagctgctg gcttccctgt ggcttagctg gtggccagcc 1800 tgactggctt cctgggcgag cctagtagct cctgcaggca ggggcagttt 1850 gttgcgttct tcgtggttcc caggccctgg gacatctcac tccactccta 1900 cctcccttac caccaggagc attcaagctc tggattgggc agcagatgtg 1950 cccccagtcc cgcaggctgt gttccagggg ccctgatttc ctcggatgtg 2000 ctattggccc caggactgaa gctgcctccc ttcaccctgg gactgtggtt 2050 ccaaggatga gagcaggggt tggagccatg gccttctggg aacctatgga 2100 gaaagggaat ccaaggaagc agccaaggct gctcgcagct tccctgagct 2150 gcacctcttg ctaaccccac catcacactg ccaccctgcc ctagggtctc 2200 actagtacca agtgggtcag cacagggctg aggatggggc tcctatccac 2250 cctggccagc acccagctta gtgctgggac tagcccagaa acttgaatgg 2300 gaccctgaga gagccagggg tcccctgagg cccccctagg ggctttctgt 2350 ctgccccagg gtgctccatg gatctccctg tggcagcagg catggagagt 2400 cagggctgcc ttcatggcag taggctctaa gtgggtgact ggccacaggc 2450 cgagaaaagg gtacagcctc taggtggggt tcccaaagac gccttcaggc 2500 tggactgagc tgctctccca cagggtttct gtgcagctgg attttctctg 2550 ttgcatacat gcctggcatc tgtctcccct tgttcctgag tggccccaca 2600 tggggctctg agcaggctgt atctggattc tggcaataaa agtactctgg 2650 atgctgtaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 2680 14 412 PRT Homo Sapien 14 Met Gly Leu His Leu Arg Pro Tyr Arg Val Gly Leu Leu Pro Asp 1 5 10 15 Gly Leu Leu Phe Leu Leu Leu Leu Leu Met Leu Leu Ala Asp Pro 20 25 30 Ala Leu Pro Ala Gly Arg His Pro Pro Val Val Leu Val Pro Gly 35 40 45 Asp Leu Gly Asn Gln Leu Glu Ala Lys Leu Asp Lys Pro Thr Val 50 55 60 Val His Tyr Leu Cys Ser Lys Lys Thr Glu Ser Tyr Phe Thr Ile 65 70 75 Trp Leu Asn Leu Glu Leu Leu Leu Pro Val Ile Ile Asp Cys Trp 80 85 90 Ile Asp Asn Ile Arg Leu Val Tyr Asn Lys Thr Ser Arg Ala Thr 95 100 105 Gln Phe Pro Asp Gly Val Asp Val Arg Val Pro Gly Phe Gly Lys 110 115 120 Thr Phe Ser Leu Glu Phe Leu Asp Pro Ser Lys Ser Ser Val Gly 125 130 135 Ser Tyr Phe His Thr Met Val Glu Ser Leu Val Gly Trp Gly Tyr 140 145 150 Thr Arg Gly Glu Asp Val Arg Gly Ala Pro Tyr Asp Trp Arg Arg 155 160 165 Ala Pro Asn Glu Asn Gly Pro Tyr Phe Leu Ala Leu Arg Glu Met 170 175 180 Ile Glu Glu Met Tyr Gln Leu Tyr Gly Gly Pro Val Val Leu Val 185 190 195 Ala His Ser Met Gly Asn Met Tyr Thr Leu Tyr Phe Leu Gln Arg 200 205 210 Gln Pro Gln Ala Trp Lys Asp Lys Tyr Ile Arg Ala Phe Val Ser 215 220 225 Leu Gly Ala Pro Trp Gly Gly Val Ala Lys Thr Leu Arg Val Leu 230 235 240 Ala Ser Gly Asp Asn Asn Arg Ile Pro Val Ile Gly Pro Leu Lys 245 250 255 Ile Arg Glu Gln Gln Arg Ser Ala Val Ser Thr Ser Trp Leu Leu 260 265 270 Pro Tyr Asn Tyr Thr Trp Ser Pro Glu Lys Val Phe Val Gln Thr 275 280 285 Pro Thr Ile Asn Tyr Thr Leu Arg Asp Tyr Arg Lys Phe Phe Gln 290 295 300 Asp Ile Gly Phe Glu Asp Gly Trp Leu Met Arg Gln Asp Thr Glu 305 310 315 Gly Leu Val Glu Ala Thr Met Pro Pro Gly Val Gln Leu His Cys 320 325 330 Leu Tyr Gly Thr Gly Val Pro Thr Pro Asp Ser Phe Tyr Tyr Glu 335 340 345 Ser Phe Pro Asp Arg Asp Pro Lys Ile Cys Phe Gly Asp Gly Asp 350 355 360 Gly Thr Val Asn Leu Lys Ser Ala Leu Gln Cys Gln Ala Trp Gln 365 370 375 Ser Arg Gln Glu His Gln Val Leu Leu Gln Glu Leu Pro Gly Ser 380 385 390 Glu His Ile Glu Met Leu Ala Asn Ala Thr Thr Leu Ala Tyr Leu 395 400 405 Lys Arg Val Leu Leu Gly Pro 410 15 1371 DNA Homo Sapien 15 cagagcagat aatggcaagc atggctgccg tgctcacctg ggctctggct 50 cttctttcag cgttttcggc cacccaggca cggaaaggct tctgggacta 100 cttcagccag accagcgggg acaaaggcag ggtggagcag atccatcagc 150 agaagatggc tcgcgagccc gcgaccctga aagacagcct tgagcaagac 200 ctcaacaata tgaacaagtt cctggaaaag ctgaggcctc tgagtgggag 250 cgaggctcct cggctcccac aggacccggt gggcatgcgg cggcagctgc 300 aggaggagtt ggaggaggtg aaggctcgcc tccagcccta catggcagag 350 gcgcacgagc tggtgggctg gaatttggag ggcttgcggc agcaactgaa 400 gccctacacg atggatctga tggagcaggt ggccctgcgc gtgcaggagc 450 tgcaggagca gttgcgcgtg gtgggggaag acaccaaggc ccagttgctg 500 gggggcgtgg acgaggcttg ggctttgctg cagggactgc agagccgcgt 550 ggtgcaccac accggccgct tcaaagagct cttccaccca tacgccgaga 600 gcctggtgag cggcatcggg cgccacgtgc aggagctgca ccgcagtgtg 650 gctccgcacg cccccgccag ccccgcgcgc ctcagtcgct gcgtgcaggt 700 gctctcccgg aagctcacgc tcaaggccaa ggccctgcac gcacgcatcc 750 agcagaacct ggaccagctg cgcgaagagc tcagcagagc ctttgcaggc 800 actgggactg aggaaggggc cggcccggac ccctagatgc tctccgagga 850 ggtgcgccag cgacttcagg ctttccgcca ggacacctac ctgcagatag 900 ctgccttcac tcgcgccatc gaccaggaga ctgaggaggt ccagcagcag 950 ctggcgccac ctccaccagg ccacagtgcc ttcgccccag agtttcaaca 1000 aacagacagt ggcaaggttc tgagcaagct gcaggcccgt ctggatgacc 1050 tgtgggaaga catcactcac agccttcatg accagggcca cagccatctg 1100 ggggacccct gaggatctac ctgcccaggc ccattcccag cttcttgtct 1150 ggggagcctt ggctctgagc ctctagcatg gttcagtcct tgaaagtggc 1200 ctgttgggtg gagggtggaa ggtcctgtgc aggacaggga ggccaccaaa 1250 ggggctgctg tctcctgcat atccagcctc ctgcgactcc ccaatctgga 1300 tgcattacat tcaccaggct ttgcaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 1350 aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa a 1371 16 274 PRT Homo Sapien 16 Met Ala Ser Met Ala Ala Val Leu Thr Trp Ala Leu Ala Leu Leu 1 5 10 15 Ser Ala Phe Ser Ala Thr Gln Ala Arg Lys Gly Phe Trp Asp Tyr 20 25 30 Phe Ser Gln Thr Ser Gly Asp Lys Gly Arg Val Glu Gln Ile His 35 40 45 Gln Gln Lys Met Ala Arg Glu Pro Ala Thr Leu Lys Asp Ser Leu 50 55 60 Glu Gln Asp Leu Asn Asn Met Asn Lys Phe Leu Glu Lys Leu Arg 65 70 75 Pro Leu Ser Gly Ser Glu Ala Pro Arg Leu Pro Gln Asp Pro Val 80 85 90 Gly Met Arg Arg Gln Leu Gln Glu Glu Leu Glu Glu Val Lys Ala 95 100 105 Arg Leu Gln Pro Tyr Met Ala Glu Ala His Glu Leu Val Gly Trp 110 115 120 Asn Leu Glu Gly Leu Arg Gln Gln Leu Lys Pro Tyr Thr Met Asp 125 130 135 Leu Met Glu Gln Val Ala Leu Arg Val Gln Glu Leu Gln Glu Gln 140 145 150 Leu Arg Val Val Gly Glu Asp Thr Lys Ala Gln Leu Leu Gly Gly 155 160 165 Val Asp Glu Ala Trp Ala Leu Leu Gln Gly Leu Gln Ser Arg Val 170 175 180 Val His His Thr Gly Arg Phe Lys Glu Leu Phe His Pro Tyr Ala 185 190 195 Glu Ser Leu Val Ser Gly Ile Gly Arg His Val Gln Glu Leu His 200 205 210 Arg Ser Val Ala Pro His Ala Pro Ala Ser Pro Ala Arg Leu Ser 215 220 225 Arg Cys Val Gln Val Leu Ser Arg Lys Leu Thr Leu Lys Ala Lys 230 235 240 Ala Leu His Ala Arg Ile Gln Gln Asn Leu Asp Gln Leu Arg Glu 245 250 255 Glu Leu Ser Arg Ala Phe Ala Gly Thr Gly Thr Glu Glu Gly Ala 260 265 270 Gly Pro Asp Pro 17 2854 DNA Homo Sapien 17 ctaagaggac aagatgaggc ccggcctctc atttctccta gcccttctgt 50 tcttccttgg ccaagctgca ggggatttgg gggatgtggg acctccaatt 100 cccagccccg gcttcagctc tttcccaggt gttgactcca gctccagctt 150 cagctccagc tccaggtcgg gctccagctc cagccgcagc ttaggcagcg 200 gaggttctgt gtcccagttg ttttccaatt tcaccggctc cgtggatgac 250 cgtgggacct gccagtgctc tgtttccctg ccagacacca cctttcccgt 300 ggacagagtg gaacgcttgg aattcacagc tcatgttctt tctcagaagt 350 ttgagaaaga actttctaaa gtgagggaat atgtccaatt aattagtgtg 400 tatgaaaaga aactgttaaa cctaactgtc cgaattgaca tcatggagaa 450 ggataccatt tcttacactg aactggactt cgagctgatc aaggtagaag 500 tgaaggagat ggaaaaactg gtcatacagc tgaaggagag ttttggtgga 550 agctcagaaa ttgttgacca gctggaggtg gagataagaa atatgactct 600 cttggtagag aagcttgaga cactagacaa aaacaatgtc cttgccattc 650 gccgagaaat cgtggctctg aagaccaagc tgaaagagtg tgaggcctct 700 aaagatcaaa acacccctgt cgtccaccct cctcccactc cagggagctg 750 tggtcatggt ggtgtggtga acatcagcaa accgtctgtg gttcagctca 800 actggagagg gttttcttat ctatatggtg cttggggtag ggattactct 850 ccccagcatc caaacaaagg actgtattgg gtggcgccat tgaatacaga 900 tgggagactg ttggagtatt atagactgta caacacactg gatgatttgc 950 tattgtatat aaatgctcga gagttgcgga tcacctatgg ccaaggtagt 1000 ggtacagcag tttacaacaa caacatgtac gtcaacatgt acaacaccgg 1050 gaatattgcc agagttaacc tgaccaccaa cacgattgct gtgactcaaa 1100 ctctccctaa tgctgcctat aataaccgct tttcatatgc taatgttgct 1150 tggcaagata ttgactttgc tgtggatgag aatggattgt gggttattta 1200 ttcaactgaa gccagcactg gtaacatggt gattagtaaa ctcaatgaca 1250 ccacacttca ggtgctaaac acttggtata ccaagcagta taaaccatct 1300 gcttctaacg ccttcatggt atgtggggtt ctgtatgcca cccgtactat 1350 gaacaccaga acagaagaga ttttttacta ttatgacaca aacacaggga 1400 aagagggcaa actagacatt gtaatgcata agatgcagga aaaagtgcag 1450 agcattaact ataacccttt tgaccagaaa ctttatgtct ataacgatgg 1500 ttaccttctg aattatgatc tttctgtctt gcagaagccc cagtaagctg 1550 tttaggagtt agggtgaaag agaaaatgtt tgttgaaaaa atagtcttct 1600 ccacttactt agatatctgc aggggtgtct aaaagtgtgt tcattttgca 1650 gcaatgttta ggtgcatagt tctaccacac tagagatcta ggacatttgt 1700 cttgatttgg tgagttctct tgggaatcat ctgcctcttc aggcgcattt 1750 tgcaataaag tctgtctagg gtgggattgt cagaggtcta ggggcactgt 1800 gggcctagtg aagcctactg tgaggaggct tcactagaag ccttaaatta 1850 ggaattaagg aacttaaaac tcagtatggc gtctagggat tctttgtaca 1900 ggaaatattg cccaatgact agtcctcatc catgtagcac cactaattct 1950 tccatgcctg gaagaaacct ggggacttag ttaggtagat taatatctgg 2000 agctcctcga gggaccaaat ctccaacttt tttttcccct cactagcacc 2050 tggaatgatg ctttgtatgt ggcagataag taaatttggc atgcttatat 2100 attctacatc tgtaaagtgc tgagttttat ggagagaggc ctttttatgc 2150 attaaattgt acatggcaaa taaatcccag aaggatctgt agatgaggca 2200 cctgcttttt cttttctctc attgtccacc ttactaaaag tcagtagaat 2250 cttctacctc ataacttcct tccaaaggca gctcagaaga ttagaaccag 2300 acttactaac caattccacc ccccaccaac ccccttctac tgcctacttt 2350 aaaaaaatta atagttttct atggaactga tctaagatta gaaaaattaa 2400 ttttctttaa tttcattatg gacttttatt tacatgactc taagactata 2450 agaaaatctg atggcagtga caaagtgcta gcatttattg ttatctaata 2500 aagaccttgg agcatatgtg caacttatga gtgtatcagt tgttgcatgt 2550 aatttttgcc tttgtttaag cctggaactt gtaagaaaat gaaaatttaa 2600 tttttttttc taggacgagc tatagaaaag ctattgagag tatctagtta 2650 atcagtgcag tagttggaaa ccttgctggt gtatgtgatg tgcttctgtg 2700 cttttgaatg actttatcat ctagtctttg tctatttttc ctttgatgtt 2750 caagtcctag tctataggat tggcagttta aatgctttac tccccctttt 2800 aaaataaatg attaaaatgt gctttgaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 2850 aaaa 2854 18 510 PRT Homo Sapien 18 Met Arg Pro Gly Leu Ser Phe Leu Leu Ala Leu Leu Phe Phe Leu 1 5 10 15 Gly Gln Ala Ala Gly Asp Leu Gly Asp Val Gly Pro Pro Ile Pro 20 25 30 Ser Pro Gly Phe Ser Ser Phe Pro Gly Val Asp Ser Ser Ser Ser 35 40 45 Phe Ser Ser Ser Ser Arg Ser Gly Ser Ser Ser Ser Arg Ser Leu 50 55 60 Gly Ser Gly Gly Ser Val Ser Gln Leu Phe Ser Asn Phe Thr Gly 65 70 75 Ser Val Asp Asp Arg Gly Thr Cys Gln Cys Ser Val Ser Leu Pro 80 85 90 Asp Thr Thr Phe Pro Val Asp Arg Val Glu Arg Leu Glu Phe Thr 95 100 105 Ala His Val Leu Ser Gln Lys Phe Glu Lys Glu Leu Ser Lys Val 110 115 120 Arg Glu Tyr Val Gln Leu Ile Ser Val Tyr Glu Lys Lys Leu Leu 125 130 135 Asn Leu Thr Val Arg Ile Asp Ile Met Glu Lys Asp Thr Ile Ser 140 145 150 Tyr Thr Glu Leu Asp Phe Glu Leu Ile Lys Val Glu Val Lys Glu 155 160 165 Met Glu Lys Leu Val Ile Gln Leu Lys Glu Ser Phe Gly Gly Ser 170 175 180 Ser Glu Ile Val Asp Gln Leu Glu Val Glu Ile Arg Asn Met Thr 185 190 195 Leu Leu Val Glu Lys Leu Glu Thr Leu Asp Lys Asn Asn Val Leu 200 205 210 Ala Ile Arg Arg Glu Ile Val Ala Leu Lys Thr Lys Leu Lys Glu 215 220 225 Cys Glu Ala Ser Lys Asp Gln Asn Thr Pro Val Val His Pro Pro 230 235 240 Pro Thr Pro Gly Ser Cys Gly His Gly Gly Val Val Asn Ile Ser 245 250 255 Lys Pro Ser Val Val Gln Leu Asn Trp Arg Gly Phe Ser Tyr Leu 260 265 270 Tyr Gly Ala Trp Gly Arg Asp Tyr Ser Pro Gln His Pro Asn Lys 275 280 285 Gly Leu Tyr Trp Val Ala Pro Leu Asn Thr Asp Gly Arg Leu Leu 290 295 300 Glu Tyr Tyr Arg Leu Tyr Asn Thr Leu Asp Asp Leu Leu Leu Tyr 305 310 315 Ile Asn Ala Arg Glu Leu Arg Ile Thr Tyr Gly Gln Gly Ser Gly 320 325 330 Thr Ala Val Tyr Asn Asn Asn Met Tyr Val Asn Met Tyr Asn Thr 335 340 345 Gly Asn Ile Ala Arg Val Asn Leu Thr Thr Asn Thr Ile Ala Val 350 355 360 Thr Gln Thr Leu Pro Asn Ala Ala Tyr Asn Asn Arg Phe Ser Tyr 365 370 375 Ala Asn Val Ala Trp Gln Asp Ile Asp Phe Ala Val Asp Glu Asn 380 385 390 Gly Leu Trp Val Ile Tyr Ser Thr Glu Ala Ser Thr Gly Asn Met 395 400 405 Val Ile Ser Lys Leu Asn Asp Thr Thr Leu Gln Val Leu Asn Thr 410 415 420 Trp Tyr Thr Lys Gln Tyr Lys Pro Ser Ala Ser Asn Ala Phe Met 425 430 435 Val Cys Gly Val Leu Tyr Ala Thr Arg Thr Met Asn Thr Arg Thr 440 445 450 Glu Glu Ile Phe Tyr Tyr Tyr Asp Thr Asn Thr Gly Lys Glu Gly 455 460 465 Lys Leu Asp Ile Val Met His Lys Met Gln Glu Lys Val Gln Ser 470 475 480 Ile Asn Tyr Asn Pro Phe Asp Gln Lys Leu Tyr Val Tyr Asn Asp 485 490 495 Gly Tyr Leu Leu Asn Tyr Asp Leu Ser Val Leu Gln Lys Pro Gln 500 505 510 19 663 DNA Homo Sapien 19 gcaccgcaga cggcgcggat cgcagggagc cggtccgccg ccggaacggg 50 agcctgggtg tgcgtgtgga gtccggactc gtgggagacg atcgcgatga 100 acacggtgct gtcgcgggcg aactcactgt tcgccttctc gctgagcgtg 150 atggcggcgc tcaccttcgg ctgcttcatc accaccgcct tcaaagacag 200 gagcgtcccg gtgcggctgc acgtctcgcg gatcatgcta aaaaatgtag 250 aagatttcac tggacctaga gaaagaagtg atctgggatt tatcacattt 300 gatataactg ctgatctaga gaatatattt gattggaatg ttaagcagtt 350 gtttctttat ttatcagcag aatattcaac aaaaaataat gctctgaacc 400 aagttgtcct atgggacaag attgttttga gaggtgataa tccgaagctg 450 ctgctgaaag atatgaaaac aaaatatttt ttctttgacg atggaaatgg 500 tctcaaggga aacaggaatg tcactttgac cctgtcttgg aacgtcgtac 550 caaatgctgg aattctacct cttgtgacag gatcaggaca cgtatctgtc 600 ccatttccag atacatatga aataacgaag agttattaaa ttattctgaa 650 tttgaaacaa aaa 663 20 180 PRT Homo Sapien 20 Met Asn Thr Val Leu Ser Arg Ala Asn Ser Leu Phe Ala Phe Ser 1 5 10 15 Leu Ser Val Met Ala Ala Leu Thr Phe Gly Cys Phe Ile Thr Thr 20 25 30 Ala Phe Lys Asp Arg Ser Val Pro Val Arg Leu His Val Ser Arg 35 40 45 Ile Met Leu Lys Asn Val Glu Asp Phe Thr Gly Pro Arg Glu Arg 50 55 60 Ser Asp Leu Gly Phe Ile Thr Phe Asp Ile Thr Ala Asp Leu Glu 65 70 75 Asn Ile Phe Asp Trp Asn Val Lys Gln Leu Phe Leu Tyr Leu Ser 80 85 90 Ala Glu Tyr Ser Thr Lys Asn Asn Ala Leu Asn Gln Val Val Leu 95 100 105 Trp Asp Lys Ile Val Leu Arg Gly Asp Asn Pro Lys Leu Leu Leu 110 115 120 Lys Asp Met Lys Thr Lys Tyr Phe Phe Phe Asp Asp Gly Asn Gly 125 130 135 Leu Lys Gly Asn Arg Asn Val Thr Leu Thr Leu Ser Trp Asn Val 140 145 150 Val Pro Asn Ala Gly Ile Leu Pro Leu Val Thr Gly Ser Gly His 155 160 165 Val Ser Val Pro Phe Pro Asp Thr Tyr Glu Ile Thr Lys Ser Tyr 170 175 180 21 415 DNA Homo Sapien 21 aaacttgacg ccatgaagat cccggtcctt cctgccgtgg tgctcctctc 50 cctcctggtg ctccactctg cccagggagc caccctgggt ggtcctgagg 100 aagaaagcac cattgagaat tatgcgtcac gacccgaggc ctttaacacc 150 ccgttcctga acatcgacaa attgcgatct gcgtttaagg ctgatgagtt 200 cctgaactgg cacgccctct ttgagtctat caaaaggaaa cttcctttcc 250 tcaactggga tgcctttcct aagctgaaag gactgaggag cgcaactcct 300 gatgcccagt gaccatgacc tccactggaa gagggggcta gcgtgagcgc 350 tgattctcaa cctaccataa ctctttcctg cctcaggaac tccaataaaa 400 cattttccat ccaaa 415 22 99 PRT Homo Sapien 22 Met Lys Ile Pro Val Leu Pro Ala Val Val Leu Leu Ser Leu Leu 1 5 10 15 Val Leu His Ser Ala Gln Gly Ala Thr Leu Gly Gly Pro Glu Glu 20 25 30 Glu Ser Thr Ile Glu Asn Tyr Ala Ser Arg Pro Glu Ala Phe Asn 35 40 45 Thr Pro Phe Leu Asn Ile Asp Lys Leu Arg Ser Ala Phe Lys Ala 50 55 60 Asp Glu Phe Leu Asn Trp His Ala Leu Phe Glu Ser Ile Lys Arg 65 70 75 Lys Leu Pro Phe Leu Asn Trp Asp Ala Phe Pro Lys Leu Lys Gly 80 85 90 Leu Arg Ser Ala Thr Pro Asp Ala Gln 95 23 866 DNA Homo Sapien 23 tctcagactc ttggaagggg ctatactaga cacacaaaga cagccccaag 50 aaggacggtg gagtagtgtc ctcgctaaaa gacagtagat atgcaacgcc 100 tcttgctcct gccctttctc ctgctgggaa cagtttctgc tcttcatctg 150 gagaatgatg ccccccatct ggagagccta gagacacagg cagacctagg 200 ccaggatctg gatagttcaa aggagcagga gagagacttg gctctgacgg 250 aggaggtgat tcaggcagag ggagaggagg tcaaggcttc tgcctgtcaa 300 gacaactttg aggatgagga agccatggag tcggacccag ctgccttaga 350 caaggacttc cagtgcccca gggaagaaga cattgttgaa gtgcagggaa 400 gtccaaggtg caagacctgc cgctacctat tggtgcggac tcctaaaact 450 tttgcagaag ctcagaatgt ctgcagcaga tgctacggag gcaaccttgt 500 ctctatccat gacttcaact tcaactatcg cattcagtgc tgcactagca 550 cagtcaacca agcccaggtc tggattggag gcaacctcag gggctggttc 600 ctgtggaagc ggttttgctg gactgatggg agccactgga attttgctta 650 ctggtcccca gggcaacctg ggaatgggca aggctcctgt gtggccctat 700 gcaccaaagg aggttattgg cgacgagctc aatgcgacaa gcaactgccc 750 ttcgtctgct ccttctaagc cagcggcacg gagaccctgc cagcagctcc 800 ctcccgtccc ccaacctctc ctgctcataa atccagactt cccacagcaa 850 aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaa 866 24 225 PRT Homo Sapien 24 Met Gln Arg Leu Leu Leu Leu Pro Phe Leu Leu Leu Gly Thr Val 1 5 10 15 Ser Ala Leu His Leu Glu Asn Asp Ala Pro His Leu Glu Ser Leu 20 25 30 Glu Thr Gln Ala Asp Leu Gly Gln Asp Leu Asp Ser Ser Lys Glu 35 40 45 Gln Glu Arg Asp Leu Ala Leu Thr Glu Glu Val Ile Gln Ala Glu 50 55 60 Gly Glu Glu Val Lys Ala Ser Ala Cys Gln Asp Asn Phe Glu Asp 65 70 75 Glu Glu Ala Met Glu Ser Asp Pro Ala Ala Leu Asp Lys Asp Phe 80 85 90 Gln Cys Pro Arg Glu Glu Asp Ile Val Glu Val Gln Gly Ser Pro 95 100 105 Arg Cys Lys Thr Cys Arg Tyr Leu Leu Val Arg Thr Pro Lys Thr 110 115 120 Phe Ala Glu Ala Gln Asn Val Cys Ser Arg Cys Tyr Gly Gly Asn 125 130 135 Leu Val Ser Ile His Asp Phe Asn Phe Asn Tyr Arg Ile Gln Cys 140 145 150 Cys Thr Ser Thr Val Asn Gln Ala Gln Val Trp Ile Gly Gly Asn 155 160 165 Leu Arg Gly Trp Phe Leu Trp Lys Arg Phe Cys Trp Thr Asp Gly 170 175 180 Ser His Trp Asn Phe Ala Tyr Trp Ser Pro Gly Gln Pro Gly Asn 185 190 195 Gly Gln Gly Ser Cys Val Ala Leu Cys Thr Lys Gly Gly Tyr Trp 200 205 210 Arg Arg Ala Gln Cys Asp Lys Gln Leu Pro Phe Val Cys Ser Phe 215 220 225 25 584 DNA Homo Sapien 25 caacagaagc caagaaggaa gccgtctatc ttgtggcgat catgtataag 50 ctggcctcct gctgtttgct tttcacagga ttcttaaatc ctctcttatc 100 tcttcctctc cttgactcca gggaaatatc ctttcaactc tcagcacctc 150 atgaagacgc gcgcttaact ccggaggagc tagaaagagc ttcccttcta 200 cagatattgc cagagatgct gggtgcagaa agaggggata ttctcaggaa 250 agcagactca agtaccaaca tttttaaccc aagaggaaat ttgagaaagt 300 ttcaggattt ctctggacaa gatcctaaca ttttactgag tcatcttttg 350 gccagaatct ggaaaccata caagaaacgt gagactcctg attgcttctg 400 gaaatactgt gtctgaagtg aaataagcat ctgttagtca gctcagaaac 450 acccatctta gaatatgaaa aataacacaa tgcttgattt gaaaacagtg 500 tggagaaaaa ctaggcaaac tacaccctgt tcattgttac ctggaaaata 550 aatcctctat gttttgcaca aaaaaaaaaa aaaa 584 26 124 PRT Homo Sapien 26 Met Tyr Lys Leu Ala Ser Cys Cys Leu Leu Phe Thr Gly Phe Leu 1 5 10 15 Asn Pro Leu Leu Ser Leu Pro Leu Leu Asp Ser Arg Glu Ile Ser 20 25 30 Phe Gln Leu Ser Ala Pro His Glu Asp Ala Arg Leu Thr Pro Glu 35 40 45 Glu Leu Glu Arg Ala Ser Leu Leu Gln Ile Leu Pro Glu Met Leu 50 55 60 Gly Ala Glu Arg Gly Asp Ile Leu Arg Lys Ala Asp Ser Ser Thr 65 70 75 Asn Ile Phe Asn Pro Arg Gly Asn Leu Arg Lys Phe Gln Asp Phe 80 85 90 Ser Gly Gln Asp Pro Asn Ile Leu Leu Ser His Leu Leu Ala Arg 95 100 105 Ile Trp Lys Pro Tyr Lys Lys Arg Glu Thr Pro Asp Cys Phe Trp 110 115 120 Lys Tyr Cys Val 27 920 DNA Homo Sapien 27 caagtaaatg cagcactagt gggtgggatt gaggtatgcc ctggtgcata 50 aatagagact cagctgtgct ggcacactca gaagcttgga ccgcatccta 100 gccgccgact cacacaaggc aggtgggtga ggaaatccag agttgccatg 150 gagaaaattc cagtgtcagc attcttgctc cttgtggccc tctcctacac 200 tctggccaga gataccacag tcaaacctgg agccaaaaag gacacaaagg 250 actctcgacc caaactgccc cagaccctct ccagaggttg gggtgaccaa 300 ctcatctgga ctcagacata tgaagaagct ctatataaat ccaagacaag 350 caacaaaccc ttgatgatta ttcatcactt ggatgagtgc ccacacagtc 400 aagctttaaa gaaagtgttt gctgaaaata aagaaatcca gaaattggca 450 gagcagtttg tcctcctcaa tctggtttat gaaacaactg acaaacacct 500 ttctcctgat ggccagtatg tccccaggat tatgtttgtt gacccatctc 550 tgacagttag agccgatatc actggaagat attcaaatcg tctctatgct 600 tacgaacctg cagatacagc tctgttgctt gacaacatga agaaagctct 650 caagttgctg aagactgaat tgtaaagaaa aaaaatctcc aagcccttct 700 gtctgtcagg ccttgagact tgaaaccaga agaagtgtga gaagactggc 750 tagtgtggaa gcatagtgaa cacactgatt aggttatggt ttaatgttac 800 aacaactatt ttttaagaaa aacaagtttt agaaatttgg tttcaagtgt 850 acatgtgtga aaacaatatt gtatactacc atagtgagcc atgattttct 900 aaaaaaaaaa ataaatgtta 920 28 175 PRT Homo Sapien 28 Met Glu Lys Ile Pro Val Ser Ala Phe Leu Leu Leu Val Ala Leu 1 5 10 15 Ser Tyr Thr Leu Ala Arg Asp Thr Thr Val Lys Pro Gly Ala Lys 20 25 30 Lys Asp Thr Lys Asp Ser Arg Pro Lys Leu Pro Gln Thr Leu Ser 35 40 45 Arg Gly Trp Gly Asp Gln Leu Ile Trp Thr Gln Thr Tyr Glu Glu 50 55 60 Ala Leu Tyr Lys Ser Lys Thr Ser Asn Lys Pro Leu Met Ile Ile 65 70 75 His His Leu Asp Glu Cys Pro His Ser Gln Ala Leu Lys Lys Val 80 85 90 Phe Ala Glu Asn Lys Glu Ile Gln Lys Leu Ala Glu Gln Phe Val 95 100 105 Leu Leu Asn Leu Val Tyr Glu Thr Thr Asp Lys His Leu Ser Pro 110 115 120 Asp Gly Gln Tyr Val Pro Arg Ile Met Phe Val Asp Pro Ser Leu 125 130 135 Thr Val Arg Ala Asp Ile Thr Gly Arg Tyr Ser Asn Arg Leu Tyr 140 145 150 Ala Tyr Glu Pro Ala Asp Thr Ala Leu Leu Leu Asp Asn Met Lys 155 160 165 Lys Ala Leu Lys Leu Leu Lys Thr Glu Leu 170 175 29 1181 DNA Homo Sapien 29 aagaccctct ctttcgctgt ttgagagtct ctcggctcaa ggaccgggag 50 gtaagaggtt tgggactgcc ccggcaactc cagggtgtct ggtccacgac 100 ctatcctagg cgccatgggt gtgataggta tacagctggt tgttaccatg 150 gtgatggcca gtgtcatgca gaagattata cctcactatt ctcttgctcg 200 atggctactc tgtaatggca gtttgaggtg gtatcaacat cctacagaag 250 aagaattaag aattcttgca gggaaacaac aaaaagggaa aaccaaaaaa 300 gataggaaat ataatggtca cattgaaagt aagccattaa ccattccaaa 350 ggatattgac cttcatctag aaacaaagtc agttacagaa gtggatactt 400 tagcattgca ttactttcca gaataccagt ggctggtgga tttcacagtg 450 gctgctacag ttgtgtatct agtaactgaa gtctactaca attttatgaa 500 gcctacacag gaaatgaata tcagcttagt ctggtgccta cttgttttgt 550 cttttgcaat caaagttcta ttttcattaa ctacacacta ttttaaagta 600 gaagatggtg gtgaaagatc tgtttgtgtc acctttggat tttttttctt 650 tgtcaaagca atggcagtgt tgattgtaac agaaaattat ctggaatttg 700 gacttgaaac agggtttaca aatttttcag acagtgcgat gcagtttctt 750 gaaaagcaag gtttagaatc tcagagtcct gtttcaaaac ttactttcaa 800 atttttcctg gctattttct gttcattcat tggggctttt ttgacatttc 850 ctggattacg actggctcaa atgcatctgg atgccctgaa tttggcaaca 900 gaaaaaatta cacaaacttt acttcatatc aacttcttgg cacctttatt 950 tatggttttg ctctgggtaa aaccaatcac caaagactac attatgaacc 1000 caccactggg caaagaaatt tccccatctg gaagatgaag ataatagtat 1050 ctaactcaca aggttatcat tggaataaat gaaagaacac atgtaatgca 1100 accagctgga attaagtgct taataaatgt tcttttcact gctttgcctc 1150 atcagaatta aaatagaaat acttgactag t 1181 30 307 PRT Homo Sapien 30 Met Gly Val Ile Gly Ile Gln Leu Val Val Thr Met Val Met Ala 1 5 10 15 Ser Val Met Gln Lys Ile Ile Pro His Tyr Ser Leu Ala Arg Trp 20 25 30 Leu Leu Cys Asn Gly Ser Leu Arg Trp Tyr Gln His Pro Thr Glu 35 40 45 Glu Glu Leu Arg Ile Leu Ala Gly Lys Gln Gln Lys Gly Lys Thr 50 55 60 Lys Lys Asp Arg Lys Tyr Asn Gly His Ile Glu Ser Lys Pro Leu 65 70 75 Thr Ile Pro Lys Asp Ile Asp Leu His Leu Glu Thr Lys Ser Val 80 85 90 Thr Glu Val Asp Thr Leu Ala Leu His Tyr Phe Pro Glu Tyr Gln 95 100 105 Trp Leu Val Asp Phe Thr Val Ala Ala Thr Val Val Tyr Leu Val 110 115 120 Thr Glu Val Tyr Tyr Asn Phe Met Lys Pro Thr Gln Glu Met Asn 125 130 135 Ile Ser Leu Val Trp Cys Leu Leu Val Leu Ser Phe Ala Ile Lys 140 145 150 Val Leu Phe Ser Leu Thr Thr His Tyr Phe Lys Val Glu Asp Gly 155 160 165 Gly Glu Arg Ser Val Cys Val Thr Phe Gly Phe Phe Phe Phe Val 170 175 180 Lys Ala Met Ala Val Leu Ile Val Thr Glu Asn Tyr Leu Glu Phe 185 190 195 Gly Leu Glu Thr Gly Phe Thr Asn Phe Ser Asp Ser Ala Met Gln 200 205 210 Phe Leu Glu Lys Gln Gly Leu Glu Ser Gln Ser Pro Val Ser Lys 215 220 225 Leu Thr Phe Lys Phe Phe Leu Ala Ile Phe Cys Ser Phe Ile Gly 230 235 240 Ala Phe Leu Thr Phe Pro Gly Leu Arg Leu Ala Gln Met His Leu 245 250 255 Asp Ala Leu Asn Leu Ala Thr Glu Lys Ile Thr Gln Thr Leu Leu 260 265 270 His Ile Asn Phe Leu Ala Pro Leu Phe Met Val Leu Leu Trp Val 275 280 285 Lys Pro Ile Thr Lys Asp Tyr Ile Met Asn Pro Pro Leu Gly Lys 290 295 300 Glu Ile Ser Pro Ser Gly Arg 305 31 513 DNA Homo Sapien 31 gtagcatagt gtgcagttca ctggaccaaa agctttggct gcacctcttc 50 tggaaagctg gccatggggc tcttcatgat cattgcaatt ctgctgttcc 100 agaaacccac agtaaccgaa caacttaaga agtgctggaa taactatgta 150 caaggacatt gcaggaaaat ctgcagagta aatgaagtgc ctgaggcact 200 atgtgaaaat gggagatact gttgcctcaa tatcaaggaa ctggaagcat 250 gtaaaaaaat tacaaagcca cctcgtccaa agccagcaac acttgcactg 300 actcttcaag actatgttac aataatagaa aatttcccaa gcctgaagac 350 acagtctaca taaatcaaat acaatttcgt tttcacttgc ttctcaacct 400 agtctaataa actaaggtga tgagatatac atcttcttcc ttctggtttc 450 ttgatcctta aaatgacctt cgagcatatt ctaataaagt gcattgccag 500 ttaaaaaaaa aaa 513 32 99 PRT Homo Sapien 32 Met Gly Leu Phe Met Ile Ile Ala Ile Leu Leu Phe Gln Lys Pro 1 5 10 15 Thr Val Thr Glu Gln Leu Lys Lys Cys Trp Asn Asn Tyr Val Gln 20 25 30 Gly His Cys Arg Lys Ile Cys Arg Val Asn Glu Val Pro Glu Ala 35 40 45 Leu Cys Glu Asn Gly Arg Tyr Cys Cys Leu Asn Ile Lys Glu Leu 50 55 60 Glu Ala Cys Lys Lys Ile Thr Lys Pro Pro Arg Pro Lys Pro Ala 65 70 75 Thr Leu Ala Leu Thr Leu Gln Asp Tyr Val Thr Ile Ile Glu Asn 80 85 90 Phe Pro Ser Leu Lys Thr Gln Ser Thr 95 33 2684 DNA Homo Sapien unsure 2636-2637 unknown base 33 cggacgcgtg ggcgctgagc cccggaggcc agggcgtccg gggctgcgcc 50 acttccgagg gccgagcgct gccggtcccg gcggtgcgac acggccggga 100 ggaggagaac aacgcaaggg gctcaaccgt cggtcgctgg agcccccccc 150 ggggcgtggc ctcccgcccc ctcagctggg gagggcgggg ctcgctgccc 200 cctgctgccg actgcgaccc ttacagggga gggagggcgc aggccgcgcg 250 gagatgagga ggaggctgcg cctacgcagg gacgcattgc tcacgctgct 300 ccttggcgcc tccctgggcc tcttactcta tgcgcagcgc gacggcgcgg 350 ccccgacggc gagcgcgccg cgagggcgag ggagggcggc accgaggccc 400 acccccggac cccgcgcgtt ccagttaccc gacgcgggtg cagccccgcc 450 ggcctacgaa ggggacacac cggcgccgcc cacgcctacg ggaccctttg 500 acttcgcccg ctatttgcgc gccaaggacc agcggcggtt tccactgctc 550 attaaccagc cgcacaagtg ccgcggcgac ggcgcacccg gtggccgccc 600 ggacctgctt attgctgtca agtcggtggc agaggacttc gagcggcgcc 650 aagccgtgcg ccagacgtgg ggcgcggagg gtcgcgtgca gggggcgctg 700 gtgcgccgcg tgttcttgct gggcgtgccc aggggcgcag gctcgggcgg 750 ggccgacgaa gttggggagg gcgcgcgaac ccactggcgc gccctgctgc 800 gggccgagag ccttgcgtat gcggacatcc tgctctgggc cttcgacgac 850 acctttttta acctaacgct caaggagatc cactttctag cctgggcctc 900 agctttctgc cccgacgtgc gcttcgtttt taagggcgac gcagatgtgt 950 tcgtgaacgt gggaaatctc ctggagttcc tggcgccgcg ggacccggcg 1000 caagacctgc ttgctggtga cgtaattgtg catgcgcggc ccatccgcac 1050 gcgggctagc aagtactaca tccccgaggc cgtgtacggc ctgcccgcct 1100 atccggccta cgcgggcggc ggtggctttg tgctttccgg ggccacgctg 1150 caccgcctgg ctggcgcctg tgcgcaggtc gagctcttcc ccatcgacga 1200 cgtctttctg ggcatgtgtc tgcagcgcct gcggctcacg cccgagcctc 1250 accctgcctt ccgcaccttt ggcatccccc agccttcagc cgcgccgcat 1300 ttgagcacct tcgacccctg cttttaccgt gagctggttg tagtgcacgg 1350 gctctcggcc gctgacatct ggcttatgtg gcgcctgctg cacgggccgc 1400 atgggccagc ctgtgcgcat ccacagcctg tcgctgcagg ccccttccaa 1450 tgggactcct agctccccac tacagcccca agctcctaac tcagacccag 1500 aatggagccg gtttcccaga ttattgccgt gtatgtggtt cttccctgat 1550 caccaggtgc ctgtctccac aggatcccag gggatggggg ttaagcttgg 1600 ctcctggcgg tccaccctgc tggaaccagt tgaaacccgt gtaatggtga 1650 ccctttgagc gagccaaggc tgggtggtag atgaccatct cttgtccaac 1700 aggtcccaga gcagtggata tgtctggtcc tcctagtagc acagaggtgt 1750 gttctggtgt ggtggcaggg acttagggaa tcctaccact ctgctggatt 1800 tggaaccccc taggctgacg cggacgtatg cagaggctct caaggccagg 1850 ccccacaggg aggtggaggg gctccggccg ccacagcctg aattcatgaa 1900 cctggcaggc actttgccat agctcatctg aaaacagata ttatgcttcc 1950 cacaacctct cctgggccca ggtgtggctg agcaccaggg atggagccac 2000 acataaggga caaatgagtg cacggtccta cctagtcttt cctcacctcc 2050 tgaactcaca caacaatgcc agtctcccac tggaggctgt atcccctcag 2100 aggagccaag gaatgtcttc ccctgagatg ccaccactat taatttcccc 2150 atatgcttca accaccccct tgctcaaaaa accaataccc acacttacct 2200 taatacaaac atcccagcaa cagcacatgg caggccattg ctgagggcac 2250 aggtgcttta ttggagaggg gatgtgggca ggggataagg aaggttcccc 2300 cattccagga ggatgggaac agtcctggct gcccctgaca gtggggatat 2350 gcaaggggct ctggccaggc cacagtccaa atgggaagac accagtcagt 2400 cacaaaagtc gggagcgcca cacaaacctg gctataaggc ccaggaacca 2450 tataggagcc tgagacaggt cccctgcaca ttcatcatta aactatacag 2500 gatgaggctg tacatgagtt aattacaaaa gagtcatatt tacaaaaatc 2550 tgtacacaca tttgaaaaac tcacaaaatt gtcatctatg tatcacaagt 2600 tgctagaccc aaaatattaa aaatgggata aaattnnttt aaaaaaaaaa 2650 aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaa 2684 34 402 PRT Homo Sapien 34 Met Arg Arg Arg Leu Arg Leu Arg Arg Asp Ala Leu Leu Thr Leu 1 5 10 15 Leu Leu Gly Ala Ser Leu Gly Leu Leu Leu Tyr Ala Gln Arg Asp 20 25 30 Gly Ala Ala Pro Thr Ala Ser Ala Pro Arg Gly Arg Gly Arg Ala 35 40 45 Ala Pro Arg Pro Thr Pro Gly Pro Arg Ala Phe Gln Leu Pro Asp 50 55 60 Ala Gly Ala Ala Pro Pro Ala Tyr Glu Gly Asp Thr Pro Ala Pro 65 70 75 Pro Thr Pro Thr Gly Pro Phe Asp Phe Ala Arg Tyr Leu Arg Ala 80 85 90 Lys Asp Gln Arg Arg Phe Pro Leu Leu Ile Asn Gln Pro His Lys 95 100 105 Cys Arg Gly Asp Gly Ala Pro Gly Gly Arg Pro Asp Leu Leu Ile 110 115 120 Ala Val Lys Ser Val Ala Glu Asp Phe Glu Arg Arg Gln Ala Val 125 130 135 Arg Gln Thr Trp Gly Ala Glu Gly Arg Val Gln Gly Ala Leu Val 140 145 150 Arg Arg Val Phe Leu Leu Gly Val Pro Arg Gly Ala Gly Ser Gly 155 160 165 Gly Ala Asp Glu Val Gly Glu Gly Ala Arg Thr His Trp Arg Ala 170 175 180 Leu Leu Arg Ala Glu Ser Leu Ala Tyr Ala Asp Ile Leu Leu Trp 185 190 195 Ala Phe Asp Asp Thr Phe Phe Asn Leu Thr Leu Lys Glu Ile His 200 205 210 Phe Leu Ala Trp Ala Ser Ala Phe Cys Pro Asp Val Arg Phe Val 215 220 225 Phe Lys Gly Asp Ala Asp Val Phe Val Asn Val Gly Asn Leu Leu 230 235 240 Glu Phe Leu Ala Pro Arg Asp Pro Ala Gln Asp Leu Leu Ala Gly 245 250 255 Asp Val Ile Val His Ala Arg Pro Ile Arg Thr Arg Ala Ser Lys 260 265 270 Tyr Tyr Ile Pro Glu Ala Val Tyr Gly Leu Pro Ala Tyr Pro Ala 275 280 285 Tyr Ala Gly Gly Gly Gly Phe Val Leu Ser Gly Ala Thr Leu His 290 295 300 Arg Leu Ala Gly Ala Cys Ala Gln Val Glu Leu Phe Pro Ile Asp 305 310 315 Asp Val Phe Leu Gly Met Cys Leu Gln Arg Leu Arg Leu Thr Pro 320 325 330 Glu Pro His Pro Ala Phe Arg Thr Phe Gly Ile Pro Gln Pro Ser 335 340 345 Ala Ala Pro His Leu Ser Thr Phe Asp Pro Cys Phe Tyr Arg Glu 350 355 360 Leu Val Val Val His Gly Leu Ser Ala Ala Asp Ile Trp Leu Met 365 370 375 Trp Arg Leu Leu His Gly Pro His Gly Pro Ala Cys Ala His Pro 380 385 390 Gln Pro Val Ala Ala Gly Pro Phe Gln Trp Asp Ser 395 400 35 1643 DNA Homo Sapien 35 agcagcctct gcccgacccg gctcgtgcgg accccaggac cgggcgcggg 50 acgcgtgcgt ccagcctccg gcgctgcgga gacccgcggc tgggtccggg 100 gaggccccaa acccgccccc gccagaaccc cgccccaaat tcccacctcc 150 tccagaagcc ccgcccactc ccgagccccg agagctccgc gcacctgggc 200 gccatccgcc ctggctccgc tgcacgagct ccacgcccgt accccggcgt 250 cacgctcagc ccgcggtgct cgcacacctg agactcatct cgcttcgacc 300 ccgccgccgc cgccgcccgg catcctgagc acggagacag tctccagctg 350 ccgttcatgc ttcctcccca gccttccgca gcccaccagg gaaggggcgg 400 taggagtggc cttttaccaa agggaccggc gatgctctgc aggctgtgct 450 ggctggtctc gtacagcttg gctgtgctgt tgctcggctg cctgctcttc 500 ctgaggaagg cggccaagcc cgcaggagac cccacggccc accagccttt 550 ctgggctccc ccaacacccc gtcacagccg gtgtccaccc aaccacacag 600 tgtctagcgc ctctctgtcc ctgcctagcc gtcaccgtct cttcttgacc 650 tatcgtcact gccgaaattt ctctatcttg ctggagcctt caggctgttc 700 caaggatacc ttcttgctcc tggccatcaa gtcacagcct ggtcacgtgg 750 agcgacgtgc ggctatccgc agcacgtggg gcagggtggg gggatgggct 800 aggggccggc agctgaagct ggtgttcctc ctaggggtgg caggatccgc 850 tcccccagcc cagctgctgg cctatgagag tagggagttt gatgacatcc 900 tccagtggga cttcactgag gacttcttca acctgacgct caaggagctg 950 cacctgcagc gctgggtggt ggctgcctgc ccccaggccc atttcatgct 1000 aaagggagat gacgatgtct ttgtccacgt ccccaacgtg ttagagttcc 1050 tggatggctg ggacccagcc caggacctcc tggtgggaga tgtcatccgc 1100 caagccctgc ccaacaggaa cactaaggtc aaatacttca tcccaccctc 1150 aatgtacagg gccacccact acccacccta tgctggtggg ggaggatatg 1200 tcatgtccag agccacagtg cggcgcctcc aggctatcat ggaagatgct 1250 gaactcttcc ccattgatga tgtctttgtg ggtatgtgcc tgaggaggct 1300 ggggctgagc cctatgcacc atgctggctt caagacattt ggaatccggc 1350 ggcccctgga ccccttagac ccctgcctgt atagggggct cctgctggtt 1400 caccgcctca gccccctcga gatgtggacc atgtgggcac tggtgacaga 1450 tgaggggctc aagtgtgcag ctggccccat accccagcgc tgaagggtgg 1500 gttgggcaac agcctgagag tggactcagt gttgattctc tatcgtgatg 1550 cgaaattgat gcctgctgct ctacagaaaa tgccaacttg gttttttaac 1600 tcctctcacc ctgttagctc tgattaaaaa cactgcaacc caa 1643 36 378 PRT Homo Sapien 36 Met Leu Pro Pro Gln Pro Ser Ala Ala His Gln Gly Arg Gly Gly 1 5 10 15 Arg Ser Gly Leu Leu Pro Lys Gly Pro Ala Met Leu Cys Arg Leu 20 25 30 Cys Trp Leu Val Ser Tyr Ser Leu Ala Val Leu Leu Leu Gly Cys 35 40 45 Leu Leu Phe Leu Arg Lys Ala Ala Lys Pro Ala Gly Asp Pro Thr 50 55 60 Ala His Gln Pro Phe Trp Ala Pro Pro Thr Pro Arg His Ser Arg 65 70 75 Cys Pro Pro Asn His Thr Val Ser Ser Ala Ser Leu Ser Leu Pro 80 85 90 Ser Arg His Arg Leu Phe Leu Thr Tyr Arg His Cys Arg Asn Phe 95 100 105 Ser Ile Leu Leu Glu Pro Ser Gly Cys Ser Lys Asp Thr Phe Leu 110 115 120 Leu Leu Ala Ile Lys Ser Gln Pro Gly His Val Glu Arg Arg Ala 125 130 135 Ala Ile Arg Ser Thr Trp Gly Arg Val Gly Gly Trp Ala Arg Gly 140 145 150 Arg Gln Leu Lys Leu Val Phe Leu Leu Gly Val Ala Gly Ser Ala 155 160 165 Pro Pro Ala Gln Leu Leu Ala Tyr Glu Ser Arg Glu Phe Asp Asp 170 175 180 Ile Leu Gln Trp Asp Phe Thr Glu Asp Phe Phe Asn Leu Thr Leu 185 190 195 Lys Glu Leu His Leu Gln Arg Trp Val Val Ala Ala Cys Pro Gln 200 205 210 Ala His Phe Met Leu Lys Gly Asp Asp Asp Val Phe Val His Val 215 220 225 Pro Asn Val Leu Glu Phe Leu Asp Gly Trp Asp Pro Ala Gln Asp 230 235 240 Leu Leu Val Gly Asp Val Ile Arg Gln Ala Leu Pro Asn Arg Asn 245 250 255 Thr Lys Val Lys Tyr Phe Ile Pro Pro Ser Met Tyr Arg Ala Thr 260 265 270 His Tyr Pro Pro Tyr Ala Gly Gly Gly Gly Tyr Val Met Ser Arg 275 280 285 Ala Thr Val Arg Arg Leu Gln Ala Ile Met Glu Asp Ala Glu Leu 290 295 300 Phe Pro Ile Asp Asp Val Phe Val Gly Met Cys Leu Arg Arg Leu 305 310 315 Gly Leu Ser Pro Met His His Ala Gly Phe Lys Thr Phe Gly Ile 320 325 330 Arg Arg Pro Leu Asp Pro Leu Asp Pro Cys Leu Tyr Arg Gly Leu 335 340 345 Leu Leu Val His Arg Leu Ser Pro Leu Glu Met Trp Thr Met Trp 350 355 360 Ala Leu Val Thr Asp Glu Gly Leu Lys Cys Ala Ala Gly Pro Ile 365 370 375 Pro Gln Arg 37 1226 DNA Homo Sapien 37 atgaaagtga taatcaggca gcccaaatga ttgttaataa ggatcaaatg 50 agatcgtgta tgtgggtcca atcaattgat tctacacaaa ggagcctggg 100 gaggggccat ggtgccaatg cacttactgg ggagactgga gaagccgctt 150 ctcctcctgt gctgcgcctc cttcctactg gggctggctt tgctgggcat 200 aaagacggac atcacccccg ttgcttattt ctttctcaca ttgggtggct 250 tcttcttgtt tgcctatctc ctggtccggt ttctggaatg ggggcttcgg 300 tcccagctcc aatcaatgca gactgagagc ccagggccct caggcaatgc 350 acgggacaat gaagcctttg aagtgccagt ctatgaagag gccgtggtgg 400 gactagaatc ccagtgccgc ccccaagagt tggaccaacc acccccctac 450 agcactgttg tgataccccc agcacctgag gaggaacaac ctagccatcc 500 agaggggtcc aggagagcca aactggaaca gaggcgaatg gcctcagagg 550 ggtccatggc ccaggaagga agccctggaa gagctccaat caaccttcgg 600 cttcggggac cacgggctgt gtccactgct cctgatctgc agagcttggc 650 ggcagtcccc acattagagc ctctgactcc accccctgcc tatgatgtct 700 gctttggtca ccctgatgat gatagtgttt tttatgagga caactgggca 750 cccccttaaa tgactctccc aagatttctc ttctctccac accagacctc 800 gttcatttga ctaacatttt ccagcgccta ctatgtgtca gaaacaagtg 850 tttctgcctg gacatcataa atggggactt ggaccctgag gagagtcagg 900 ccacggtaag cccttcccag ctgagatatg ggtggcataa tttgagtctt 950 ctggcaacat ttggtgacct accccatatc caatatttcc agcgttagat 1000 tgaggatgag gtagggaggt gatccagaga aggcggagaa ggaagaagta 1050 acctctgagt ggcggctatt gcttctgttc caggtgctgt tcgagctgtt 1100 agaaccctta ggcttgacag ctttgtgagt tattattgaa aaatgaggat 1150 tccaagagtc agaggagttt gataatgtgc acgagggcac actgctagta 1200 aataacatta aaataactgg aatgaa 1226 38 216 PRT Homo Sapien 38 Met Val Pro Met His Leu Leu Gly Arg Leu Glu Lys Pro Leu Leu 1 5 10 15 Leu Leu Cys Cys Ala Ser Phe Leu Leu Gly Leu Ala Leu Leu Gly 20 25 30 Ile Lys Thr Asp Ile Thr Pro Val Ala Tyr Phe Phe Leu Thr Leu 35 40 45 Gly Gly Phe Phe Leu Phe Ala Tyr Leu Leu Val Arg Phe Leu Glu 50 55 60 Trp Gly Leu Arg Ser Gln Leu Gln Ser Met Gln Thr Glu Ser Pro 65 70 75 Gly Pro Ser Gly Asn Ala Arg Asp Asn Glu Ala Phe Glu Val Pro 80 85 90 Val Tyr Glu Glu Ala Val Val Gly Leu Glu Ser Gln Cys Arg Pro 95 100 105 Gln Glu Leu Asp Gln Pro Pro Pro Tyr Ser Thr Val Val Ile Pro 110 115 120 Pro Ala Pro Glu Glu Glu Gln Pro Ser His Pro Glu Gly Ser Arg 125 130 135 Arg Ala Lys Leu Glu Gln Arg Arg Met Ala Ser Glu Gly Ser Met 140 145 150 Ala Gln Glu Gly Ser Pro Gly Arg Ala Pro Ile Asn Leu Arg Leu 155 160 165 Arg Gly Pro Arg Ala Val Ser Thr Ala Pro Asp Leu Gln Ser Leu 170 175 180 Ala Ala Val Pro Thr Leu Glu Pro Leu Thr Pro Pro Pro Ala Tyr 185 190 195 Asp Val Cys Phe Gly His Pro Asp Asp Asp Ser Val Phe Tyr Glu 200 205 210 Asp Asn Trp Ala Pro Pro 215 39 2770 DNA Homo Sapien 39 cccacgcgtc cggcggctac acacctaggt gcggtgggct tcgggtgggg 50 ggcctgcagc tagctgatgg caagggagga atagcagggg tggggattgt 100 ggtgtgcgag aggtcccgcg gacggggggc tcgggggtct cttcagacga 150 gattcccttc aggcttgggc cgggtccctt cgcacggaga tcccaatgaa 200 cgcgggcccc tggaggccgg tggttggggc ttctccgcgt cggggatggg 250 gccggtaccc tagcccgttt ccagcgcctc agtcggttcc ccatgccctc 300 agaggtggcc cggggcaagc gcgccgccct cttcttcgct gcggtggcca 350 tcgtgctggg gctaccgctc tggtggaaga ccacggagac ctaccgggcc 400 tcgttgcctt actcccagat cagtggcctg aatgcccttc agctccgcct 450 catggtgcct gtcactgtcg tgtttacgcg ggagtcagtg cccctggacg 500 accaggagaa gctgcccttc accgttgtgc atgaaagaga gattcctctg 550 aaatacaaaa tgaaaatcaa atgccgtttc cagaaggcct atcggagggc 600 tttggaccat gaggaggagg ccctgtcatc gggcagtgtg caagaggcag 650 aagccatgtt agatgagcct caggaacaag cggagggctc cctgactgtg 700 tacgtgatat ctgaacactc ctcacttctt ccccaggaca tgatgagcta 750 cattgggccc aagaggacag cagtggtgcg ggggataatg caccgggagg 800 cctttaacat cattggccgc cgcatagtcc aggtggccca ggccatgtct 850 ttgactgagg atgtgcttgc tgctgctctg gctgaccacc ttccagagga 900 caagtggagc gctgagaaga ggcggcctct caagtccagc ttgggctatg 950 agatcacctt cagtttactc aacccagacc ccaagtccca tgatgtctac 1000 tgggacattg agggggctgt ccggcgctat gtgcaacctt tcctgaatgc 1050 cctcggtgcc gctggcaact tctctgtgga ctctcagatt ctttactatg 1100 caatgttggg ggtgaatccc cgctttgact cagcttcctc cagctactat 1150 ttggacatgc acagcctccc ccatgtcatc aacccagtgg agtcccggct 1200 gggatccagt gctgcctcct tgtaccctgt gctcaacttt ctactctacg 1250 tgcctgagct tgcacactca ccgctgtaca ttcaggacaa ggatggcgct 1300 ccagtggcca ccaatgcctt ccatagtccc cgctggggtg gcattatggt 1350 atataatgtt gactccaaaa cctataatgc ctcagtgctg ccagtgagag 1400 tcgaggtgga catggtgcga gtgatggagg tgttcctggc acagttgcgg 1450 ttgctctttg ggattgctca gccccagctg cctccaaaat gcctgctttc 1500 agggcctacg agtgaagggc taatgacctg ggagctagac cggctgctct 1550 gggctcggtc agtggagaac ctggccacag ccaccaccac ccttacctcc 1600 ctggcgcagc ttctgggcaa gatcagcaac attgtcatta aggacgacgt 1650 ggcatctgag gtgtacaagg ctgtagctgc cgtccagaag tcggcagaag 1700 agttggcgtc tgggcacctg gcatctgcct ttgtcgccag ccaggaagct 1750 gtgacatcct ctgagcttgc cttctttgac ccgtcactcc tccacctcct 1800 ttatttccct gatgaccaga agtttgccat ctacatccca ctcttcctgc 1850 ctatggctgt gcccatcctc ctgtccctgg tcaagatctt cctggagacc 1900 cgcaagtcct ggagaaagcc tgagaagaca gactgagcag ggcagcacct 1950 ccataggaag ccttcctttc tggccaaggt gggcggtgtt agattgtgag 2000 gcacgtacat ggggcctgcc ggaatgactt aaatatttgt ctccagtctc 2050 cactgttggc tctccagcaa ccaaagtaca acactccaag atgggttcat 2100 cttttcttcc tttcccattc acctggctca atcctcctcc accaccaggg 2150 gcctcaaaag gcacatcatc cgggtctcct tatcttgttt gataaggctg 2200 ctgcctgtct ccctctgtgg caaggactgt ttgttctttt gccccatttc 2250 tcaacatagc acacttgtgc actgagagga gggagcatta tgggaaagtc 2300 cctgccttcc acacctctct ctagtccctg tgggacagcc ctagcccctg 2350 ctgtcatgaa ggggccaggc attggtcacc tgtgggacct tctccctcac 2400 tcccctccct cctagttggc tttgtctgtc aggtgcagtc tggcgggagt 2450 ccaggaggca gcagctcagg acatggtgct gtgtgtgtgt gtgtgtgtgt 2500 gtgtgtgtgt gtgtgtgtca gaggttccag aaagttccag atttggaatc 2550 aaacagtcct gaattcaaat ccttgttttt gcacttattg tctggagagc 2600 tttggataag gtattgaatc tctctgagcc tcagtttttc atttgttcaa 2650 atggcactga tgatgtctcc cttacaagat ggttgtgagg agtaaatgtg 2700 atcagcatgt aaagtgtctg gcgtgtagta ggctcttaat aaacactggc 2750 tgaatatgaa ttggaatgat 2770 40 547 PRT Homo Sapien 40 Met Pro Ser Glu Val Ala Arg Gly Lys Arg Ala Ala Leu Phe Phe 1 5 10 15 Ala Ala Val Ala Ile Val Leu Gly Leu Pro Leu Trp Trp Lys Thr 20 25 30 Thr Glu Thr Tyr Arg Ala Ser Leu Pro Tyr Ser Gln Ile Ser Gly 35 40 45 Leu Asn Ala Leu Gln Leu Arg Leu Met Val Pro Val Thr Val Val 50 55 60 Phe Thr Arg Glu Ser Val Pro Leu Asp Asp Gln Glu Lys Leu Pro 65 70 75 Phe Thr Val Val His Glu Arg Glu Ile Pro Leu Lys Tyr Lys Met 80 85 90 Lys Ile Lys Cys Arg Phe Gln Lys Ala Tyr Arg Arg Ala Leu Asp 95 100 105 His Glu Glu Glu Ala Leu Ser Ser Gly Ser Val Gln Glu Ala Glu 110 115 120 Ala Met Leu Asp Glu Pro Gln Glu Gln Ala Glu Gly Ser Leu Thr 125 130 135 Val Tyr Val Ile Ser Glu His Ser Ser Leu Leu Pro Gln Asp Met 140 145 150 Met Ser Tyr Ile Gly Pro Lys Arg Thr Ala Val Val Arg Gly Ile 155 160 165 Met His Arg Glu Ala Phe Asn Ile Ile Gly Arg Arg Ile Val Gln 170 175 180 Val Ala Gln Ala Met Ser Leu Thr Glu Asp Val Leu Ala Ala Ala 185 190 195 Leu Ala Asp His Leu Pro Glu Asp Lys Trp Ser Ala Glu Lys Arg 200 205 210 Arg Pro Leu Lys Ser Ser Leu Gly Tyr Glu Ile Thr Phe Ser Leu 215 220 225 Leu Asn Pro Asp Pro Lys Ser His Asp Val Tyr Trp Asp Ile Glu 230 235 240 Gly Ala Val Arg Arg Tyr Val Gln Pro Phe Leu Asn Ala Leu Gly 245 250 255 Ala Ala Gly Asn Phe Ser Val Asp Ser Gln Ile Leu Tyr Tyr Ala 260 265 270 Met Leu Gly Val Asn Pro Arg Phe Asp Ser Ala Ser Ser Ser Tyr 275 280 285 Tyr Leu Asp Met His Ser Leu Pro His Val Ile Asn Pro Val Glu 290 295 300 Ser Arg Leu Gly Ser Ser Ala Ala Ser Leu Tyr Pro Val Leu Asn 305 310 315 Phe Leu Leu Tyr Val Pro Glu Leu Ala His Ser Pro Leu Tyr Ile 320 325 330 Gln Asp Lys Asp Gly Ala Pro Val Ala Thr Asn Ala Phe His Ser 335 340 345 Pro Arg Trp Gly Gly Ile Met Val Tyr Asn Val Asp Ser Lys Thr 350 355 360 Tyr Asn Ala Ser Val Leu Pro Val Arg Val Glu Val Asp Met Val 365 370 375 Arg Val Met Glu Val Phe Leu Ala Gln Leu Arg Leu Leu Phe Gly 380 385 390 Ile Ala Gln Pro Gln Leu Pro Pro Lys Cys Leu Leu Ser Gly Pro 395 400 405 Thr Ser Glu Gly Leu Met Thr Trp Glu Leu Asp Arg Leu Leu Trp 410 415 420 Ala Arg Ser Val Glu Asn Leu Ala Thr Ala Thr Thr Thr Leu Thr 425 430 435 Ser Leu Ala Gln Leu Leu Gly Lys Ile Ser Asn Ile Val Ile Lys 440 445 450 Asp Asp Val Ala Ser Glu Val Tyr Lys Ala Val Ala Ala Val Gln 455 460 465 Lys Ser Ala Glu Glu Leu Ala Ser Gly His Leu Ala Ser Ala Phe 470 475 480 Val Ala Ser Gln Glu Ala Val Thr Ser Ser Glu Leu Ala Phe Phe 485 490 495 Asp Pro Ser Leu Leu His Leu Leu Tyr Phe Pro Asp Asp Gln Lys 500 505 510 Phe Ala Ile Tyr Ile Pro Leu Phe Leu Pro Met Ala Val Pro Ile 515 520 525 Leu Leu Ser Leu Val Lys Ile Phe Leu Glu Thr Arg Lys Ser Trp 530 535 540 Arg Lys Pro Glu Lys Thr Asp 545 41 1964 DNA Homo Sapien 41 ccagctgcag agaggaggag gtgagctgca gagaagagga ggttggtgtg 50 gagcacaggc agcaccgagc ctgccccgtg agctgagggc ctgcagtctg 100 cggctggaat caggatagac accaaggcag gacccccaga gatgctgaag 150 cctctttgga aagcagcagt ggcccccaca tggccatgct ccatgccgcc 200 ccgccgcccg tgggacagag aggctggcac gttgcaggtc ctgggagcgc 250 tggctgtgct gtggctgggc tccgtggctc ttatctgcct cctgtggcaa 300 gtgccccgtc ctcccacctg gggccaggtg cagcccaagg acgtgcccag 350 gtcctgggag catggctcca gcccagcttg ggagcccctg gaagcagagg 400 ccaggcagca gagggactcc tgccagcttg tccttgtgga aagcatcccc 450 caggacctgc catctgcagc cggcagcccc tctgcccagc ctctgggcca 500 ggcctggctg cagctgctgg acactgccca ggagagcgtc cacgtggctt 550 catactactg gtccctcaca gggcctgaca tcggggtcaa cgactcgtct 600 tcccagctgg gagaggctct tctgcagaag ctgcagcagc tgctgggcag 650 gaacatttcc ctggctgtgg ccaccagcag cccgacactg gccaggacat 700 ccaccgacct gcaggttctg gctgcccgag gtgcccatgt acgacaggtg 750 cccatggggc ggctcaccag gggtgttttg cactccaaat tctgggttgt 800 ggatggacgg cacatataca tgggcagtgc caacatggac tggcggtctc 850 tgacgcaggt gaaggagctt ggcgctgtca tctataactg cagccacctg 900 gcccaagacc tggagaagac cttccagacc tactgggtac tgggggtgcc 950 caaggctgtc ctccccaaaa cctggcctca gaacttctca tctcacttca 1000 accgtttcca gcccttccac ggcctctttg atggggtgcc caccactgcc 1050 tacttctcag cgtcgccacc agcactctgt ccccagggcc gcacccggga 1100 cctggaggcg ctgctggcgg tgatggggag cgcccaggag ttcatctatg 1150 cctccgtgat ggagtatttc cccaccacgc gcttcagcca ccccccgagg 1200 tactggccgg tgctggacaa cgcgctgcgg gcggcagcct tcggcaaggg 1250 cgtgcgcgtg cgcctgctgg tcggctgcgg actcaacacg gaccccacca 1300 tgttccccta cctgcggtcc ctgcaggcgc tcagcaaccc cgcggccaac 1350 gtctctgtgg acgtgaaagt cttcatcgtg ccggtgggga accattccaa 1400 catcccattc agcagggtga accacagcaa gttcatggtc acggagaagg 1450 cagcctacat aggcacctcc aactggtcgg aggattactt cagcagcacg 1500 gcgggggtgg gcttggtggt cacccagagc cctggcgcgc agcccgcggg 1550 ggccacggtg caggagcagc tgcggcagct ctttgagcgg gactggagtt 1600 cgcgctacgc cgtcggcctg gacggacagg ctccgggcca ggactgcgtt 1650 tggcagggct gaggggggcc tctttttctc tcggcgaccc cgccccgcac 1700 gcgccctccc ctctgacccc ggcctgggct tcagccgctt cctcccgcaa 1750 gcagcccggg tccgcactgc gccaggagcc gcctgcgacc gcccgggcgt 1800 cgcaaaccgc ccgcctgctc tctgatttcc gagtccagcc ccccctgagc 1850 cccacctcct ccagggagcc ctccaggaag ccccttccct gactcctggc 1900 ccacaggcca ggcctaaaaa aaactcgtgg cttcaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 1950 aaaaaaaaaa aaaa 1964 42 489 PRT Homo Sapien 42 Met Pro Pro Arg Arg Pro Trp Asp Arg Glu Ala Gly Thr Leu Gln 1 5 10 15 Val Leu Gly Ala Leu Ala Val Leu Trp Leu Gly Ser Val Ala Leu 20 25 30 Ile Cys Leu Leu Trp Gln Val Pro Arg Pro Pro Thr Trp Gly Gln 35 40 45 Val Gln Pro Lys Asp Val Pro Arg Ser Trp Glu His Gly Ser Ser 50 55 60 Pro Ala Trp Glu Pro Leu Glu Ala Glu Ala Arg Gln Gln Arg Asp 65 70 75 Ser Cys Gln Leu Val Leu Val Glu Ser Ile Pro Gln Asp Leu Pro 80 85 90 Ser Ala Ala Gly Ser Pro Ser Ala Gln Pro Leu Gly Gln Ala Trp 95 100 105 Leu Gln Leu Leu Asp Thr Ala Gln Glu Ser Val His Val Ala Ser 110 115 120 Tyr Tyr Trp Ser Leu Thr Gly Pro Asp Ile Gly Val Asn Asp Ser 125 130 135 Ser Ser Gln Leu Gly Glu Ala Leu Leu Gln Lys Leu Gln Gln Leu 140 145 150 Leu Gly Arg Asn Ile Ser Leu Ala Val Ala Thr Ser Ser Pro Thr 155 160 165 Leu Ala Arg Thr Ser Thr Asp Leu Gln Val Leu Ala Ala Arg Gly 170 175 180 Ala His Val Arg Gln Val Pro Met Gly Arg Leu Thr Arg Gly Val 185 190 195 Leu His Ser Lys Phe Trp Val Val Asp Gly Arg His Ile Tyr Met 200 205 210 Gly Ser Ala Asn Met Asp Trp Arg Ser Leu Thr Gln Val Lys Glu 215 220 225 Leu Gly Ala Val Ile Tyr Asn Cys Ser His Leu Ala Gln Asp Leu 230 235 240 Glu Lys Thr Phe Gln Thr Tyr Trp Val Leu Gly Val Pro Lys Ala 245 250 255 Val Leu Pro Lys Thr Trp Pro Gln Asn Phe Ser Ser His Phe Asn 260 265 270 Arg Phe Gln Pro Phe His Gly Leu Phe Asp Gly Val Pro Thr Thr 275 280 285 Ala Tyr Phe Ser Ala Ser Pro Pro Ala Leu Cys Pro Gln Gly Arg 290 295 300 Thr Arg Asp Leu Glu Ala Leu Leu Ala Val Met Gly Ser Ala Gln 305 310 315 Glu Phe Ile Tyr Ala Ser Val Met Glu Tyr Phe Pro Thr Thr Arg 320 325 330 Phe Ser His Pro Pro Arg Tyr Trp Pro Val Leu Asp Asn Ala Leu 335 340 345 Arg Ala Ala Ala Phe Gly Lys Gly Val Arg Val Arg Leu Leu Val 350 355 360 Gly Cys Gly Leu Asn Thr Asp Pro Thr Met Phe Pro Tyr Leu Arg 365 370 375 Ser Leu Gln Ala Leu Ser Asn Pro Ala Ala Asn Val Ser Val Asp 380 385 390 Val Lys Val Phe Ile Val Pro Val Gly Asn His Ser Asn Ile Pro 395 400 405 Phe Ser Arg Val Asn His Ser Lys Phe Met Val Thr Glu Lys Ala 410 415 420 Ala Tyr Ile Gly Thr Ser Asn Trp Ser Glu Asp Tyr Phe Ser Ser 425 430 435 Thr Ala Gly Val Gly Leu Val Val Thr Gln Ser Pro Gly Ala Gln 440 445 450 Pro Ala Gly Ala Thr Val Gln Glu Gln Leu Arg Gln Leu Phe Glu 455 460 465 Arg Asp Trp Ser Ser Arg Tyr Ala Val Gly Leu Asp Gly Gln Ala 470 475 480 Pro Gly Gln Asp Cys Val Trp Gln Gly 485 43 1130 DNA Homo Sapien 43 gggcctggcg atccggatcc cgcaggcgcg ctggctgcgc tgcccggctg 50 tctgtcgtca tggtggggcc ctgggtgtat ctggtggcgg cagttttgct 100 catcggcctg atcctcttcc tgactcgcag ccggggtcgg gcggcagcag 150 ctgacggaga accactgcac aatgaggaag agagggcagg agcaggccag 200 gtaggccgct ctttgcccca ggagtctgaa gaacagagaa ctggaagcag 250 accccggcgt cggagggact tgggcagccg tctacaggcc cagcgtcgag 300 cccagcgagt ggcctgggaa gacggggatg agaatgtggg tcaaactgtt 350 attccagccc aggaggaaga aggcattgag aagccagcag aagttcaccc 400 aacagggaaa attggagcca agaaactacg gaagctagag gaaaaacagg 450 ctcgaaaggc tcagcgagag gcagaggagg ctgaacgtga agaacggaaa 500 cgcctagagt cccaacgtga ggccgaatgg aagaaggaag aggaacggct 550 tcgcctgaag gaagaacaga aggaggagga agagaggaag gctcaggagg 600 agcaggcccg gcgggatcac gaggagtacc tgaaactgaa ggaggccttc 650 gtggtagaag aagaaggtgt tagcgaaacc atgactgagg agcagtctca 700 cagcttcctg acagaattca tcaattacat caagaagtcc aaggttgtgc 750 ttttggaaga tctggctttc cagatgggcc taaggactca ggacgccata 800 aaccgcatcc aggacctgct gacggagggg actctaacag gtgtgattga 850 cgaccggggc aagtttatct acataacccc agaggaactg gctgccgtgg 900 ccaatttcat ccgacagcgg ggccgggtgt ccatcacaga gcttgcccag 950 gccagcaact ccctcatctc ctggggccag gacctccctg cccaggcttc 1000 agcctgactc cagtccttcc ttgagtgtat cctgtggcct acatgtgtct 1050 tcatccttcc ctaatgccgt cttggggcag ggatggaata tgaccagaaa 1100 gttgtggatt aaaggcctgt gaatactgaa 1130 44 315 PRT Homo Sapien 44 Met Val Gly Pro Trp Val Tyr Leu Val Ala Ala Val Leu Leu Ile 1 5 10 15 Gly Leu Ile Leu Phe Leu Thr Arg Ser Arg Gly Arg Ala Ala Ala 20 25 30 Ala Asp Gly Glu Pro Leu His Asn Glu Glu Glu Arg Ala Gly Ala 35 40 45 Gly Gln Val Gly Arg Ser Leu Pro Gln Glu Ser Glu Glu Gln Arg 50 55 60 Thr Gly Ser Arg Pro Arg Arg Arg Arg Asp Leu Gly Ser Arg Leu 65 70 75 Gln Ala Gln Arg Arg Ala Gln Arg Val Ala Trp Glu Asp Gly Asp 80 85 90 Glu Asn Val Gly Gln Thr Val Ile Pro Ala Gln Glu Glu Glu Gly 95 100 105 Ile Glu Lys Pro Ala Glu Val His Pro Thr Gly Lys Ile Gly Ala 110 115 120 Lys Lys Leu Arg Lys Leu Glu Glu Lys Gln Ala Arg Lys Ala Gln 125 130 135 Arg Glu Ala Glu Glu Ala Glu Arg Glu Glu Arg Lys Arg Leu Glu 140 145 150 Ser Gln Arg Glu Ala Glu Trp Lys Lys Glu Glu Glu Arg Leu Arg 155 160 165 Leu Lys Glu Glu Gln Lys Glu Glu Glu Glu Arg Lys Ala Gln Glu 170 175 180 Glu Gln Ala Arg Arg Asp His Glu Glu Tyr Leu Lys Leu Lys Glu 185 190 195 Ala Phe Val Val Glu Glu Glu Gly Val Ser Glu Thr Met Thr Glu 200 205 210 Glu Gln Ser His Ser Phe Leu Thr Glu Phe Ile Asn Tyr Ile Lys 215 220 225 Lys Ser Lys Val Val Leu Leu Glu Asp Leu Ala Phe Gln Met Gly 230 235 240 Leu Arg Thr Gln Asp Ala Ile Asn Arg Ile Gln Asp Leu Leu Thr 245 250 255 Glu Gly Thr Leu Thr Gly Val Ile Asp Asp Arg Gly Lys Phe Ile 260 265 270 Tyr Ile Thr Pro Glu Glu Leu Ala Ala Val Ala Asn Phe Ile Arg 275 280 285 Gln Arg Gly Arg Val Ser Ile Thr Glu Leu Ala Gln Ala Ser Asn 290 295 300 Ser Leu Ile Ser Trp Gly Gln Asp Leu Pro Ala Gln Ala Ser Ala 305 310 315 45 1977 DNA Homo Sapien 45 acgggccgca gcggcagtga cgtagggttg gcgcacggat ccgttgcggc 50 tgcagctctg cagtcgggcc gttccttcgc cgccgccagg ggtagcggtg 100 tagctgcgca gcgtcgcgcg cgctaccgca cccaggttcg gcccgtaggc 150 gtctggcagc ccggcgccat cttcatcgag cgccatggcc gcagcctgcg 200 ggccgggagc ggccgggtac tgcttgctcc tcggcttgca tttgtttctg 250 ctgaccgcgg gccctgccct gggctggaac gaccctgaca gaatgttgct 300 gcgggatgta aaagctctta ccctccacta tgaccgctat accacctccc 350 gcaggctgga tcccatccca cagttgaaat gtgttggagg cacagctggt 400 tgtgattctt ataccccaaa agtcatacag tgtcagaaca aaggctggga 450 tgggtatgat gtacagtggg aatgtaagac ggacttagat attgcataca 500 aatttggaaa aactgtggtg agctgtgaag gctatgagtc ctctgaagac 550 cagtatgtac taagaggttc ttgtggcttg gagtataatt tagattatac 600 agaacttggc ctgcagaaac tgaaggagtc tggaaagcag cacggctttg 650 cctctttctc tgattattat tataagtggt cctcggcgga ttcctgtaac 700 atgagtggat tgattaccat cgtggtactc cttgggatcg cctttgtagt 750 ctataagctg ttcctgagtg acgggcagta ttctcctcca ccgtactctg 800 agtatcctcc attttcccac cgttaccaga gattcaccaa ctcagcagga 850 cctcctcccc caggctttaa gtctgagttc acaggaccac agaatactgg 900 ccatggtgca acttctggtt ttggcagtgc ttttacagga caacaaggat 950 atgaaaattc aggaccaggg ttctggacag gcttgggaac tggtggaata 1000 ctaggatatt tgtttggcag caatagagcg gcaacaccct tctcagactc 1050 gtggtactac ccgtcctatc ctccctccta ccctggcacg tggaataggg 1100 cttactcacc ccttcatgga ggctcgggca gctattcggt atgttcaaac 1150 tcagacacga aaaccagaac tgcatcagga tatggtggta ccaggagacg 1200 ataaagtaga aagttggagt caaacactgg atgcagaaat tttggatttt 1250 tcatcacttt ctctttagaa aaaaagtact acctgttaac aattgggaaa 1300 aggggatatt caaaagttct gtggtgttat gtccagtgta gctttttgta 1350 ttctattatt tgaggctaaa agttgatgtg tgacaaaata cttatgtgtt 1400 gtatgtcagt gtaacatgca gatgtatatt gcagtttttg aaagtgatca 1450 ttactgtgga atgctaaaaa tacattaatt tctaaaacct gtgatgccct 1500 aagaagcatt aagaatgaag gtgttgtact aatagaaact aagtacagaa 1550 aatttcagtt ttaggtggtt gtagctgatg agttattacc tcatagagac 1600 tataatattc tatttggtat tatattattt gatgtttgct gttcttcaaa 1650 catttaaatc aagctttgga ctaattatgc taatttgtga gttctgatca 1700 cttttgagct ctgaagcttt gaatcattca gtggtggaga tggccttctg 1750 gtaactgaat attaccttct gtaggaaaag gtggaaaata agcatctaga 1800 aggttgttgt gaatgactct gtgctggcaa aaatgcttga aacctctata 1850 tttctttcgt tcataagagg taaaggtcaa atttttcaac aaaagtcttt 1900 taataacaaa agcatgcagt tctctgtgaa atctcaaata ttgttgtaat 1950 agtctgtttc aatcttaaaa agaatca 1977 46 339 PRT Homo Sapien 46 Met Ala Ala Ala Cys Gly Pro Gly Ala Ala Gly Tyr Cys Leu Leu 1 5 10 15 Leu Gly Leu His Leu Phe Leu Leu Thr Ala Gly Pro Ala Leu Gly 20 25 30 Trp Asn Asp Pro Asp Arg Met Leu Leu Arg Asp Val Lys Ala Leu 35 40 45 Thr Leu His Tyr Asp Arg Tyr Thr Thr Ser Arg Arg Leu Asp Pro 50 55 60 Ile Pro Gln Leu Lys Cys Val Gly Gly Thr Ala Gly Cys Asp Ser 65 70 75 Tyr Thr Pro Lys Val Ile Gln Cys Gln Asn Lys Gly Trp Asp Gly 80 85 90 Tyr Asp Val Gln Trp Glu Cys Lys Thr Asp Leu Asp Ile Ala Tyr 95 100 105 Lys Phe Gly Lys Thr Val Val Ser Cys Glu Gly Tyr Glu Ser Ser 110 115 120 Glu Asp Gln Tyr Val Leu Arg Gly Ser Cys Gly Leu Glu Tyr Asn 125 130 135 Leu Asp Tyr Thr Glu Leu Gly Leu Gln Lys Leu Lys Glu Ser Gly 140 145 150 Lys Gln His Gly Phe Ala Ser Phe Ser Asp Tyr Tyr Tyr Lys Trp 155 160 165 Ser Ser Ala Asp Ser Cys Asn Met Ser Gly Leu Ile Thr Ile Val 170 175 180 Val Leu Leu Gly Ile Ala Phe Val Val Tyr Lys Leu Phe Leu Ser 185 190 195 Asp Gly Gln Tyr Ser Pro Pro Pro Tyr Ser Glu Tyr Pro Pro Phe 200 205 210 Ser His Arg Tyr Gln Arg Phe Thr Asn Ser Ala Gly Pro Pro Pro 215 220 225 Pro Gly Phe Lys Ser Glu Phe Thr Gly Pro Gln Asn Thr Gly His 230 235 240 Gly Ala Thr Ser Gly Phe Gly Ser Ala Phe Thr Gly Gln Gln Gly 245 250 255 Tyr Glu Asn Ser Gly Pro Gly Phe Trp Thr Gly Leu Gly Thr Gly 260 265 270 Gly Ile Leu Gly Tyr Leu Phe Gly Ser Asn Arg Ala Ala Thr Pro 275 280 285 Phe Ser Asp Ser Trp Tyr Tyr Pro Ser Tyr Pro Pro Ser Tyr Pro 290 295 300 Gly Thr Trp Asn Arg Ala Tyr Ser Pro Leu His Gly Gly Ser Gly 305 310 315 Ser Tyr Ser Val Cys Ser Asn Ser Asp Thr Lys Thr Arg Thr Ala 320 325 330 Ser Gly Tyr Gly Gly Thr Arg Arg Arg 335 47 1766 DNA Homo Sapien 47 cccggagccg gggagggagg gagcgaggtt cggacaccgg cggcggctgc 50 ctggcctttc catgagcccg cggcggaccc tcccgcgccc cctctcgctc 100 tgcctctccc tctgcctctg cctctgcctg gccgcggctc tgggaagtgc 150 gcagtccggg tcgtgtaggg ataaaaagaa ctgtaaggtg gtcttttccc 200 agcaggaact gaggaagcgg ctaacacccc tgcagtacca tgtcactcag 250 gagaaaggga ccgaaagtgc ctttgaagga gaatacacac atcacaaaga 300 tcctggaata tataaatgtg ttgtttgtgg aactccattg tttaagtcag 350 aaaccaaatt tgactccggt tcaggttggc cttcattcca cgatgtgatc 400 aattctgagg caatcacatt cacagatgac ttttcctatg ggatgcacag 450 ggtggaaaca agctgctctc agtgtggtgc tcaccttggg cacatttttg 500 atgatgggcc tcgtccaact gggaaaagat actgcataaa ttcggctgcc 550 ttgtctttta cacctgcgga tagcagtggc accgccgagg gaggcagtgg 600 ggtcgccagc ccggcccagg cagacaaagc ggagctctag agtaatggag 650 agtgatggaa acaaagtgta cttaatgcac agcttattaa aaaaatcaaa 700 attgttatct taatagatat attttttcaa aaactataag ggcagttttg 750 tgctattgat attttttctt cttttgctta aacagaagcc ctggccatcc 800 atgtattttg caattgacta gatcaagaac tgtttatagc tttagcaaat 850 ggagacagct ttgtgaaact tcttcacaag ccacttatac cctttggcat 900 tcttttcttt gagcacatgg cttcttttgc agtttttccc cctttgattc 950 agaagcagag ggttcatggt cttcaaacat gaaaatagag atctcctctg 1000 cagtgtagag accagagctg ggcagtgcag ggcatggaga cctgcaagac 1050 acatggcctt gaggcctttg cacagaccca cctaagataa ggttggagtg 1100 atgttttaat gagactgttc agctttgtgg aaagtttgag ctaaggtcat 1150 tttttttttt ctcactgaaa gggtgtgaag gtctaaagtc tttccttatg 1200 ttaaattgtt gccagatcca aaggggcata ctgagtgttg tggcagagaa 1250 gtaaacatta ccacactgtt aggcctttat tttattttat tttccatcga 1300 aagcattgga ggcccagtgc aatggctcac gcctgtgatc ccagcacttt 1350 gggaggccaa ggcgggtgga tcacgaggtc aggagatgga gaccatcctg 1400 gctaacatgg tgaaaccccg tctctactaa aaatacgaaa aattagccag 1450 gcgtggtggt gggcacctgt agtcccagct actcaggagg ctgaggcagg 1500 agaatggcgt gaacccggaa ggcggagctt gcagttagcc gagatcatgc 1550 cactgcactc cagcctacat gacaatgtga cactccatct caaaaaataa 1600 taataataac aatataagaa ctagctgggc atggtggcgc atgcatgtag 1650 tcccagctac tcctgaggct cagtcaggag aatcgcttga acttgggagg 1700 cggaggttgc agtgagctga gctcatacca ctgcactcca gcctgaacag 1750 agtgagatcc tgtcaa 1766 48 192 PRT Homo Sapien 48 Met Ser Pro Arg Arg Thr Leu Pro Arg Pro Leu Ser Leu Cys Leu 1 5 10 15 Ser Leu Cys Leu Cys Leu Cys Leu Ala Ala Ala Leu Gly Ser Ala 20 25 30 Gln Ser Gly Ser Cys Arg Asp Lys Lys Asn Cys Lys Val Val Phe 35 40 45 Ser Gln Gln Glu Leu Arg Lys Arg Leu Thr Pro Leu Gln Tyr His 50 55 60 Val Thr Gln Glu Lys Gly Thr Glu Ser Ala Phe Glu Gly Glu Tyr 65 70 75 Thr His His Lys Asp Pro Gly Ile Tyr Lys Cys Val Val Cys Gly 80 85 90 Thr Pro Leu Phe Lys Ser Glu Thr Lys Phe Asp Ser Gly Ser Gly 95 100 105 Trp Pro Ser Phe His Asp Val Ile Asn Ser Glu Ala Ile Thr Phe 110 115 120 Thr Asp Asp Phe Ser Tyr Gly Met His Arg Val Glu Thr Ser Cys 125 130 135 Ser Gln Cys Gly Ala His Leu Gly His Ile Phe Asp Asp Gly Pro 140 145 150 Arg Pro Thr Gly Lys Arg Tyr Cys Ile Asn Ser Ala Ala Leu Ser 155 160 165 Phe Thr Pro Ala Asp Ser Ser Gly Thr Ala Glu Gly Gly Ser Gly 170 175 180 Val Ala Ser Pro Ala Gln Ala Asp Lys Ala Glu Leu 185 190 49 2065 DNA Homo Sapien 49 cccaaagagg tgaggagccg gcagcggggg cggctgtaac tgtgaggaag 50 gctgcagagt ggcgacgtct acgccgtagg ttggaggctg tggggggtgg 100 ccgggcgcca gctcccaggc cgcagaagtg acctgcggtg gagttccctc 150 ctcgctgctg gagaacggag ggagaaggtt gctggccggg tgaaagtgcc 200 tccctctgct tgacggggct gaggggcccg aagtctaggg cgtccgtagt 250 cgccccggcc tccgtgaagc cccaggtcta gagatatgac ccgagagtgc 300 ccatctccgg ccccggggcc tggggctccg ctgagtggat cggtgctggc 350 agaggcggca gtagtgtttg cagtggtgct gagcatccac gcaaccgtat 400 gggaccgata ctcgtggtgc gccgtggccc tcgcagtgca ggccttctac 450 gtccaataca agtgggaccg gctgctacag cagggaagcg ccgtcttcca 500 gttccgaatg tccgcaaaca gtggcctatt gcccgcctcc atggtcatgc 550 ctttgcttgg actagtcatg aaggagcggt gccagactgc tgggaacccg 600 ttctttgagc gttttggcat tgtggtggca gccactggca tggcagtggc 650 cctcttctca tcagtgttgg cgctcggcat cactcgccca gtgccaacca 700 acacttgtgt catcttgggc ttggctggag gtgttatcat ttatatcatg 750 aagcactcgt tgagcgtggg ggaggtgatc gaagtcctgg aagtccttct 800 gatcttcgtt tatctcaaca tgatcctgct gtacctgctg ccccgctgct 850 tcacccctgg tgaggcactg ctggtattgg gtggcattag ctttgtcctc 900 aaccagctca tcaagcgctc tctgacactg gtggaaagtc agggggaccc 950 agtggacttc ttcctgctgg tggtggtagt agggatggta ctcatgggca 1000 ttttcttcag cactctgttt gtcttcatgg actcaggcac ctgggcctcc 1050 tccatcttct tccacctcat gacctgtgtg ctgagccttg gtgtggtcct 1100 accctggctg caccggctca tccgcaggaa tcccctgctc tggcttcttc 1150 agtttctctt ccagacagac acccgcatct acctcctagc ctattggtct 1200 ctgctggcca ccttggcctg cctggtggtg ctgtaccaga atgccaagcg 1250 gtcatcttcc gagtccaaga agcaccaggc ccccaccatc gcccgaaagt 1300 atttccacct cattgtggta gccacctaca tcccaggtat catctttgac 1350 cggccactgc tctatgtagc cgccactgta tgcctggcgg tcttcatctt 1400 cctggagtat gtgcgctact tccgcatcaa gcctttgggt cacactctac 1450 ggagcttcct gtcccttttt ctggatgaac gagacagtgg accactcatt 1500 ctgacacaca tctacctgct cctgggcatg tctcttccca tctggctgat 1550 ccccagaccc tgcacacaga agggtagcct gggaggagcc agggccctcg 1600 tcccctatgc cggtgtcctg gctgtgggtg tgggtgatac tgtggcctcc 1650 atcttcggta gcaccatggg ggagatccgc tggcctggaa ccaaaaagac 1700 ttttgagggg accatgacat ctatatttgc gcagatcatt tctgtagctc 1750 tgatcttaat ctttgacagt ggagtggacc taaactacag ttatgcttgg 1800 attttggggt ccatcagcac tgtgtccctc ctggaagcat acactacaca 1850 gatagacaat ctccttctgc ctctctacct cctgatattg ctgatggcct 1900 agctgttaca gtgcagcagc agtgacggag gaaacagaca tggggagggt 1950 gaacagtccc cacagcagac agctacttgg gcatgaagag ccaaggtgtg 2000 aaaagcagat ttgatttttc agttgattca gatttaaaat aaaaagcaaa 2050 gctctcctag ttcta 2065 50 538 PRT Homo Sapien 50 Met Thr Arg Glu Cys Pro Ser Pro Ala Pro Gly Pro Gly Ala Pro 1 5 10 15 Leu Ser Gly Ser Val Leu Ala Glu Ala Ala Val Val Phe Ala Val 20 25 30 Val Leu Ser Ile His Ala Thr Val Trp Asp Arg Tyr Ser Trp Cys 35 40 45 Ala Val Ala Leu Ala Val Gln Ala Phe Tyr Val Gln Tyr Lys Trp 50 55 60 Asp Arg Leu Leu Gln Gln Gly Ser Ala Val Phe Gln Phe Arg Met 65 70 75 Ser Ala Asn Ser Gly Leu Leu Pro Ala Ser Met Val Met Pro Leu 80 85 90 Leu Gly Leu Val Met Lys Glu Arg Cys Gln Thr Ala Gly Asn Pro 95 100 105 Phe Phe Glu Arg Phe Gly Ile Val Val Ala Ala Thr Gly Met Ala 110 115 120 Val Ala Leu Phe Ser Ser Val Leu Ala Leu Gly Ile Thr Arg Pro 125 130 135 Val Pro Thr Asn Thr Cys Val Ile Leu Gly Leu Ala Gly Gly Val 140 145 150 Ile Ile Tyr Ile Met Lys His Ser Leu Ser Val Gly Glu Val Ile 155 160 165 Glu Val Leu Glu Val Leu Leu Ile Phe Val Tyr Leu Asn Met Ile 170 175 180 Leu Leu Tyr Leu Leu Pro Arg Cys Phe Thr Pro Gly Glu Ala Leu 185 190 195 Leu Val Leu Gly Gly Ile Ser Phe Val Leu Asn Gln Leu Ile Lys 200 205 210 Arg Ser Leu Thr Leu Val Glu Ser Gln Gly Asp Pro Val Asp Phe 215 220 225 Phe Leu Leu Val Val Val Val Gly Met Val Leu Met Gly Ile Phe 230 235 240 Phe Ser Thr Leu Phe Val Phe Met Asp Ser Gly Thr Trp Ala Ser 245 250 255 Ser Ile Phe Phe His Leu Met Thr Cys Val Leu Ser Leu Gly Val 260 265 270 Val Leu Pro Trp Leu His Arg Leu Ile Arg Arg Asn Pro Leu Leu 275 280 285 Trp Leu Leu Gln Phe Leu Phe Gln Thr Asp Thr Arg Ile Tyr Leu 290 295 300 Leu Ala Tyr Trp Ser Leu Leu Ala Thr Leu Ala Cys Leu Val Val 305 310 315 Leu Tyr Gln Asn Ala Lys Arg Ser Ser Ser Glu Ser Lys Lys His 320 325 330 Gln Ala Pro Thr Ile Ala Arg Lys Tyr Phe His Leu Ile Val Val 335 340 345 Ala Thr Tyr Ile Pro Gly Ile Ile Phe Asp Arg Pro Leu Leu Tyr 350 355 360 Val Ala Ala Thr Val Cys Leu Ala Val Phe Ile Phe Leu Glu Tyr 365 370 375 Val Arg Tyr Phe Arg Ile Lys Pro Leu Gly His Thr Leu Arg Ser 380 385 390 Phe Leu Ser Leu Phe Leu Asp Glu Arg Asp Ser Gly Pro Leu Ile 395 400 405 Leu Thr His Ile Tyr Leu Leu Leu Gly Met Ser Leu Pro Ile Trp 410 415 420 Leu Ile Pro Arg Pro Cys Thr Gln Lys Gly Ser Leu Gly Gly Ala 425 430 435 Arg Ala Leu Val Pro Tyr Ala Gly Val Leu Ala Val Gly Val Gly 440 445 450 Asp Thr Val Ala Ser Ile Phe Gly Ser Thr Met Gly Glu Ile Arg 455 460 465 Trp Pro Gly Thr Lys Lys Thr Phe Glu Gly Thr Met Thr Ser Ile 470 475 480 Phe Ala Gln Ile Ile Ser Val Ala Leu Ile Leu Ile Phe Asp Ser 485 490 495 Gly Val Asp Leu Asn Tyr Ser Tyr Ala Trp Ile Leu Gly Ser Ile 500 505 510 Ser Thr Val Ser Leu Leu Glu Ala Tyr Thr Thr Gln Ile Asp Asn 515 520 525 Leu Leu Leu Pro Leu Tyr Leu Leu Ile Leu Leu Met Ala 530 535 51 3476 DNA Homo Sapien 51 gctctatgcc gcctaccttg ctctcgccgc tgctgccgga gccgaagcag 50 agaaggcagc gggtcccgtg accgtcccga gagccccgcg ctcccgacca 100 gggggcgggg gcggccccgg ggagggcggg gcaggggcgg ggggaagaaa 150 gggggttttg tgctgcgccg ggagggccgg cgccctcttc cgaatgtcct 200 gcggccccag cctctcctca cgctcgcgca gtctccgccg cagtctcagc 250 tgcagctgca ggactgagcc gtgcacccgg aggagacccc cggaggaggc 300 gacaaacttc gcagtgccgc gacccaaccc cagccctggg tagcctgcag 350 catggcccag ctgttcctgc ccctgctggc agccctggtc ctggcccagg 400 ctcctgcagc tttagcagat gttctggaag gagacagctc agaggaccgc 450 gcttttcgcg tgcgcatcgc gggcgacgcg ccactgcagg gcgtgctcgg 500 cggcgccctc accatccctt gccacgtcca ctacctgcgg ccaccgccga 550 gccgccgggc tgtgctgggc tctccgcggg tcaagtggac tttcctgtcc 600 cggggccggg aggcagaggt gctggtggcg cggggagtgc gcgtcaaggt 650 gaacgaggcc taccggttcc gcgtggcact gcctgcgtac ccagcgtcgc 700 tcaccgacgt ctccctggcg ctgagcgagc tgcgccccaa cgactcaggt 750 atctatcgct gtgaggtcca gcacggcatc gatgacagca gcgacgctgt 800 ggaggtcaag gtcaaagggg tcgtctttct ctaccgagag ggctctgccc 850 gctatgcttt ctccttttct ggggcccagg aggcctgtgc ccgcattgga 900 gcccacatcg ccaccccgga gcagctctat gccgcctacc ttgggggcta 950 tgagcaatgt gatgctggct ggctgtcgga tcagaccgtg aggtatccca 1000 tccagacccc acgagaggcc tgttacggag acatggatgg cttccccggg 1050 gtccggaact atggtgtggt ggacccggat gacctctatg atgtgtactg 1100 ttatgctgaa gacctaaatg gagaactgtt cctgggtgac cctccagaga 1150 agctgacatt ggaggaagca cgggcgtact gccaggagcg gggtgcagag 1200 attgccacca cgggccaact gtatgcagcc tgggatggtg gcctggacca 1250 ctgcagccca gggtggctag ctgatggcag tgtgcgctac cccatcgtca 1300 cacccagcca gcgctgtggt gggggcttgc ctggtgtcaa gactctcttc 1350 ctcttcccca accagactgg cttccccaat aagcacagcc gcttcaacgt 1400 ctactgcttc cgagactcgg cccagccttc tgccatccct gaggcctcca 1450 acccagcctc caacccagcc tctgatggac tagaggctat cgtcacagtg 1500 acagagaccc tggaggaact gcagctgcct caggaagcca cagagagtga 1550 atcccgtggg gccatctact ccatccccat catggaggac ggaggaggtg 1600 gaagctccac tccagaagac ccagcagagg cccctaggac gctcctagaa 1650 tttgaaacac aatccatggt accgcccacg gggttctcag aagaggaagg 1700 taaggcattg gaggaagaag agaaatatga agatgaagaa gagaaagagg 1750 aggaagaaga agaggaggag gtggaggatg aggctctgtg ggcatggccc 1800 agcgagctca gcagcccggg ccctgaggcc tctctcccca ctgagccagc 1850 agcccaggag aagtcactct cccaggcgcc agcaagggca gtcctgcagc 1900 ctggtgcatc accacttcct gatggagagt cagaagcttc caggcctcca 1950 agggtccatg gaccacctac tgagactctg cccactccca gggagaggaa 2000 cctagcatcc ccatcacctt ccactctggt tgaggcaaga gaggtggggg 2050 aggcaactgg tggtcctgag ctatctgggg tccctcgagg agagagcgag 2100 gagacaggaa gctccgaggg tgccccttcc ctgcttccag ccacacgggc 2150 ccctgagggt accagggagc tggaggcccc ctctgaagat aattctggaa 2200 gaactgcccc agcagggacc tcagtgcagg cccagccagt gctgcccact 2250 gacagcgcca gccgaggtgg agtggccgtg gtccccgcat caggtgactg 2300 tgtccccagc ccctgccaca atggtgggac atgcttggag gaggaggaag 2350 gggtccgctg cctatgtctg cctggctatg ggggggacct gtgcgatgtt 2400 ggcctccgct tctgcaaccc cggctgggac gccttccagg gcgcctgcta 2450 caagcacttt tccacacgaa ggagctggga ggaggcagag acccagtgcc 2500 ggatgtacgg cgcgcatctg gccagcatca gcacacccga ggaacaggac 2550 ttcatcaaca accggtaccg ggagtaccag tggatcggac tcaacgacag 2600 gaccatcgaa ggcgacttct tgtggtcgga tggcgtcccc ctgctctatg 2650 agaactggaa ccctgggcag cctgacagct acttcctgtc tggagagaac 2700 tgcgtggtca tggtgtggca tgatcaggga caatggagtg acgtgccctg 2750 caactaccac ctgtcctaca cctgcaagat ggggctggtg tcctgtgggc 2800 cgccaccgga gctgcccctg gctcaagtgt tcggccgccc acggctgcgc 2850 tatgaggtgg acactgtgct tcgctaccgg tgccgggaag gactggccca 2900 gcgcaatctg ccgctgatcc gatgccaaga gaacggtcgt tgggaggccc 2950 cccagatctc ctgtgtgccc agaagacctg cccgagctct gcacccagag 3000 gaggacccag aaggacgtca ggggaggcta ctgggacgct ggaaggcgct 3050 gttgatcccc ccttccagcc ccatgccagg tccctagggg gcaaggcctt 3100 gaacactgcc ggccacagca ctgccctgtc acccaaattt tccctcacac 3150 cttgcgctcc cgccaccaca ggaagtgaca acatgacgag gggtggtgct 3200 ggagtccagg tgacagttcc tgaaggggct tctgggaaat acctaggagg 3250 ctccagccca gcccaggccc tctcccccta ccctgggcac cagatcttcc 3300 atcagggccg gagtaaatcc ctaagtgcct caactgccct ctccctggca 3350 gccatcttgt cccctctatt cctctaggga gcactgtgcc cactctttct 3400 gggttttcca agggaatggg cttgcaggat ggagtgtctg taaaatcaac 3450 aggaaataaa actgtgtatg agccca 3476 52 911 PRT Homo Sapien 52 Met Ala Gln Leu Phe Leu Pro Leu Leu Ala Ala Leu Val Leu Ala 1 5 10 15 Gln Ala Pro Ala Ala Leu Ala Asp Val Leu Glu Gly Asp Ser Ser 20 25 30 Glu Asp Arg Ala Phe Arg Val Arg Ile Ala Gly Asp Ala Pro Leu 35 40 45 Gln Gly Val Leu Gly Gly Ala Leu Thr Ile Pro Cys His Val His 50 55 60 Tyr Leu Arg Pro Pro Pro Ser Arg Arg Ala Val Leu Gly Ser Pro 65 70 75 Arg Val Lys Trp Thr Phe Leu Ser Arg Gly Arg Glu Ala Glu Val 80 85 90 Leu Val Ala Arg Gly Val Arg Val Lys Val Asn Glu Ala Tyr Arg 95 100 105 Phe Arg Val Ala Leu Pro Ala Tyr Pro Ala Ser Leu Thr Asp Val 110 115 120 Ser Leu Ala Leu Ser Glu Leu Arg Pro Asn Asp Ser Gly Ile Tyr 125 130 135 Arg Cys Glu Val Gln His Gly Ile Asp Asp Ser Ser Asp Ala Val 140 145 150 Glu Val Lys Val Lys Gly Val Val Phe Leu Tyr Arg Glu Gly Ser 155 160 165 Ala Arg Tyr Ala Phe Ser Phe Ser Gly Ala Gln Glu Ala Cys Ala 170 175 180 Arg Ile Gly Ala His Ile Ala Thr Pro Glu Gln Leu Tyr Ala Ala 185 190 195 Tyr Leu Gly Gly Tyr Glu Gln Cys Asp Ala Gly Trp Leu Ser Asp 200 205 210 Gln Thr Val Arg Tyr Pro Ile Gln Thr Pro Arg Glu Ala Cys Tyr 215 220 225 Gly Asp Met Asp Gly Phe Pro Gly Val Arg Asn Tyr Gly Val Val 230 235 240 Asp Pro Asp Asp Leu Tyr Asp Val Tyr Cys Tyr Ala Glu Asp Leu 245 250 255 Asn Gly Glu Leu Phe Leu Gly Asp Pro Pro Glu Lys Leu Thr Leu 260 265 270 Glu Glu Ala Arg Ala Tyr Cys Gln Glu Arg Gly Ala Glu Ile Ala 275 280 285 Thr Thr Gly Gln Leu Tyr Ala Ala Trp Asp Gly Gly Leu Asp His 290 295 300 Cys Ser Pro Gly Trp Leu Ala Asp Gly Ser Val Arg Tyr Pro Ile 305 310 315 Val Thr Pro Ser Gln Arg Cys Gly Gly Gly Leu Pro Gly Val Lys 320 325 330 Thr Leu Phe Leu Phe Pro Asn Gln Thr Gly Phe Pro Asn Lys His 335 340 345 Ser Arg Phe Asn Val Tyr Cys Phe Arg Asp Ser Ala Gln Pro Ser 350 355 360 Ala Ile Pro Glu Ala Ser Asn Pro Ala Ser Asn Pro Ala Ser Asp 365 370 375 Gly Leu Glu Ala Ile Val Thr Val Thr Glu Thr Leu Glu Glu Leu 380 385 390 Gln Leu Pro Gln Glu Ala Thr Glu Ser Glu Ser Arg Gly Ala Ile 395 400 405 Tyr Ser Ile Pro Ile Met Glu Asp Gly Gly Gly Gly Ser Ser Thr 410 415 420 Pro Glu Asp Pro Ala Glu Ala Pro Arg Thr Leu Leu Glu Phe Glu 425 430 435 Thr Gln Ser Met Val Pro Pro Thr Gly Phe Ser Glu Glu Glu Gly 440 445 450 Lys Ala Leu Glu Glu Glu Glu Lys Tyr Glu Asp Glu Glu Glu Lys 455 460 465 Glu Glu Glu Glu Glu Glu Glu Glu Val Glu Asp Glu Ala Leu Trp 470 475 480 Ala Trp Pro Ser Glu Leu Ser Ser Pro Gly Pro Glu Ala Ser Leu 485 490 495 Pro Thr Glu Pro Ala Ala Gln Glu Lys Ser Leu Ser Gln Ala Pro 500 505 510 Ala Arg Ala Val Leu Gln Pro Gly Ala Ser Pro Leu Pro Asp Gly 515 520 525 Glu Ser Glu Ala Ser Arg Pro Pro Arg Val His Gly Pro Pro Thr 530 535 540 Glu Thr Leu Pro Thr Pro Arg Glu Arg Asn Leu Ala Ser Pro Ser 545 550 555 Pro Ser Thr Leu Val Glu Ala Arg Glu Val Gly Glu Ala Thr Gly 560 565 570 Gly Pro Glu Leu Ser Gly Val Pro Arg Gly Glu Ser Glu Glu Thr 575 580 585 Gly Ser Ser Glu Gly Ala Pro Ser Leu Leu Pro Ala Thr Arg Ala 590 595 600 Pro Glu Gly Thr Arg Glu Leu Glu Ala Pro Ser Glu Asp Asn Ser 605 610 615 Gly Arg Thr Ala Pro Ala Gly Thr Ser Val Gln Ala Gln Pro Val 620 625 630 Leu Pro Thr Asp Ser Ala Ser Arg Gly Gly Val Ala Val Val Pro 635 640 645 Ala Ser Gly Asp Cys Val Pro Ser Pro Cys His Asn Gly Gly Thr 650 655 660 Cys Leu Glu Glu Glu Glu Gly Val Arg Cys Leu Cys Leu Pro Gly 665 670 675 Tyr Gly Gly Asp Leu Cys Asp Val Gly Leu Arg Phe Cys Asn Pro 680 685 690 Gly Trp Asp Ala Phe Gln Gly Ala Cys Tyr Lys His Phe Ser Thr 695 700 705 Arg Arg Ser Trp Glu Glu Ala Glu Thr Gln Cys Arg Met Tyr Gly 710 715 720 Ala His Leu Ala Ser Ile Ser Thr Pro Glu Glu Gln Asp Phe Ile 725 730 735 Asn Asn Arg Tyr Arg Glu Tyr Gln Trp Ile Gly Leu Asn Asp Arg 740 745 750 Thr Ile Glu Gly Asp Phe Leu Trp Ser Asp Gly Val Pro Leu Leu 755 760 765 Tyr Glu Asn Trp Asn Pro Gly Gln Pro Asp Ser Tyr Phe Leu Ser 770 775 780 Gly Glu Asn Cys Val Val Met Val Trp His Asp Gln Gly Gln Trp 785 790 795 Ser Asp Val Pro Cys Asn Tyr His Leu Ser Tyr Thr Cys Lys Met 800 805 810 Gly Leu Val Ser Cys Gly Pro Pro Pro Glu Leu Pro Leu Ala Gln 815 820 825 Val Phe Gly Arg Pro Arg Leu Arg Tyr Glu Val Asp Thr Val Leu 830 835 840 Arg Tyr Arg Cys Arg Glu Gly Leu Ala Gln Arg Asn Leu Pro Leu 845 850 855 Ile Arg Cys Gln Glu Asn Gly Arg Trp Glu Ala Pro Gln Ile Ser 860 865 870 Cys Val Pro Arg Arg Pro Ala Arg Ala Leu His Pro Glu Glu Asp 875 880 885 Pro Glu Gly Arg Gln Gly Arg Leu Leu Gly Arg Trp Lys Ala Leu 890 895 900 Leu Ile Pro Pro Ser Ser Pro Met Pro Gly Pro 905 910 53 3316 DNA Homo Sapien 53 ctgccaggtg acagccgcca agatggggtc ttgggccctg ctgtggcctc 50 ccctgctgtt caccgggctg ctcgtccgac ccccggggac catggcccag 100 gcccagtact gctctgtgaa caaggacatc tttgaagtag aggagaacac 150 aaatgtcacc gagccgctgg tggacatcca cgtcccggag ggccaggagg 200 tgaccctcgg agccttgtcc accccctttg catttcggat ccagggaaac 250 cagctgtttc tcaacgtgac tcctgattac gaggagaagt cactgcttga 300 ggctcagctg ctgtgtcaga gcggaggcac attggtgacc cagctaaggg 350 tgttcgtgtc agtgctggac gtcaatgaca atgcccccga attccccttt 400 aagaccaagg agataagggt ggaggaggac acgaaagtga actccaccgt 450 catccctgag acgcaactgc aggctgagga ccgcgacaag gacgacattc 500 tgttctacac cctccaggaa atgacagcag gtgccagtga ctacttctcc 550 ctggtgagtg taaaccgtcc cgccctgagg ctggaccggc ccctggactt 600 ctacgagcgg ccgaacatga ccttctggct gctggtgcgg gacactccag 650 gggagaatgt ggaacccagc cacactgcca ccgccacact agtgctgaac 700 gtggtgcccg ccgacctgcg gcccccgtgg ttcctgccct gcaccttctc 750 agatggctac gtctgcattc aagctcagta ccacggggct gtccccacgg 800 ggcacatact gccatctccc ctcgtcctgc gtcccggacc catctacgct 850 gaggacggag accgcggcat caaccagccc atcatctaca gcatctttag 900 gggaaacgtg aatggtacat tcatcatcca cccagactcg ggcaacctca 950 ccgtggccag gagtgtcccc agccccatga ccttccttct gctggtgaag 1000 ggccaacagg ccgaccttgc ccgctactca gtgacccagg tcaccgtgga 1050 ggctgtggct gcggccggga gcccgccccg cttcccccag agcctgtatc 1100 gtggcaccgt ggcgcgtggc gctggagcgg gcgttgtggt caaggatgca 1150 gctgcccctt ctcagcctct gaggatccag gctcaggacc cggagttctc 1200 ggacctcaac tcggccatca catatcgaat taccaaccac tcacacttcc 1250 ggatggaggg agaggttgtg ctgaccacca ccacactggc acaggcggga 1300 gccttctacg cagaggttga ggcccacaac acggtgacct ctggcaccgc 1350 aaccacagtc attgagatac aagtttccga acaggagccc ccctccacag 1400 aggctggagg aacaactggg ccctggacca gcaccacttc cgaggtcccc 1450 agaccccctg agccctccca gggaccctcc acgaccagct ctgggggagg 1500 cacaggccct catccaccct ctggcacaac tctgaggcca ccaacctcgt 1550 ccacacccgg ggggcccccg ggtgcagaaa acagcacctc ccaccaacca 1600 gccactcccg gtggggacac agcacagacc ccaaagccag gaacctctca 1650 gccgatgccc cccggtgtgg gaaccagcac ctcccaccaa ccagccacac 1700 ccagtggggg cacagcacag accccagagc caggaacctc tcagccgatg 1750 ccccccagta tgggaaccag cacctcccac caaccagcca cacccggtgg 1800 gggcacagca cagaccccag aggcaggaac ctctcagccg atgccccccg 1850 gtatgggaac cagcacctcc caccaaccaa ccacacccgg tgggggcaca 1900 gcacagaccc cagagccagg aacctctcag ccgatgcccc tcagcaagag 1950 caccccatct tcaggtggcg gcccctcgga ggacaagcgc ttctcggtgg 2000 tggatatggc ggccctgggc ggggtgctgg gtgcgctgct gctgctggct 2050 ctccttggcc tcgccgtcct tgtccacaag cactatggcc cccggctcaa 2100 gtgctgctct ggcaaagctc cggagcccca gccccaaggc tttgacaacc 2150 aggcgttcct ccctgaccac aaggccaact gggcgcccgt ccccagcccc 2200 acgcacgacc ccaagcccgc ggaggcaccg atgcccgcag agcccgcacc 2250 ccccggccct gcctccccag gcggtgcccc tgagcccccc gcagcggccc 2300 gagctggcgg aagccccacg gcggtgaggt ccatcctgac caaggagcgg 2350 cggccggagg gcgggtacaa ggccgtctgg tttggcgagg acatcgggac 2400 ggaggcagac gtggtcgttc tcaacgcgcc caccctggac gtggatggcg 2450 ccagtgactc cggcagcggc gacgagggcg agggcgcggg gaggggtggg 2500 ggtccctacg atgcacccgg tggtgatgac tcctacatct aagtggcccc 2550 tccaccctct cccccagccg cacgggcact ggaggtctcg ctcccccagc 2600 ctccgacccg aggcagaata aagcaaggct cccgaaaccc aggccatggc 2650 gtggggcagg cgcgtgggtc cctgggggcc ccattcactc agtcccctgt 2700 cgtcattagc gcttgagccc aggtgtgcag atgaggcggt gggtctggcc 2750 acgctgtccc caccccaagg ctgcagcact tcccgtaaac cacctgcagt 2800 gcccgccgcc ttcccgaggc tctgtgccag ctagtctggg aagttcctct 2850 cccgctctaa ccacagcccg aggggggctc ccctcccccg acctgcacca 2900 gagatctcag gcacccggct caactcagac ctcccgctcc cgaccctaca 2950 cagagattgc ctggggaggc tgaggagccg atgcaaaccc ccaaggcgac 3000 gcacttggga gccggtggtc tcaaacacct gccgggggtc ctagtcccct 3050 tctgaaatct acatgcttgg gttggagcgc agcagtaaac accctgccca 3100 gtgacctgga ctgaggcgcg ctgggggtgg gtgcgccgtg tggcctgagc 3150 aggagccaga ccaggaggcc taggggtgag agacacattc ccctcgctgc 3200 tcccaaagcc agagcccagg ctgggcgccc atgcccagaa ccatcaaggg 3250 atcccttgcg gcttgtcagc actttcccta atggaaatac accattaatt 3300 cctttccaaa tgtttt 3316 54 839 PRT Homo Sapien 54 Met Gly Ser Trp Ala Leu Leu Trp Pro Pro Leu Leu Phe Thr Gly 1 5 10 15 Leu Leu Val Arg Pro Pro Gly Thr Met Ala Gln Ala Gln Tyr Cys 20 25 30 Ser Val Asn Lys Asp Ile Phe Glu Val Glu Glu Asn Thr Asn Val 35 40 45 Thr Glu Pro Leu Val Asp Ile His Val Pro Glu Gly Gln Glu Val 50 55 60 Thr Leu Gly Ala Leu Ser Thr Pro Phe Ala Phe Arg Ile Gln Gly 65 70 75 Asn Gln Leu Phe Leu Asn Val Thr Pro Asp Tyr Glu Glu Lys Ser 80 85 90 Leu Leu Glu Ala Gln Leu Leu Cys Gln Ser Gly Gly Thr Leu Val 95 100 105 Thr Gln Leu Arg Val Phe Val Ser Val Leu Asp Val Asn Asp Asn 110 115 120 Ala Pro Glu Phe Pro Phe Lys Thr Lys Glu Ile Arg Val Glu Glu 125 130 135 Asp Thr Lys Val Asn Ser Thr Val Ile Pro Glu Thr Gln Leu Gln 140 145 150 Ala Glu Asp Arg Asp Lys Asp Asp Ile Leu Phe Tyr Thr Leu Gln 155 160 165 Glu Met Thr Ala Gly Ala Ser Asp Tyr Phe Ser Leu Val Ser Val 170 175 180 Asn Arg Pro Ala Leu Arg Leu Asp Arg Pro Leu Asp Phe Tyr Glu 185 190 195 Arg Pro Asn Met Thr Phe Trp Leu Leu Val Arg Asp Thr Pro Gly 200 205 210 Glu Asn Val Glu Pro Ser His Thr Ala Thr Ala Thr Leu Val Leu 215 220 225 Asn Val Val Pro Ala Asp Leu Arg Pro Pro Trp Phe Leu Pro Cys 230 235 240 Thr Phe Ser Asp Gly Tyr Val Cys Ile Gln Ala Gln Tyr His Gly 245 250 255 Ala Val Pro Thr Gly His Ile Leu Pro Ser Pro Leu Val Leu Arg 260 265 270 Pro Gly Pro Ile Tyr Ala Glu Asp Gly Asp Arg Gly Ile Asn Gln 275 280 285 Pro Ile Ile Tyr Ser Ile Phe Arg Gly Asn Val Asn Gly Thr Phe 290 295 300 Ile Ile His Pro Asp Ser Gly Asn Leu Thr Val Ala Arg Ser Val 305 310 315 Pro Ser Pro Met Thr Phe Leu Leu Leu Val Lys Gly Gln Gln Ala 320 325 330 Asp Leu Ala Arg Tyr Ser Val Thr Gln Val Thr Val Glu Ala Val 335 340 345 Ala Ala Ala Gly Ser Pro Pro Arg Phe Pro Gln Ser Leu Tyr Arg 350 355 360 Gly Thr Val Ala Arg Gly Ala Gly Ala Gly Val Val Val Lys Asp 365 370 375 Ala Ala Ala Pro Ser Gln Pro Leu Arg Ile Gln Ala Gln Asp Pro 380 385 390 Glu Phe Ser Asp Leu Asn Ser Ala Ile Thr Tyr Arg Ile Thr Asn 395 400 405 His Ser His Phe Arg Met Glu Gly Glu Val Val Leu Thr Thr Thr 410 415 420 Thr Leu Ala Gln Ala Gly Ala Phe Tyr Ala Glu Val Glu Ala His 425 430 435 Asn Thr Val Thr Ser Gly Thr Ala Thr Thr Val Ile Glu Ile Gln 440 445 450 Val Ser Glu Gln Glu Pro Pro Ser Thr Glu Ala Gly Gly Thr Thr 455 460 465 Gly Pro Trp Thr Ser Thr Thr Ser Glu Val Pro Arg Pro Pro Glu 470 475 480 Pro Ser Gln Gly Pro Ser Thr Thr Ser Ser Gly Gly Gly Thr Gly 485 490 495 Pro His Pro Pro Ser Gly Thr Thr Leu Arg Pro Pro Thr Ser Ser 500 505 510 Thr Pro Gly Gly Pro Pro Gly Ala Glu Asn Ser Thr Ser His Gln 515 520 525 Pro Ala Thr Pro Gly Gly Asp Thr Ala Gln Thr Pro Lys Pro Gly 530 535 540 Thr Ser Gln Pro Met Pro Pro Gly Val Gly Thr Ser Thr Ser His 545 550 555 Gln Pro Ala Thr Pro Ser Gly Gly Thr Ala Gln Thr Pro Glu Pro 560 565 570 Gly Thr Ser Gln Pro Met Pro Pro Ser Met Gly Thr Ser Thr Ser 575 580 585 His Gln Pro Ala Thr Pro Gly Gly Gly Thr Ala Gln Thr Pro Glu 590 595 600 Ala Gly Thr Ser Gln Pro Met Pro Pro Gly Met Gly Thr Ser Thr 605 610 615 Ser His Gln Pro Thr Thr Pro Gly Gly Gly Thr Ala Gln Thr Pro 620 625 630 Glu Pro Gly Thr Ser Gln Pro Met Pro Leu Ser Lys Ser Thr Pro 635 640 645 Ser Ser Gly Gly Gly Pro Ser Glu Asp Lys Arg Phe Ser Val Val 650 655 660 Asp Met Ala Ala Leu Gly Gly Val Leu Gly Ala Leu Leu Leu Leu 665 670 675 Ala Leu Leu Gly Leu Ala Val Leu Val His Lys His Tyr Gly Pro 680 685 690 Arg Leu Lys Cys Cys Ser Gly Lys Ala Pro Glu Pro Gln Pro Gln 695 700 705 Gly Phe Asp Asn Gln Ala Phe Leu Pro Asp His Lys Ala Asn Trp 710 715 720 Ala Pro Val Pro Ser Pro Thr His Asp Pro Lys Pro Ala Glu Ala 725 730 735 Pro Met Pro Ala Glu Pro Ala Pro Pro Gly Pro Ala Ser Pro Gly 740 745 750 Gly Ala Pro Glu Pro Pro Ala Ala Ala Arg Ala Gly Gly Ser Pro 755 760 765 Thr Ala Val Arg Ser Ile Leu Thr Lys Glu Arg Arg Pro Glu Gly 770 775 780 Gly Tyr Lys Ala Val Trp Phe Gly Glu Asp Ile Gly Thr Glu Ala 785 790 795 Asp Val Val Val Leu Asn Ala Pro Thr Leu Asp Val Asp Gly Ala 800 805 810 Ser Asp Ser Gly Ser Gly Asp Glu Gly Glu Gly Ala Gly Arg Gly 815 820 825 Gly Gly Pro Tyr Asp Ala Pro Gly Gly Asp Asp Ser Tyr Ile 830 835 55 3846 DNA Homo Sapien 55 gcagctgggt tctcccggtt cccttgggca ggtgcagggt cgggttcaaa 50 gcctccggaa cgcgttttgg cctgatttga ggaggggggc ggggagggac 100 ctgcggcttg cggccccgcc cccttctccg gctcgcagcc gaccggtaag 150 cccgcctcct ccctcggccg gccctggggc cgtgtccgcc gggcaactcc 200 agccgaggcc tgggcttctg cctgcaggtg tctgcggcga ggcccctagg 250 gtacagcccg atttggcccc atggtgggtt tcggggccaa ccggcgggct 300 ggccgcctgc cctctctcgt gctggtggtg ctgctggtgg tgatcgtcgt 350 cctcgccttc aactactgga gcatctcctc ccgccacgtc ctgcttcagg 400 aggaggtggc cgagctgcag ggccaggtcc agcgcaccga agtggcccgc 450 gggcggctgg aaaagcgcaa ttcggacctc ttgctgttgg tggacacgca 500 caagaaacag atcgaccaga aggaggccga ctacggccgc ctcagcagcc 550 ggctgcaggc cagagagggc ctcgggaaga gatgcgagga tgacaaggtt 600 aaactacaga acaacatatc gtatcagatg gcagacatac atcatttaaa 650 ggagcaactt gctgagcttc gtcaggaatt tcttcgacaa gaagaccagc 700 ttcaggacta taggaagaac aatacttacc ttgtgaagag gttagaatat 750 gaaagttttc agtgtggaca gcagatgaag gaattgagag cacagcatga 800 agaaaatatt aaaaagttag cagaccagtt tttagaggaa caaaagcaag 850 agacccaaaa gattcaatca aatgatggaa aggaattgga tataaacaat 900 caagtagtac ctaaaaatat tccaaaagta gctgagaatg ttgcagataa 950 gaatgaagaa ccctcaagca atcatattcc acatgggaaa gaacaaatca 1000 aaagaggtgg tgatgcaggg atgcctggaa tagaagagaa tgacctagca 1050 aaagttgatg atcttccccc tgctttaagg aagcctccta tttcagtttc 1100 tcaacatgaa agtcatcaag caatctccca tcttccaact ggacaacctc 1150 tctccccaaa tatgcctcca gattcacaca taaaccacaa tggaaacccc 1200 ggtacttcaa aacagaatcc ttccagtcct cttcagcgtt taattccagg 1250 ctcaaacttg gacagtgaac ccagaattca aacagatata ctaaagcagg 1300 ctaccaagga cagagtcagt gatttccata aattgaagca aaatgatgaa 1350 gaacgagagc ttcaaatgga tcctgcagac tatggaaagc aacatttcaa 1400 tgatgtcctt taagtcctaa aggaatgctt cagaaaacct aaagtgctgt 1450 aaaatgaaat cattctactt tgtcctttct gacttttgtt gtaaagacga 1500 attgtatcag ttgtaaagat acattgagat agaattaagg aaaaacttta 1550 atgaaggaat gtacccatgt acatatgtga actttttcat attgtattat 1600 caaggtatag acttttttgg ttatgataca gttaagccaa aaacagctaa 1650 tctttgcatc taaagcaaac taatgtatat ttcacatttt attgagccga 1700 cttatttcca caaatagata aacaggacaa aatagttgta caggttatat 1750 gtggcatagc ataaccacag taagaacaga acagatattc agcagaaaac 1800 tttttatact ctaattcttt tttttttttt tttgagacag agttttagtc 1850 ttgtttccca ggctggagtg caatggcaca atcttggctc actgcaacct 1900 ccgcctcctg ggttcaggca attttcctgc ctcagcctcc caagtagctg 1950 ggattacagg cacccaccac catgcccagc taatttttgt atttttaata 2000 gagagctaat aattgtatat ttaataaaga cgggtttcac catgttggcc 2050 aggctggtct tgaactcctg acctcaggtg atcctcctgc attggcctcc 2100 caaagtgctg gaattccagg catgagccac tgcgcccagt ctacacacta 2150 attcttgtta gcccaacagc tgttctgttc tatctacccc tcatttcacg 2200 ctcaaggagt catacctaga atagttacac acaagaggga aactggaagc 2250 caaacactgt acagtattgt gtagaaagtc acctccctac tccttttatt 2300 ttacatgagt gctgatgtgt tttggcagat gagctttcag ctgaggcctg 2350 atggaaattg agataacctg caaagacata acagtattta tgagttatat 2400 cttagttctt gaaattgtgg aatgcatgat tgacaatata tttttaattt 2450 ttattttttc aagtaatacc agtactgttt aactatagcc agaactggct 2500 aaaattttta tattttcaga gttgaagttg gtgaagacat tcatgattta 2550 aacaccagat cctgaaaggg gttaaatcta ctttgaaatg aatctgcaat 2600 cagtatttca aagcttttct ggtaatttta gtgatcttat ttgattagac 2650 tttttcagaa gtactaaata aggaatttta acaggttttt attaatgcac 2700 agataaatag aagtacagtg aggtctatag ccattttatt aaaatagctt 2750 aaaagtttgt aaaaaaatga atctttgtaa ttacttaata tgttagttaa 2800 gaacccgtca agcttatatt tgctagactt acaaattatt ttaaatgcat 2850 ttatcttttt tgacactatt cagtggaatg tgtaagctag ctaattcttg 2900 ttttctgatt taaagcactt ttaaatctta tcctgccccc taaaaacaaa 2950 aggttttgat cacaagggga aatttaagat tgttaaccct gtttttcaga 3000 agggctactg ttaattgcac ataaacatga aatgtgtttt cccctgtgta 3050 ctaacacatt ctaggcaaaa ttcaaactta tagtggtaaa gaaacaggtt 3100 gttcacttgc tgaggtgcaa aaattcttaa gacttctgtt tgaaattgct 3150 caatgactag gaaaagatgt agtagtttac taaaattgtt tttctaccat 3200 atcaaattaa acaattcatg cctttatagg gtcaggccta caatgaatag 3250 gtatggtggt ttcacagaat tttaaaatag agttaaaggg aagtgatgta 3300 catttcgggg gcattagggt agggagatga atcaaaaaat acccctagta 3350 atgctttata ttttaatact gcaaaagctt tacaaatgga aaccatgcaa 3400 ttacctgcct tagttctttt gtcataaaaa caatcacttg gttggttgta 3450 ttgtagctat tacttataca gcaacatttc ttcaattagc agtctagaca 3500 ttttataaac agaaatcttg gaccaattga taatatttct gactgtatta 3550 atattttagt gctataaaat actatgtgaa tctcttaaaa atctgacatt 3600 ttacagtctg tattagacat actgttttta taatgtttta cttctgcctt 3650 aagatttagg ttttttaaat gtatttttgc cctgaattaa gtgttaattt 3700 gatggaaact ctgcttttaa aatcatcatt tactgggttc taataaatta 3750 aaaattaaac ttgaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 3800 aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaa 3846 56 380 PRT Homo Sapien 56 Met Val Gly Phe Gly Ala Asn Arg Arg Ala Gly Arg Leu Pro Ser 1 5 10 15 Leu Val Leu Val Val Leu Leu Val Val Ile Val Val Leu Ala Phe 20 25 30 Asn Tyr Trp Ser Ile Ser Ser Arg His Val Leu Leu Gln Glu Glu 35 40 45 Val Ala Glu Leu Gln Gly Gln Val Gln Arg Thr Glu Val Ala Arg 50 55 60 Gly Arg Leu Glu Lys Arg Asn Ser Asp Leu Leu Leu Leu Val Asp 65 70 75 Thr His Lys Lys Gln Ile Asp Gln Lys Glu Ala Asp Tyr Gly Arg 80 85 90 Leu Ser Ser Arg Leu Gln Ala Arg Glu Gly Leu Gly Lys Arg Cys 95 100 105 Glu Asp Asp Lys Val Lys Leu Gln Asn Asn Ile Ser Tyr Gln Met 110 115 120 Ala Asp Ile His His Leu Lys Glu Gln Leu Ala Glu Leu Arg Gln 125 130 135 Glu Phe Leu Arg Gln Glu Asp Gln Leu Gln Asp Tyr Arg Lys Asn 140 145 150 Asn Thr Tyr Leu Val Lys Arg Leu Glu Tyr Glu Ser Phe Gln Cys 155 160 165 Gly Gln Gln Met Lys Glu Leu Arg Ala Gln His Glu Glu Asn Ile 170 175 180 Lys Lys Leu Ala Asp Gln Phe Leu Glu Glu Gln Lys Gln Glu Thr 185 190 195 Gln Lys Ile Gln Ser Asn Asp Gly Lys Glu Leu Asp Ile Asn Asn 200 205 210 Gln Val Val Pro Lys Asn Ile Pro Lys Val Ala Glu Asn Val Ala 215 220 225 Asp Lys Asn Glu Glu Pro Ser Ser Asn His Ile Pro His Gly Lys 230 235 240 Glu Gln Ile Lys Arg Gly Gly Asp Ala Gly Met Pro Gly Ile Glu 245 250 255 Glu Asn Asp Leu Ala Lys Val Asp Asp Leu Pro Pro Ala Leu Arg 260 265 270 Lys Pro Pro Ile Ser Val Ser Gln His Glu Ser His Gln Ala Ile 275 280 285 Ser His Leu Pro Thr Gly Gln Pro Leu Ser Pro Asn Met Pro Pro 290 295 300 Asp Ser His Ile Asn His Asn Gly Asn Pro Gly Thr Ser Lys Gln 305 310 315 Asn Pro Ser Ser Pro Leu Gln Arg Leu Ile Pro Gly Ser Asn Leu 320 325 330 Asp Ser Glu Pro Arg Ile Gln Thr Asp Ile Leu Lys Gln Ala Thr 335 340 345 Lys Asp Arg Val Ser Asp Phe His Lys Leu Lys Gln Asn Asp Glu 350 355 360 Glu Arg Glu Leu Gln Met Asp Pro Ala Asp Tyr Gly Lys Gln His 365 370 375 Phe Asn Asp Val Leu 380 57 841 DNA Homo Sapien 57 ggatgggcga gcagtctgaa tgccagaatg gataaccgtt ttgctacagc 50 atttgtaatt gcttgtgtgc ttagcctcat ttccaccatc tacatggcag 100 cctccattgg cacagacttc tggtatgaat atcgaagtcc agttcaagaa 150 aattccagtg atttgaataa aagcatctgg gatgaattca ttagtgatga 200 ggcagatgaa aagacttata atgatgcact ttttcgatac aatggcacag 250 tgggattgtg gagacggtgt atcaccatac ccaaaaacat gcattggtat 300 agcccaccag aaaggacaga gtcatttgat gtggtcacaa aatgtgtgag 350 tttcacacta actgagcagt tcatggagaa atttgttgat cccggaaacc 400 acaatagcgg gattgatctc cttaggacct atctttggcg ttgccagttc 450 cttttacctt ttgtgagttt aggtttgatg tgctttgggg ctttgatcgg 500 actttgtgct tgcatttgcc gaagcttata tcccaccatt gccacgggca 550 ttctccatct ccttgcagat accatgctgt gaagtccagg ccacatggag 600 gtgtcctgtg tagatgctcc agctgaaatc ccaagctaag ctcccaactg 650 acagccaaca tcatttccag ccatgtgtgg gagccatcct ggatgtccag 700 ccttaacaag ccttcagagg acttcagcca cagctattat cttactacat 750 ccttgtgaga ctctaataaa gaaccaacta gctgagccca atcaacctat 800 ggaactgata gaaataaaat gaattgttgt tttgtgccgt t 841 58 184 PRT Homo Sapien 58 Met Asp Asn Arg Phe Ala Thr Ala Phe Val Ile Ala Cys Val Leu 1 5 10 15 Ser Leu Ile Ser Thr Ile Tyr Met Ala Ala Ser Ile Gly Thr Asp 20 25 30 Phe Trp Tyr Glu Tyr Arg Ser Pro Val Gln Glu Asn Ser Ser Asp 35 40 45 Leu Asn Lys Ser Ile Trp Asp Glu Phe Ile Ser Asp Glu Ala Asp 50 55 60 Glu Lys Thr Tyr Asn Asp Ala Leu Phe Arg Tyr Asn Gly Thr Val 65 70 75 Gly Leu Trp Arg Arg Cys Ile Thr Ile Pro Lys Asn Met His Trp 80 85 90 Tyr Ser Pro Pro Glu Arg Thr Glu Ser Phe Asp Val Val Thr Lys 95 100 105 Cys Val Ser Phe Thr Leu Thr Glu Gln Phe Met Glu Lys Phe Val 110 115 120 Asp Pro Gly Asn His Asn Ser Gly Ile Asp Leu Leu Arg Thr Tyr 125 130 135 Leu Trp Arg Cys Gln Phe Leu Leu Pro Phe Val Ser Leu Gly Leu 140 145 150 Met Cys Phe Gly Ala Leu Ile Gly Leu Cys Ala Cys Ile Cys Arg 155 160 165 Ser Leu Tyr Pro Thr Ile Ala Thr Gly Ile Leu His Leu Leu Ala 170 175 180 Asp Thr Met Leu 59 997 DNA Homo Sapien 59 gcgtggacac cacctcagcc cactgagcag gagtcacagc acgaagacca 50 agcgcaaagc gacccctgcc ctccatcctg actgctcctc ctaagagaga 100 tggcaccggc cagagcagga ttctgccccc ttctgctgct tctgctgctg 150 gggctgtggg tggcagagat cccagtcagt gccaagccca agggcatgac 200 ctcatcacag tggtttaaaa ttcagcacat gcagcccagc cctcaagcat 250 gcaactcagc catgaaaaac attaacaagc acacaaaacg gtgcaaagac 300 ctcaacacct tcctgcacga gcctttctcc agtgtggccg ccacctgcca 350 gacccccaaa atagcctgca agaatggcga taaaaactgc caccagagcc 400 acgggcccgt gtccctgacc atgtgtaagc tcacctcagg gaagtatccg 450 aactgcaggt acaaagagaa gcgacagaac aagtcttacg tagtggcctg 500 taagcctccc cagaaaaagg actctcagca attccacctg gttcctgtac 550 acttggacag agtcctttag gtttccagac tggcttgctc tttggctgac 600 cttcaattcc ctctccagga ctccgcacca ctcccctaca cccagagcat 650 tctcttcccc tcatctcttg gggctgttcc tggttcagcc tctgctggga 700 ggctgaagct gacactctgg tgagctgagc tctagaggga tggcttttca 750 tctttttgtt gctgttttcc cagatgctta tccccaagaa acagcaagct 800 caggtctgtg ggttccctgg tctatgccat tgcacatgtc tcccctgccc 850 cctggcatta gggcagcatg acaaggagag gaaataaatg gaaagggggc 900 aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 950 aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaa 997 60 156 PRT Homo Sapien 60 Met Ala Pro Ala Arg Ala Gly Phe Cys Pro Leu Leu Leu Leu Leu 1 5 10 15 Leu Leu Gly Leu Trp Val Ala Glu Ile Pro Val Ser Ala Lys Pro 20 25 30 Lys Gly Met Thr Ser Ser Gln Trp Phe Lys Ile Gln His Met Gln 35 40 45 Pro Ser Pro Gln Ala Cys Asn Ser Ala Met Lys Asn Ile Asn Lys 50 55 60 His Thr Lys Arg Cys Lys Asp Leu Asn Thr Phe Leu His Glu Pro 65 70 75 Phe Ser Ser Val Ala Ala Thr Cys Gln Thr Pro Lys Ile Ala Cys 80 85 90 Lys Asn Gly Asp Lys Asn Cys His Gln Ser His Gly Pro Val Ser 95 100 105 Leu Thr Met Cys Lys Leu Thr Ser Gly Lys Tyr Pro Asn Cys Arg 110 115 120 Tyr Lys Glu Lys Arg Gln Asn Lys Ser Tyr Val Val Ala Cys Lys 125 130 135 Pro Pro Gln Lys Lys Asp Ser Gln Gln Phe His Leu Val Pro Val 140 145 150 His Leu Asp Arg Val Leu 155 61 520 DNA Homo Sapien 61 cgggtcatgc gccgccgcct gtggctgggc ctggcctggc tgctgctggc 50 gcgggcgccg gacgccgcgg gaaccccgag cgcgtcgcgg ggaccgcgca 100 gctacccgca cctggagggc gacgtgcgct ggcggcgcct cttctcctcc 150 actcacttct tcctgcgcgt ggatcccggc ggccgcgtgc agggcacccg 200 ctggcgccac ggccaggaca gcatcctgga gatccgctct gtacacgtgg 250 gcgtcgtggt catcaaagca gtgtcctcag gcttctacgt ggccatgaac 300 cgccggggcc gcctctacgg gtcgcgactc tacaccgtgg actgcaggtt 350 ccgggagcgc atcgaagaga acggccacaa cacctacgcc tcacagcgct 400 ggcgccgccg cggccagccc atgttcctgg cgctggacag gagggggggg 450 ccccggccag gcggccggac gcggcggtac cacctgtccg cccacttcct 500 gcccgtcctg gtctcctgag 520 62 170 PRT Homo Sapien 62 Met Arg Arg Arg Leu Trp Leu Gly Leu Ala Trp Leu Leu Leu Ala 1 5 10 15 Arg Ala Pro Asp Ala Ala Gly Thr Pro Ser Ala Ser Arg Gly Pro 20 25 30 Arg Ser Tyr Pro His Leu Glu Gly Asp Val Arg Trp Arg Arg Leu 35 40 45 Phe Ser Ser Thr His Phe Phe Leu Arg Val Asp Pro Gly Gly Arg 50 55 60 Val Gln Gly Thr Arg Trp Arg His Gly Gln Asp Ser Ile Leu Glu 65 70 75 Ile Arg Ser Val His Val Gly Val Val Val Ile Lys Ala Val Ser 80 85 90 Ser Gly Phe Tyr Val Ala Met Asn Arg Arg Gly Arg Leu Tyr Gly 95 100 105 Ser Arg Leu Tyr Thr Val Asp Cys Arg Phe Arg Glu Arg Ile Glu 110 115 120 Glu Asn Gly His Asn Thr Tyr Ala Ser Gln Arg Trp Arg Arg Arg 125 130 135 Gly Gln Pro Met Phe Leu Ala Leu Asp Arg Arg Gly Gly Pro Arg 140 145 150 Pro Gly Gly Arg Thr Arg Arg Tyr His Leu Ser Ala His Phe Leu 155 160 165 Pro Val Leu Val Ser 170 63 2329 DNA Homo Sapien 63 atccctcgac ctcgacccac gcgtccgctg gaaggtggcg tgccctcctc 50 tggctggtac catgcagctc ccactggccc tgtgtctcgt ctgcctgctg 100 gtacacacag ccttccgtgt agtggagggc caggggtggc aggcgttcaa 150 gaatgatgcc acggaaatca tccccgagct cggagagtac cccgagcctc 200 caccggagct ggagaacaac aagaccatga accgggcgga gaacggaggg 250 cggcctcccc accacccctt tgagaccaaa gacgtgtccg agtacagctg 300 ccgcgagctg cacttcaccc gctacgtgac cgatgggccg tgccgcagcg 350 ccaagccggt caccgagctg gtgtgctccg gccagtgcgg cccggcgcgc 400 ctgctgccca acgccatcgg ccgcggcaag tggtggcgac ctagtgggcc 450 cgacttccgc tgcatccccg accgctaccg cgcgcagcgc gtgcagctgc 500 tgtgtcccgg tggtgaggcg ccgcgcgcgc gcaaggtgcg cctggtggcc 550 tcgtgcaagt gcaagcgcct cacccgcttc cacaaccagt cggagctcaa 600 ggacttcggg accgaggccg ctcggccgca gaagggccgg aagccgcggc 650 cccgcgcccg gagcgccaaa gccaaccagg ccgagctgga gaacgcctac 700 tagagcccgc ccgcgcccct ccccaccggc gggcgccccg gccctgaacc 750 cgcgccccac atttctgtcc tctgcgcgtg gtttgattgt ttatatttca 800 ttgtaaatgc ctgcaaccca gggcaggggg ctgagacctt ccaggccctg 850 aggaatcccg ggcgccggca aggcccccct cagcccgcca gctgaggggt 900 cccacggggc aggggaggga attgagagtc acagacactg agccacgcag 950 ccccgcctct ggggccgcct acctttgctg gtcccacttc agaggaggca 1000 gaaatggaag cattttcacc gccctggggt tttaagggag cggtgtggga 1050 gtgggaaagt ccagggactg gttaagaaag ttggataaga ttcccccttg 1100 cacctcgctg cccatcagaa agcctgaggc gtgcccagag cacaagactg 1150 ggggcaactg tagatgtggt ttctagtcct ggctctgcca ctaacttcct 1200 gtgtaacctt gaactacaca attctccttc gggacctcaa tttccacttt 1250 gtaaaatgag ggtggaggtg ggaataggat ctcgaggaga ctattggcat 1300 atgattccaa ggactccagt gccttttgaa tgggcagagg tgagagagag 1350 agagagaaag agagagaatg aatgcagttg cattgattca gtgccaaggt 1400 cacttccaga attcagagtt gtgatgctct cttctgacag ccaaagatga 1450 aaaacaaaca gaaaaaaaaa agtaaagagt ctatttatgg ctgacatatt 1500 tacggctgac aaactcctgg aagaagctat gctgcttccc agcctggctt 1550 ccccggatgt ttggctacct ccacccctcc atctcaaaga aataacatca 1600 tccattgggg tagaaaagga gagggtccga gggtggtggg agggatagaa 1650 atcacatccg ccccaacttc ccaaagagca gcatccctcc cccgacccat 1700 agccatgttt taaagtcacc ttccgaagag aagtgaaagg ttcaaggaca 1750 ctggccttgc aggcccgagg gagcagccat cacaaactca cagaccagca 1800 catccctttt gagacaccgc cttctgccca ccactcacgg acacatttct 1850 gcctagaaaa cagcttctta ctgctcttac atgtgatggc atatcttaca 1900 ctaaaagaat attattgggg gaaaaactac aagtgctgta catatgctga 1950 gaaactgcag agcataatag ctgccaccca aaaatctttt tgaaaatcat 2000 ttccagacaa cctcttactt tctgtgtagt ttttaattgt taaaaaaaaa 2050 aagttttaaa cagaagcaca tgacatatga aagcctgcag gactggtcgt 2100 ttttttggca attcttccac gtgggacttg tccacaagaa tgaaagtagt 2150 ggtttttaaa gagttaagtt acatatttat tttctcactt aagttattta 2200 tgcaaaagtt tttcttgtag agaatgacaa tgttaatatt gctttatgaa 2250 ttaacagtct gttcttccag agtccagaga cattgttaat aaagacaatg 2300 aatcatgaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaa 2329 64 213 PRT Homo Sapien 64 Met Gln Leu Pro Leu Ala Leu Cys Leu Val Cys Leu Leu Val His 1 5 10 15 Thr Ala Phe Arg Val Val Glu Gly Gln Gly Trp Gln Ala Phe Lys 20 25 30 Asn Asp Ala Thr Glu Ile Ile Pro Glu Leu Gly Glu Tyr Pro Glu 35 40 45 Pro Pro Pro Glu Leu Glu Asn Asn Lys Thr Met Asn Arg Ala Glu 50 55 60 Asn Gly Gly Arg Pro Pro His His Pro Phe Glu Thr Lys Asp Val 65 70 75 Ser Glu Tyr Ser Cys Arg Glu Leu His Phe Thr Arg Tyr Val Thr 80 85 90 Asp Gly Pro Cys Arg Ser Ala Lys Pro Val Thr Glu Leu Val Cys 95 100 105 Ser Gly Gln Cys Gly Pro Ala Arg Leu Leu Pro Asn Ala Ile Gly 110 115 120 Arg Gly Lys Trp Trp Arg Pro Ser Gly Pro Asp Phe Arg Cys Ile 125 130 135 Pro Asp Arg Tyr Arg Ala Gln Arg Val Gln Leu Leu Cys Pro Gly 140 145 150 Gly Glu Ala Pro Arg Ala Arg Lys Val Arg Leu Val Ala Ser Cys 155 160 165 Lys Cys Lys Arg Leu Thr Arg Phe His Asn Gln Ser Glu Leu Lys 170 175 180 Asp Phe Gly Thr Glu Ala Ala Arg Pro Gln Lys Gly Arg Lys Pro 185 190 195 Arg Pro Arg Ala Arg Ser Ala Lys Ala Asn Gln Ala Glu Leu Glu 200 205 210 Asn Ala Tyr 65 2663 DNA Homo Sapien 65 cccactcggc ggtttggcgg gagggagggg ctttgcgcag gccccgctcc 50 cgccccgcct ccatgcggcc cgccccgatt gcgctgtggc tgcgcctggt 100 cttggccctg gcccttgtcc gcccccgggc tgtggggtgg gccccggtcc 150 gagcccccat ctatgtcagc agctgggccg tccaggtgtc ccagggtaac 200 cgggaggtcg agcgcctggc acgcaaattc ggcttcgtca acctggggcc 250 gatcttctct gacgggcagt actttcacct gcggcaccgg ggcgtggtcc 300 agcagtccct gaccccgcac tggggccacc gcctgcacct gaagaaaaac 350 cccaaggtgc agtggttcca gcagcagacg ctgcagcggc gggtgaaacg 400 ctctgtcgtg gtgcccacgg acccctggtt ctccaagcag tggtacatga 450 acagcgaggc ccaaccagac ctgagcatcc tgcaggcctg gagtcagggg 500 ctgtcaggcc agggcatcgt ggtctctgtg ctggacgatg gcatcgagaa 550 ggaccacccg gacctctggg ccaactacga ccccctggcc agctatgact 600 tcaatgacta cgacccggac ccccagcccc gctacacccc cagcaaagag 650 aaccggcacg ggacccgctg tgctggggag gtggccgcga tggccaacaa 700 tggcttctgt ggtgtggggg tcgctttcaa cgcccgaatc ggaggcgtac 750 ggatgctgga cggtaccatc accgatgtca tcgaggccca gtcgctgagc 800 ctgcagccgc agcacatcca catttacagc gccagctggg gtcccgagga 850 cgacggccgc acggtggacg gccccggcat cctcacccgc gaggccttcc 900 ggcgtggtgt gaccaagggc cgcggcgggc tgggcacgct cttcatctgg 950 gcctcgggca acggcggcct gcactacgac aactgcaact gcgacggcta 1000 caccaacagc atccacacgc tttccgtggg cagcaccacc cagcagggcc 1050 gcgtgccctg gtacagcgaa gcctgcgcct ccaccctcac caccacctac 1100 agcagcggcg tggccaccga cccccagatc gtcaccacgg acctgcatca 1150 cgggtgcaca gaccagcaca cgggcacctc ggcctcagcc ccactggcgg 1200 ccggcatgat cgccctagcg ctggaggcca acccgttcct gacgtggaga 1250 gacatgcagc acctggtggt ccgcgcgtcc aagccggcgc acctgcaggc 1300 cgaggactgg aggaccaacg gcgtggggcg ccaagtgagc catcactacg 1350 gatacgggct gctggacgcc gggctgctgg tggacaccgc ccgcacctgg 1400 ctgcccaccc agccgcagag gaagtgcgcc gtccgggtcc agagccgccc 1450 cacccccatc ctgccgctga tctacatcag ggaaaacgta tcggcctgcg 1500 ccggcctcca caactccatc cgctcgctgg agcacgtgca ggcgcagctg 1550 acgctgtcct acagccggcg cggagacctg gagatctcgc tcaccagccc 1600 catgggcacg cgctccacac tcgtggccat acgacccttg gacgtcagca 1650 ctgaaggcta caacaactgg gtcttcatgt ccacccactt ctgggatgag 1700 aacccacagg gcgtgtggac cctgggccta gagaacaagg gctactattt 1750 caacacgggg acgttgtacc gctacacgct gctgctctat gggacggccg 1800 aggacatgac agcgcggcct acaggccccc aggtgaccag cagcgcgtgt 1850 gtgcagcggg acacagaggg gctgtgccag gcgtgtgacg gccccgccta 1900 catcctggga cagctctgcc tggcctactg ccccccgcgg ttcttcaacc 1950 acacaaggct ggtgaccgct gggcctgggc acacggcggc gcccgcgctg 2000 agggtctgct ccagctgcca tgcctcctgc tacacctgcc gcggcggctc 2050 cccgagggac tgcacctcct gtcccccatc ctccacgctg gaccagcagc 2100 agggctcctg catgggaccc accacccccg acagccgccc ccggcttaga 2150 gctgccgcct gtccccacca ccgctgccca gcctcggcca tggtgctgag 2200 cctcctggcc gtgaccctcg gaggccccgt cctctgcggc atgtccatgg 2250 acctcccact atacgcctgg ctctcccgtg ccagggccac ccccaccaaa 2300 ccccaggtct ggctgccagc tggaacctga agttgtcagc tcagaaagcg 2350 accttgcccc cgcctgggtc cctgacaggc actgctgcca tgctgcctcc 2400 ccaggctggc cccagaggag cgagcaccag cacccgacgc ctggcctgcc 2450 agggatgggc cccgtggaac cccgaagcct ggcgggagag agagagagag 2500 aagtctcctc tgcattttgg gtttgggcag gagtgggctg gggggagagg 2550 ctggagcacc ccaaaagcca ggggaaagtg gagggagaga aacgtgacac 2600 tgtccgtctc gggcaccgcg tccaacctca gagtttgcaa ataaaggttg 2650 cttagaaggt gaa 2663 66 755 PRT Homo Sapien 66 Met Arg Pro Ala Pro Ile Ala Leu Trp Leu Arg Leu Val Leu Ala 1 5 10 15 Leu Ala Leu Val Arg Pro Arg Ala Val Gly Trp Ala Pro Val Arg 20 25 30 Ala Pro Ile Tyr Val Ser Ser Trp Ala Val Gln Val Ser Gln Gly 35 40 45 Asn Arg Glu Val Glu Arg Leu Ala Arg Lys Phe Gly Phe Val Asn 50 55 60 Leu Gly Pro Ile Phe Ser Asp Gly Gln Tyr Phe His Leu Arg His 65 70 75 Arg Gly Val Val Gln Gln Ser Leu Thr Pro His Trp Gly His Arg 80 85 90 Leu His Leu Lys Lys Asn Pro Lys Val Gln Trp Phe Gln Gln Gln 95 100 105 Thr Leu Gln Arg Arg Val Lys Arg Ser Val Val Val Pro Thr Asp 110 115 120 Pro Trp Phe Ser Lys Gln Trp Tyr Met Asn Ser Glu Ala Gln Pro 125 130 135 Asp Leu Ser Ile Leu Gln Ala Trp Ser Gln Gly Leu Ser Gly Gln 140 145 150 Gly Ile Val Val Ser Val Leu Asp Asp Gly Ile Glu Lys Asp His 155 160 165 Pro Asp Leu Trp Ala Asn Tyr Asp Pro Leu Ala Ser Tyr Asp Phe 170 175 180 Asn Asp Tyr Asp Pro Asp Pro Gln Pro Arg Tyr Thr Pro Ser Lys 185 190 195 Glu Asn Arg His Gly Thr Arg Cys Ala Gly Glu Val Ala Ala Met 200 205 210 Ala Asn Asn Gly Phe Cys Gly Val Gly Val Ala Phe Asn Ala Arg 215 220 225 Ile Gly Gly Val Arg Met Leu Asp Gly Thr Ile Thr Asp Val Ile 230 235 240 Glu Ala Gln Ser Leu Ser Leu Gln Pro Gln His Ile His Ile Tyr 245 250 255 Ser Ala Ser Trp Gly Pro Glu Asp Asp Gly Arg Thr Val Asp Gly 260 265 270 Pro Gly Ile Leu Thr Arg Glu Ala Phe Arg Arg Gly Val Thr Lys 275 280 285 Gly Arg Gly Gly Leu Gly Thr Leu Phe Ile Trp Ala Ser Gly Asn 290 295 300 Gly Gly Leu His Tyr Asp Asn Cys Asn Cys Asp Gly Tyr Thr Asn 305 310 315 Ser Ile His Thr Leu Ser Val Gly Ser Thr Thr Gln Gln Gly Arg 320 325 330 Val Pro Trp Tyr Ser Glu Ala Cys Ala Ser Thr Leu Thr Thr Thr 335 340 345 Tyr Ser Ser Gly Val Ala Thr Asp Pro Gln Ile Val Thr Thr Asp 350 355 360 Leu His His Gly Cys Thr Asp Gln His Thr Gly Thr Ser Ala Ser 365 370 375 Ala Pro Leu Ala Ala Gly Met Ile Ala Leu Ala Leu Glu Ala Asn 380 385 390 Pro Phe Leu Thr Trp Arg Asp Met Gln His Leu Val Val Arg Ala 395 400 405 Ser Lys Pro Ala His Leu Gln Ala Glu Asp Trp Arg Thr Asn Gly 410 415 420 Val Gly Arg Gln Val Ser His His Tyr Gly Tyr Gly Leu Leu Asp 425 430 435 Ala Gly Leu Leu Val Asp Thr Ala Arg Thr Trp Leu Pro Thr Gln 440 445 450 Pro Gln Arg Lys Cys Ala Val Arg Val Gln Ser Arg Pro Thr Pro 455 460 465 Ile Leu Pro Leu Ile Tyr Ile Arg Glu Asn Val Ser Ala Cys Ala 470 475 480 Gly Leu His Asn Ser Ile Arg Ser Leu Glu His Val Gln Ala Gln 485 490 495 Leu Thr Leu Ser Tyr Ser Arg Arg Gly Asp Leu Glu Ile Ser Leu 500 505 510 Thr Ser Pro Met Gly Thr Arg Ser Thr Leu Val Ala Ile Arg Pro 515 520 525 Leu Asp Val Ser Thr Glu Gly Tyr Asn Asn Trp Val Phe Met Ser 530 535 540 Thr His Phe Trp Asp Glu Asn Pro Gln Gly Val Trp Thr Leu Gly 545 550 555 Leu Glu Asn Lys Gly Tyr Tyr Phe Asn Thr Gly Thr Leu Tyr Arg 560 565 570 Tyr Thr Leu Leu Leu Tyr Gly Thr Ala Glu Asp Met Thr Ala Arg 575 580 585 Pro Thr Gly Pro Gln Val Thr Ser Ser Ala Cys Val Gln Arg Asp 590 595 600 Thr Glu Gly Leu Cys Gln Ala Cys Asp Gly Pro Ala Tyr Ile Leu 605 610 615 Gly Gln Leu Cys Leu Ala Tyr Cys Pro Pro Arg Phe Phe Asn His 620 625 630 Thr Arg Leu Val Thr Ala Gly Pro Gly His Thr Ala Ala Pro Ala 635 640 645 Leu Arg Val Cys Ser Ser Cys His Ala Ser Cys Tyr Thr Cys Arg 650 655 660 Gly Gly Ser Pro Arg Asp Cys Thr Ser Cys Pro Pro Ser Ser Thr 665 670 675 Leu Asp Gln Gln Gln Gly Ser Cys Met Gly Pro Thr Thr Pro Asp 680 685 690 Ser Arg Pro Arg Leu Arg Ala Ala Ala Cys Pro His His Arg Cys 695 700 705 Pro Ala Ser Ala Met Val Leu Ser Leu Leu Ala Val Thr Leu Gly 710 715 720 Gly Pro Val Leu Cys Gly Met Ser Met Asp Leu Pro Leu Tyr Ala 725 730 735 Trp Leu Ser Arg Ala Arg Ala Thr Pro Thr Lys Pro Gln Val Trp 740 745 750 Leu Pro Ala Gly Thr 755 67 332 DNA Homo Sapien 67 atgaggaagc tccagggcag gatggtttac ctgcctggac agcaagatga 50 tggctacact agcccccatt ctctgggcgc ctggatttgc ccaccagatc 100 tcctcacctc ttgcccttca cctcctgctg tacctacaag gtctccccga 150 ttctcatctg cccataatca tggacacagc cccaggatgt gcaggactct 200 cagggaccat ctggagttcc agctggaatc tgggcctggt ggagtgggag 250 tggggcaggg gcctgcattg ggctgactta gagagcacag ttattccatc 300 catatggaaa taaacatttt ggattcctga tc 332 68 88 PRT Homo Sapien 68 Met Met Ala Thr Leu Ala Pro Ile Leu Trp Ala Pro Gly Phe Ala 1 5 10 15 His Gln Ile Ser Ser Pro Leu Ala Leu His Leu Leu Leu Tyr Leu 20 25 30 Gln Gly Leu Pro Asp Ser His Leu Pro Ile Ile Met Asp Thr Ala 35 40 45 Pro Gly Cys Ala Gly Leu Ser Gly Thr Ile Trp Ser Ser Ser Trp 50 55 60 Asn Leu Gly Leu Val Glu Trp Glu Trp Gly Arg Gly Leu His Trp 65 70 75 Ala Asp Leu Glu Ser Thr Val Ile Pro Ser Ile Trp Lys 80 85 69 1302 DNA Homo Sapien unsure 1218-1253 unknown base 69 tttgcagtgg ggtcctcctc tggcctcctg cccctcctgc tgctgctgct 50 gcttccattg ctggcagccc agggtggggg tggcctgcag gcagcgctgc 100 tggcccttga ggtggggctg gtgggtctgg gggcctccta cctgctcctt 150 tgtacagccc tgcacctgcc ctccagtctt ttcctactcc tggcccaggg 200 taccgcactg ggggccgtcc tgggcctgag ctggcgccga ggcctcatgg 250 gtgttcccct gggccttgga gctgcctggc tcttagcttg gccaggccta 300 gctctacctc tggtggctat ggcagcgggg ggcagatggg tgcggcagca 350 gggcccccgg gtgcgccggg gcatatctcg actctggttg cgggttctgc 400 tgcgcctgtc acccatggcc ttccgggccc tgcagggctg tggggctgtg 450 ggggaccggg gtctgtttgc actgtacccc aaaaccaaca aggatggctt 500 ccgcagccgc ctgcccgtcc ctgggccccg gcggcgtaat ccccgcacca 550 cccaacaccc attagctctg ttggcaaggg tctgggtcct gtgcaagggc 600 tggaactggc gtctggcacg ggccagccag ggtttagcat cccacttgcc 650 cccgtgggcc atccacacac tggccagctg gggcctgctt cggggtgaac 700 ggcccacccg aatcccccgg ctactaccac gcagccagcg ccagctaggg 750 ccccctgcct cccgccagcc actgccaggg actctagccg ggcggaggtc 800 acgcacccgc cagtcccggg ccctgccccc ctggaggtag ctgactccag 850 cccttccagc ccaaatctag agcattgagc actttatctc ccacgactca 900 gtgaagtttc tccagtccct agtcctctct tttcacccac cttcctcagt 950 ttgctcactt accccaggcc cagcccttcg gacctctaga caggcagcct 1000 cctcagctgt ggagtccagc agtcactctg tgttctcctg gcgctcctcc 1050 cctaagttat tgctgttcgc ccgctgtgtg tgctcatcct caccctcatt 1100 gactcaggcc tggggccagg ggtggtggag ggtgggaaga gtcatgtttt 1150 ttttctcctc tttgattttg tttttctgtc tcccttccaa cctgtcccct 1200 tccccccacc aaaaaaannn nnnnnnnnnn nnnnnnnnnn nnnnnnnnnn 1250 nnnaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 1300 aa 1302 70 197 PRT Homo Sapien 70 Met Gly Val Pro Leu Gly Leu Gly Ala Ala Trp Leu Leu Ala Trp 1 5 10 15 Pro Gly Leu Ala Leu Pro Leu Val Ala Met Ala Ala Gly Gly Arg 20 25 30 Trp Val Arg Gln Gln Gly Pro Arg Val Arg Arg Gly Ile Ser Arg 35 40 45 Leu Trp Leu Arg Val Leu Leu Arg Leu Ser Pro Met Ala Phe Arg 50 55 60 Ala Leu Gln Gly Cys Gly Ala Val Gly Asp Arg Gly Leu Phe Ala 65 70 75 Leu Tyr Pro Lys Thr Asn Lys Asp Gly Phe Arg Ser Arg Leu Pro 80 85 90 Val Pro Gly Pro Arg Arg Arg Asn Pro Arg Thr Thr Gln His Pro 95 100 105 Leu Ala Leu Leu Ala Arg Val Trp Val Leu Cys Lys Gly Trp Asn 110 115 120 Trp Arg Leu Ala Arg Ala Ser Gln Gly Leu Ala Ser His Leu Pro 125 130 135 Pro Trp Ala Ile His Thr Leu Ala Ser Trp Gly Leu Leu Arg Gly 140 145 150 Glu Arg Pro Thr Arg Ile Pro Arg Leu Leu Pro Arg Ser Gln Arg 155 160 165 Gln Leu Gly Pro Pro Ala Ser Arg Gln Pro Leu Pro Gly Thr Leu 170 175 180 Ala Gly Arg Arg Ser Arg Thr Arg Gln Ser Arg Ala Leu Pro Pro 185 190 195 Trp Arg 71 1976 DNA Homo Sapien 71 gtttgggggt tgtttgggat tagtgaagct actgcctttg ccgccagcgc 50 agcctcagag tttgattatt tgcaatgtca ggctttgaaa acttaaacac 100 ggatttctac cagacaagtt acagcatcga tgatcagtca cagcagtcct 150 atgattatgg aggaagtgga ggaccctata gcaaacagta tgctggctat 200 gactattcgc agcaaggcag atttgtccct ccagacatga tgcagccaca 250 acagccatac accgggcaga tttaccagcc aactcaggca tatactccag 300 cttcacctca gcctttctat ggaaacaact ttgaggatga gccaccttta 350 ttagaagagt taggtatcaa ttttgaccac atctggcaaa aaacactaac 400 agtattacat ccgttaaaag tagcagatgg cagcatcatg aatgaaactg 450 atttggcagg tccaatggtt ttttgccttg cttttggagc cacattgcta 500 ctggctggca aaatccagtt tggctatgta tacgggatca gtgcaattgg 550 atgtctagga atgttttgtt tattaaactt aatgagtatg acaggtgttt 600 catttggttg tgtggcaagt gtccttggat attgtcttct gcccatgatc 650 ctactttcca gctttgcagt gatattttct ttgcaaggaa tggtaggaat 700 cattctcact gctgggatta ttggatggtg tagtttttct gcttccaaaa 750 tatttatttc tgcattagcc atggaaggac agcaactttt agtagcatat 800 ccttgcgctt tgttatatgg agtctttgcc ctgatttccg tcttttgaaa 850 atttatctgg gatgtggaca tcagtgggcc agatgtacaa aaaggacctt 900 gaactcttaa attggaccag caaactgctg cagcgcaact ctcatgcaga 950 tttacatttg actgttggag caatgaaagt aaacgtgtat ctcttgttca 1000 tttttataga acttttgcat actatattgg atttacctgc ggtgtgacta 1050 gctttaaatg tttgtgttta tacagataag aaatgctatt tctttctggt 1100 tcctgcagcc attgaaaaac ctttttcctt gcaaattata atgtttttga 1150 tagattttta tcaactgtgg gaaaccaaac acaaagctga taacctttct 1200 taaaaacgac ccagtcacag taaagaagac acaagacggc cgggcgtggt 1250 agctcacgcc tgtaatccca gcactttggg aggccgaggc gggcggatca 1300 caagggcagg agatcgagac catcctggtt aacacggtga aaccccgact 1350 ctactaaaac tacaaaaaaa attagctggg cgtggtggcg ggcgcctgta 1400 gtcccagcta ctcaggaggc tgaggcagga gaagtgtgaa cccaggaggc 1450 ggagcttgca gtgagccgag atcacaccac tgcactccat ccagcctggg 1500 tgacagggtg agactctgtc tcaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaagg agacacaaga 1550 cttactgcaa aaatattttt ccaaggattt aggaaagaaa aattgccttg 1600 tattctcaag tcaggtaact caaagcaaaa aagtgatcca aatgtagagt 1650 atgagtttgc actccaaaaa tttgacatta ctgtaaatta tctcatggaa 1700 tttttgctaa aattcagaga tacgggaagt tcacaatcta cctcattgta 1750 gacatgaaat gcgaacactt acttacatat taatgttaac tcaaccttag 1800 ggacctggaa tggttgcatt aatgctataa tcgttggatc gccacatttc 1850 ccaaaaataa taaaaaaatc actaaccttt tttaaggaaa atatttaaag 1900 ttttacaaaa ttcaatattg caattatcaa tgtaaagtac atttgaatgc 1950 ttattaaaac tttcccaatt aatttt 1976 72 257 PRT Homo Sapien 72 Met Ser Gly Phe Glu Asn Leu Asn Thr Asp Phe Tyr Gln Thr Ser 1 5 10 15 Tyr Ser Ile Asp Asp Gln Ser Gln Gln Ser Tyr Asp Tyr Gly Gly 20 25 30 Ser Gly Gly Pro Tyr Ser Lys Gln Tyr Ala Gly Tyr Asp Tyr Ser 35 40 45 Gln Gln Gly Arg Phe Val Pro Pro Asp Met Met Gln Pro Gln Gln 50 55 60 Pro Tyr Thr Gly Gln Ile Tyr Gln Pro Thr Gln Ala Tyr Thr Pro 65 70 75 Ala Ser Pro Gln Pro Phe Tyr Gly Asn Asn Phe Glu Asp Glu Pro 80 85 90 Pro Leu Leu Glu Glu Leu Gly Ile Asn Phe Asp His Ile Trp Gln 95 100 105 Lys Thr Leu Thr Val Leu His Pro Leu Lys Val Ala Asp Gly Ser 110 115 120 Ile Met Asn Glu Thr Asp Leu Ala Gly Pro Met Val Phe Cys Leu 125 130 135 Ala Phe Gly Ala Thr Leu Leu Leu Ala Gly Lys Ile Gln Phe Gly 140 145 150 Tyr Val Tyr Gly Ile Ser Ala Ile Gly Cys Leu Gly Met Phe Cys 155 160 165 Leu Leu Asn Leu Met Ser Met Thr Gly Val Ser Phe Gly Cys Val 170 175 180 Ala Ser Val Leu Gly Tyr Cys Leu Leu Pro Met Ile Leu Leu Ser 185 190 195 Ser Phe Ala Val Ile Phe Ser Leu Gln Gly Met Val Gly Ile Ile 200 205 210 Leu Thr Ala Gly Ile Ile Gly Trp Cys Ser Phe Ser Ala Ser Lys 215 220 225 Ile Phe Ile Ser Ala Leu Ala Met Glu Gly Gln Gln Leu Leu Val 230 235 240 Ala Tyr Pro Cys Ala Leu Leu Tyr Gly Val Phe Ala Leu Ile Ser 245 250 255 Val Phe 73 1285 DNA Homo Sapien 73 acactggcca aaacgcggct cgccctcggc tgcgctcggc tcccgcgggc 50 gctcggcccc gagcccctcc tccccctacc cgccggccgg acagggagga 100 gccaatggct gggcctgcca tccacaccgc tcccatgctg ttcctcgtcc 150 tcctgctgcc ccagctgagc ctggcaggcg cccttgcacc tgggacccct 200 gcccggaacc tccctgagaa tcacattgac ctcccaggcc cagcgctgtg 250 gacgcctcag gccagccacc accgccggcg gggcccgggc aagaaggagt 300 ggggcccagg cctgcccagc caggcccagg atggggctgt ggtcaccgcc 350 accaggcagg cctccaggct gccagaggct gaggggctgc tgcctgagca 400 gagtcctgca ggcctgctgc aggacaagga cctgctcctg ggactggcat 450 tgccctaccc cgagaaggag aacagacctc caggttggga gaggaccagg 500 aaacgcagca gggagcacaa gagacgcagg gacaggttga ggctgcacca 550 aggccgagcc ttggtccgag gtcccagctc cctgatgaag aaggcagagc 600 tctccgaagc ccaggtgctg gatgcagcca tggaggaatc ctccaccagc 650 ctggcgccca ccatgttctt tctcaccacc tttgaggcag cacctgccac 700 agaagagtcc ctgatcctgc ccgtcacctc cctgcggccc cagcaggcac 750 agcccaggtc tgacggggag gtgatgccca cgctggacat ggccttgttc 800 gactggaccg attatgaaga cttaaaacct gatggttggc cctctgcaaa 850 gaagaaagag aaacaccgcg gtaaactctc cagtgatggt aacgaaacat 900 caccagccga aggggaacca tgcgaccatc accaagactg cctgccaggg 950 acttgctgcg acctgcggga gcatctctgc acaccccaca accgaggcct 1000 caacaacaaa tgcttcgatg actgcatgtg tgtggaaggg ctgcgctgct 1050 atgccaaatt ccaccggaac cgcagggtta cacggaggaa agggcgctgt 1100 gtggagcccg agacggccaa cggcgaccag ggatccttca tcaacgtcta 1150 gcggccccgc gggactgggg actgagccca ggaggtttgc acaagccggg 1200 cgatttgttt gtaactagca gtgggagatc aagttgggga acagatggct 1250 gaggctgcag actcaggccc aggacactca acccc 1285 74 348 PRT Homo Sapien 74 Met Ala Gly Pro Ala Ile His Thr Ala Pro Met Leu Phe Leu Val 1 5 10 15 Leu Leu Leu Pro Gln Leu Ser Leu Ala Gly Ala Leu Ala Pro Gly 20 25 30 Thr Pro Ala Arg Asn Leu Pro Glu Asn His Ile Asp Leu Pro Gly 35 40 45 Pro Ala Leu Trp Thr Pro Gln Ala Ser His His Arg Arg Arg Gly 50 55 60 Pro Gly Lys Lys Glu Trp Gly Pro Gly Leu Pro Ser Gln Ala Gln 65 70 75 Asp Gly Ala Val Val Thr Ala Thr Arg Gln Ala Ser Arg Leu Pro 80 85 90 Glu Ala Glu Gly Leu Leu Pro Glu Gln Ser Pro Ala Gly Leu Leu 95 100 105 Gln Asp Lys Asp Leu Leu Leu Gly Leu Ala Leu Pro Tyr Pro Glu 110 115 120 Lys Glu Asn Arg Pro Pro Gly Trp Glu Arg Thr Arg Lys Arg Ser 125 130 135 Arg Glu His Lys Arg Arg Arg Asp Arg Leu Arg Leu His Gln Gly 140 145 150 Arg Ala Leu Val Arg Gly Pro Ser Ser Leu Met Lys Lys Ala Glu 155 160 165 Leu Ser Glu Ala Gln Val Leu Asp Ala Ala Met Glu Glu Ser Ser 170 175 180 Thr Ser Leu Ala Pro Thr Met Phe Phe Leu Thr Thr Phe Glu Ala 185 190 195 Ala Pro Ala Thr Glu Glu Ser Leu Ile Leu Pro Val Thr Ser Leu 200 205 210 Arg Pro Gln Gln Ala Gln Pro Arg Ser Asp Gly Glu Val Met Pro 215 220 225 Thr Leu Asp Met Ala Leu Phe Asp Trp Thr Asp Tyr Glu Asp Leu 230 235 240 Lys Pro Asp Gly Trp Pro Ser Ala Lys Lys Lys Glu Lys His Arg 245 250 255 Gly Lys Leu Ser Ser Asp Gly Asn Glu Thr Ser Pro Ala Glu Gly 260 265 270 Glu Pro Cys Asp His His Gln Asp Cys Leu Pro Gly Thr Cys Cys 275 280 285 Asp Leu Arg Glu His Leu Cys Thr Pro His Asn Arg Gly Leu Asn 290 295 300 Asn Lys Cys Phe Asp Asp Cys Met Cys Val Glu Gly Leu Arg Cys 305 310 315 Tyr Ala Lys Phe His Arg Asn Arg Arg Val Thr Arg Arg Lys Gly 320 325 330 Arg Cys Val Glu Pro Glu Thr Ala Asn Gly Asp Gln Gly Ser Phe 335 340 345 Ile Asn Val 75 1868 DNA Homo Sapien 75 cagaagggca aaaacattga ctgcctcaag gtctcaagca ccagtcttca 50 ccgcggaaag catgttgtgg ctgttccaat cgctcctgtt tgtcttctgc 100 tttggcccag ggaatgtagt ttcacaaagc agcttaaccc cattgatggt 150 gaacgggatt ctgggggagt cagtaactct tcccctggag tttcctgcag 200 gagagaaggt caacttcatc acttggcttt tcaatgaaac atctcttgcc 250 ttcatagtac cccatgaaac caaaagtcca gaaatccacg tgactaatcc 300 gaaacaggga aagcgactga acttcaccca gtcctactcc ctgcaactca 350 gcaacctgaa gatggaagac acaggctctt acagagccca gatatccaca 400 aagacctctg caaagctgtc cagttacact ctgaggatat taagacaact 450 gaggaacata caagttacca atcacagtca gctatttcag aatatgacct 500 gtgagctcca tctgacttgc tctgtggagg atgcagatga caatgtctca 550 ttcagatggg aggccttggg aaacacactt tcaagtcagc caaacctcac 600 tgtctcctgg gaccccagga tttccagtga acaggactac acctgcatag 650 cagagaatgc tgtcagtaat ttatccttct ctgtctctgc ccagaagctt 700 tgcgaagatg ttaaaattca atatacagat accaaaatga ttctgtttat 750 ggtttctggg atatgcatag tcttcggttt catcatactg ctgttacttg 800 ttttgaggaa aagaagagat tccctatctt tgtctactca gcgaacacag 850 ggccccgcag agtccgcaag gaacctagag tatgtttcag tgtctccaac 900 gaacaacact gtgtatgctt cagtcactca ttcaaacagg gaaacagaaa 950 tctggacacc tagagaaaat gatactatca caatttactc cacaattaat 1000 cattccaaag agagtaaacc cactttttcc agggcaactg cccttgacaa 1050 tgtcgtgtaa gttgctgaaa ggcctcagag gaattcggga atgacacgtc 1100 ttctgatccc atgagacaga acaaagaaca ggaagcttgg ttcctgttgt 1150 tcctggcaac agaatttgaa tatctaggat aggatgatca cctccagtcc 1200 ttcggactta aacctgccta cctgagtcaa acacctaagg ataacatcat 1250 ttccagcatg tggttcaaat aatattttcc aatccacttc aggccaaaac 1300 atgctaaaga taacacacca gcacattgac tctctctttg ataactaagc 1350 aaatggaatt atggttgaca gagagtttat gatccagaag acaaccactt 1400 ctctcctttt agaaagcagc aggattgact tattgagaaa taatgcagtg 1450 tgttggttac atgtgtagtc tctggagttg gatgggccca tcctgataca 1500 agttgagcat cccttgtctg aaatgcttgg gattagaaat gtttcagatt 1550 tcaatttttt ttcagatttt ggaatatttg cattatattt agcggttgag 1600 tatccaaatc caaaaatcca aaattcaaaa tgctccaata agcatttccc 1650 ttgagtttca ttgatgtcga tgcagtgctc aaaatctcag attttggagc 1700 aatttggata ttggattttt ggatttggga tgctcaactt gtacaatgtt 1750 tattagacac atctcctggg acatactgcc taaccttttg gagccttagt 1800 ctcccagact gaaaaaggaa gaggatggta ttacatcagc tccattgttt 1850 gagccaagaa tctaagtc 1868 76 332 PRT Homo Sapien 76 Met Leu Trp Leu Phe Gln Ser Leu Leu Phe Val Phe Cys Phe Gly 1 5 10 15 Pro Gly Asn Val Val Ser Gln Ser Ser Leu Thr Pro Leu Met Val 20 25 30 Asn Gly Ile Leu Gly Glu Ser Val Thr Leu Pro Leu Glu Phe Pro 35 40 45 Ala Gly Glu Lys Val Asn Phe Ile Thr Trp Leu Phe Asn Glu Thr 50 55 60 Ser Leu Ala Phe Ile Val Pro His Glu Thr Lys Ser Pro Glu Ile 65 70 75 His Val Thr Asn Pro Lys Gln Gly Lys Arg Leu Asn Phe Thr Gln 80 85 90 Ser Tyr Ser Leu Gln Leu Ser Asn Leu Lys Met Glu Asp Thr Gly 95 100 105 Ser Tyr Arg Ala Gln Ile Ser Thr Lys Thr Ser Ala Lys Leu Ser 110 115 120 Ser Tyr Thr Leu Arg Ile Leu Arg Gln Leu Arg Asn Ile Gln Val 125 130 135 Thr Asn His Ser Gln Leu Phe Gln Asn Met Thr Cys Glu Leu His 140 145 150 Leu Thr Cys Ser Val Glu Asp Ala Asp Asp Asn Val Ser Phe Arg 155 160 165 Trp Glu Ala Leu Gly Asn Thr Leu Ser Ser Gln Pro Asn Leu Thr 170 175 180 Val Ser Trp Asp Pro Arg Ile Ser Ser Glu Gln Asp Tyr Thr Cys 185 190 195 Ile Ala Glu Asn Ala Val Ser Asn Leu Ser Phe Ser Val Ser Ala 200 205 210 Gln Lys Leu Cys Glu Asp Val Lys Ile Gln Tyr Thr Asp Thr Lys 215 220 225 Met Ile Leu Phe Met Val Ser Gly Ile Cys Ile Val Phe Gly Phe 230 235 240 Ile Ile Leu Leu Leu Leu Val Leu Arg Lys Arg Arg Asp Ser Leu 245 250 255 Ser Leu Ser Thr Gln Arg Thr Gln Gly Pro Ala Glu Ser Ala Arg 260 265 270 Asn Leu Glu Tyr Val Ser Val Ser Pro Thr Asn Asn Thr Val Tyr 275 280 285 Ala Ser Val Thr His Ser Asn Arg Glu Thr Glu Ile Trp Thr Pro 290 295 300 Arg Glu Asn Asp Thr Ile Thr Ile Tyr Ser Thr Ile Asn His Ser 305 310 315 Lys Glu Ser Lys Pro Thr Phe Ser Arg Ala Thr Ala Leu Asp Asn 320 325 330 Val Val 77 3073 DNA Homo Sapien 77 gatccctcga cctcgaccca cgcgtccgct ctttaatgct ttctttttaa 50 gagatcacct tctgacttct cacagaagag gttaactatt acctgtggga 100 agtcagaagg tgatctcttt aatgctttct ttttaagaat ttttcaaatt 150 gagactaatt gcagaggttc cagttgacca gcattcatag gaatgaagac 200 aaacacagag atggtgtgtc taagaaactt caaaaggtgt agacctcctg 250 actgaagcat attggattta tttaattttt ttcactgtat ttctgtcctc 300 ctacaaggga aagtcatgat tacactaact gagctaaaat gcttagcaga 350 tgcccagtca tcttatcaca tcttaaaacc atggtgggac gtcttctggt 400 attacatcac actgatcatg ctgctggtgg ccgtgctggc cggagctctc 450 cagctgacgc agagcagggt tctgtgctgt cttccatgca aagtggaatt 500 tgacaatcac tgtgccgtgc cttgggacat cctgaaagcc agcatgaaca 550 catcctctaa tcctgggaca ccgcttccgc tccccctccg aattcagaat 600 gacctccacc gacagcagta ctcctatatt gatgccgtct gttacgagaa 650 acagctccat tggtttgcaa agtttttccc ctatctggtg ctcttgcaca 700 cgctcatctt tgcagcctgc agcaactttt ggcttcacta ccccagtacc 750 agttccaggc tcgagcattt tgtggccatc cttcacaagt gcttcgattc 800 tccatggacc acccgcgccc tttcagaaac agtggctgag cagtcagtga 850 ggcctctgaa actctccaag tccaagattt tgctttcgtc ctcagggtgt 900 tcagctgaca tagattccgg caaacagtca ttgccctacc cacagccagg 950 tttggagtca gctggtatag aaagcccaac ttccagtggc ctggacaaga 1000 aggagggtga acaggccaaa gccatctttg aaaaagtgaa aagattccgc 1050 atgcatgtgg agcagaagga catcatttat agagtatatc tgaaacagat 1100 aatagtcaaa gtcattttgt ttgtgctcat cataacttat gttccatatt 1150 ttttaaccca catcactctt gaaatcgact gttcagttga tgtgcaggct 1200 tttacaggat ataagcgcta ccagtgtgtc tattccttgg cagaaatctt 1250 taaggtcctg gcttcatttt atgtcatttt ggttatactt tatggtctga 1300 cctcttccta cagcctgtgg tggatgctga ggagttccct gaagcaatat 1350 tcctttgagg cgttaagaga aaaaagcaac tacagtgaca tccctgatgt 1400 caagaatgac tttgccttca tccttcatct ggctgatcag tatgatcctc 1450 tttattccaa acgcttctcc atattcctat cagaggtcag tgagaacaaa 1500 ctgaaacaga tcaacctcaa taatgaatgg acagttgaga aactgaaaag 1550 taagcttgtg aaaaatgccc aggacaagat agaactgcat ctttttatgc 1600 tcaacggtct tccagacaat gtctttgagt taactgaaat ggaagtgcta 1650 agcctggagc ttatcccaga ggtgaagctg ccctctgcag tctcacagct 1700 ggtcaacctc aaggagcttc gtgtgtacca ttcatctctg gtcgtagacc 1750 atcctgcact ggcctttcta gaggagaatt taaaaatcct ccgcctgaaa 1800 tttactgaaa tgggaaaaat cccacgctgg gtatttcacc tcaagaatct 1850 caaggaactt tatctttcgg gctgtgttct ccctgaacag ttgagtacta 1900 tgcagttgga gggctttcag gacttaaaaa atctaaggac cctgtacttg 1950 aagagcagcc tctcccggat cccacaagtt gttacagacc tcctgccttc 2000 attgcagaaa ctgtcccttg ataatgaggg aagcaaactg gttgtgttga 2050 acaacttgaa aaagatggtc aatctgaaaa gcctagaact gatcagctgt 2100 gacctggaac gcatcccaca ttccattttc agcctgaata atttgcatga 2150 gttagaccta agggaaaata accttaaaac tgtggaagag attagctttc 2200 agcatcttca gaatctttcc tgcttaaagt tgtggcacaa taacattgct 2250 tatattcctg cacagattgg ggcattatct aacctagagc agctctcttt 2300 ggaccataat aatattgaga atctgccctt gcagcttttc ctatgcacta 2350 aactacatta tttggatcta agctataacc acttgacctt cattccagaa 2400 gaaatccagt atctgagtaa tttgcagtac tttgctgtga ccaacaacaa 2450 tattgagatg ctaccagatg ggctgtttca gtgcaaaaag ctgcagtgtt 2500 tacttttggg gaaaaatagc ttgatgaatt tgtcccctca tgtgggtgag 2550 ctgtcaaacc ttactcatct ggagctcatt ggtaattacc tggaaacact 2600 tcctcctgaa ctagaaggat gtcagtccct aaaacggaac tgtctgattg 2650 ttgaggagaa cttgctcaat actcttcctc tccctgtaac agaacgttta 2700 cagacgtgct tagacaaatg ttgacttaaa gaaaagagac ccgtgtttca 2750 aaatcatttt taaaagtatg ctcggccggg cgtggtggct catgcctata 2800 atcccagcac tttgggaggc caagatgggc ggattgcttg aggtcaggag 2850 ttcgagacca gtctggccaa cctggtgaaa ccccatctct gctaaaacta 2900 caaaaaaatt agccaggcgt ggtggcgtgc gcctgtaatc ccagctactt 2950 gggaggctga cgcaggggaa ttgcttgaac cagggaggtg gaggttgcag 3000 tgagccgaga ttgtgccact gtacaccagc ctgggtgaca gagcaagact 3050 cttatctcaa aaaaaaaaaa aaa 3073 78 802 PRT Homo Sapien 78 Met Ile Thr Leu Thr Glu Leu Lys Cys Leu Ala Asp Ala Gln Ser 1 5 10 15 Ser Tyr His Ile Leu Lys Pro Trp Trp Asp Val Phe Trp Tyr Tyr 20 25 30 Ile Thr Leu Ile Met Leu Leu Val Ala Val Leu Ala Gly Ala Leu 35 40 45 Gln Leu Thr Gln Ser Arg Val Leu Cys Cys Leu Pro Cys Lys Val 50 55 60 Glu Phe Asp Asn His Cys Ala Val Pro Trp Asp Ile Leu Lys Ala 65 70 75 Ser Met Asn Thr Ser Ser Asn Pro Gly Thr Pro Leu Pro Leu Pro 80 85 90 Leu Arg Ile Gln Asn Asp Leu His Arg Gln Gln Tyr Ser Tyr Ile 95 100 105 Asp Ala Val Cys Tyr Glu Lys Gln Leu His Trp Phe Ala Lys Phe 110 115 120 Phe Pro Tyr Leu Val Leu Leu His Thr Leu Ile Phe Ala Ala Cys 125 130 135 Ser Asn Phe Trp Leu His Tyr Pro Ser Thr Ser Ser Arg Leu Glu 140 145 150 His Phe Val Ala Ile Leu His Lys Cys Phe Asp Ser Pro Trp Thr 155 160 165 Thr Arg Ala Leu Ser Glu Thr Val Ala Glu Gln Ser Val Arg Pro 170 175 180 Leu Lys Leu Ser Lys Ser Lys Ile Leu Leu Ser Ser Ser Gly Cys 185 190 195 Ser Ala Asp Ile Asp Ser Gly Lys Gln Ser Leu Pro Tyr Pro Gln 200 205 210 Pro Gly Leu Glu Ser Ala Gly Ile Glu Ser Pro Thr Ser Ser Gly 215 220 225 Leu Asp Lys Lys Glu Gly Glu Gln Ala Lys Ala Ile Phe Glu Lys 230 235 240 Val Lys Arg Phe Arg Met His Val Glu Gln Lys Asp Ile Ile Tyr 245 250 255 Arg Val Tyr Leu Lys Gln Ile Ile Val Lys Val Ile Leu Phe Val 260 265 270 Leu Ile Ile Thr Tyr Val Pro Tyr Phe Leu Thr His Ile Thr Leu 275 280 285 Glu Ile Asp Cys Ser Val Asp Val Gln Ala Phe Thr Gly Tyr Lys 290 295 300 Arg Tyr Gln Cys Val Tyr Ser Leu Ala Glu Ile Phe Lys Val Leu 305 310 315 Ala Ser Phe Tyr Val Ile Leu Val Ile Leu Tyr Gly Leu Thr Ser 320 325 330 Ser Tyr Ser Leu Trp Trp Met Leu Arg Ser Ser Leu Lys Gln Tyr 335 340 345 Ser Phe Glu Ala Leu Arg Glu Lys Ser Asn Tyr Ser Asp Ile Pro 350 355 360 Asp Val Lys Asn Asp Phe Ala Phe Ile Leu His Leu Ala Asp Gln 365 370 375 Tyr Asp Pro Leu Tyr Ser Lys Arg Phe Ser Ile Phe Leu Ser Glu 380 385 390 Val Ser Glu Asn Lys Leu Lys Gln Ile Asn Leu Asn Asn Glu Trp 395 400 405 Thr Val Glu Lys Leu Lys Ser Lys Leu Val Lys Asn Ala Gln Asp 410 415 420 Lys Ile Glu Leu His Leu Phe Met Leu Asn Gly Leu Pro Asp Asn 425 430 435 Val Phe Glu Leu Thr Glu Met Glu Val Leu Ser Leu Glu Leu Ile 440 445 450 Pro Glu Val Lys Leu Pro Ser Ala Val Ser Gln Leu Val Asn Leu 455 460 465 Lys Glu Leu Arg Val Tyr His Ser Ser Leu Val Val Asp His Pro 470 475 480 Ala Leu Ala Phe Leu Glu Glu Asn Leu Lys Ile Leu Arg Leu Lys 485 490 495 Phe Thr Glu Met Gly Lys Ile Pro Arg Trp Val Phe His Leu Lys 500 505 510 Asn Leu Lys Glu Leu Tyr Leu Ser Gly Cys Val Leu Pro Glu Gln 515 520 525 Leu Ser Thr Met Gln Leu Glu Gly Phe Gln Asp Leu Lys Asn Leu 530 535 540 Arg Thr Leu Tyr Leu Lys Ser Ser Leu Ser Arg Ile Pro Gln Val 545 550 555 Val Thr Asp Leu Leu Pro Ser Leu Gln Lys Leu Ser Leu Asp Asn 560 565 570 Glu Gly Ser Lys Leu Val Val Leu Asn Asn Leu Lys Lys Met Val 575 580 585 Asn Leu Lys Ser Leu Glu Leu Ile Ser Cys Asp Leu Glu Arg Ile 590 595 600 Pro His Ser Ile Phe Ser Leu Asn Asn Leu His Glu Leu Asp Leu 605 610 615 Arg Glu Asn Asn Leu Lys Thr Val Glu Glu Ile Ser Phe Gln His 620 625 630 Leu Gln Asn Leu Ser Cys Leu Lys Leu Trp His Asn Asn Ile Ala 635 640 645 Tyr Ile Pro Ala Gln Ile Gly Ala Leu Ser Asn Leu Glu Gln Leu 650 655 660 Ser Leu Asp His Asn Asn Ile Glu Asn Leu Pro Leu Gln Leu Phe 665 670 675 Leu Cys Thr Lys Leu His Tyr Leu Asp Leu Ser Tyr Asn His Leu 680 685 690 Thr Phe Ile Pro Glu Glu Ile Gln Tyr Leu Ser Asn Leu Gln Tyr 695 700 705 Phe Ala Val Thr Asn Asn Asn Ile Glu Met Leu Pro Asp Gly Leu 710 715 720 Phe Gln Cys Lys Lys Leu Gln Cys Leu Leu Leu Gly Lys Asn Ser 725 730 735 Leu Met Asn Leu Ser Pro His Val Gly Glu Leu Ser Asn Leu Thr 740 745 750 His Leu Glu Leu Ile Gly Asn Tyr Leu Glu Thr Leu Pro Pro Glu 755 760 765 Leu Glu Gly Cys Gln Ser Leu Lys Arg Asn Cys Leu Ile Val Glu 770 775 780 Glu Asn Leu Leu Asn Thr Leu Pro Leu Pro Val Thr Glu Arg Leu 785 790 795 Gln Thr Cys Leu Asp Lys Cys 800 79 1504 DNA Homo Sapien 79 cggacgcgtg ggccgcgctc cctcacggcc cctcggcggc gcccgtcgga 50 tccggcctct ctctgcgccc cggggcgcgc cacctccccg ccggaggtgt 100 ccacgcgtcc ggccgtccat ccgtccgtcc ctcctggggc cggcgctgac 150 catgcccagc ggctgccgct gcctgcatct cgtgtgcctg ttgtgcattc 200 tgggggctcc cggtcagcct gtccgagccg atgactgcag ctcccactgt 250 gacctggccc acggctgctg tgcacctgac ggctcctgca ggtgtgaccc 300 gggctgggag gggctgcact gtgagcgctg tgtgaggatg cctggctgcc 350 agcacggtac ctgccaccag ccatggcagt gcatctgcca cagtggctgg 400 gcaggcaagt tctgtgacaa agatgaacat atctgtacca cgcagtcccc 450 ctgccagaat ggaggccagt gcatgtatga cgggggcggt gagtaccatt 500 gtgtgtgctt accaggcttc catgggcgtg actgcgagcg caaggctgga 550 ccctgtgaac aggcaggctc cccatgccgc aatggcgggc agtgccagga 600 cgaccagggc tttgctctca acttcacgtg ccgctgcttg gtgggctttg 650 tgggtgcccg ctgtgaggta aatgtggatg actgcctgat gcggccttgt 700 gctaacggtg ccacctgcct tgacggcata aaccgcttct cctgcctctg 750 tcctgagggc tttgctggac gcttctgcac catcaacctg gatgactgtg 800 ccagccgccc atgccagaga ggggcccgct gtcgggaccg tgtccacgac 850 ttcgactgcc tctgccccag tggctatggt ggcaagacct gtgagcttgt 900 cttacctgtc ccagaccccc caaccacagt ggacacccct ctagggccca 950 cctcagctgt agtggtacct gctacggggc cagcccccca cagcgcaggg 1000 gctggtctgc tgcggatctc agtgaaggag gtggtgcgga ggcaagaggc 1050 tgggctaggt gagcctagct tggtggccct ggtggtgttt ggggccctca 1100 ctgctgccct ggttctggct actgtgttgc tgaccctgag ggcctggcgc 1150 cggggtgtct gcccccctgg accctgttgc taccctgccc cacactatgc 1200 tccagcgtgc caggaccagg agtgtcaggt tagcatgctg ccagcagggc 1250 tccccctgcc acgtgacttg ccccctgagc ctggaaagac cacagcactg 1300 tgatggaggt gggggctttc tggccccctt cctcacctct tccacccctc 1350 agactggagt ggtccgttct caccaccctt cagcttgggt acacacacag 1400 aggagacctc agcctcacac cagaaatatt atttttttaa tacacagaat 1450 gtaagatgga attttatcaa ataaaactat gaaaatgcaa aaaaaaaaaa 1500 aaaa 1504 80 383 PRT Homo Sapien 80 Met Pro Ser Gly Cys Arg Cys Leu His Leu Val Cys Leu Leu Cys 1 5 10 15 Ile Leu Gly Ala Pro Gly Gln Pro Val Arg Ala Asp Asp Cys Ser 20 25 30 Ser His Cys Asp Leu Ala His Gly Cys Cys Ala Pro Asp Gly Ser 35 40 45 Cys Arg Cys Asp Pro Gly Trp Glu Gly Leu His Cys Glu Arg Cys 50 55 60 Val Arg Met Pro Gly Cys Gln His Gly Thr Cys His Gln Pro Trp 65 70 75 Gln Cys Ile Cys His Ser Gly Trp Ala Gly Lys Phe Cys Asp Lys 80 85 90 Asp Glu His Ile Cys Thr Thr Gln Ser Pro Cys Gln Asn Gly Gly 95 100 105 Gln Cys Met Tyr Asp Gly Gly Gly Glu Tyr His Cys Val Cys Leu 110 115 120 Pro Gly Phe His Gly Arg Asp Cys Glu Arg Lys Ala Gly Pro Cys 125 130 135 Glu Gln Ala Gly Ser Pro Cys Arg Asn Gly Gly Gln Cys Gln Asp 140 145 150 Asp Gln Gly Phe Ala Leu Asn Phe Thr Cys Arg Cys Leu Val Gly 155 160 165 Phe Val Gly Ala Arg Cys Glu Val Asn Val Asp Asp Cys Leu Met 170 175 180 Arg Pro Cys Ala Asn Gly Ala Thr Cys Leu Asp Gly Ile Asn Arg 185 190 195 Phe Ser Cys Leu Cys Pro Glu Gly Phe Ala Gly Arg Phe Cys Thr 200 205 210 Ile Asn Leu Asp Asp Cys Ala Ser Arg Pro Cys Gln Arg Gly Ala 215 220 225 Arg Cys Arg Asp Arg Val His Asp Phe Asp Cys Leu Cys Pro Ser 230 235 240 Gly Tyr Gly Gly Lys Thr Cys Glu Leu Val Leu Pro Val Pro Asp 245 250 255 Pro Pro Thr Thr Val Asp Thr Pro Leu Gly Pro Thr Ser Ala Val 260 265 270 Val Val Pro Ala Thr Gly Pro Ala Pro His Ser Ala Gly Ala Gly 275 280 285 Leu Leu Arg Ile Ser Val Lys Glu Val Val Arg Arg Gln Glu Ala 290 295 300 Gly Leu Gly Glu Pro Ser Leu Val Ala Leu Val Val Phe Gly Ala 305 310 315 Leu Thr Ala Ala Leu Val Leu Ala Thr Val Leu Leu Thr Leu Arg 320 325 330 Ala Trp Arg Arg Gly Val Cys Pro Pro Gly Pro Cys Cys Tyr Pro 335 340 345 Ala Pro His Tyr Ala Pro Ala Cys Gln Asp Gln Glu Cys Gln Val 350 355 360 Ser Met Leu Pro Ala Gly Leu Pro Leu Pro Arg Asp Leu Pro Pro 365 370 375 Glu Pro Gly Lys Thr Thr Ala Leu 380 81 1034 DNA Homo Sapien 81 gtttgttgct caaaccgagt tctggagaac gccatcagct cgctgcttaa 50 aattaaacca caggttccat tatgggtcga cttgatggga aagtcatcat 100 cctgacggcc gctgctcagg ggattggcca agcagctgcc ttagcttttg 150 caagagaagg tgccaaagtc atagccacag acattaatga gtccaaactt 200 caggaactgg aaaagtaccc gggtattcaa actcgtgtcc ttgatgtcac 250 aaagaagaaa caaattgatc agtttgccag tgaagttgag agacttgatg 300 ttctctttaa tgttgctggt tttgtccatc atggaactgt cctggattgt 350 gaggagaaag actgggactt ctcgatgaat ctcaatgtgc gcagcatgta 400 cctgatgatc aaggcattcc ttcctaaaat gcttgctcag aaatctggca 450 atattatcaa catgtcttct gtggcttcca gcgtcaaagg agttgtgaac 500 agatgtgtgt acagcacaac caaggcagcc gtgattggcc tcacaaaatc 550 tctggctgca gatttcatcc agcagggcat caggtgcaac tgtgtgtgcc 600 caggaacagt tgatacgcca tctctacaag aaagaataca agccagagga 650 aatcctgaag aggcacggaa tgatttcctg aagagacaaa agacgggaag 700 attcgcaact gcagaagaaa tagccatgct ctgcgtgtat ttggcttctg 750 atgaatctgc ttatgtaact ggtaaccctg tcatcattga tggaggctgg 800 agcttgtgat tttaggatct ccatggtggg aaggaaggca ggcccttcct 850 atccacagtg aacctggtta cgaagaaaac tcaccaatca tctccttcct 900 gttaatcaca tgttaatgaa aataagctct ttttaatgat gtcactgttt 950 gcaagagtct gattctttaa gtatattaat ctctttgtaa tctcttctga 1000 aatcattgta aagaaataaa aatattgaac tcat 1034 82 245 PRT Homo Sapien 82 Met Gly Arg Leu Asp Gly Lys Val Ile Ile Leu Thr Ala Ala Ala 1 5 10 15 Gln Gly Ile Gly Gln Ala Ala Ala Leu Ala Phe Ala Arg Glu Gly 20 25 30 Ala Lys Val Ile Ala Thr Asp Ile Asn Glu Ser Lys Leu Gln Glu 35 40 45 Leu Glu Lys Tyr Pro Gly Ile Gln Thr Arg Val Leu Asp Val Thr 50 55 60 Lys Lys Lys Gln Ile Asp Gln Phe Ala Ser Glu Val Glu Arg Leu 65 70 75 Asp Val Leu Phe Asn Val Ala Gly Phe Val His His Gly Thr Val 80 85 90 Leu Asp Cys Glu Glu Lys Asp Trp Asp Phe Ser Met Asn Leu Asn 95 100 105 Val Arg Ser Met Tyr Leu Met Ile Lys Ala Phe Leu Pro Lys Met 110 115 120 Leu Ala Gln Lys Ser Gly Asn Ile Ile Asn Met Ser Ser Val Ala 125 130 135 Ser Ser Val Lys Gly Val Val Asn Arg Cys Val Tyr Ser Thr Thr 140 145 150 Lys Ala Ala Val Ile Gly Leu Thr Lys Ser Leu Ala Ala Asp Phe 155 160 165 Ile Gln Gln Gly Ile Arg Cys Asn Cys Val Cys Pro Gly Thr Val 170 175 180 Asp Thr Pro Ser Leu Gln Glu Arg Ile Gln Ala Arg Gly Asn Pro 185 190 195 Glu Glu Ala Arg Asn Asp Phe Leu Lys Arg Gln Lys Thr Gly Arg 200 205 210 Phe Ala Thr Ala Glu Glu Ile Ala Met Leu Cys Val Tyr Leu Ala 215 220 225 Ser Asp Glu Ser Ala Tyr Val Thr Gly Asn Pro Val Ile Ile Asp 230 235 240 Gly Gly Trp Ser Leu 245 83 1961 DNA Homo Sapien 83 gggcggcggc ggcagcggtt ggaggttgta ggaccggcga ggaataggaa 50 tcatggcggc tgcgctgttc gtgctgctgg gattcgcgct gctgggcacc 100 cacggagcct ccggggctgc cggcttcgtc caggcgccgc tgtcccagca 150 gaggtgggtg gggggcagtg tggagctgca ctgcgaggcc gtgggcagcc 200 cggtgcccga gatccagtgg tggtttgaag ggcagggtcc caacgacacc 250 tgctcccagc tctgggacgg cgcccggctg gaccgcgtcc acatccacgc 300 cacctaccac cagcacgcgg ccagcaccat ctccatcgac acgctcgtgg 350 aggaggacac gggcacttac gagtgccggg ccagcaacga cccggatcgc 400 aaccacctga cccgggcgcc cagggtcaag tgggtccgcg cccaggcagt 450 cgtgctagtc ctggaacccg gcacagtctt cactaccgta gaagaccttg 500 gctccaagat actcctcacc tgctccttga atgacagcgc cacagaggtc 550 acagggcacc gctggctgaa ggggggcgtg gtgctgaagg aggacgcgct 600 gcccggccag aaaacggagt tcaaggtgga ctccgacgac cagtggggag 650 agtactcctg cgtcttcctc cccgagccca tgggcacggc caacatccag 700 ctccacgggc ctcccagagt gaaggctgtg aagtcgtcag aacacatcaa 750 cgagggggag acggccatgc tggtctgcaa gtcagagtcc gtgccacctg 800 tcactgactg ggcctggtac aagatcactg actctgagga caaggccctc 850 atgaacggct ccgagagcag gttcttcgtg agttcctcgc agggccggtc 900 agagctacac attgagaacc tgaacatgga ggccgacccc ggccagtacc 950 ggtgcaacgg caccagctcc aagggctccg accaggccat catcacgctc 1000 cgcgtgcgca gccacctggc cgccctctgg cccttcctgg gcatcgtggc 1050 tgaggtgctg gtgctggtca ccatcatctt catctacgag aagcgccgga 1100 agcccgagga cgtcctggat gatgacgacg ccggctctgc acccctgaag 1150 agcagcgggc agcaccagaa tgacaaaggc aagaacgtcc gccagaggaa 1200 ctcttcctga ggcaggtggc ccgaggacgc tccctgctcc acgtctgcgc 1250 cgccgccgga gtccactccc agtgcttgca agattccaag ttctcacctc 1300 ttaaagaaaa cccaccccgt agattcccat catacacttc cttctttttt 1350 aaaaaagttg ggttttctcc attcaggatt ctgttcctta ggtttttttc 1400 cttctgaagt gtttcacgag agcccgggag ctgctgccct gcggccccgt 1450 ctgtggcttt cagcctctgg gtctgagtca tggccgggtg ggcggcacag 1500 ccttctccac tggccggagt cagtgccagg tccttgccct ttgtggaaag 1550 tcacaggtca cacgaggggc cccgtgtcct gcctgtctga agccaatgct 1600 gtctggttgc gccatttttg tgcttttatg tttaatttta tgagggccac 1650 gggtctgtgt tcgactcagc ctcagggacg actctgacct cttggccaca 1700 gaggactcac ttgcccacac cgagggcgac cccgtcacag cctcaagtca 1750 ctcccaagcc ccctccttgt ctgtgcatcc gggggcagct ctggaggggg 1800 tttgctgggg aactggcgcc atcgccggga ctccagaacc gcagaagcct 1850 ccccagctca cccctggagg acggccggct ctctatagca ccagggctca 1900 cgtgggaacc cccctcccac ccaccgccac aataaagatc gcccccacct 1950 ccacccaaaa a 1961 84 385 PRT Homo Sapien 84 Met Ala Ala Ala Leu Phe Val Leu Leu Gly Phe Ala Leu Leu Gly 1 5 10 15 Thr His Gly Ala Ser Gly Ala Ala Gly Phe Val Gln Ala Pro Leu 20 25 30 Ser Gln Gln Arg Trp Val Gly Gly Ser Val Glu Leu His Cys Glu 35 40 45 Ala Val Gly Ser Pro Val Pro Glu Ile Gln Trp Trp Phe Glu Gly 50 55 60 Gln Gly Pro Asn Asp Thr Cys Ser Gln Leu Trp Asp Gly Ala Arg 65 70 75 Leu Asp Arg Val His Ile His Ala Thr Tyr His Gln His Ala Ala 80 85 90 Ser Thr Ile Ser Ile Asp Thr Leu Val Glu Glu Asp Thr Gly Thr 95 100 105 Tyr Glu Cys Arg Ala Ser Asn Asp Pro Asp Arg Asn His Leu Thr 110 115 120 Arg Ala Pro Arg Val Lys Trp Val Arg Ala Gln Ala Val Val Leu 125 130 135 Val Leu Glu Pro Gly Thr Val Phe Thr Thr Val Glu Asp Leu Gly 140 145 150 Ser Lys Ile Leu Leu Thr Cys Ser Leu Asn Asp Ser Ala Thr Glu 155 160 165 Val Thr Gly His Arg Trp Leu Lys Gly Gly Val Val Leu Lys Glu 170 175 180 Asp Ala Leu Pro Gly Gln Lys Thr Glu Phe Lys Val Asp Ser Asp 185 190 195 Asp Gln Trp Gly Glu Tyr Ser Cys Val Phe Leu Pro Glu Pro Met 200 205 210 Gly Thr Ala Asn Ile Gln Leu His Gly Pro Pro Arg Val Lys Ala 215 220 225 Val Lys Ser Ser Glu His Ile Asn Glu Gly Glu Thr Ala Met Leu 230 235 240 Val Cys Lys Ser Glu Ser Val Pro Pro Val Thr Asp Trp Ala Trp 245 250 255 Tyr Lys Ile Thr Asp Ser Glu Asp Lys Ala Leu Met Asn Gly Ser 260 265 270 Glu Ser Arg Phe Phe Val Ser Ser Ser Gln Gly Arg Ser Glu Leu 275 280 285 His Ile Glu Asn Leu Asn Met Glu Ala Asp Pro Gly Gln Tyr Arg 290 295 300 Cys Asn Gly Thr Ser Ser Lys Gly Ser Asp Gln Ala Ile Ile Thr 305 310 315 Leu Arg Val Arg Ser His Leu Ala Ala Leu Trp Pro Phe Leu Gly 320 325 330 Ile Val Ala Glu Val Leu Val Leu Val Thr Ile Ile Phe Ile Tyr 335 340 345 Glu Lys Arg Arg Lys Pro Glu Asp Val Leu Asp Asp Asp Asp Ala 350 355 360 Gly Ser Ala Pro Leu Lys Ser Ser Gly Gln His Gln Asn Asp Lys 365 370 375 Gly Lys Asn Val Arg Gln Arg Asn Ser Ser 380 385 85 1002 DNA Homo Sapien 85 ggctcgagca aagacatacg aacagggagg aaggccgact gaaagaaaga 50 cggagaagag gagagagaag ccagggccga gcgtgccagc aggcggatgg 100 agggcggcct ggtggaggag gagacgtagt ggcctgggct gagctgggtg 150 ggccgggaga agcgggtgcc tcagagtggg ggtgggggca tgggaggggc 200 aggcattctg ctgctgctgc tggctggggc gggggtggtg gtggcctgga 250 gacccccaaa gggaaagtgt cccctgcgct gctcctgctc taaagacagc 300 gccctgtgtg agggctcccc ggacctgccc gtcagcttct ctccgaccct 350 gctgtcactc tcactcgtca ggacgggagt cacccagctg aaggccggca 400 gcttcctgag aattccgtct ctgcacctgc tcctcttcac ctccaactcc 450 ttctccgtga ttgaggacga tgcatttgcg ggcctgtccc acctgcagta 500 cctcttcatc gaggacaatg agattggctc catctctaag aatgccctca 550 gaggacttcg ctcgcttaca cacctaagcc tggccaataa ccatctggag 600 accctcccca gattcctgtt ccgaggcctg gacaccctta ctcacgtgga 650 cctccgcggg aacccgttcc agtgtgactg ccgcgtcctc tggctcctgc 700 agtggatgcc caccgtgaat gccagcgtgg ggaccggcgc ctgtgcgggc 750 cccgcctccc tgagccacat gcagctccac cacctcgacc ccaagacttt 800 caagtgcaga gccataggtg gggggctttc ccgatggggt gggaggcggg 850 agatctgggg gaaaggctgc cagggccaag aggctcgtct cactccctgc 900 cctgccattt cccggagtgg gaagaccctg agcaagcagc actgccttcc 950 tgagccccag ttttctcatc tgtaaagtgg gggtaataaa cagtgatata 1000 gg 1002 86 261 PRT Homo Sapien 86 Met Gly Gly Ala Gly Ile Leu Leu Leu Leu Leu Ala Gly Ala Gly 1 5 10 15 Val Val Val Ala Trp Arg Pro Pro Lys Gly Lys Cys Pro Leu Arg 20 25 30 Cys Ser Cys Ser Lys Asp Ser Ala Leu Cys Glu Gly Ser Pro Asp 35 40 45 Leu Pro Val Ser Phe Ser Pro Thr Leu Leu Ser Leu Ser Leu Val 50 55 60 Arg Thr Gly Val Thr Gln Leu Lys Ala Gly Ser Phe Leu Arg Ile 65 70 75 Pro Ser Leu His Leu Leu Leu Phe Thr Ser Asn Ser Phe Ser Val 80 85 90 Ile Glu Asp Asp Ala Phe Ala Gly Leu Ser His Leu Gln Tyr Leu 95 100 105 Phe Ile Glu Asp Asn Glu Ile Gly Ser Ile Ser Lys Asn Ala Leu 110 115 120 Arg Gly Leu Arg Ser Leu Thr His Leu Ser Leu Ala Asn Asn His 125 130 135 Leu Glu Thr Leu Pro Arg Phe Leu Phe Arg Gly Leu Asp Thr Leu 140 145 150 Thr His Val Asp Leu Arg Gly Asn Pro Phe Gln Cys Asp Cys Arg 155 160 165 Val Leu Trp Leu Leu Gln Trp Met Pro Thr Val Asn Ala Ser Val 170 175 180 Gly Thr Gly Ala Cys Ala Gly Pro Ala Ser Leu Ser His Met Gln 185 190 195 Leu His His Leu Asp Pro Lys Thr Phe Lys Cys Arg Ala Ile Gly 200 205 210 Gly Gly Leu Ser Arg Trp Gly Gly Arg Arg Glu Ile Trp Gly Lys 215 220 225 Gly Cys Gln Gly Gln Glu Ala Arg Leu Thr Pro Cys Pro Ala Ile 230 235 240 Ser Arg Ser Gly Lys Thr Leu Ser Lys Gln His Cys Leu Pro Glu 245 250 255 Pro Gln Phe Ser His Leu 260 87 2945 DNA Homo Sapien 87 cggacgcgtg gggcggcgag agcagctgca gttcgcatct caggcagtac 50 ctagaggagc tgccggtgcc tcctcagaac atctcctgat cgctacccag 100 gaccaggcac caaggacagg gagtcccagg cgcacacccc ccattctggg 150 tcccccaggc ccagaccccc actctgccac aggttgcatc ttgacctggt 200 cctcctgcag aagtggcccc tgtggtcctg ctctgagact cgtccctggg 250 cgcccctgca gcccctttct atgactccat ctggatttgg ctggctgtgg 300 ggacgcggtc cgaggggcgg cctggctctc agcgtggtgg cagccagctc 350 tctggccacc atggcaaatg ctgagatctg aggggacaag gctctacagc 400 ctcagccagg ggcactcagc tgttgcaggg tgtgatggag aacaaagcta 450 tgtacctaca caccgtcagc gactgtgaca ccagctccat ctgtgaggat 500 tcctttgatg gcaggagcct gtccaagctg aacctgtgtg aggatggtcc 550 atgtcacaaa cggcgggcaa gcatctgctg tacccagctg gggtccctgt 600 cggccctgaa gcatgctgtc ctggggctct acctgctggt cttcctgatt 650 cttgtgggca tcttcatctt agcagggcca ccgggaccca aaggtgatca 700 gggggatgaa ggaaaggaag gcaggcctgg catccctgga ttgcctggac 750 ttcgaggtct gcccggggag agaggtaccc caggattgcc cgggcccaag 800 ggcgatgatg ggaagctggg ggccacagga ccaatgggca tgcgtgggtt 850 caaaggtgac cgaggcccaa aaggagagaa aggagagaaa ggagacagag 900 ctggggatgc cagtggcgtg gaggccccga tgatgatccg cctggtgaat 950 ggctcaggtc cgcacgaggg ccgcgtggaa gtgtaccacg accggcgctg 1000 gggcaccgtg tgtgacgacg gctgggacaa gaaggacgga gacgtggtgt 1050 gccgcatgct cggcttccgc ggtgtggagg aggtgtaccg cacagctcga 1100 ttcgggcaag gcactgggag gatctggatg gatgacgttg cctgcaaggg 1150 cacagaggaa accatcttcc gctgcagctt ctccaaatgg ggggtgacaa 1200 actgtggaca tgccgaagat gccagcgtga catgcaacag acactgaaag 1250 tgggcagagc ccaagttcgg ggtcctgcac agagcaccct tgctgcatcc 1300 ctggggtggg gcacagctcg gggccaccct gaccatgcct cgaccacacc 1350 ccgtccagca ttctcagtcc tcacacctgc atcccaggac cgtgggggcc 1400 ggtcgtcatt tccctcttga acatgtgctc cgaagtataa ctctgggacc 1450 tactgcccgt ctctctcttc caccaggttc ctgcatgagg agccctgatc 1500 aactggatca ccactttgcc cagcctctga acaccatgca ccaggcctca 1550 atatcccagt tccctttggc cttttagtta caggtgaatg ctgagaatgt 1600 gtcagagaca agtgcagcag cagcgatggt tggtagtata gatcatttac 1650 tcttcagaca attcccaaac ctccattagt ccaagagttt ctacatcttc 1700 ctccccagca agaggcaacg tcaagtgatg aatttccccc ctttactctg 1750 cctctgctcc ccatttgcta gtttgaggaa gtgacataga ggagaagcca 1800 gctgtagggg caagagggaa atgcaagtca cctgcaggaa tccagctaga 1850 tttggagaag ggaatgaaac taacattgaa tgactaccat ggcacgctaa 1900 atagtatctt gggtgccaaa ttcatgtatc cacttagctg cattggtcca 1950 gggcatgtca gtctggatac agccttacct tcaggtagca cttaactggt 2000 ccattcacct agactgcaag taagaagaca aaatgactga gaccgtgtgc 2050 ccacctgaac ttattgtctt tacttggcct gagctaaaag cttgggtgca 2100 ggacctgtgt aactagaaag ttgcctactt cagaacctcc agggcgtgag 2150 tgcaaggtca aacatgactg gcttccaggc cgaccatcaa tgtaggagga 2200 gagctgatgt ggagggtgac atgggggctg cccatgttaa acctgagtcc 2250 agtgctctgg cattgggcag tcacggttaa agccaagtca tgtgtgtctc 2300 agctgtttgg aggtgatgat tttgcatctt ccaagcctct tcaggtgtga 2350 atctgtggtc aggaaaacac aagtcctaat ggaaccctta ggggggaagg 2400 aaatgaagat tccctataac ctctgggggt ggggagtagg aataaggggc 2450 cttgggcctc cataaatctg caatctgcac cctcctccta gagacaggga 2500 gatcgtgttc tgctttttac atgaggagca gaactgggcc atacacgtgt 2550 tcaagaacta ggggagctac ctggtagcaa gtgagtgcag acccacctca 2600 ccttggggga atctcaaact cataggcctc agatacacga tcacctgtca 2650 tatcaggtga gcactggcct gcttggggag agacctgggc ccctccaggt 2700 gtaggaacag caacactcct ggctgacaac taagccaata tggccctagg 2750 tcattcttgc ttccaatatg cttgccactc cttaaatgtc ctaatgatga 2800 gaaactctct ttctgaccaa ttgctatgtt tacataacac gcatgtactc 2850 atgcatccct tgccagagcc catatatgta tgcatatata aacatagcac 2900 tttttactac atagctcagc acattgcaag gtttgcattt aagtt 2945 88 270 PRT Homo Sapien 88 Met Glu Asn Lys Ala Met Tyr Leu His Thr Val Ser Asp Cys Asp 1 5 10 15 Thr Ser Ser Ile Cys Glu Asp Ser Phe Asp Gly Arg Ser Leu Ser 20 25 30 Lys Leu Asn Leu Cys Glu Asp Gly Pro Cys His Lys Arg Arg Ala 35 40 45 Ser Ile Cys Cys Thr Gln Leu Gly Ser Leu Ser Ala Leu Lys His 50 55 60 Ala Val Leu Gly Leu Tyr Leu Leu Val Phe Leu Ile Leu Val Gly 65 70 75 Ile Phe Ile Leu Ala Gly Pro Pro Gly Pro Lys Gly Asp Gln Gly 80 85 90 Asp Glu Gly Lys Glu Gly Arg Pro Gly Ile Pro Gly Leu Pro Gly 95 100 105 Leu Arg Gly Leu Pro Gly Glu Arg Gly Thr Pro Gly Leu Pro Gly 110 115 120 Pro Lys Gly Asp Asp Gly Lys Leu Gly Ala Thr Gly Pro Met Gly 125 130 135 Met Arg Gly Phe Lys Gly Asp Arg Gly Pro Lys Gly Glu Lys Gly 140 145 150 Glu Lys Gly Asp Arg Ala Gly Asp Ala Ser Gly Val Glu Ala Pro 155 160 165 Met Met Ile Arg Leu Val Asn Gly Ser Gly Pro His Glu Gly Arg 170 175 180 Val Glu Val Tyr His Asp Arg Arg Trp Gly Thr Val Cys Asp Asp 185 190 195 Gly Trp Asp Lys Lys Asp Gly Asp Val Val Cys Arg Met Leu Gly 200 205 210 Phe Arg Gly Val Glu Glu Val Tyr Arg Thr Ala Arg Phe Gly Gln 215 220 225 Gly Thr Gly Arg Ile Trp Met Asp Asp Val Ala Cys Lys Gly Thr 230 235 240 Glu Glu Thr Ile Phe Arg Cys Ser Phe Ser Lys Trp Gly Val Thr 245 250 255 Asn Cys Gly His Ala Glu Asp Ala Ser Val Thr Cys Asn Arg His 260 265 270 89 2758 DNA Homo Sapien 89 gtcgccgcga gggacgcaga gagcaccctc cacgcccaga tgcctgcgta 50 gtttttgtga ccagtccgct cctgcctccc cctggggcag tagaggggga 100 gcgatggaga actggactgg caggccctgg ctgtatctgc tgctgcttct 150 gtccctccct cagctctgct tggatcagga ggtgttgtcc ggacactctc 200 ttcagacacc tacagaggag ggccagggcc ccgaaggtgt ctggggacct 250 tgggtccagt gggcctcttg ctcccagccc tgcggggtgg gggtgcagcg 300 caggagccgg acatgtcagc tccctacagt gcagctccac ccgagtctgc 350 ccctccctcc ccggccccca agacatccag aagccctcct cccccggggc 400 cagggtccca gaccccagac ttctccagaa accctcccct tgtacaggac 450 acagtctcgg ggaaggggtg gcccacttcg aggtcccgct tcccacctag 500 ggagagagga gacccaggag attcgagcgg ccaggaggtc ccggcttcga 550 gaccccatca agccaggaat gttcggttat gggagagtgc cctttgcatt 600 gccactgcac cggaaccgca ggcaccctcg gagcccaccc agatctgagc 650 tgtccctgat ctcttctaga ggggaagagg ctattccgtc ccctactcca 700 agagcagagc cattctccgc aaacggcagc ccccaaactg agctccctcc 750 cacagaactg tctgtccaca ccccatcccc ccaagcagaa cctctaagcc 800 ctgaaactgc tcagacagag gtggccccca gaaccaggcc tgccccccta 850 cggcatcacc ccagagccca ggcctctggc acagagcccc cctcacccac 900 gcactcctta ggagaaggtg gcttcttccg tgcatcccct cagccacgaa 950 ggccaagttc ccagggttgg gccagtcccc aggtagcagg gagacgccct 1000 gatccttttc cttcggtccc tcggggccga ggccagcagg gccaagggcc 1050 ttggggaacg ggggggactc ctcacgggcc ccgcctggag cctgaccctc 1100 agcacccggg cgcctggctg cccctgctga gcaacggccc ccatgccagc 1150 tccctctgga gcctctttgc tcccagtagc cctattccaa gatgttctgg 1200 ggagagtgaa cagctaagag cctgcagcca agcgccctgc ccccctgagc 1250 agccagaccc ccgggccctg cagtgcgcag cctttaactc ccaggaattc 1300 atgggccagc tgtatcagtg ggagcccttc actgaagtcc agggctccca 1350 gcgctgtgaa ctgaactgcc ggccccgtgg cttccgcttc tatgtccgtc 1400 acactgaaaa ggtccaggat gggaccctgt gtcagcctgg agcccctgac 1450 atctgtgtgg ctggacgctg tctgagcccc ggctgtgatg ggatccttgg 1500 ctctggcagg cgtcctgatg gctgtggagt ctgtgggggt gatgattcta 1550 cctgtcgcct tgtttcgggg aacctcactg accgaggggg ccccctgggc 1600 tatcagaaga tcttgtggat tccagcggga gccttgcggc tccagattgc 1650 ccagctccgg cctagctcca actacctggc acttcgtggc cctgggggcc 1700 ggtccatcat caatgggaac tgggctgtgg atccccctgg gtcctacagg 1750 gccggcggga ccgtctttcg atataaccgt cctcccaggg aggagggcaa 1800 aggggagagt ctgtcggctg aaggccccac cacccagcct gtggatgtct 1850 atatgatctt tcaggaggaa aacccaggcg ttttttatca gtatgtcatc 1900 tcttcacctc ctccaatcct tgagaacccc accccagagc cccctgtccc 1950 ccagcttcag ccggagattc tgagggtgga gcccccactt gctccggcac 2000 cccgcccagc ccggacccca ggcaccctcc agcgtcaggt gcggatcccc 2050 cagatgcccg ccccgcccca tcccaggaca cccctggggt ctccagctgc 2100 gtactggaaa cgagtgggac actctgcatg ctcagcgtcc tgcgggaaag 2150 gtgtctggcg ccccattttc ctctgcatct cccgtgagtc gggagaggaa 2200 ctggatgaac gcagctgtgc cgcgggtgcc aggcccccag cctcccctga 2250 accctgccac ggcaccccat gccccccata ctgggaggct ggcgagtgga 2300 catcctgcag ccgctcctgt ggccccggca cccagcaccg ccagctgcag 2350 tgccggcagg aatttggggg gggtggctcc tcggtgcccc cggagcgctg 2400 tggacatctc ccccggccca acatcaccca gtcttgccag ctgcgcctct 2450 gtggccattg ggaagttggc tctccttgga gccagtgctc cgtgcggtgc 2500 ggccggggcc agagaagccg gcaggttcgc tgtgttggga acaacggtga 2550 tgaagtgagc gagcaggagt gtgcgtcagg ccccccacag ccccccagca 2600 gagaggcctg tgacatgggg ccctgtacta ctgcctggtt ccacagcgac 2650 tggagctcca aggtgagccc ggaaccccca gccatatcct gcatcctggg 2700 taaccatgcc caggacacct cagcctttcc agcatagctc aataaacttg 2750 tattgatc 2758 90 877 PRT Homo Sapien 90 Met Glu Asn Trp Thr Gly Arg Pro Trp Leu Tyr Leu Leu Leu Leu 1 5 10 15 Leu Ser Leu Pro Gln Leu Cys Leu Asp Gln Glu Val Leu Ser Gly 20 25 30 His Ser Leu Gln Thr Pro Thr Glu Glu Gly Gln Gly Pro Glu Gly 35 40 45 Val Trp Gly Pro Trp Val Gln Trp Ala Ser Cys Ser Gln Pro Cys 50 55 60 Gly Val Gly Val Gln Arg Arg Ser Arg Thr Cys Gln Leu Pro Thr 65 70 75 Val Gln Leu His Pro Ser Leu Pro Leu Pro Pro Arg Pro Pro Arg 80 85 90 His Pro Glu Ala Leu Leu Pro Arg Gly Gln Gly Pro Arg Pro Gln 95 100 105 Thr Ser Pro Glu Thr Leu Pro Leu Tyr Arg Thr Gln Ser Arg Gly 110 115 120 Arg Gly Gly Pro Leu Arg Gly Pro Ala Ser His Leu Gly Arg Glu 125 130 135 Glu Thr Gln Glu Ile Arg Ala Ala Arg Arg Ser Arg Leu Arg Asp 140 145 150 Pro Ile Lys Pro Gly Met Phe Gly Tyr Gly Arg Val Pro Phe Ala 155 160 165 Leu Pro Leu His Arg Asn Arg Arg His Pro Arg Ser Pro Pro Arg 170 175 180 Ser Glu Leu Ser Leu Ile Ser Ser Arg Gly Glu Glu Ala Ile Pro 185 190 195 Ser Pro Thr Pro Arg Ala Glu Pro Phe Ser Ala Asn Gly Ser Pro 200 205 210 Gln Thr Glu Leu Pro Pro Thr Glu Leu Ser Val His Thr Pro Ser 215 220 225 Pro Gln Ala Glu Pro Leu Ser Pro Glu Thr Ala Gln Thr Glu Val 230 235 240 Ala Pro Arg Thr Arg Pro Ala Pro Leu Arg His His Pro Arg Ala 245 250 255 Gln Ala Ser Gly Thr Glu Pro Pro Ser Pro Thr His Ser Leu Gly 260 265 270 Glu Gly Gly Phe Phe Arg Ala Ser Pro Gln Pro Arg Arg Pro Ser 275 280 285 Ser Gln Gly Trp Ala Ser Pro Gln Val Ala Gly Arg Arg Pro Asp 290 295 300 Pro Phe Pro Ser Val Pro Arg Gly Arg Gly Gln Gln Gly Gln Gly 305 310 315 Pro Trp Gly Thr Gly Gly Thr Pro His Gly Pro Arg Leu Glu Pro 320 325 330 Asp Pro Gln His Pro Gly Ala Trp Leu Pro Leu Leu Ser Asn Gly 335 340 345 Pro His Ala Ser Ser Leu Trp Ser Leu Phe Ala Pro Ser Ser Pro 350 355 360 Ile Pro Arg Cys Ser Gly Glu Ser Glu Gln Leu Arg Ala Cys Ser 365 370 375 Gln Ala Pro Cys Pro Pro Glu Gln Pro Asp Pro Arg Ala Leu Gln 380 385 390 Cys Ala Ala Phe Asn Ser Gln Glu Phe Met Gly Gln Leu Tyr Gln 395 400 405 Trp Glu Pro Phe Thr Glu Val Gln Gly Ser Gln Arg Cys Glu Leu 410 415 420 Asn Cys Arg Pro Arg Gly Phe Arg Phe Tyr Val Arg His Thr Glu 425 430 435 Lys Val Gln Asp Gly Thr Leu Cys Gln Pro Gly Ala Pro Asp Ile 440 445 450 Cys Val Ala Gly Arg Cys Leu Ser Pro Gly Cys Asp Gly Ile Leu 455 460 465 Gly Ser Gly Arg Arg Pro Asp Gly Cys Gly Val Cys Gly Gly Asp 470 475 480 Asp Ser Thr Cys Arg Leu Val Ser Gly Asn Leu Thr Asp Arg Gly 485 490 495 Gly Pro Leu Gly Tyr Gln Lys Ile Leu Trp Ile Pro Ala Gly Ala 500 505 510 Leu Arg Leu Gln Ile Ala Gln Leu Arg Pro Ser Ser Asn Tyr Leu 515 520 525 Ala Leu Arg Gly Pro Gly Gly Arg Ser Ile Ile Asn Gly Asn Trp 530 535 540 Ala Val Asp Pro Pro Gly Ser Tyr Arg Ala Gly Gly Thr Val Phe 545 550 555 Arg Tyr Asn Arg Pro Pro Arg Glu Glu Gly Lys Gly Glu Ser Leu 560 565 570 Ser Ala Glu Gly Pro Thr Thr Gln Pro Val Asp Val Tyr Met Ile 575 580 585 Phe Gln Glu Glu Asn Pro Gly Val Phe Tyr Gln Tyr Val Ile Ser 590 595 600 Ser Pro Pro Pro Ile Leu Glu Asn Pro Thr Pro Glu Pro Pro Val 605 610 615 Pro Gln Leu Gln Pro Glu Ile Leu Arg Val Glu Pro Pro Leu Ala 620 625 630 Pro Ala Pro Arg Pro Ala Arg Thr Pro Gly Thr Leu Gln Arg Gln 635 640 645 Val Arg Ile Pro Gln Met Pro Ala Pro Pro His Pro Arg Thr Pro 650 655 660 Leu Gly Ser Pro Ala Ala Tyr Trp Lys Arg Val Gly His Ser Ala 665 670 675 Cys Ser Ala Ser Cys Gly Lys Gly Val Trp Arg Pro Ile Phe Leu 680 685 690 Cys Ile Ser Arg Glu Ser Gly Glu Glu Leu Asp Glu Arg Ser Cys 695 700 705 Ala Ala Gly Ala Arg Pro Pro Ala Ser Pro Glu Pro Cys His Gly 710 715 720 Thr Pro Cys Pro Pro Tyr Trp Glu Ala Gly Glu Trp Thr Ser Cys 725 730 735 Ser Arg Ser Cys Gly Pro Gly Thr Gln His Arg Gln Leu Gln Cys 740 745 750 Arg Gln Glu Phe Gly Gly Gly Gly Ser Ser Val Pro Pro Glu Arg 755 760 765 Cys Gly His Leu Pro Arg Pro Asn Ile Thr Gln Ser Cys Gln Leu 770 775 780 Arg Leu Cys Gly His Trp Glu Val Gly Ser Pro Trp Ser Gln Cys 785 790 795 Ser Val Arg Cys Gly Arg Gly Gln Arg Ser Arg Gln Val Arg Cys 800 805 810 Val Gly Asn Asn Gly Asp Glu Val Ser Glu Gln Glu Cys Ala Ser 815 820 825 Gly Pro Pro Gln Pro Pro Ser Arg Glu Ala Cys Asp Met Gly Pro 830 835 840 Cys Thr Thr Ala Trp Phe His Ser Asp Trp Ser Ser Lys Val Ser 845 850 855 Pro Glu Pro Pro Ala Ile Ser Cys Ile Leu Gly Asn His Ala Gln 860 865 870 Asp Thr Ser Ala Phe Pro Ala 875 91 2597 DNA Homo Sapien 91 cgagtatttt cccaccatct ccagccggaa actgaccaag aactctgagg 50 cggatggcat gttcgcgtac gtcttccatg atgagttcgt ggcctcgatg 100 attaagatcc cttcggacac cttcaccatc atccctgact ttgatatcta 150 ctatgtctat ggttttagca gtggcaactt tgtctacttt ttgaccctcc 200 aacctgagat ggtgtctcca ccaggctcca ccaccaagga gcaggtgtat 250 acatccaagc tcgtgaggct ttgcaaggag gacacagcct tcaactccta 300 tgtagaggtg cccattggct gtgagcgcag tggggtggag taccgcctgc 350 tgcaggctgc ctacctgtcc aaagcggggg ccgtgcttgg caggaccctt 400 ggagtccatc cagatgatga cctgctcttc accgtcttct ccaagggcca 450 gaagcggaaa atgaaatccc tggatgagtc ggccctgtgc atcttcatct 500 tgaagcagat aaatgaccgc attaaggagc ggctgcagtc ttgttaccgg 550 ggcgagggca cgctggacct ggcctggctc aaggtgaagg acatcccctg 600 cagcagtgcg ctcttaacca ttgacgataa cttctgtggc ctggacatga 650 atgctcccct gggagtgtcc gacatggtgc gtggaattcc cgtcttcacg 700 gaggacaggg accgcatgac gtctgtcatc gcatatgtct acaagaacca 750 ctctctggcc tttgtgggca ccaaaagtgg caagctgaag aaggtgcctg 800 gtaccagcct ctgccctacc cttgagctac agacgggacc ccgatcccac 850 agagcaacag tgactctgga actcctgttc tccagctgtt catcaaactg 900 agaaaaactt cagagctgtg taggcttatt tagtgtgttg tcagccttgg 950 atattggaaa atggaaacag atgagacaca tctacctccc tgtgacccca 1000 gccatacatc atagctcatg tcctgccacc ccaagtcctt agggaaaaaa 1050 gactttggag aatgtgtctc tgcttagctt ggctaggtag ttggtctctt 1100 ttctctgccc caagcgtccc ctgggtaatt ttggacaatg gagtgtaggc 1150 atgtttgact cttgtggtgt tatcacttgt atatgtcagt gaaactaact 1200 gattctccca tcggaatata gttatctctt gggcctgata tatggtagga 1250 taaccttatg ctcatctgtc cacttctgca gccaagtcgc ctggccagtg 1300 tgtgtgtgtg tgtgtgtgtg tgtgtgtgtg tgtgtgtatg cttatctgtg 1350 tttaaaggtg tgtgtgcata cacagggcag agaggatgga gcccaccgta 1400 ctgcagcatc atgtaattaa ctcagtgctc agaaccatcc cagcctctgc 1450 gggaaagaga aaagtaagcc aacagtgcct gatgagctga tcatatgtgc 1500 aaaagctctg ttggcatctg gtccaggaga gcacccaaaa aaagttaatt 1550 ggtgttgtcc agtctccttt ccttaagact atggttacaa caaagcgtga 1600 gcagtgtctc ctgcatggcc actatccagc acaattccat aattccccca 1650 tagagccggt ggggaggagg aggtgagtgg cgaaggaagt ggaaacactt 1700 ggtgtcatgt gctcctatca tttctactag cttactggga aataaagtgt 1750 agtcaagagt gtatgaaggc aagatgtaaa attagcgact ggtgctaatc 1800 tggttacttg aaaacaagtg aaagtgctgt agatttgttc tgttgctaag 1850 aaccaccaca ctaaacctcg tatagttcct ggaggatata caacagtgta 1900 attctcttta gggtgtgcca caggttcctg gcctgtggga gggaatgaat 1950 caggagggct cttgagaacc ttcatctgtg tgcttgcact gaaagtgagt 2000 cccaaagctg gagatttagt gagagcaggc aacccctctg tgtctcactg 2050 tccatattct ggaggcagag gtttgtaaca ggccatgtgc acctgcatag 2100 ggatgggtaa agcaaggact ttgaaagagt tgaaaagcat tataaacagt 2150 tgttcagaaa tacgtcccag gagttccatg tgaaactggc tctgtgtgca 2200 ttgaagcatg gctgttggga attctaactg gtccaacact cctgcaaaac 2250 aatgtgtaaa tatttaggaa gaaacttgaa aatagtcaaa tcctttgaac 2300 tggtgacaat tttttaaaga atcaattcta atttgtttca agggtaataa 2350 tcaccaagat acacatttca gcatttattt agtctatcaa aaattggaat 2400 tgatatatac actcatttat aggagaatgg ttaggtagat ttggtatatt 2450 tatgtagtca ttgaaaactt agtttataaa ggccaatctt gtaactgatt 2500 cttgtgtgat aacattcagt gaaaaagcat gagacaatta gaaagcatga 2550 tacaatgaat aaaataaaaa ctggaaagag aaccatcaaa atgctaa 2597 92 280 PRT Homo Sapien 92 Met Phe Ala Tyr Val Phe His Asp Glu Phe Val Ala Ser Met Ile 1 5 10 15 Lys Ile Pro Ser Asp Thr Phe Thr Ile Ile Pro Asp Phe Asp Ile 20 25 30 Tyr Tyr Val Tyr Gly Phe Ser Ser Gly Asn Phe Val Tyr Phe Leu 35 40 45 Thr Leu Gln Pro Glu Met Val Ser Pro Pro Gly Ser Thr Thr Lys 50 55 60 Glu Gln Val Tyr Thr Ser Lys Leu Val Arg Leu Cys Lys Glu Asp 65 70 75 Thr Ala Phe Asn Ser Tyr Val Glu Val Pro Ile Gly Cys Glu Arg 80 85 90 Ser Gly Val Glu Tyr Arg Leu Leu Gln Ala Ala Tyr Leu Ser Lys 95 100 105 Ala Gly Ala Val Leu Gly Arg Thr Leu Gly Val His Pro Asp Asp 110 115 120 Asp Leu Leu Phe Thr Val Phe Ser Lys Gly Gln Lys Arg Lys Met 125 130 135 Lys Ser Leu Asp Glu Ser Ala Leu Cys Ile Phe Ile Leu Lys Gln 140 145 150 Ile Asn Asp Arg Ile Lys Glu Arg Leu Gln Ser Cys Tyr Arg Gly 155 160 165 Glu Gly Thr Leu Asp Leu Ala Trp Leu Lys Val Lys Asp Ile Pro 170 175 180 Cys Ser Ser Ala Leu Leu Thr Ile Asp Asp Asn Phe Cys Gly Leu 185 190 195 Asp Met Asn Ala Pro Leu Gly Val Ser Asp Met Val Arg Gly Ile 200 205 210 Pro Val Phe Thr Glu Asp Arg Asp Arg Met Thr Ser Val Ile Ala 215 220 225 Tyr Val Tyr Lys Asn His Ser Leu Ala Phe Val Gly Thr Lys Ser 230 235 240 Gly Lys Leu Lys Lys Val Pro Gly Thr Ser Leu Cys Pro Thr Leu 245 250 255 Glu Leu Gln Thr Gly Pro Arg Ser His Arg Ala Thr Val Thr Leu 260 265 270 Glu Leu Leu Phe Ser Ser Cys Ser Ser Asn 275 280 93 2883 DNA Homo Sapien 93 ccttatcaga caaaggacga gatggaaaat acaagataat ttacagtgga 50 gaagaattag aatgtaacct gaaagatctt agaccagcaa cagattatca 100 tgtgagggtg tatgccatgt acaattccgt aaagggatcc tgctccgagc 150 ctgttagctt caccacccac agctgtgcac ccgagtgtcc tttcccccct 200 aagctggcac ataggagcaa aagttcacta accctgcagt ggaaggcacc 250 aattgacaac ggttcaaaaa tcaccaacta ccttttagag tgggatgagg 300 gaaaaagaaa tagtggtttc agacagtgct tcttcgggag ccagaagcac 350 tgcaagttga caaagctttg tccggcaatg gggtacacat tcaggctggc 400 cgctcgaaac gacattggca ccagtggtta tagccaagag gtggtgtgct 450 acacattagg aaatatccct cagatgcctt ctgcactaag gctggttcga 500 gctggcatca catgggtcac gttgcagtgg agtaagccag aaggctgttc 550 acccgaggaa gtgatcacct acaccttgga aattcaggag gatgaaaatg 600 ataacctttt ccacccaaaa tacactggag aggatttaac ctgtactgtg 650 aaaaatctca aaagaagcac acagtataaa ttcaggctga ctgcttctaa 700 tacggaagga aaaagctgtc caagcgaagt tcttgtttgt acgacgagtc 750 ctgacaggcc tggacctcct accagaccgc ttgtcaaagg cccagttaca 800 tctcatggct ttagtgtcaa atgggatccc cctaaggaca atggtggttc 850 agaaatcctc aagtacttgc tagagattac tgatggaaat tctgaagcga 900 atcagtggga agtggcctac agtgggtcgg ctaccgaata caccttcacc 950 cacttgaaac caggcacttt gtacaaactc cgagcatgct gcatcagtac 1000 cggcggacac agccagtgtt ctgaaagtct ccctgttcgc acactaagca 1050 ttgcaccagg tcaatgtcga ccaccgaggg ttttgggtag accaaagcac 1100 aaagaagtcc acttagagtg ggatgttcct gcatcggaaa gtggctgtga 1150 ggtctcagag tacagcgtgg agatgacgga gcccgaagac gtagcctcgg 1200 aagtgtacca tggcccagag ctggagtgca ccgtcggcaa cctgcttcct 1250 ggaaccgtgt atcgcttccg ggtgagggct ctgaatgatg gagggtatgg 1300 tccctattct gatgtctcag aaattaccac tgctgcaggg cctcctggac 1350 aatgcaaagc accttgtatt tcttgtacac ctgatggatg tgtcttagtg 1400 ggttgggaga gtcctgatag ttctggtgct gacatctcag agtacaggtt 1450 ggaatgggga gaagatgaag aatccttaga actcatttat catgggacag 1500 acacccgttt tgaaataaga gacctgttgc ctgctgcaca gtattgctgt 1550 agactacagg ccttcaatca agcaggggca gggccgtaca gtgaacttgt 1600 cctttgccag acgccagcgt ctgcccctga ccccgtctcc actctctgtg 1650 tcctggagga ggagcccctt gatgcctacc ctgattcacc ttctgcgtgc 1700 cttgtactga actgggaaga gccgtgcaat aacggatctg aaatccttgc 1750 ttacaccatt gatctaggag acactagcat taccgtgggc aacaccacca 1800 tgcatgttat gaaagatctc cttccagaaa ccacctaccg gatcagaatt 1850 caggctataa atgaaattgg agctggacca tttagtcagt tcattaaagc 1900 aaaaactcgg ccattaccac ccttgcctcc taggctagaa tgtgctgctg 1950 ctggtcctca gagcctgaag ctaaaatggg gagacagtaa ctccaagaca 2000 catgctgctg aggacattgt gtacacacta cagctggagg acagaaacaa 2050 gaggtttatt tcaatctaca gaggacccag ccacacctac aaggtccaga 2100 gactgacgga attcacatgc tactccttca gaatccaggc agcaagcgag 2150 gctggagaag ggcccttctc agaaacctat accttcagca caaccaaaag 2200 tgtccccccc accatcaaag cacctcgagt aacacagtta gaagtaaatt 2250 catgtgaaat tttatgggag acggtaccat caatgaaagg tgaccctgtt 2300 aactacattc tgcaggtatt ggttggaaga gaatctgagt acaaacaggt 2350 gtacaaggga gaagaagcca cattccaaat ctcaggcctc cagaccaaca 2400 cagactacag gttccgcgta tgtgcgtgtc gtcgctgttt agacacctct 2450 caggagctaa gcggagcctt cagcccctct gcggcttttg tattacaacg 2500 aagtgaggtc atgcttacag gggacatggg gagcttagat gatcccaaaa 2550 tgaagagcat gatgcctact gatgaacagt ttgcagccat cattgtgctt 2600 ggctttgcaa ctttgtccat tttatttgcc tttatattac agtacttctt 2650 aatgaagtaa acccaacaaa actagaggta tgaattaatg ctacacattt 2700 taatacacac atttattcag atactcccct ttttaaagcc cttttgtttt 2750 ttgatttata tactctgttt tacagattta gctagaaaaa aaatgtcagt 2800 gttttggtgc acctttttga aatgcaaaac taggaaaagg ttaaactgga 2850 ttttttttta aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaa 2883 94 847 PRT Homo Sapien 94 Met Tyr Asn Ser Val Lys Gly Ser Cys Ser Glu Pro Val Ser Phe 1 5 10 15 Thr Thr His Ser Cys Ala Pro Glu Cys Pro Phe Pro Pro Lys Leu 20 25 30 Ala His Arg Ser Lys Ser Ser Leu Thr Leu Gln Trp Lys Ala Pro 35 40 45 Ile Asp Asn Gly Ser Lys Ile Thr Asn Tyr Leu Leu Glu Trp Asp 50 55 60 Glu Gly Lys Arg Asn Ser Gly Phe Arg Gln Cys Phe Phe Gly Ser 65 70 75 Gln Lys His Cys Lys Leu Thr Lys Leu Cys Pro Ala Met Gly Tyr 80 85 90 Thr Phe Arg Leu Ala Ala Arg Asn Asp Ile Gly Thr Ser Gly Tyr 95 100 105 Ser Gln Glu Val Val Cys Tyr Thr Leu Gly Asn Ile Pro Gln Met 110 115 120 Pro Ser Ala Leu Arg Leu Val Arg Ala Gly Ile Thr Trp Val Thr 125 130 135 Leu Gln Trp Ser Lys Pro Glu Gly Cys Ser Pro Glu Glu Val Ile 140 145 150 Thr Tyr Thr Leu Glu Ile Gln Glu Asp Glu Asn Asp Asn Leu Phe 155 160 165 His Pro Lys Tyr Thr Gly Glu Asp Leu Thr Cys Thr Val Lys Asn 170 175 180 Leu Lys Arg Ser Thr Gln Tyr Lys Phe Arg Leu Thr Ala Ser Asn 185 190 195 Thr Glu Gly Lys Ser Cys Pro Ser Glu Val Leu Val Cys Thr Thr 200 205 210 Ser Pro Asp Arg Pro Gly Pro Pro Thr Arg Pro Leu Val Lys Gly 215 220 225 Pro Val Thr Ser His Gly Phe Ser Val Lys Trp Asp Pro Pro Lys 230 235 240 Asp Asn Gly Gly Ser Glu Ile Leu Lys Tyr Leu Leu Glu Ile Thr 245 250 255 Asp Gly Asn Ser Glu Ala Asn Gln Trp Glu Val Ala Tyr Ser Gly 260 265 270 Ser Ala Thr Glu Tyr Thr Phe Thr His Leu Lys Pro Gly Thr Leu 275 280 285 Tyr Lys Leu Arg Ala Cys Cys Ile Ser Thr Gly Gly His Ser Gln 290 295 300 Cys Ser Glu Ser Leu Pro Val Arg Thr Leu Ser Ile Ala Pro Gly 305 310 315 Gln Cys Arg Pro Pro Arg Val Leu Gly Arg Pro Lys His Lys Glu 320 325 330 Val His Leu Glu Trp Asp Val Pro Ala Ser Glu Ser Gly Cys Glu 335 340 345 Val Ser Glu Tyr Ser Val Glu Met Thr Glu Pro Glu Asp Val Ala 350 355 360 Ser Glu Val Tyr His Gly Pro Glu Leu Glu Cys Thr Val Gly Asn 365 370 375 Leu Leu Pro Gly Thr Val Tyr Arg Phe Arg Val Arg Ala Leu Asn 380 385 390 Asp Gly Gly Tyr Gly Pro Tyr Ser Asp Val Ser Glu Ile Thr Thr 395 400 405 Ala Ala Gly Pro Pro Gly Gln Cys Lys Ala Pro Cys Ile Ser Cys 410 415 420 Thr Pro Asp Gly Cys Val Leu Val Gly Trp Glu Ser Pro Asp Ser 425 430 435 Ser Gly Ala Asp Ile Ser Glu Tyr Arg Leu Glu Trp Gly Glu Asp 440 445 450 Glu Glu Ser Leu Glu Leu Ile Tyr His Gly Thr Asp Thr Arg Phe 455 460 465 Glu Ile Arg Asp Leu Leu Pro Ala Ala Gln Tyr Cys Cys Arg Leu 470 475 480 Gln Ala Phe Asn Gln Ala Gly Ala Gly Pro Tyr Ser Glu Leu Val 485 490 495 Leu Cys Gln Thr Pro Ala Ser Ala Pro Asp Pro Val Ser Thr Leu 500 505 510 Cys Val Leu Glu Glu Glu Pro Leu Asp Ala Tyr Pro Asp Ser Pro 515 520 525 Ser Ala Cys Leu Val Leu Asn Trp Glu Glu Pro Cys Asn Asn Gly 530 535 540 Ser Glu Ile Leu Ala Tyr Thr Ile Asp Leu Gly Asp Thr Ser Ile 545 550 555 Thr Val Gly Asn Thr Thr Met His Val Met Lys Asp Leu Leu Pro 560 565 570 Glu Thr Thr Tyr Arg Ile Arg Ile Gln Ala Ile Asn Glu Ile Gly 575 580 585 Ala Gly Pro Phe Ser Gln Phe Ile Lys Ala Lys Thr Arg Pro Leu 590 595 600 Pro Pro Leu Pro Pro Arg Leu Glu Cys Ala Ala Ala Gly Pro Gln 605 610 615 Ser Leu Lys Leu Lys Trp Gly Asp Ser Asn Ser Lys Thr His Ala 620 625 630 Ala Glu Asp Ile Val Tyr Thr Leu Gln Leu Glu Asp Arg Asn Lys 635 640 645 Arg Phe Ile Ser Ile Tyr Arg Gly Pro Ser His Thr Tyr Lys Val 650 655 660 Gln Arg Leu Thr Glu Phe Thr Cys Tyr Ser Phe Arg Ile Gln Ala 665 670 675 Ala Ser Glu Ala Gly Glu Gly Pro Phe Ser Glu Thr Tyr Thr Phe 680 685 690 Ser Thr Thr Lys Ser Val Pro Pro Thr Ile Lys Ala Pro Arg Val 695 700 705 Thr Gln Leu Glu Val Asn Ser Cys Glu Ile Leu Trp Glu Thr Val 710 715 720 Pro Ser Met Lys Gly Asp Pro Val Asn Tyr Ile Leu Gln Val Leu 725 730 735 Val Gly Arg Glu Ser Glu Tyr Lys Gln Val Tyr Lys Gly Glu Glu 740 745 750 Ala Thr Phe Gln Ile Ser Gly Leu Gln Thr Asn Thr Asp Tyr Arg 755 760 765 Phe Arg Val Cys Ala Cys Arg Arg Cys Leu Asp Thr Ser Gln Glu 770 775 780 Leu Ser Gly Ala Phe Ser Pro Ser Ala Ala Phe Val Leu Gln Arg 785 790 795 Ser Glu Val Met Leu Thr Gly Asp Met Gly Ser Leu Asp Asp Pro 800 805 810 Lys Met Lys Ser Met Met Pro Thr Asp Glu Gln Phe Ala Ala Ile 815 820 825 Ile Val Leu Gly Phe Ala Thr Leu Ser Ile Leu Phe Ala Phe Ile 830 835 840 Leu Gln Tyr Phe Leu Met Lys 845 95 4725 DNA Homo Sapien 95 caattcggcc tcgctccttg tgattgcgct aaaccttccg tcctcagctg 50 agaacgctcc accacctccc cggatcgctc atctcttggc tgccctccca 100 ctgttcctga tgttatttta ctccccgtat cccctactcg ttcttcacaa 150 ttctgtaggt gagtggttcc agctggtgcc tggcctgtgt ctcttggatg 200 ccctgtggct tcagtccgtc tcctgttgcc caccacctcg tccctgggcc 250 gcctgatacc ccagcccaac agctaaggtg tggatggaca gtagggggct 300 ggcttctctc actggtcagg ggtcttctcc cctgtctgcc tcccggagct 350 aggactgcag aggggcctat catggtgctt gcaggccccc tggctgtctc 400 gctgttgctg cccagcctca cactgctggt gtcccacctc tccagctccc 450 aggatgtctc cagtgagccc agcagtgagc agcagctgtg cgcccttagc 500 aagcacccca ccgtggcctt tgaagacctg cagccgtggg tctctaactt 550 cacctaccct ggagcccggg atttctccca gctggctttg gacccctccg 600 ggaaccagct catcgtggga gccaggaact acctcttcag actcagcctt 650 gccaatgtct ctcttcttca ggccacagag tgggcctcca gtgaggacac 700 gcgccgctcc tgccaaagca aagggaagac tgaggaggag tgtcagaact 750 acgtgcgagt cctgatcgtc gccggccgga aggtgttcat gtgtggaacc 800 aatgcctttt cccccatgtg caccagcaga caggtgggga acctcagccg 850 gactattgag aagatcaatg gtgtggcccg ctgcccctat gacccacgcc 900 acaactccac agctgtcatc tcctcccagg gggagctcta tgcagccacg 950 gtcatcgact tctcaggtcg ggaccctgcc atctaccgca gcctgggcag 1000 tgggccaccg cttcgcactg cccaatataa ctccaagtgg cttaatgagc 1050 caaacttcgt ggcagcctat gatattgggc tgtttgcata cttcttcctg 1100 cgggagaacg cagtggagca cgactgtgga cgcaccgtgt actctcgcgt 1150 ggcccgcgtg tgcaagaatg acgtgggggg ccgattcctg ctggaggaca 1200 catggaccac attcatgaag gcccggctca actgctcccg cccgggcgag 1250 gtccccttct actataacga gctgcagagt gccttccact tgccggagca 1300 ggacctcatc tatggagttt tcacaaccaa cgtaaacagc atcgcggctt 1350 ctgctgtctg cgccttcaac ctcagtgcta tctcccaggc tttcaatggc 1400 ccatttcgct accaggagaa ccccagggct gcctggctcc ccatagccaa 1450 ccccatcccc aatttccagt gtggcaccct gcctgagacc ggtcccaacg 1500 agaacctgac ggagcgcagc ctgcaggacg cgcagcgcct cttcctgatg 1550 agcgaggccg tgcagccggt gacacccgag ccctgtgtca cccaggacag 1600 cgtgcgcttc tcacacctcg tggtggacct ggtgcaggct aaagacacgc 1650 tctaccatgt actctacatt ggcaccgagt cgggcaccat cctgaaggcg 1700 ctgtccacgg cgagccgcag cctccacggc tgctacctgg aggagctgca 1750 cgtgctgccc cccgggcgcc gcgagcccct gcgcagcctg cgcatcctgc 1800 acagcgcccg cgcgctcttc gtggggctga gagacggcgt cctgcgggtc 1850 ccactggaga ggtgcgccgc ctaccgcagc cagggggcat gcctgggggc 1900 ccgggacccg tactgtggct gggacgggaa gcagcaacgt tgcagcacac 1950 tcgaggacag ctccaacatg agcctctgga cccagaacat caccgcctgt 2000 cctgtgcgga atgtgacacg ggatgggggc ttcggcccat ggtcaccatg 2050 gcaaccatgt gagcacttgg atggggacaa ctcaggctct tgcctgtgtc 2100 gagctcgatc ctgtgattcc cctcgacccc gctgtggggg ccttgactgc 2150 ctggggccag ccatccacat cgccaactgc tccaggaatg gggcgtggac 2200 cccgtggtca tcgtgggcgc tgtgcagcac gtcctgtggc atcggcttcc 2250 aggtccgcca gcgaagttgc agcaaccctg ctccccgcca cgggggccgc 2300 atcttcgtgg gcaagagccg ggaggaacgg ttctgtaatg agaacacgcc 2350 ttgcccggtg cccatcttct gggcttcctg gggctcctgg agcaagtgca 2400 gcagcaactg tggagggggc atgcagtcgc ggcgtcgggc ctgcgagaac 2450 ggcaactcct gcctgggctg cggcgagttc aagacgtgca accccgaggg 2500 ctgccccgaa gtgcggcgca acaccccctg gacgccgtgg ctgcccgtga 2550 acgtgacgca gggcggggca cggcaggagc agcggttccg cttcacctgc 2600 cgcgcgcccc ttgcagaccc gcacggcctg cagttcggca ggagaaggac 2650 cgagacgagg acctgtcccg cggacggctc cggctcctgc gacaccgacg 2700 ccctggtgga ggtcctcctg cgcagcggga gcacctcccc gcacacggtg 2750 agcgggggct gggccgcctg gggcccgtgg tcgtcctgct cccgggactg 2800 cgagctgggc ttccgcgtcc gcaagagaac gtgcactaac ccggagcccc 2850 gcaacggggg cctgccctgc gtgggcgatg ctgccgagta ccaggactgc 2900 aacccccagg cttgcccagt tcggggtgct tggtcctgct ggacctcatg 2950 gtctccatgc tcagcttcct gtggtggggg tcactatcaa cgcacccgtt 3000 cctgcaccag ccccgcaccc tccccaggtg aggacatctg tctcgggctg 3050 cacacggagg aggcactatg tgccacacag gcctgcccag gctggtcgcc 3100 ctggtctgag tggagtaagt gcactgacga cggagcccag agccgaagcc 3150 ggcactgtga ggagctcctc ccagggtcca gcgcctgtgc tggaaacagc 3200 agccagagcc gcccctgccc ctacagcgag attcccgtca tcctgccagc 3250 ctccagcatg gaggaggcca ccgactgtgc aggtaaaaga aaccggacct 3300 acctcatgct gcggtcctcc cagccctcca gcaccccact ccaaagtctg 3350 gactctttcc acatcctgct ccagacagcc aagctttgtt ggggtcccca 3400 ctgctttgag atgggttcaa tctcatccac ttggtggcca cgggcatctc 3450 ctgcttcttg ggctctgggc tcctgaccct agcagtgtac ctgtcttgcc 3500 agcactgcca gcgtcagtcc caggagtcca cactggtcca tcctgccacc 3550 cccaaccatt tgcactacaa gggcggaggc accccgaaga atgaaaagta 3600 cacacccatg gaattcaaga ccctgaacaa gaataacttg atccctgatg 3650 acagagccaa cttctaccca ttgcagcaga ccaatgtgta cacgactact 3700 tactacccaa gccccctgaa caaacacagc ttccggcccg aggcctcacc 3750 tggacaacgg tgcttcccca acagctgata ccgccgtcct ggggacttgg 3800 gcttcttgcc ttcataaggc acagagcaga tggagatggg acagtggagc 3850 cagtttggtt ttctccctct gcactaggcc aagaacttgc tgccttgcct 3900 gtggggggtc ccatccggct tcagagagct ctggctggca ttgaccatgg 3950 gggaaagggc tggtttcagg ctgacatatg gccgcaggtc cagttcagcc 4000 caggtctctc atggttatct tccaacccac tgtcacgctg acactatgct 4050 gccatgcctg ggctgtggac ctactgggca tttgaggaat tggagaatgg 4100 agatggcaag agggcaggct tttaagtttg ggttggagac aacttcctgt 4150 ggcccccaca agctgagtct ggccttctcc agctggcccc aaaaaaggcc 4200 tttgctacat cctgattatc tctgaaagta atcaatcaag tggctccagt 4250 agctctggat tttctgccag ggctgggcca ttgtggtgct gccccagtat 4300 gacatgggac caaggccagc gcaggttatc cacctctgcc tggaagtcta 4350 tactctaccc agggcatccc tctggtcaga ggcagtgagt actgggaact 4400 ggaggctgac ctgtgcttag aagtccttta atctgggctg gtacaggcct 4450 cagccttgcc ctcaatgcac gaaaggtggc ccaggagaga ggatcaatgc 4500 cataggaggc agaagtctgg cctctgtgcc tctatggaga ctatcttcca 4550 gttgctgctc aacagagttg ttggctgaga cctgcttggg agtctctgct 4600 ggcccttcat ctgttcagga acacacacac acacacactc acacacgcac 4650 acacaatcac aatttgctac agcaacaaaa aagacattgg gctgtggcat 4700 tattaattaa agatgatatc cagtc 4725 96 1092 PRT Homo Sapien 96 Met Pro Cys Gly Phe Ser Pro Ser Pro Val Ala His His Leu Val 1 5 10 15 Pro Gly Pro Pro Asp Thr Pro Ala Gln Gln Leu Arg Cys Gly Trp 20 25 30 Thr Val Gly Gly Trp Leu Leu Ser Leu Val Arg Gly Leu Leu Pro 35 40 45 Cys Leu Pro Pro Gly Ala Arg Thr Ala Glu Gly Pro Ile Met Val 50 55 60 Leu Ala Gly Pro Leu Ala Val Ser Leu Leu Leu Pro Ser Leu Thr 65 70 75 Leu Leu Val Ser His Leu Ser Ser Ser Gln Asp Val Ser Ser Glu 80 85 90 Pro Ser Ser Glu Gln Gln Leu Cys Ala Leu Ser Lys His Pro Thr 95 100 105 Val Ala Phe Glu Asp Leu Gln Pro Trp Val Ser Asn Phe Thr Tyr 110 115 120 Pro Gly Ala Arg Asp Phe Ser Gln Leu Ala Leu Asp Pro Ser Gly 125 130 135 Asn Gln Leu Ile Val Gly Ala Arg Asn Tyr Leu Phe Arg Leu Ser 140 145 150 Leu Ala Asn Val Ser Leu Leu Gln Ala Thr Glu Trp Ala Ser Ser 155 160 165 Glu Asp Thr Arg Arg Ser Cys Gln Ser Lys Gly Lys Thr Glu Glu 170 175 180 Glu Cys Gln Asn Tyr Val Arg Val Leu Ile Val Ala Gly Arg Lys 185 190 195 Val Phe Met Cys Gly Thr Asn Ala Phe Ser Pro Met Cys Thr Ser 200 205 210 Arg Gln Val Gly Asn Leu Ser Arg Thr Ile Glu Lys Ile Asn Gly 215 220 225 Val Ala Arg Cys Pro Tyr Asp Pro Arg His Asn Ser Thr Ala Val 230 235 240 Ile Ser Ser Gln Gly Glu Leu Tyr Ala Ala Thr Val Ile Asp Phe 245 250 255 Ser Gly Arg Asp Pro Ala Ile Tyr Arg Ser Leu Gly Ser Gly Pro 260 265 270 Pro Leu Arg Thr Ala Gln Tyr Asn Ser Lys Trp Leu Asn Glu Pro 275 280 285 Asn Phe Val Ala Ala Tyr Asp Ile Gly Leu Phe Ala Tyr Phe Phe 290 295 300 Leu Arg Glu Asn Ala Val Glu His Asp Cys Gly Arg Thr Val Tyr 305 310 315 Ser Arg Val Ala Arg Val Cys Lys Asn Asp Val Gly Gly Arg Phe 320 325 330 Leu Leu Glu Asp Thr Trp Thr Thr Phe Met Lys Ala Arg Leu Asn 335 340 345 Cys Ser Arg Pro Gly Glu Val Pro Phe Tyr Tyr Asn Glu Leu Gln 350 355 360 Ser Ala Phe His Leu Pro Glu Gln Asp Leu Ile Tyr Gly Val Phe 365 370 375 Thr Thr Asn Val Asn Ser Ile Ala Ala Ser Ala Val Cys Ala Phe 380 385 390 Asn Leu Ser Ala Ile Ser Gln Ala Phe Asn Gly Pro Phe Arg Tyr 395 400 405 Gln Glu Asn Pro Arg Ala Ala Trp Leu Pro Ile Ala Asn Pro Ile 410 415 420 Pro Asn Phe Gln Cys Gly Thr Leu Pro Glu Thr Gly Pro Asn Glu 425 430 435 Asn Leu Thr Glu Arg Ser Leu Gln Asp Ala Gln Arg Leu Phe Leu 440 445 450 Met Ser Glu Ala Val Gln Pro Val Thr Pro Glu Pro Cys Val Thr 455 460 465 Gln Asp Ser Val Arg Phe Ser His Leu Val Val Asp Leu Val Gln 470 475 480 Ala Lys Asp Thr Leu Tyr His Val Leu Tyr Ile Gly Thr Glu Ser 485 490 495 Gly Thr Ile Leu Lys Ala Leu Ser Thr Ala Ser Arg Ser Leu His 500 505 510 Gly Cys Tyr Leu Glu Glu Leu His Val Leu Pro Pro Gly Arg Arg 515 520 525 Glu Pro Leu Arg Ser Leu Arg Ile Leu His Ser Ala Arg Ala Leu 530 535 540 Phe Val Gly Leu Arg Asp Gly Val Leu Arg Val Pro Leu Glu Arg 545 550 555 Cys Ala Ala Tyr Arg Ser Gln Gly Ala Cys Leu Gly Ala Arg Asp 560 565 570 Pro Tyr Cys Gly Trp Asp Gly Lys Gln Gln Arg Cys Ser Thr Leu 575 580 585 Glu Asp Ser Ser Asn Met Ser Leu Trp Thr Gln Asn Ile Thr Ala 590 595 600 Cys Pro Val Arg Asn Val Thr Arg Asp Gly Gly Phe Gly Pro Trp 605 610 615 Ser Pro Trp Gln Pro Cys Glu His Leu Asp Gly Asp Asn Ser Gly 620 625 630 Ser Cys Leu Cys Arg Ala Arg Ser Cys Asp Ser Pro Arg Pro Arg 635 640 645 Cys Gly Gly Leu Asp Cys Leu Gly Pro Ala Ile His Ile Ala Asn 650 655 660 Cys Ser Arg Asn Gly Ala Trp Thr Pro Trp Ser Ser Trp Ala Leu 665 670 675 Cys Ser Thr Ser Cys Gly Ile Gly Phe Gln Val Arg Gln Arg Ser 680 685 690 Cys Ser Asn Pro Ala Pro Arg His Gly Gly Arg Ile Phe Val Gly 695 700 705 Lys Ser Arg Glu Glu Arg Phe Cys Asn Glu Asn Thr Pro Cys Pro 710 715 720 Val Pro Ile Phe Trp Ala Ser Trp Gly Ser Trp Ser Lys Cys Ser 725 730 735 Ser Asn Cys Gly Gly Gly Met Gln Ser Arg Arg Arg Ala Cys Glu 740 745 750 Asn Gly Asn Ser Cys Leu Gly Cys Gly Glu Phe Lys Thr Cys Asn 755 760 765 Pro Glu Gly Cys Pro Glu Val Arg Arg Asn Thr Pro Trp Thr Pro 770 775 780 Trp Leu Pro Val Asn Val Thr Gln Gly Gly Ala Arg Gln Glu Gln 785 790 795 Arg Phe Arg Phe Thr Cys Arg Ala Pro Leu Ala Asp Pro His Gly 800 805 810 Leu Gln Phe Gly Arg Arg Arg Thr Glu Thr Arg Thr Cys Pro Ala 815 820 825 Asp Gly Ser Gly Ser Cys Asp Thr Asp Ala Leu Val Glu Val Leu 830 835 840 Leu Arg Ser Gly Ser Thr Ser Pro His Thr Val Ser Gly Gly Trp 845 850 855 Ala Ala Trp Gly Pro Trp Ser Ser Cys Ser Arg Asp Cys Glu Leu 860 865 870 Gly Phe Arg Val Arg Lys Arg Thr Cys Thr Asn Pro Glu Pro Arg 875 880 885 Asn Gly Gly Leu Pro Cys Val Gly Asp Ala Ala Glu Tyr Gln Asp 890 895 900 Cys Asn Pro Gln Ala Cys Pro Val Arg Gly Ala Trp Ser Cys Trp 905 910 915 Thr Ser Trp Ser Pro Cys Ser Ala Ser Cys Gly Gly Gly His Tyr 920 925 930 Gln Arg Thr Arg Ser Cys Thr Ser Pro Ala Pro Ser Pro Gly Glu 935 940 945 Asp Ile Cys Leu Gly Leu His Thr Glu Glu Ala Leu Cys Ala Thr 950 955 960 Gln Ala Cys Pro Gly Trp Ser Pro Trp Ser Glu Trp Ser Lys Cys 965 970 975 Thr Asp Asp Gly Ala Gln Ser Arg Ser Arg His Cys Glu Glu Leu 980 985 990 Leu Pro Gly Ser Ser Ala Cys Ala Gly Asn Ser Ser Gln Ser Arg 995 1000 1005 Pro Cys Pro Tyr Ser Glu Ile Pro Val Ile Leu Pro Ala Ser Ser 1010 1015 1020 Met Glu Glu Ala Thr Asp Cys Ala Gly Lys Arg Asn Arg Thr Tyr 1025 1030 1035 Leu Met Leu Arg Ser Ser Gln Pro Ser Ser Thr Pro Leu Gln Ser 1040 1045 1050 Leu Asp Ser Phe His Ile Leu Leu Gln Thr Ala Lys Leu Cys Trp 1055 1060 1065 Gly Pro His Cys Phe Glu Met Gly Ser Ile Ser Ser Thr Trp Trp 1070 1075 1080 Pro Arg Ala Ser Pro Ala Ser Trp Ala Leu Gly Ser 1085 1090 97 3391 DNA Homo Sapien 97 caagccctcc cagcatcccc tctcctgtgt tcctccccag ttctctactc 50 agagttgact gaccagagat ttatcagctt ggagggctgg aggtgtggat 100 ccatggggta gcctcaacgc atctgcccct ccaccccagc cagctcatgg 150 gccacgtggc ctggcccagc ctcagcaccc agggccagtg aacagagccc 200 tggctggagt ccaaacatgt ggggcctggt gaggctcctg ctggcctggc 250 tgggtggctg gggctgcatg gggcgtctgg cagccccagc ccgggcctgg 300 gcagggtccc gggaacaccc agggcctgct ctgctgcgga ctcgaaggag 350 ctgggtctgg aaccagttct ttgtcattga ggaatatgct ggtccagagc 400 ctgttctcat tggcaagctg cactcggatg ttgaccgggg agagggccgc 450 accaagtacc tgttgaccgg ggagggggca ggcaccgtat ttgtgattga 500 tgaggccaca ggcaatattc atgttaccaa gagccttgac cgggaggaaa 550 aggcgcaata tgtgctactg gcccaagccg tggaccgagc ctccaaccgg 600 cccctggagc ccccatcaga gttcatcatc aaagtgcaag acatcaacga 650 caatccaccc atttttcccc ttgggcccta ccatgccacc gtgcccgaga 700 tgtccaatgt cgggacatca gtgatccagg tgactgctca cgatgctgat 750 gaccccagct atgggaacag tgccaagctg gtgtacactg ttctggatgg 800 actgcctttc ttctctgtgg acccccagac tggagtggtg cgtacagcca 850 tccccaacat ggaccgggag acacaggagg agttcttggt ggtgatccag 900 gccaaggaca tgggcggcca catggggggg ctgtcaggca gcactacggt 950 gactgtcacg ctcagcgatg tcaacgacaa cccccccaag ttcccacaga 1000 gcctatacca gttctccgtg gtggagacag ctggacctgg cacactggtg 1050 ggccggctcc gggcccagga cccagacctg ggggacaacg ccctgatggc 1100 atacagcatc ctggatgggg aggggtctga ggccttcagc atcagcacag 1150 acttgcaggg tcgagacggg ctcctcactg tccgcaagcc cctagacttt 1200 gagagccagc gctcctactc cttccgtgtc gaggccacca acacgctcat 1250 tgacccagcc tatctgcggc gagggccctt caaggatgtg gcctctgtgc 1300 gtgtggcagt gcaagatgcc ccagagccac ctgccttcac ccaggctgcc 1350 taccacctga cagtgcctga gaacaaggcc ccggggaccc tggtaggcca 1400 gatctccgcg gctgacctgg actcccctgc cagcccaatc agatactcca 1450 tcctccccca ctcagatccg gagcgttgct tctctatcca gcccgaggaa 1500 ggcaccatcc atacagcagc acccctggat cgcgaggctc gcgcctggca 1550 caacctcact gtgctggcta cagagctcga cagttctgca caggcctcgc 1600 gcgtgcaagt ggccatccag accctggatg agaatgacaa tgctccccag 1650 ctggctgagc cctacgatac ttttgtgtgt gactctgcag ctcctggcca 1700 gctgattcag gtcatccggg ccctggacag agatgaagtt ggcaacagta 1750 gccatgtctc ctttcaaggt cctctgggcc ctgatgccaa ctttactgtc 1800 caggacaacc gagatggctc cgccagcctg ctgctgccct cccgccctgc 1850 tccaccccgc catgccccct acttggttcc catagaactg tgggactggg 1900 ggcagccggc gctgagcagc actgccacag tgactgttag tgtgtgccgc 1950 tgccagcctg acggctctgt ggcatcctgc tggcctgagg ctcacctctc 2000 agctgctggg ctcagcaccg gcgccctgct tgccatcatc acctgtgtgg 2050 gtgccctgct tgccctggtg gtgctcttcg tggccctgcg gcggcagaag 2100 caagaagcac tgatggtact ggaggaggag gacgtccgag agaacatcat 2150 cacctacgac gacgagggcg gcggcgagga ggacaccgag gccttcgaca 2200 tcacggcctt gcagaacccg gacggggcgg cccccccggc gcccggccct 2250 cccgcgcgcc gagacgtgtt gccccgggcc cgggtgtcgc gccagcccag 2300 accccccggc cccgccgacg tggcgcagct cctggcgctg cggctccgcg 2350 aggcggacga ggaccccggc gtacccccgt acgactcggt gcaggtgtac 2400 ggctacgagg gccgcggctc ctcttgcggc tccctcagct ccctgggctc 2450 cggcagcgaa gccggcggcg cccccggccc cgcggagccg ctggacgact 2500 ggggtccgct cttccgcacc ctggccgagc tgtatggggc caaggagccc 2550 ccggccccct gagcgcccgg gctggcccgg cccaccgcgg ggggggggca 2600 gcgggcacag gccctctgag tgagccccac ggggtccagg cgggcggcag 2650 cagcccaggg gccccaggcc tcctccctgt ccttgtgtcc ctccttgctt 2700 ccccggggca ccctcgctct cacctccctc ctcctgagtc ggtgtgtgtg 2750 tctctctcca ggaatctttg tctctatctg tgacacgctc ctctgtccgg 2800 gcctgggttt cctgccctgg ccctggccct gcgatctctc actgtgattc 2850 ctctccttcc tccgtggcgt tttgtctctg cagttctgaa gctcacacat 2900 agtctccctg cgtcttcctt gcccatacac atgctctgtg tctgtctcct 2950 gcccacatct cccttccttc tctctgggtc cctgtgactg gctttttgtt 3000 tttttctgtt gtccatccca aaatcaagag aaacttccag ccactgctgc 3050 ccaccctcct gcaggggatg ttgtgcccca gacctgcctg catggttcca 3100 tccattactc atggcctcag cctcatcctg gctccactgg cctccagctg 3150 agagagggaa ccagcctgcc tcccagggca agagctccag cctcccgtgt 3200 ggccgcctcc ctggagctct gcccagctgc cagcttcccc tgggcatccc 3250 agccctgggc attgtcttgt gtgcttcctg agggagtagg gaaaggaaag 3300 ggggaggcgg ctggggaagg ggaaagaggg aggaagggga ggggcctcca 3350 tctctaattt cataataaac aaacacttta ttttgtaaaa c 3391 98 781 PRT Homo Sapien 98 Met Trp Gly Leu Val Arg Leu Leu Leu Ala Trp Leu Gly Gly Trp 1 5 10 15 Gly Cys Met Gly Arg Leu Ala Ala Pro Ala Arg Ala Trp Ala Gly 20 25 30 Ser Arg Glu His Pro Gly Pro Ala Leu Leu Arg Thr Arg Arg Ser 35 40 45 Trp Val Trp Asn Gln Phe Phe Val Ile Glu Glu Tyr Ala Gly Pro 50 55 60 Glu Pro Val Leu Ile Gly Lys Leu His Ser Asp Val Asp Arg Gly 65 70 75 Glu Gly Arg Thr Lys Tyr Leu Leu Thr Gly Glu Gly Ala Gly Thr 80 85 90 Val Phe Val Ile Asp Glu Ala Thr Gly Asn Ile His Val Thr Lys 95 100 105 Ser Leu Asp Arg Glu Glu Lys Ala Gln Tyr Val Leu Leu Ala Gln 110 115 120 Ala Val Asp Arg Ala Ser Asn Arg Pro Leu Glu Pro Pro Ser Glu 125 130 135 Phe Ile Ile Lys Val Gln Asp Ile Asn Asp Asn Pro Pro Ile Phe 140 145 150 Pro Leu Gly Pro Tyr His Ala Thr Val Pro Glu Met Ser Asn Val 155 160 165 Gly Thr Ser Val Ile Gln Val Thr Ala His Asp Ala Asp Asp Pro 170 175 180 Ser Tyr Gly Asn Ser Ala Lys Leu Val Tyr Thr Val Leu Asp Gly 185 190 195 Leu Pro Phe Phe Ser Val Asp Pro Gln Thr Gly Val Val Arg Thr 200 205 210 Ala Ile Pro Asn Met Asp Arg Glu Thr Gln Glu Glu Phe Leu Val 215 220 225 Val Ile Gln Ala Lys Asp Met Gly Gly His Met Gly Gly Leu Ser 230 235 240 Gly Ser Thr Thr Val Thr Val Thr Leu Ser Asp Val Asn Asp Asn 245 250 255 Pro Pro Lys Phe Pro Gln Ser Leu Tyr Gln Phe Ser Val Val Glu 260 265 270 Thr Ala Gly Pro Gly Thr Leu Val Gly Arg Leu Arg Ala Gln Asp 275 280 285 Pro Asp Leu Gly Asp Asn Ala Leu Met Ala Tyr Ser Ile Leu Asp 290 295 300 Gly Glu Gly Ser Glu Ala Phe Ser Ile Ser Thr Asp Leu Gln Gly 305 310 315 Arg Asp Gly Leu Leu Thr Val Arg Lys Pro Leu Asp Phe Glu Ser 320 325 330 Gln Arg Ser Tyr Ser Phe Arg Val Glu Ala Thr Asn Thr Leu Ile 335 340 345 Asp Pro Ala Tyr Leu Arg Arg Gly Pro Phe Lys Asp Val Ala Ser 350 355 360 Val Arg Val Ala Val Gln Asp Ala Pro Glu Pro Pro Ala Phe Thr 365 370 375 Gln Ala Ala Tyr His Leu Thr Val Pro Glu Asn Lys Ala Pro Gly 380 385 390 Thr Leu Val Gly Gln Ile Ser Ala Ala Asp Leu Asp Ser Pro Ala 395 400 405 Ser Pro Ile Arg Tyr Ser Ile Leu Pro His Ser Asp Pro Glu Arg 410 415 420 Cys Phe Ser Ile Gln Pro Glu Glu Gly Thr Ile His Thr Ala Ala 425 430 435 Pro Leu Asp Arg Glu Ala Arg Ala Trp His Asn Leu Thr Val Leu 440 445 450 Ala Thr Glu Leu Asp Ser Ser Ala Gln Ala Ser Arg Val Gln Val 455 460 465 Ala Ile Gln Thr Leu Asp Glu Asn Asp Asn Ala Pro Gln Leu Ala 470 475 480 Glu Pro Tyr Asp Thr Phe Val Cys Asp Ser Ala Ala Pro Gly Gln 485 490 495 Leu Ile Gln Val Ile Arg Ala Leu Asp Arg Asp Glu Val Gly Asn 500 505 510 Ser Ser His Val Ser Phe Gln Gly Pro Leu Gly Pro Asp Ala Asn 515 520 525 Phe Thr Val Gln Asp Asn Arg Asp Gly Ser Ala Ser Leu Leu Leu 530 535 540 Pro Ser Arg Pro Ala Pro Pro Arg His Ala Pro Tyr Leu Val Pro 545 550 555 Ile Glu Leu Trp Asp Trp Gly Gln Pro Ala Leu Ser Ser Thr Ala 560 565 570 Thr Val Thr Val Ser Val Cys Arg Cys Gln Pro Asp Gly Ser Val 575 580 585 Ala Ser Cys Trp Pro Glu Ala His Leu Ser Ala Ala Gly Leu Ser 590 595 600 Thr Gly Ala Leu Leu Ala Ile Ile Thr Cys Val Gly Ala Leu Leu 605 610 615 Ala Leu Val Val Leu Phe Val Ala Leu Arg Arg Gln Lys Gln Glu 620 625 630 Ala Leu Met Val Leu Glu Glu Glu Asp Val Arg Glu Asn Ile Ile 635 640 645 Thr Tyr Asp Asp Glu Gly Gly Gly Glu Glu Asp Thr Glu Ala Phe 650 655 660 Asp Ile Thr Ala Leu Gln Asn Pro Asp Gly Ala Ala Pro Pro Ala 665 670 675 Pro Gly Pro Pro Ala Arg Arg Asp Val Leu Pro Arg Ala Arg Val 680 685 690 Ser Arg Gln Pro Arg Pro Pro Gly Pro Ala Asp Val Ala Gln Leu 695 700 705 Leu Ala Leu Arg Leu Arg Glu Ala Asp Glu Asp Pro Gly Val Pro 710 715 720 Pro Tyr Asp Ser Val Gln Val Tyr Gly Tyr Glu Gly Arg Gly Ser 725 730 735 Ser Cys Gly Ser Leu Ser Ser Leu Gly Ser Gly Ser Glu Ala Gly 740 745 750 Gly Ala Pro Gly Pro Ala Glu Pro Leu Asp Asp Trp Gly Pro Leu 755 760 765 Phe Arg Thr Leu Ala Glu Leu Tyr Gly Ala Lys Glu Pro Pro Ala 770 775 780 Pro 99 2855 DNA Homo Sapien 99 gccaacactg gccaaacata tggggctgga atctcaacat cggtcactgg 50 gacctcaata tttggagccg gaaccccaca atttggaaca cagaccccaa 100 tatttggagc agaaccccaa gatttgacat ctaaaacctc aagcctggag 150 ctgaactctg aattctgggc ctgggacctt gaaatctggg actggatttc 200 cagtactgta ccctggaacc cactcttggg gacctgaacc ctgggattca 250 ggcctcaaat tccaagatct ggactgtggg attccaaggg gcctgaaccc 300 gagtttgggc ctgaagtcct tgctgcagac ctgagtgctt aaatctgggg 350 cttgagacct cccaatcttg actcagcacc ccaatatctg aatgcagaac 400 cccgggatcg gatctcagac tctaaacccc accgtttggc tgcttagcat 450 cccaagactg gacctgggag accctgaccc tgaacaaccc aaactggacc 500 cgtaaaactg gaccctagag gcccaatatt taggggtctg gaaccccgag 550 tattaaggtc tggagactcc gttgccacag atttgagccg agtcaggaca 600 cagtccctct acagaagcct tggggacagg aaaagcatga ccagatgctc 650 cctccagagc cctgacctct gactcccctg gagctaggac tctgctccct 700 ggggctgctt ctagctcagg acacccctgc ccgcgatggc catcctcccg 750 ttgctcctgt gcctgctgcc gctggcccct gcctcatccc caccccagtc 800 agccacaccc agcccatgtc cccgccgctg ccgctgccag acacagtcgc 850 tgcccctaag cgtgctgtgc ccaggggcag gcctcctgtt cgtgccaccc 900 tcgctggacc gccgggcagc cgagctgcgg ctggcagaca acttcatcgc 950 ctccgtgcgc cgccgcgacc tggccaacat gacaggcctg ctgcatctga 1000 gcctgtcgcg gaacaccatc cgccacgtgg ctgccggcgc cttcgccgac 1050 ctgcgggccc tgcgtgccct gcacctggat ggcaaccggc tgacctcact 1100 gggcgagggc cagctgcgcg gcctggtcaa cttgcgccac ctcatcctca 1150 gcaacaacca gctggcagcg ctggcggccg gcgccctgga tgattgtgcc 1200 gagacactgg aggacctcga cctctcctac aacaacctcg agcagctgcc 1250 ctgggaggcc ctgggccgcc tgggcaacgt caacacgttg ggcctcgacc 1300 acaacctgct ggcttctgtg cccggcgctt tttcccgcct gcacaagctg 1350 gcccggctgg acatgacctc caaccgcctg accacaatcc cacccgaccc 1400 actcttctcc cgcctgcccc tgctcgccag gccccggggc tcgcccgcct 1450 ctgccctggt gctggccttt ggcgggaacc ccctgcactg caactgcgag 1500 ctggtgtggc tgcgtcgcct ggcgcgggag gacgacctcg aggcctgcgc 1550 gtccccacct gctctgggcg gccgctactt ctgggcggtg ggcgaggagg 1600 agtttgtctg cgagccgccc gtggtgactc accgctcacc acctctggct 1650 gtgcccgcag gtcggccggc tgccctgcgc tgccgggcag tgggggaccc 1700 agagccccgt gtgcgttggg tgtcacccca gggccggctg ctaggcaact 1750 caagccgtgc ccgcgccttc cccaatggga cgctggagct gctggtcacc 1800 gagccgggtg atggtggcat cttcacctgc attgcggcca atgcagctgg 1850 cgaggccaca gctgctgtgg agctgactgt gggtccccca ccacctcctc 1900 agctagccaa cagcaccagc tgtgaccccc cgcgggacgg ggatcctgat 1950 gctctcaccc caccctccgc tgcctctgct tctgccaagg tggccgacac 2000 tgggccccct accgaccgtg gcgtccaggt gactgagcac ggggccacag 2050 ctgctcttgt ccagtggccg gatcagcggc ctatcccggg catccgcatg 2100 taccagatcc agtacaacag ctcggctgat gacatcctcg tctacaggat 2150 gatcccggcg gagagccgct cgttcctgct gacggacctg gcgtcaggcc 2200 ggacctacga tctgtgcgtg ctcgccgtgt atgaggacag cgccacgggg 2250 ctcacggcca cgcggcctgt gggctgcgcc cgcttctcca ccgaacctgc 2300 gctgcggcca tgcggggcgc cgcacgctcc cttcctgggc ggcacgatga 2350 tcatcgcgct gggcggcgtc atcgtagcct cggtactggt cttcatcttc 2400 gtgctgctaa tgcgctacaa ggtgcacggc ggccagcccc ccggcaaggc 2450 caagattccc gcgcctgtta gcagcgtttg ctcccagacc aacggcgccc 2500 tgggccccac gcccacgccc gccccgcccg ccccggagcc cgcggcgctc 2550 agggcccaca ccgtggtcca gctggactgc gagccctggg ggcccggcca 2600 cgaacctgtg ggaccctagc caggcgcccc cccctctaag ggtcctctgg 2650 ccccacggac agcaggaccc ggacaccctg tgggacctgg cctcaaactc 2700 accaaatcgc tcatggtttt taaaactctg atggggaggg tgtcggggac 2750 accggggcaa aacaagaaag tcctattttt ccaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 2800 aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 2850 aaaaa 2855 100 627 PRT Homo Sapien 100 Met Ala Ile Leu Pro Leu Leu Leu Cys Leu Leu Pro Leu Ala Pro 1 5 10 15 Ala Ser Ser Pro Pro Gln Ser Ala Thr Pro Ser Pro Cys Pro Arg 20 25 30 Arg Cys Arg Cys Gln Thr Gln Ser Leu Pro Leu Ser Val Leu Cys 35 40 45 Pro Gly Ala Gly Leu Leu Phe Val Pro Pro Ser Leu Asp Arg Arg 50 55 60 Ala Ala Glu Leu Arg Leu Ala Asp Asn Phe Ile Ala Ser Val Arg 65 70 75 Arg Arg Asp Leu Ala Asn Met Thr Gly Leu Leu His Leu Ser Leu 80 85 90 Ser Arg Asn Thr Ile Arg His Val Ala Ala Gly Ala Phe Ala Asp 95 100 105 Leu Arg Ala Leu Arg Ala Leu His Leu Asp Gly Asn Arg Leu Thr 110 115 120 Ser Leu Gly Glu Gly Gln Leu Arg Gly Leu Val Asn Leu Arg His 125 130 135 Leu Ile Leu Ser Asn Asn Gln Leu Ala Ala Leu Ala Ala Gly Ala 140 145 150 Leu Asp Asp Cys Ala Glu Thr Leu Glu Asp Leu Asp Leu Ser Tyr 155 160 165 Asn Asn Leu Glu Gln Leu Pro Trp Glu Ala Leu Gly Arg Leu Gly 170 175 180 Asn Val Asn Thr Leu Gly Leu Asp His Asn Leu Leu Ala Ser Val 185 190 195 Pro Gly Ala Phe Ser Arg Leu His Lys Leu Ala Arg Leu Asp Met 200 205 210 Thr Ser Asn Arg Leu Thr Thr Ile Pro Pro Asp Pro Leu Phe Ser 215 220 225 Arg Leu Pro Leu Leu Ala Arg Pro Arg Gly Ser Pro Ala Ser Ala 230 235 240 Leu Val Leu Ala Phe Gly Gly Asn Pro Leu His Cys Asn Cys Glu 245 250 255 Leu Val Trp Leu Arg Arg Leu Ala Arg Glu Asp Asp Leu Glu Ala 260 265 270 Cys Ala Ser Pro Pro Ala Leu Gly Gly Arg Tyr Phe Trp Ala Val 275 280 285 Gly Glu Glu Glu Phe Val Cys Glu Pro Pro Val Val Thr His Arg 290 295 300 Ser Pro Pro Leu Ala Val Pro Ala Gly Arg Pro Ala Ala Leu Arg 305 310 315 Cys Arg Ala Val Gly Asp Pro Glu Pro Arg Val Arg Trp Val Ser 320 325 330 Pro Gln Gly Arg Leu Leu Gly Asn Ser Ser Arg Ala Arg Ala Phe 335 340 345 Pro Asn Gly Thr Leu Glu Leu Leu Val Thr Glu Pro Gly Asp Gly 350 355 360 Gly Ile Phe Thr Cys Ile Ala Ala Asn Ala Ala Gly Glu Ala Thr 365 370 375 Ala Ala Val Glu Leu Thr Val Gly Pro Pro Pro Pro Pro Gln Leu 380 385 390 Ala Asn Ser Thr Ser Cys Asp Pro Pro Arg Asp Gly Asp Pro Asp 395 400 405 Ala Leu Thr Pro Pro Ser Ala Ala Ser Ala Ser Ala Lys Val Ala 410 415 420 Asp Thr Gly Pro Pro Thr Asp Arg Gly Val Gln Val Thr Glu His 425 430 435 Gly Ala Thr Ala Ala Leu Val Gln Trp Pro Asp Gln Arg Pro Ile 440 445 450 Pro Gly Ile Arg Met Tyr Gln Ile Gln Tyr Asn Ser Ser Ala Asp 455 460 465 Asp Ile Leu Val Tyr Arg Met Ile Pro Ala Glu Ser Arg Ser Phe 470 475 480 Leu Leu Thr Asp Leu Ala Ser Gly Arg Thr Tyr Asp Leu Cys Val 485 490 495 Leu Ala Val Tyr Glu Asp Ser Ala Thr Gly Leu Thr Ala Thr Arg 500 505 510 Pro Val Gly Cys Ala Arg Phe Ser Thr Glu Pro Ala Leu Arg Pro 515 520 525 Cys Gly Ala Pro His Ala Pro Phe Leu Gly Gly Thr Met Ile Ile 530 535 540 Ala Leu Gly Gly Val Ile Val Ala Ser Val Leu Val Phe Ile Phe 545 550 555 Val Leu Leu Met Arg Tyr Lys Val His Gly Gly Gln Pro Pro Gly 560 565 570 Lys Ala Lys Ile Pro Ala Pro Val Ser Ser Val Cys Ser Gln Thr 575 580 585 Asn Gly Ala Leu Gly Pro Thr Pro Thr Pro Ala Pro Pro Ala Pro 590 595 600 Glu Pro Ala Ala Leu Arg Ala His Thr Val Val Gln Leu Asp Cys 605 610 615 Glu Pro Trp Gly Pro Gly His Glu Pro Val Gly Pro 620 625 101 1111 DNA Homo Sapien 101 cgactccata accgtggcct tggccccagt ccccctgact tccggacttc 50 agaccagata ctgcccatat ccccttatga agtcttggcc aggcaacccc 100 tagggtgtac gttttctaaa gattaaagag gcggtgctaa gctgcagacg 150 gacttgcgac tcagccactg gtgtaagtca ggcgggaggt ggcgcccaat 200 aagctcaaga gaggaggcgg gttctggaaa aaggccaata gcctgtgaag 250 gcgagtctag cagcaaccaa tagctatgag cgagaggcgg gactctgagg 300 gaagtcaatc gctgccgcag gtaccgccaa tggcttttgg cgggggcgtt 350 ccccaaccct gccctctctc atgaccccgc tccgggatta tggccgggac 400 tgggctgctg gcgctgcgga cgctgccagg gcccagctgg gtgcgaggct 450 cgggcccttc cgtgctgagc cgcctgcagg acgcggccgt ggtgcggcct 500 ggcttcctga gcacggcaga ggaggagacg ctgagccgag aactggagcc 550 cgagctgcgc cgccgccgct acgaatacga tcactgggac gcggccatcc 600 acggcttccg agagacagag aagtcgcgct ggtcagaagc cagccgggcc 650 atcctgcagc gcgtgcaggc ggccgccttt ggccccggcc agaccctgct 700 ctcctccgtg cacgtgctgg acctggaagc ccgcggctac atcaagcccc 750 acgtggacag catcaagttc tgcggggcca ccatcgccgg cctgtctctc 800 ctgtctccca gcgttatgcg gctggtgcac acccaggagc cgggggagtg 850 gctggaactc ttgctggagc cgggctccct ctacatcctt aggggctcag 900 cccgttatga cttctcccat gagatccttc gggatgaaga gtccttcttt 950 ggggaacgcc ggattccccg gggccggcgc atctccgtga tctgccgctc 1000 cctccctgag ggcatggggc caggggagtc tggacagccg cccccagcct 1050 gctgaccccc agctttctac agacaccaga tttgtgaata aagttgggga 1100 atggacagcc t 1111 102 221 PRT Homo Sapien 102 Met Ala Gly Thr Gly Leu Leu Ala Leu Arg Thr Leu Pro Gly Pro 1 5 10 15 Ser Trp Val Arg Gly Ser Gly Pro Ser Val Leu Ser Arg Leu Gln 20 25 30 Asp Ala Ala Val Val Arg Pro Gly Phe Leu Ser Thr Ala Glu Glu 35 40 45 Glu Thr Leu Ser Arg Glu Leu Glu Pro Glu Leu Arg Arg Arg Arg 50 55 60 Tyr Glu Tyr Asp His Trp Asp Ala Ala Ile His Gly Phe Arg Glu 65 70 75 Thr Glu Lys Ser Arg Trp Ser Glu Ala Ser Arg Ala Ile Leu Gln 80 85 90 Arg Val Gln Ala Ala Ala Phe Gly Pro Gly Gln Thr Leu Leu Ser 95 100 105 Ser Val His Val Leu Asp Leu Glu Ala Arg Gly Tyr Ile Lys Pro 110 115 120 His Val Asp Ser Ile Lys Phe Cys Gly Ala Thr Ile Ala Gly Leu 125 130 135 Ser Leu Leu Ser Pro Ser Val Met Arg Leu Val His Thr Gln Glu 140 145 150 Pro Gly Glu Trp Leu Glu Leu Leu Leu Glu Pro Gly Ser Leu Tyr 155 160 165 Ile Leu Arg Gly Ser Ala Arg Tyr Asp Phe Ser His Glu Ile Leu 170 175 180 Arg Asp Glu Glu Ser Phe Phe Gly Glu Arg Arg Ile Pro Arg Gly 185 190 195 Arg Arg Ile Ser Val Ile Cys Arg Ser Leu Pro Glu Gly Met Gly 200 205 210 Pro Gly Glu Ser Gly Gln Pro Pro Pro Ala Cys 215 220 103 3583 DNA Homo Sapien 103 ctccccggcg ccgcaggcag cgtcctcctc cgaagcagct gcacctgcaa 50 ctgggcagcc tggaccctcg tgccctgttc ccgggacctc gcgcaggggg 100 cgccccggga caccccctgc gggccgggtg gaggaggaag aggaggagga 150 ggaagaagac gtggacaagg acccccatcc tacccagaac acctgcctgc 200 gctgccgcca cttctcttta agggagagga aaagagagcc taggagaacc 250 atggggggct gcgaagtccg ggaatttctt ttgcaatttg gtttcttctt 300 gcctctgctg acagcgtggc caggcgactg cagtcacgtc tccaacaacc 350 aagttgtgtt gcttgataca acaactgtac tgggagagct aggatggaaa 400 acatatccat taaatgggtg ggatgccatc actgaaatgg atgaacataa 450 taggcccatt cacacatacc aggtatgtaa tgtaatggaa ccaaaccaaa 500 acaactggct tcgtacaaac tggatctccc gtgatgcagc tcagaaaatt 550 tatgtggaaa tgaaattcac actaagggat tgtaacagca tcccatgggt 600 cttggggact tgcaaagaaa catttaatct gttttatatg gaatcagatg 650 agtcccacgg aattaaattc aagccaaacc agtatacaaa gatcgacaca 700 attgctgctg atgagagttt tacccagatg gatttgggtg atcgcatcct 750 caaactcaac actgaaattc gtgaggtggg gcctatagaa aggaaaggat 800 tttatctggc ttttcaagac attggggcgt gcattgccct ggtttcagtc 850 cgtgttttct acaagaaatg ccccttcact gttcgtaact tggccatgtt 900 tcctgatacc attccaaggg ttgattcctc ctctttggtt gaagtacggg 950 gttcttgtgt gaagagtgct gaagagcgtg acactcctaa actgtattgt 1000 ggagctgatg gagattggct ggttcctctt ggaaggtgca tctgcagtac 1050 aggatatgaa gaaattgagg gttcttgcca tgcttgcaga ccaggattct 1100 ataaagcttt tgctgggaac acaaaatgtt ctaaatgtcc tccacacagt 1150 ttaacataca tggaagcaac ttctgtctgt cagtgtgaaa agggttattt 1200 ccgagctgaa aaagacccac cttctatggc atgtaccagg ccaccttcag 1250 ctcctaggaa tgtggttttt aacatcaatg aaacagccct tattttggaa 1300 tggagcccac caagtgacac aggagggaga aaagatctca catacagtgt 1350 aatctgtaag aaatgtggct tagacaccag ccagtgtgag gactgtggtg 1400 gaggactccg cttcatccca agacatacag gcctgatcaa caattccgtg 1450 atagtacttg actttgtgtc tcacgtgaat tacacctttg aaatagaagc 1500 aatgaatgga gtttctgagt tgagtttttc tcccaagcca ttcacagcta 1550 ttacagtgac cacggatcaa gatgcacctt ccctgatagg tgtggtaagg 1600 aaggactggg catcccaaaa tagcattgcc ctatcatggc aagcacctgc 1650 tttttccaat ggagccattc tggactacga gatcaagtac tatgagaaag 1700 aacatgagca gctgacctac tcttccacaa ggtccaaagc ccccagtgtc 1750 atcatcacag gtcttaagcc agccaccaaa tatgtatttc acatccgagt 1800 gagaactgcg acaggataca gtggctacag tcagaaattt gaatttgaaa 1850 caggagatga aacttctgac atggcagcag aacaaggaca gattctcgtg 1900 atagccaccg ccgctgttgg cggattcact ctcctcgtca tcctcacttt 1950 attcttcttg atcactggga gatgtcagtg gtacataaaa gccaagatga 2000 agtcagaaga gaagagaaga aaccacttac agaatgggca tttgcgcttc 2050 ccgggaatta aaacttacat tgatccagat acatatgaag acccatccct 2100 agcagtccat gaatttgcaa aggagattga tccctcaaga attcgtattg 2150 agagagtcat tggggcaggt gaatttggag aagtctgtag tgggcgtttg 2200 aagacaccag ggaaaagaga gatcccagtt gccattaaaa ctttgaaagg 2250 tggccacatg gatcggcaaa gaagagattt tctaagagaa gctagtatca 2300 tgggccagtt tgaccatcca aacatcattc gcctagaagg ggttgtcacc 2350 aaaagatcct tcccggccat tggggtggag gcgttttgcc ccagcttcct 2400 gagggcaggg tttttaaata gcatccaggc cccgcatcca gtgccagggg 2450 gaggatcttt gccccccagg attcctgctg gcagaccagt aatgattgtg 2500 gtggaatata tggagaatgg atccctagac tcctttttgc ggaagcatga 2550 tggccacttc acagtcatcc agttggtcgg aatgctccga ggcattgcat 2600 caggcatgaa gtatctttct gatatgggtt atgttcatcg agacctagcg 2650 gctcggaata tactggtcaa tagcaactta gtatgcaaag tttctgattt 2700 tggtctctcc agagtgctgg aagatgatcc agaagctgct tatacaacaa 2750 ctggtggaaa aatccccata aggtggacag ccccagaagc catcgcctac 2800 agaaaattct cctcagcaag cgatgcatgg agctatggca ttgtcatgtg 2850 ggaggtcatg tcctatggag agagacctta ttgggaaatg tctaaccaag 2900 atgtcattct gtccattgaa gaagggtaca gacttccagc tcccatgggc 2950 tgtccagcat ctctacacca gctgatgctc cactgctggc agaaggagag 3000 aaatcacaga ccaaaattta ctgacattgt cagcttcctt gacaaactga 3050 tccgaaatcc cagtgccctt cacaccctgg tggaggacat ccttgtaatg 3100 ccagagtccc ctggtgaagt tccggaatat cctttgtttg tcacagttgg 3150 tgactggcta gattctataa agatggggca atacaagaat aacttcgtgg 3200 cagcagggtt tacaacattt gacctgattt caagaatgag cattgatgac 3250 attagaagaa ttggagtcat acttattgga caccagagac gaatagtcag 3300 cagcatacag actttacgtt tacacatgat gcacatacag gagaagggat 3350 ttcatgtatg aaagtaccac aagcacctgt gttttgtgcc tcagcatttc 3400 taaaatgaac gatatcctct ctactactct ctcttctgat tctccaaaca 3450 tcacttcaca aactgcagtc ttctgttcag actataggca cacaccttat 3500 gtttatgctt ccaaccagga ttttaaaatc atgctacata aatccgttct 3550 gaataacctg caactaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaa 3583 104 1036 PRT Homo Sapien 104 Met Gly Gly Cys Glu Val Arg Glu Phe Leu Leu Gln Phe Gly Phe 1 5 10 15 Phe Leu Pro Leu Leu Thr Ala Trp Pro Gly Asp Cys Ser His Val 20 25 30 Ser Asn Asn Gln Val Val Leu Leu Asp Thr Thr Thr Val Leu Gly 35 40 45 Glu Leu Gly Trp Lys Thr Tyr Pro Leu Asn Gly Trp Asp Ala Ile 50 55 60 Thr Glu Met Asp Glu His Asn Arg Pro Ile His Thr Tyr Gln Val 65 70 75 Cys Asn Val Met Glu Pro Asn Gln Asn Asn Trp Leu Arg Thr Asn 80 85 90 Trp Ile Ser Arg Asp Ala Ala Gln Lys Ile Tyr Val Glu Met Lys 95 100 105 Phe Thr Leu Arg Asp Cys Asn Ser Ile Pro Trp Val Leu Gly Thr 110 115 120 Cys Lys Glu Thr Phe Asn Leu Phe Tyr Met Glu Ser Asp Glu Ser 125 130 135 His Gly Ile Lys Phe Lys Pro Asn Gln Tyr Thr Lys Ile Asp Thr 140 145 150 Ile Ala Ala Asp Glu Ser Phe Thr Gln Met Asp Leu Gly Asp Arg 155 160 165 Ile Leu Lys Leu Asn Thr Glu Ile Arg Glu Val Gly Pro Ile Glu 170 175 180 Arg Lys Gly Phe Tyr Leu Ala Phe Gln Asp Ile Gly Ala Cys Ile 185 190 195 Ala Leu Val Ser Val Arg Val Phe Tyr Lys Lys Cys Pro Phe Thr 200 205 210 Val Arg Asn Leu Ala Met Phe Pro Asp Thr Ile Pro Arg Val Asp 215 220 225 Ser Ser Ser Leu Val Glu Val Arg Gly Ser Cys Val Lys Ser Ala 230 235 240 Glu Glu Arg Asp Thr Pro Lys Leu Tyr Cys Gly Ala Asp Gly Asp 245 250 255 Trp Leu Val Pro Leu Gly Arg Cys Ile Cys Ser Thr Gly Tyr Glu 260 265 270 Glu Ile Glu Gly Ser Cys His Ala Cys Arg Pro Gly Phe Tyr Lys 275 280 285 Ala Phe Ala Gly Asn Thr Lys Cys Ser Lys Cys Pro Pro His Ser 290 295 300 Leu Thr Tyr Met Glu Ala Thr Ser Val Cys Gln Cys Glu Lys Gly 305 310 315 Tyr Phe Arg Ala Glu Lys Asp Pro Pro Ser Met Ala Cys Thr Arg 320 325 330 Pro Pro Ser Ala Pro Arg Asn Val Val Phe Asn Ile Asn Glu Thr 335 340 345 Ala Leu Ile Leu Glu Trp Ser Pro Pro Ser Asp Thr Gly Gly Arg 350 355 360 Lys Asp Leu Thr Tyr Ser Val Ile Cys Lys Lys Cys Gly Leu Asp 365 370 375 Thr Ser Gln Cys Glu Asp Cys Gly Gly Gly Leu Arg Phe Ile Pro 380 385 390 Arg His Thr Gly Leu Ile Asn Asn Ser Val Ile Val Leu Asp Phe 395 400 405 Val Ser His Val Asn Tyr Thr Phe Glu Ile Glu Ala Met Asn Gly 410 415 420 Val Ser Glu Leu Ser Phe Ser Pro Lys Pro Phe Thr Ala Ile Thr 425 430 435 Val Thr Thr Asp Gln Asp Ala Pro Ser Leu Ile Gly Val Val Arg 440 445 450 Lys Asp Trp Ala Ser Gln Asn Ser Ile Ala Leu Ser Trp Gln Ala 455 460 465 Pro Ala Phe Ser Asn Gly Ala Ile Leu Asp Tyr Glu Ile Lys Tyr 470 475 480 Tyr Glu Lys Glu His Glu Gln Leu Thr Tyr Ser Ser Thr Arg Ser 485 490 495 Lys Ala Pro Ser Val Ile Ile Thr Gly Leu Lys Pro Ala Thr Lys 500 505 510 Tyr Val Phe His Ile Arg Val Arg Thr Ala Thr Gly Tyr Ser Gly 515 520 525 Tyr Ser Gln Lys Phe Glu Phe Glu Thr Gly Asp Glu Thr Ser Asp 530 535 540 Met Ala Ala Glu Gln Gly Gln Ile Leu Val Ile Ala Thr Ala Ala 545 550 555 Val Gly Gly Phe Thr Leu Leu Val Ile Leu Thr Leu Phe Phe Leu 560 565 570 Ile Thr Gly Arg Cys Gln Trp Tyr Ile Lys Ala Lys Met Lys Ser 575 580 585 Glu Glu Lys Arg Arg Asn His Leu Gln Asn Gly His Leu Arg Phe 590 595 600 Pro Gly Ile Lys Thr Tyr Ile Asp Pro Asp Thr Tyr Glu Asp Pro 605 610 615 Ser Leu Ala Val His Glu Phe Ala Lys Glu Ile Asp Pro Ser Arg 620 625 630 Ile Arg Ile Glu Arg Val Ile Gly Ala Gly Glu Phe Gly Glu Val 635 640 645 Cys Ser Gly Arg Leu Lys Thr Pro Gly Lys Arg Glu Ile Pro Val 650 655 660 Ala Ile Lys Thr Leu Lys Gly Gly His Met Asp Arg Gln Arg Arg 665 670 675 Asp Phe Leu Arg Glu Ala Ser Ile Met Gly Gln Phe Asp His Pro 680 685 690 Asn Ile Ile Arg Leu Glu Gly Val Val Thr Lys Arg Ser Phe Pro 695 700 705 Ala Ile Gly Val Glu Ala Phe Cys Pro Ser Phe Leu Arg Ala Gly 710 715 720 Phe Leu Asn Ser Ile Gln Ala Pro His Pro Val Pro Gly Gly Gly 725 730 735 Ser Leu Pro Pro Arg Ile Pro Ala Gly Arg Pro Val Met Ile Val 740 745 750 Val Glu Tyr Met Glu Asn Gly Ser Leu Asp Ser Phe Leu Arg Lys 755 760 765 His Asp Gly His Phe Thr Val Ile Gln Leu Val Gly Met Leu Arg 770 775 780 Gly Ile Ala Ser Gly Met Lys Tyr Leu Ser Asp Met Gly Tyr Val 785 790 795 His Arg Asp Leu Ala Ala Arg Asn Ile Leu Val Asn Ser Asn Leu 800 805 810 Val Cys Lys Val Ser Asp Phe Gly Leu Ser Arg Val Leu Glu Asp 815 820 825 Asp Pro Glu Ala Ala Tyr Thr Thr Thr Gly Gly Lys Ile Pro Ile 830 835 840 Arg Trp Thr Ala Pro Glu Ala Ile Ala Tyr Arg Lys Phe Ser Ser 845 850 855 Ala Ser Asp Ala Trp Ser Tyr Gly Ile Val Met Trp Glu Val Met 860 865 870 Ser Tyr Gly Glu Arg Pro Tyr Trp Glu Met Ser Asn Gln Asp Val 875 880 885 Ile Leu Ser Ile Glu Glu Gly Tyr Arg Leu Pro Ala Pro Met Gly 890 895 900 Cys Pro Ala Ser Leu His Gln Leu Met Leu His Cys Trp Gln Lys 905 910 915 Glu Arg Asn His Arg Pro Lys Phe Thr Asp Ile Val Ser Phe Leu 920 925 930 Asp Lys Leu Ile Arg Asn Pro Ser Ala Leu His Thr Leu Val Glu 935 940 945 Asp Ile Leu Val Met Pro Glu Ser Pro Gly Glu Val Pro Glu Tyr 950 955 960 Pro Leu Phe Val Thr Val Gly Asp Trp Leu Asp Ser Ile Lys Met 965 970 975 Gly Gln Tyr Lys Asn Asn Phe Val Ala Ala Gly Phe Thr Thr Phe 980 985 990 Asp Leu Ile Ser Arg Met Ser Ile Asp Asp Ile Arg Arg Ile Gly 995 1000 1005 Val Ile Leu Ile Gly His Gln Arg Arg Ile Val Ser Ser Ile Gln 1010 1015 1020 Thr Leu Arg Leu His Met Met His Ile Gln Glu Lys Gly Phe His 1025 1030 1035 Val 105 2148 DNA Homo Sapien 105 ggcggcgggc tgcgcggagc ggcgtcccct gcagccgcgg accgaggcag 50 cggcggcacc tgccggccga gcaatgccaa gtgagtacac ctatgtgaaa 100 ctgagaagtg attgctcgag gccttccctg caatggtaca cccgagctca 150 aagcaagatg agaaggccca gcttgttatt aaaagacatc ctcaaatgta 200 cattgcttgt gtttggagtg tggatccttt atatcctcaa gttaaattat 250 actactgaag aatgtgacat gaaaaaaatg cattatgtgg accctgacca 300 tgtaaagaga gctcagaaat atgctcagca agtcttgcag aaggaatgtc 350 gtcccaagtt tgccaagaca tcaatggcgc tgttatttga gcacaggtat 400 agcgtggact tactcccttt tgtgcagaag gcccccaaag acagtgaagc 450 tgagtccaag tacgatcctc cttttgggtt ccggaagttc tccagtaaag 500 tccagaccct cttggaactc ttgccagagc acgacctccc tgaacacttg 550 aaagccaaga cctgtcggcg ctgtgtggtt attggaagcg gaggaatact 600 gcacggatta gaactgggcc acaccctgaa ccagttcgat gttgtgataa 650 ggttaaacag tgcaccagtt gagggatatt cagaacatgt tggaaataaa 700 actactataa ggatgactta tccagagggc gcaccactgt ctgaccttga 750 atattattcc aatgacttat ttgttgctgt tttatttaag agtgttgatt 800 tcaactggct tcaagcaatg gtaaaaaagg aaaccctgcc attctgggta 850 cgactcttct tttggaagca ggtggcagaa aaaatcccac tgcagccaaa 900 acatttcagg attttgaatc cagttatcat caaagagact gcctttgaca 950 tccttcagta ctcagagcct cagtcaaggt tctggggccg agataagaac 1000 gtccccacaa tcggtgtcat tgccgttgtc ttagccacac atctgtgcga 1050 tgaagtcagt ttggcgggtt ttggatatga cctcaatcaa cccagaacac 1100 ctttgcacta cttcgacagt caatgcatgg ctgctatgaa ctttcagacc 1150 atgcataatg tgacaacgga aaccaagttc ctcttaaagc tggtcaaaga 1200 gggagtggtg aaagatctca gtggaggcat tgatcgtgaa ttttgaacac 1250 agaaaacctc agttgaaaat gcaactctaa ctctgagagc tgtttttgac 1300 agccttcttg atgtatttct ccatcctgca gatactttga agtgcagctc 1350 atgtttttaa cttttaattt aaaaacacaa aaaaaatttt agctcttccc 1400 actttttttt tcctatttat ttgaggtcag tgtttgtttt tgcacaccat 1450 tttgtaaatg aaacttaaga attgaattgg aaagacttct caaagagaat 1500 tgtatgtaac gatgttgtat tgatttttaa gaaagtaatt taatttgtaa 1550 aacttctgct cgtttacact gcacattgaa tacaggtaac taattggaag 1600 gagaggggag gtcactcttt tgatggtggc cctgaacctc attctggttc 1650 cctgctgcgc tgcttggtgt gacccacgga ggatccactc ccaggatgac 1700 gtgctccgta gctctgctgc tgatactggg tctgcgatgc agcggcgtga 1750 ggcctgggct ggttggagaa ggtcacaacc cttctctgtt ggtctgcctt 1800 ctgctgaaag actcgagaac caaccaggga agctgtcctg gaggtccctg 1850 gtcggagagg gacatagaat ctgtgacctc tgacaactgt gaagccaccc 1900 tgggctacag aaaccacagt cttcccagca attattacaa ttcttgaatt 1950 ccttggggat tttttactgc cctttcaaag cacttaagtg ttagatctaa 2000 cgtgttccag tgtctgtctg aggtgactta aaaaatcaga acaaaacttc 2050 tattatccag agtcatggga gagtacaccc tttccaggaa taatgttttg 2100 ggaaacactg aaatgaaatc ttcccagtat tataaattgt gtatttaa 2148 106 362 PRT Homo Sapien 106 Met Arg Arg Pro Ser Leu Leu Leu Lys Asp Ile Leu Lys Cys Thr 1 5 10 15 Leu Leu Val Phe Gly Val Trp Ile Leu Tyr Ile Leu Lys Leu Asn 20 25 30 Tyr Thr Thr Glu Glu Cys Asp Met Lys Lys Met His Tyr Val Asp 35 40 45 Pro Asp His Val Lys Arg Ala Gln Lys Tyr Ala Gln Gln Val Leu 50 55 60 Gln Lys Glu Cys Arg Pro Lys Phe Ala Lys Thr Ser Met Ala Leu 65 70 75 Leu Phe Glu His Arg Tyr Ser Val Asp Leu Leu Pro Phe Val Gln 80 85 90 Lys Ala Pro Lys Asp Ser Glu Ala Glu Ser Lys Tyr Asp Pro Pro 95 100 105 Phe Gly Phe Arg Lys Phe Ser Ser Lys Val Gln Thr Leu Leu Glu 110 115 120 Leu Leu Pro Glu His Asp Leu Pro Glu His Leu Lys Ala Lys Thr 125 130 135 Cys Arg Arg Cys Val Val Ile Gly Ser Gly Gly Ile Leu His Gly 140 145 150 Leu Glu Leu Gly His Thr Leu Asn Gln Phe Asp Val Val Ile Arg 155 160 165 Leu Asn Ser Ala Pro Val Glu Gly Tyr Ser Glu His Val Gly Asn 170 175 180 Lys Thr Thr Ile Arg Met Thr Tyr Pro Glu Gly Ala Pro Leu Ser 185 190 195 Asp Leu Glu Tyr Tyr Ser Asn Asp Leu Phe Val Ala Val Leu Phe 200 205 210 Lys Ser Val Asp Phe Asn Trp Leu Gln Ala Met Val Lys Lys Glu 215 220 225 Thr Leu Pro Phe Trp Val Arg Leu Phe Phe Trp Lys Gln Val Ala 230 235 240 Glu Lys Ile Pro Leu Gln Pro Lys His Phe Arg Ile Leu Asn Pro 245 250 255 Val Ile Ile Lys Glu Thr Ala Phe Asp Ile Leu Gln Tyr Ser Glu 260 265 270 Pro Gln Ser Arg Phe Trp Gly Arg Asp Lys Asn Val Pro Thr Ile 275 280 285 Gly Val Ile Ala Val Val Leu Ala Thr His Leu Cys Asp Glu Val 290 295 300 Ser Leu Ala Gly Phe Gly Tyr Asp Leu Asn Gln Pro Arg Thr Pro 305 310 315 Leu His Tyr Phe Asp Ser Gln Cys Met Ala Ala Met Asn Phe Gln 320 325 330 Thr Met His Asn Val Thr Thr Glu Thr Lys Phe Leu Leu Lys Leu 335 340 345 Val Lys Glu Gly Val Val Lys Asp Leu Ser Gly Gly Ile Asp Arg 350 355 360 Glu Phe 107 1399 DNA Homo Sapien 107 tgacgcgggg cgccagctgc caacttcgcg cgcggagctc cccggcggtg 50 cagtcccgtc ccggcggcgc gggcggcatg aagactagcc gccgcggccg 100 agcgctcctg gccgtggccc tgaacctgct ggcgctgctg ttcgccacca 150 ccgctttcct caccacgcac tggtgccagg gcacgcagcg ggtccccaag 200 ccgggctgcg gccagggcgg gcgcgccaac tgccccaact cgggcgccaa 250 cgccacggcc aacggcaccg ccgcccccgc cgccgccgcc gccgccgcca 300 ccgcctcggg gaacggcccc cctggcggcg cgctctacag ctgggagacc 350 ggcgacgacc gcttcctctt caggaatttc cacaccggca tctggtactc 400 gtgcgaggag gagctcagcg ggcttggtga aaaatgtcgc agcttcattg 450 acctggcccc ggcgtcggag aaaggcctcc tgggaatggt cgcccacatg 500 atgtacacgc aggtgttcca ggtcaccgtg agcctcggtc ctgaggactg 550 gagaccccat tcctgggact acgggtggtc cttctgcctg gcgtggggct 600 cctttacctg ctgcatggca gcctctgtca ccacgctcaa ctcctacacc 650 aagacggtca ttgagttccg gcacaagcgc aaggtctttg agcagggcta 700 ccgggaagag ccgaccttca tagaccctga ggccatcaag tacttccggg 750 agaggatgga gaagagggac gggagcgagg aggactttca cttagactgc 800 cgccacgaga gataccctgc ccgacaccag ccacacatgg cggattcctg 850 gccccggagc tccgcacagg aagcaccaga gctgaaccga cagtgctggg 900 tcttggggca ctgggtgtga ccaagacctc aacctggccc gcggacctca 950 ggccatcgct ggcaccagcc cctgctgcaa gaccaccaga gtggtgcccc 1000 cagaaccctg gcctgtgtgc cgtgaactca gtcagcctgc gtgggagatg 1050 ccaggcctgt cctgcccatc gctgcctggg tcccatggcc ttggaaatgg 1100 ggccagggca ggcccaaggg aatgcacagg gctgcacaga gtgactttgg 1150 gacagcagcc ccggactctt gccatcatca catgagccct gctgggcaca 1200 gctgcgatgc caggagacac atggccactg gccactgaat ggctggcacc 1250 cacaagccag tcaggtgccc agaggggcag agccctttgg ggggcagaga 1300 gtggcttcct gaaggagggg gcagtggcgc aggcactgca ggggtgtcac 1350 acagcaggca cacagcaggg gctcaataaa tgcttgttga acttgtttt 1399 108 280 PRT Homo Sapien 108 Met Lys Thr Ser Arg Arg Gly Arg Ala Leu Leu Ala Val Ala Leu 1 5 10 15 Asn Leu Leu Ala Leu Leu Phe Ala Thr Thr Ala Phe Leu Thr Thr 20 25 30 His Trp Cys Gln Gly Thr Gln Arg Val Pro Lys Pro Gly Cys Gly 35 40 45 Gln Gly Gly Arg Ala Asn Cys Pro Asn Ser Gly Ala Asn Ala Thr 50 55 60 Ala Asn Gly Thr Ala Ala Pro Ala Ala Ala Ala Ala Ala Ala Thr 65 70 75 Ala Ser Gly Asn Gly Pro Pro Gly Gly Ala Leu Tyr Ser Trp Glu 80 85 90 Thr Gly Asp Asp Arg Phe Leu Phe Arg Asn Phe His Thr Gly Ile 95 100 105 Trp Tyr Ser Cys Glu Glu Glu Leu Ser Gly Leu Gly Glu Lys Cys 110 115 120 Arg Ser Phe Ile Asp Leu Ala Pro Ala Ser Glu Lys Gly Leu Leu 125 130 135 Gly Met Val Ala His Met Met Tyr Thr Gln Val Phe Gln Val Thr 140 145 150 Val Ser Leu Gly Pro Glu Asp Trp Arg Pro His Ser Trp Asp Tyr 155 160 165 Gly Trp Ser Phe Cys Leu Ala Trp Gly Ser Phe Thr Cys Cys Met 170 175 180 Ala Ala Ser Val Thr Thr Leu Asn Ser Tyr Thr Lys Thr Val Ile 185 190 195 Glu Phe Arg His Lys Arg Lys Val Phe Glu Gln Gly Tyr Arg Glu 200 205 210 Glu Pro Thr Phe Ile Asp Pro Glu Ala Ile Lys Tyr Phe Arg Glu 215 220 225 Arg Met Glu Lys Arg Asp Gly Ser Glu Glu Asp Phe His Leu Asp 230 235 240 Cys Arg His Glu Arg Tyr Pro Ala Arg His Gln Pro His Met Ala 245 250 255 Asp Ser Trp Pro Arg Ser Ser Ala Gln Glu Ala Pro Glu Leu Asn 260 265 270 Arg Gln Cys Trp Val Leu Gly His Trp Val 275 280 109 2964 DNA Homo Sapien 109 gattaccaag caagaacagc taaaatgaaa gccatcattc atcttactct 50 tcttgctctc ctttctgtaa acacagccac caaccaaggc aactcagctg 100 atgctgtaac aaccacagaa actgcgacta gtggtcctac agtagctgca 150 gctgatacca ctgaaactaa tttccctgaa actgctagca ccacagcaaa 200 tacaccttct ttcccaacag ctacttcacc tgctcccccc ataattagta 250 cacatagttc ctccacaatt cctacacctg ctccccccat aattagtaca 300 catagttcct ccacaattcc tatacctact gctgcagaca gtgagtcaac 350 cacaaatgta aattcattag ctacctctga cataatcacc gcttcatctc 400 caaatgatgg attaatcaca atggttcctt ctgaaacaca aagtaacaat 450 gaaatgtccc ccaccacaga agacaatcaa tcatcagggc ctcccactgg 500 caccgcttta ttggagacca gcaccctaaa cagcacaggt cccagcaatc 550 cttgccaaga tgatccctgt gcagataatt cgttatgtgt taagctgcat 600 aatacaagtt tttgcctgtg tttagaaggg tattactaca actcttctac 650 atgtaagaaa ggaaaggtat tccctgggaa gatttcagtg acagtatcag 700 aaacatttga cccagaagag aaacattcca tggcctatca agacttgcat 750 agtgaaatta ctagcttgtt taaagatgta tttggcacat ctgtttatgg 800 acagactgta attcttactg taagcacatc tctgtcacca agatctgaaa 850 tgcgtgctga tgacaagttt gttaatgtaa caatagtaac aattttggca 900 gaaaccacaa gtgacaatga gaagactgtg actgagaaaa ttaataaagc 950 aattagaagt agctcaagca actttctaaa ctatgatttg acccttcggt 1000 gtgattatta tggctgtaac cagactgcgg atgactgcct caatggttta 1050 gcatgcgatt gcaaatctga cctgcaaagg cctaacccac agagcccttt 1100 ctgcgttgct tccagtctca agtgtcctga tgcctgcaac gcacagcaca 1150 agcaatgctt aataaagaag agtggtgggg cccctgagtg tgcgtgcgtg 1200 cccggctacc aggaagatgc taatgggaac tgccaaaagt gtgcatttgg 1250 ctacagtgga ctcgactgta aggacaaatt tcagctgatc ctcactattg 1300 tgggcaccat cgctggcatt gtcattctca gcatgataat tgcattgatt 1350 gtcacagcaa gatcaaataa caaaacgaag catattgaag aagagaactt 1400 gattgacgaa gactttcaaa atctaaaact gcggtcgaca ggcttcacca 1450 atcttggagc agaagggagc gtctttccta aggtcaggat aacggcctcc 1500 agagacagcc agatgcaaaa tccctattca agccacagca gcatgccccg 1550 ccctgactat tagaatcata agaatgtgga acccgccatg gcccccaacc 1600 aatgtacaag ctattattta gagtgtttag aaagactgat ggagaagtga 1650 gcaccagtaa agatctggcc tccggggttt ttcttccatc tgacatctgc 1700 cagcctctct gaatggaagt tgtgaatgtt tgcaacgaat ccagctcact 1750 tgctaaataa gaatctatga cattaaatgt agtagatgct attagcgctt 1800 gtcagagagg tggttttctt caatcagtac aaagtactga gacaatggtt 1850 agggttgttt tcttaattct tttcctggta gggcaacaag aaccatttcc 1900 aatctagagg aaagctcccc agcattgctt gctcctgggc aaacattgct 1950 cttgagttaa gtgacctaat tcccctggga gacatacgca tcaactgtgg 2000 aggtccgagg ggatgagaag ggatacccac catctttcaa gggtcacaag 2050 ctcactctct gacaagtcag aatagggaca ctgcttctat ccctccaatg 2100 gagagattct ggcaaccttt gaacagccca gagcttgcaa cctagcctca 2150 cccaagaaga ctggaaagag acatatctct cagctttttc aggaggcgtg 2200 cctgggaatc caggaacttt ttgatgctaa ttagaaggcc tggactaaaa 2250 atgtccacta tggggtgcac tctacagttt ttgaaatgct aggaggcaga 2300 aggggcagag agtaaaaaac atgacctggt agaaggaaga gaggcaaagg 2350 aaactgggtg gggaggatca attagagagg aggcacctgg gatccacctt 2400 cttccttagg tcccctcctc catcagcaaa ggagcacttc tctaatcatg 2450 ccctcccgaa gactggctgg gagaaggttt aaaaacaaaa aatccaggag 2500 taagagcctt aggtcagttt gaaattggag acaaactgtc tggcaaaggg 2550 tgcgagaggg agcttgtgct caggagtcca gccgcccagc ctcggggtgt 2600 aggtttctga ggtgtgccat tggggcctca gccttctctg gtgacagagg 2650 ctcagctgtg gccaccaaca cacaaccaca cacacacaac cacacacaca 2700 aatgggggca accacatcca gtacaagctt ttacaaatgt tattagtgtc 2750 cttttttatt tctaatgcct tgtcctctta aaagttattt tatttgttat 2800 tattatttgt tcttgactgt taattgtgaa tggtaatgca ataaagtgcc 2850 tttgttagat ggtgaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 2900 aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa 2950 aaaaaaaaaa aaaa 2964 110 512 PRT Homo Sapien 110 Met Lys Ala Ile Ile His Leu Thr Leu Leu Ala Leu Leu Ser Val 1 5 10 15 Asn Thr Ala Thr Asn Gln Gly Asn Ser Ala Asp Ala Val Thr Thr 20 25 30 Thr Glu Thr Ala Thr Ser Gly Pro Thr Val Ala Ala Ala Asp Thr 35 40 45 Thr Glu Thr Asn Phe Pro Glu Thr Ala Ser Thr Thr Ala Asn Thr 50 55 60 Pro Ser Phe Pro Thr Ala Thr Ser Pro Ala Pro Pro Ile Ile Ser 65 70 75 Thr His Ser Ser Ser Thr Ile Pro Thr Pro Ala Pro Pro Ile Ile 80 85 90 Ser Thr His Ser Ser Ser Thr Ile Pro Ile Pro Thr Ala Ala Asp 95 100 105 Ser Glu Ser Thr Thr Asn Val Asn Ser Leu Ala Thr Ser Asp Ile 110 115 120 Ile Thr Ala Ser Ser Pro Asn Asp Gly Leu Ile Thr Met Val Pro 125 130 135 Ser Glu Thr Gln Ser Asn Asn Glu Met Ser Pro Thr Thr Glu Asp 140 145 150 Asn Gln Ser Ser Gly Pro Pro Thr Gly Thr Ala Leu Leu Glu Thr 155 160 165 Ser Thr Leu Asn Ser Thr Gly Pro Ser Asn Pro Cys Gln Asp Asp 170 175 180 Pro Cys Ala Asp Asn Ser Leu Cys Val Lys Leu His Asn Thr Ser 185 190 195 Phe Cys Leu Cys Leu Glu Gly Tyr Tyr Tyr Asn Ser Ser Thr Cys 200 205 210 Lys Lys Gly Lys Val Phe Pro Gly Lys Ile Ser Val Thr Val Ser 215 220 225 Glu Thr Phe Asp Pro Glu Glu Lys His Ser Met Ala Tyr Gln Asp 230 235 240 Leu His Ser Glu Ile Thr Ser Leu Phe Lys Asp Val Phe Gly Thr 245 250 255 Ser Val Tyr Gly Gln Thr Val Ile Leu Thr Val Ser Thr Ser Leu 260 265 270 Ser Pro Arg Ser Glu Met Arg Ala Asp Asp Lys Phe Val Asn Val 275 280 285 Thr Ile Val Thr Ile Leu Ala Glu Thr Thr Ser Asp Asn Glu Lys 290 295 300 Thr Val Thr Glu Lys Ile Asn Lys Ala Ile Arg Ser Ser Ser Ser 305 310 315 Asn Phe Leu Asn Tyr Asp Leu Thr Leu Arg Cys Asp Tyr Tyr Gly 320 325 330 Cys Asn Gln Thr Ala Asp Asp Cys Leu Asn Gly Leu Ala Cys Asp 335 340 345 Cys Lys Ser Asp Leu Gln Arg Pro Asn Pro Gln Ser Pro Phe Cys 350 355 360 Val Ala Ser Ser Leu Lys Cys Pro Asp Ala Cys Asn Ala Gln His 365 370 375 Lys Gln Cys Leu Ile Lys Lys Ser Gly Gly Ala Pro Glu Cys Ala 380 385 390 Cys Val Pro Gly Tyr Gln Glu Asp Ala Asn Gly Asn Cys Gln Lys 395 400 405 Cys Ala Phe Gly Tyr Ser Gly Leu Asp Cys Lys Asp Lys Phe Gln 410 415 420 Leu Ile Leu Thr Ile Val Gly Thr Ile Ala Gly Ile Val Ile Leu 425 430 435 Ser Met Ile Ile Ala Leu Ile Val Thr Ala Arg Ser Asn Asn Lys 440 445 450 Thr Lys His Ile Glu Glu Glu Asn Leu Ile Asp Glu Asp Phe Gln 455 460 465 Asn Leu Lys Leu Arg Ser Thr Gly Phe Thr Asn Leu Gly Ala Glu 470 475 480 Gly Ser Val Phe Pro Lys Val Arg Ile Thr Ala Ser Arg Asp Ser 485 490 495 Gln Met Gln Asn Pro Tyr Ser Ser His Ser Ser Met Pro Arg Pro 500 505 510 Asp Tyr 111 943 DNA Homo Sapien 111 ctgggacttg gctttctccg gataagcggc ggcaccggcg tcagcgatga 50 ccgtgcagag actcgtggcc gcggccgtgc tggtggccct ggtctcactc 100 atcctcaaca acgtggcggc cttcacctcc aactgggtgt gccagacgct 150 ggaggatggg cgcaggcgca gcgtggggct gtggaggtcc tgctggctgg 200 tggacaggac ccggggaggg ccgagccctg gggccagagc cggccaggtg 250 gacgcacatg actgtgaggc gctgggctgg ggctccgagg cagccggctt 300 ccaggagtcc cgaggcaccg tcaaactgca gttcgacatg atgcgcgcct 350 gcaacctggt ggccacggcc gcgctcaccg caggccagct caccttcctc 400 ctggggctgg tgggcctgcc cctgctgtca cccgacgccc cgtgctggga 450 ggaggccatg gccgctgcat tccaactggc gagttttgtc ctggtcatcg 500 ggctcgtgac tttctacaga attggcccat acaccaacct gtcctggtcc 550 tgctacctga acattggcgc ctgccttctg gccacgctgg cggcagccat 600 gctcatctgg aacattctcc acaagaggga ggactgcatg gccccccggg 650 tgattgtcat cagccgctcc ctgacagcgc gctttcgccg tgggctggac 700 aatgactacg tggagtcacc atgctgagtc gcccttctca gcgctccatc 750 aacgcacacc tgctatcgtg gaacagccta gaaaccaagg gactccacca 800 ccaagtcact tcccctgctc gtgcagaggc acgggatgag tctgggtgac 850 ctctgcgcca tgcgtgcgag acacgtgtgc gtttactgtt atgtcggtca 900 tatgtctgta cgtgtcgtgg gccaacctcg ttctgcctcc agc 943 112 226 PRT Homo Sapien 112 Met Thr Val Gln Arg Leu Val Ala Ala Ala Val Leu Val Ala Leu 1 5 10 15 Val Ser Leu Ile Leu Asn Asn Val Ala Ala Phe Thr Ser Asn Trp 20 25 30 Val Cys Gln Thr Leu Glu Asp Gly Arg Arg Arg Ser Val Gly Leu 35 40 45 Trp Arg Ser Cys Trp Leu Val Asp Arg Thr Arg Gly Gly Pro Ser 50 55 60 Pro Gly Ala Arg Ala Gly Gln Val Asp Ala His Asp Cys Glu Ala 65 70 75 Leu Gly Trp Gly Ser Glu Ala Ala Gly Phe Gln Glu Ser Arg Gly 80 85 90 Thr Val Lys Leu Gln Phe Asp Met Met Arg Ala Cys Asn Leu Val 95 100 105 Ala Thr Ala Ala Leu Thr Ala Gly Gln Leu Thr Phe Leu Leu Gly 110 115 120 Leu Val Gly Leu Pro Leu Leu Ser Pro Asp Ala Pro Cys Trp Glu 125 130 135 Glu Ala Met Ala Ala Ala Phe Gln Leu Ala Ser Phe Val Leu Val 140 145 150 Ile Gly Leu Val Thr Phe Tyr Arg Ile Gly Pro Tyr Thr Asn Leu 155 160 165 Ser Trp Ser Cys Tyr Leu Asn Ile Gly Ala Cys Leu Leu Ala Thr 170 175 180 Leu Ala Ala Ala Met Leu Ile Trp Asn Ile Leu His Lys Arg Glu 185 190 195 Asp Cys Met Ala Pro Arg Val Ile Val Ile Ser Arg Ser Leu Thr 200 205 210 Ala Arg Phe Arg Arg Gly Leu Asp Asn Asp Tyr Val Glu Ser Pro 215 220 225 Cys 113 1389 DNA Homo Sapien 113 gactttacca ctactcgcta tagagccctg gtcaagttct ctccacctct 50 ctatctatgt ctcagtttct tcatctgtaa catcaaatga ataataatac 100 caatctccta gacttcataa gaggattaac aaagacaaaa tatgggaaaa 150 acataacatg gcgtcccata attattagat cttattattg acactaaaat 200 ggcattaaaa ttaccaaaag gaagacagca tctgtttcct ctttggtcct 250 gagctggtta aaaggaacac tggttgcctg aacagtcaca cttgcaacca 300 tgatgcctaa acattgcttt ctaggcttcc tcatcagttt cttccttact 350 ggtgtagcag gaactcagtc aacgcatgag tctctgaagc ctcagagggt 400 acaatttcag tcccgaaatt ttcacaacat tttgcaatgg cagcctggga 450 gggcacttac tggcaacagc agtgtctatt ttgtgcagta caaaatatat 500 ggacagagac aatggaaaaa taaagaagac tgttggggta ctcaagaact 550 ctcttgtgac cttaccagtg aaacctcaga catacaggaa ccttattacg 600 ggagggtgag ggcggcctcg gctgggagct actcagaatg gagcatgacg 650 ccgcggttca ctccctggtg ggaaacaaaa atagatcctc cagtcatgaa 700 tataacccaa gtcaatggct ctttgttggt aattctccat gctccaaatt 750 taccatatag ataccaaaag gaaaaaaatg tatctataga agattactat 800 gaactactat accgagtttt tataattaac aattcactag aaaaggagca 850 aaaggtttat gaaggggctc acagagcggt tgaaattgaa gctctaacac 900 cacactccag ctactgtgta gtggctgaaa tatatcagcc catgttagac 950 agaagaagtc agagaagtga agagagatgt gtggaaattc catgacttgt 1000 ggaatttggc attcagcaat gtggaaattc taaagctccc tgagaacagg 1050 atgactcgtg tttgaaggat cttatttaaa attgtttttg tattttctta 1100 aagcaatatt cactgttaca ccttggggac ttctttgttt acccattctt 1150 ttatccttta tatttcattt gtaaactata tttgaacgac attccccccg 1200 aaaaattgaa atgtaaagat gaggcagaga ataaagtgtt ctatgaaatt 1250 cagaacttta tttctgaatg taacatccct aataacaacc ttcattcttc 1300 taatacagca aaataaaaat ttaacaacca aggaatagta tttaagaaaa 1350 tgttgaaata atttttttaa aatagcatta cagactgag 1389 114 231 PRT Homo Sapien 114 Met Met Pro Lys His Cys Phe Leu Gly Phe Leu Ile Ser Phe Phe 1 5 10 15 Leu Thr Gly Val Ala Gly Thr Gln Ser Thr His Glu Ser Leu Lys 20 25 30 Pro Gln Arg Val Gln Phe Gln Ser Arg Asn Phe His Asn Ile Leu 35 40 45 Gln Trp Gln Pro Gly Arg Ala Leu Thr Gly Asn Ser Ser Val Tyr 50 55 60 Phe Val Gln Tyr Lys Ile Tyr Gly Gln Arg Gln Trp Lys Asn Lys 65 70 75 Glu Asp Cys Trp Gly Thr Gln Glu Leu Ser Cys Asp Leu Thr Ser 80 85 90 Glu Thr Ser Asp Ile Gln Glu Pro Tyr Tyr Gly Arg Val Arg Ala 95 100 105 Ala Ser Ala Gly Ser Tyr Ser Glu Trp Ser Met Thr Pro Arg Phe 110 115 120 Thr Pro Trp Trp Glu Thr Lys Ile Asp Pro Pro Val Met Asn Ile 125 130 135 Thr Gln Val Asn Gly Ser Leu Leu Val Ile Leu His Ala Pro Asn 140 145 150 Leu Pro Tyr Arg Tyr Gln Lys Glu Lys Asn Val Ser Ile Glu Asp 155 160 165 Tyr Tyr Glu Leu Leu Tyr Arg Val Phe Ile Ile Asn Asn Ser Leu 170 175 180 Glu Lys Glu Gln Lys Val Tyr Glu Gly Ala His Arg Ala Val Glu 185 190 195 Ile Glu Ala Leu Thr Pro His Ser Ser Tyr Cys Val Val Ala Glu 200 205 210 Ile Tyr Gln Pro Met Leu Asp Arg Arg Ser Gln Arg Ser Glu Glu 215 220 225 Arg Cys Val Glu Ile Pro 230 115 43 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probe 115 tgtaaaacga cggccagtta aatagacctg caattattaa tct 43 116 41 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probe 116 caggaaacag ctatgaccac ctgcacacct gcaaatccat t 41

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US2151733May 4, 1936Mar 28, 1939American Box Board CoContainer
CH283612A * Title not available
FR1392029A * Title not available
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7351555Jan 28, 2005Apr 1, 2008Zymogenetics, Inc.Mouse cytokine receptor Zcytor16
US8034784Nov 17, 2009Oct 11, 2011Zymogenetics, Inc.Method of suppressing or reducing IL-TIF-induced inflammation, or treating associated conditions thereof, using Zcytor16
US8101381Jul 8, 2010Jan 24, 2012Zymogenetics, Inc.Human cytokine receptor
Classifications
U.S. Classification435/69.1, 530/350, 536/23.2, 435/325, 435/183, 435/320.1
International ClassificationC07K14/705, A61K38/00, C07K14/47
Cooperative ClassificationC07K14/705, C07K14/4703, C07K2319/00, C07K14/47, C07K2317/24, C12N2799/026, A61K38/00
European ClassificationC07K14/47A1A, C07K14/47, C07K14/705