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Publication numberUS20030131552 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/230,231
Publication dateJul 17, 2003
Filing dateAug 29, 2002
Priority dateJan 15, 2002
Publication number10230231, 230231, US 2003/0131552 A1, US 2003/131552 A1, US 20030131552 A1, US 20030131552A1, US 2003131552 A1, US 2003131552A1, US-A1-20030131552, US-A1-2003131552, US2003/0131552A1, US2003/131552A1, US20030131552 A1, US20030131552A1, US2003131552 A1, US2003131552A1
InventorsFranz Leichtfried
Original AssigneeFranz Leichtfried
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Siding system
US 20030131552 A1
Abstract
The present invention relates to a siding system for buildings and other structures. Specifically, this invention relates to an improved siding system that prevents the collection of moisture between the vinyl siding and the wall of the building.
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Claims(11)
1. A siding panel assembly for attachment to an exterior wall of a building, comprising:
a) a siding panel having an inner surface, an outer surface, and a body, said body terminating in a wall engaging elongated edge and a siding engaging elongated edge;
i. said wall engaging edge terminating in an elongated flange having a spacing element and a wall engaging element, said wall engaging element parallel to said body, said spacing element operative, when said elongated flange is in place against the exterior wall, to space said body away from the exterior wall, wherein a region of said wall engaging edge between said body of said panel and said spacing element has holes operative to permit air flow over the exterior wall; and
ii. said siding engaging elongated edge shaped to engage an outer surface of another underlying siding panel.
2. The siding panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said elongated flange defines a U-shaped channel.
3. The siding panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said elongated flange comprises a plurality of nail holes operative to permit the passage of nails for attaching said siding panel to said exterior wall.
4. The siding panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said siding panel is made of vinyl.
5. The siding panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said elongated flange comprises a plurality of spaced apart flanges.
6. The siding panel assembly of claim 1, wherein a right angle is formed between said spacing element and said body.
7. The siding panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said spacing element is between ″ and 1″ wide.
8. The siding panel assembly of claim 1, further comprising a starter strip, said starter strip comprising a wall engaging plate having an elongated edge, said elongated edge terminating in an elongated flange having a spacer element and a distal element, said spacer element perpendicular to said wall engaging plate, and said distal element shaped to engage the siding engaging elongated edge of said siding panel, wherein said spacer element comprises a plurality of holes operative, when said starter strip is in place against the exterior wall, to permit air flow over the exterior wall, said elongated flange operative, when said starter strip is in place against the exterior wall, to space said siding panel away from the exterior wall.
9. The siding panel assembly of claim 8, wherein said wall engaging plate of said starter strip has a plurality of nail holes, said nail holes operative to permit passage of nails for attaching said starter strip to the exterior wall.
10. The siding system of claim 8, wherein said siding panel and said starter strip are made of vinyl.
11. The siding panel assembly of claim 8, further comprising:
a) a double J-trim element, said double J-trim element comprising:
i) a wall engaging plate having a longitudinal edge;
ii) a soffit supporting plate having a first face and a second face, said soffit supporting plate extending perpendicularly from said longitudinal edge of said wall engaging plate;
iii) a spacing flange extending perpendicularly from said first face of said soffit supporting plate such that a first U-shaped channel is formed between said wall engaging plate, said soffit supporting plate and said spacing flange;
iv) a soffit supporting flange extending from said first face of said soffit supporting plate, said soffit supporting flange shaped such that a second U-shaped channel is formed between said first face and said soffit supporting flange, said second U-shaped channel operative to receive an edge of a soffit;
wherein said spacing flange and said soffit supporting flange are spaced apart such that a third U-shaped channel is formed between said spacing flange, said first face and said soffit supporting flange, said third U-shaped channel operative, when said double J-trim element is in place against the exterior wall, to receive an edge of said siding panel; wherein said spacing flange is operative to space said siding panel away from the exterior wall; wherein a region of said soffit supporting plate between said wall engaging plate and said spacing flange comprises holes, operative to permit air flow over said exterior wall.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application No. 10/045,152, filed Jan. 15, 2002, and entitled SIDING SYSTEM.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention relates generally to exterior coverings for buildings. Specifically, this invention relates to an improved siding system that prevents the collection of moisture between the vinyl siding and the wall of the building.

[0003] The primary purpose of applying aluminum or vinyl siding to the exterior of a building is to protect the structure from the elements. Most importantly, the exterior of the building is protected from moisture, wind and UV. In addition, siding performs an aesthetic function.

[0004] However, existing siding systems suffer from significant drawbacks. Conventional siding consists of panels, which are nailed directly to the wall of the structure thereby creating a barrier to the movement of air behind the panels. Furthermore, the panels interlock with one another, creating a seal therebetween and effectively trapping air and moisture in a pocket behind each panel. Although prior art siding systems do protect the structure of a building from rain, rainwater when driven by the wind is often able to penetrate behind the siding panels at corners, around windows and doors, and at other points where adjacent siding panels come together. Water may also collect behind the siding by condensation.

[0005] Once water penetrates behind the siding or collects behind the siding by condensation, the barriers formed between the panels and the wall, and the seals formed between adjacent panels, prevent the water from escaping. Water trapped behind the siding results in damage to the structure of the building.

[0006] U.S. Pat. No. 6,223,488 B1 issued to Pelfrey et al. discloses vented siding, having recessed vents that allow moisture to escape from behind the siding. Unfortunately, the siding of Pelfrey et al. is only applicable in drier climates. In wetter climates the vented siding of Pelfrey et al. actually allows water to penetrate behind the siding, thereby damaging the building structure. This is clearly undesirable.

[0007] Another drawback of prior art siding systems is that, when exposed to strong sunlight and high outdoor temperatures, vinyl siding can become so heated as to become warped and buckled. Warped vinyl siding may no longer form an effective barrier against rain and moisture and has diminished aesthetic qualities.

[0008] Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a siding system that prevents water from penetrating to the wall behind the siding.

[0009] It is a further object of the present invention to provide a siding system that allows moisture behind the siding to escape.

[0010] It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a siding system that is resistant to warping and buckling due to high ambient temperatures and sunlight.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0011] The present invention comprises a siding system for attachment to an exterior wall of a building. The siding panel of the present system comprises an elongated flange along the top edge of the panel. The elongated flange comprises a spacing element perpendicular to the body of the panel and a wall engaging element parallel to the body of the panel. The spacing element comprises a plurality of air holes operative to allow air to move behind the panels. The spacing element is additionally operative to maintain the siding panel spaced away from the wall. The siding panel additionally comprises a siding engaging flange along the lower edge, operative to stabilize the siding panel by engaging an adjacent siding panel.

[0012] The spacing elements may form an integral part of the siding panels or may form separate components to which the siding panels are connected. In the preferred embodiment described herein the spacing elements form an integral part of the siding panels.

[0013] The present siding system additionally comprises starter strips and double J-trim elements operative to maintain the siding panels spaced apart from the supporting wall and to allow air to enter and exit the space between the siding panels and the supporting wall.

[0014] The starter strips and double J-trim elements of the present siding system allow air to move through the space between the siding panels and the supporting wall, thereby permitting accumulated moisture to evaporate.

[0015] In addition, the movement of air behind the panels of the present siding system acts to cool the panels when exposed to high temperatures. The present siding system is therefore resistant to heat-induced warping and buckling which may take place in hot climates.

[0016] The present siding system additionally comprises J-trim, gable line trim, inside corner elements, outside corner elements and similar components incorporating a raised bead or ridge on the surface directly behind the siding panels. By channeling water that penetrates behind the siding panels, the bead prevents the supporting wall from coming into contact with water thereby protecting the supporting wall from water damage.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0017] Further features and advantages will be apparent from the following detailed description, given by way of example, of a preferred embodiment taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

[0018]FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a panel of prior art siding;

[0019]FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a panel of siding of the present invention;

[0020]FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a prior art starter strip;

[0021]FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a starter strip of the present invention;

[0022]FIG. 5 is a perspective view of prior art J-trim;

[0023]FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a J-trim element of the present invention for use along the gable line;

[0024]FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a J-trim element of the present invention for use, for example, along the side of windows and doors;

[0025]FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a prior art inside corner element;

[0026]FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a inside corner element of the present invention;

[0027]FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a prior art outside corner element;

[0028]FIG. 11 is a perspective view of an outside corner element of the present invention;

[0029]FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a panel of prior art siding and soffit trim;

[0030]FIG. 13 is a perspective view of a double J-trim element of the present invention;

[0031]FIG. 14 is a perspective view of a panel of siding panel and a double J-trim element of the present invention; and

[0032]FIG. 15 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of a panel of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0033] Referring to FIG. 1, a prior art panel of vinyl siding 10 is shown mounted on the wall 12. The panel 10 is supported by nails 14 which pass through nail holes 16. The panel 10 has a fold 20 and a bottom flange 22. The bottom flange 22 of a first panel 10 is received by the fold 20 of an adjacent panel 10 so as to secure the bottom of the first panel 10. The body 18 of the panel 10 is in contact with the wall at points 24. The fact that the panel 10 contacts the wall 12 means that air and moisture are trapped in pockets behind the panel 10 and are therefore prevented from escaping.

[0034] Referring to FIG. 2, a panel of vinyl siding 30 of the present invention is shown mounted on the wall 12. The panel has a top flange 32 with a first vertical portion 34, a horizontal portion 36 and a second vertical portion 38. The first vertical portion 34 and second vertical portion 38 have nail holes 16 operative to pass nails 14 to support the panel 30 on the wall 12. The horizontal portion 36 has a plurality of air holes 42. The panel 30 has a fold 46 and a bottom flange 48. The bottom flange 48 of a first panel 30 is received by the fold 46 of an adjacent panel 30 so as to secure the bottom of the first panel 30. The separation between the wall 12 and the body 50 of the panel 30 is the smallest at points 44. However, in contrast to the panel 10 of FIG. 1, the body 50 of the panel 30 does not come into contact with the wall 12. This feature, in conjunction with the air holes 42, allows air to move behind the panel 30 thereby allowing moisture trapped between the panel 30 and the wall 12 to evaporate. In a preferred embodiment the horizontal portion 36 of the top flange 32 is of a width such that points 44 of the body 50 of the panel 30 are separated from the wall 12 by ⅜″ to ″.

[0035] In an alternative embodiment, in place of a single elongated top flange 32 containing air holes 42 and extending the length of the panel 30, the panel 30 may incorporate a plurality of spaced-apart flanges. The spaced apart flanges would not require air holes as such. Rather than moving through the air holes 42, air would move between the spaced apart flanges.

[0036] Referring to FIG. 2, in a preferred embodiment the method of the present invention the nails 14 that support the panels 30 of the present siding system are nailed into the wall 12 so that the head of the nail is lower than the point. Water condensing on or contacting nails oriented in this way is caused to move down and away from the wall 12 by gravity. Damage to the wall 12 is thereby minimized. More specifically, it has been found that nails 12 are optimally oriented at an angle of 10-15 degrees.

[0037] In an alternate embodiment of the present siding system, a prior art panel 10 may be used in combination with a spacer element. The spacer element is similar to the top flange 32 of panel 30 in that it comprises a first vertical portion, a horizontal portion and a second vertical portion. The horizontal portion of the spacer element additionally comprises air holes to allow the passage of air. The spacer element is nailed to the wall 12 and then the panel 10 is attached to the spacer element by nails or otherwise. In this way the panel 10 is spaced from the wall 12 and air is permitted to move behind the panel ten, in a manner similar to that of the embodiment described in FIG. 2.

[0038] Referring to FIG. 15, in a further alternate embodiment, the air holes are located on the first vertical portion 34 rather than on the horizontal portion 36. Such air holes may be located on the first vertical portion 34 anywhere between the fold 46 and the horizontal portion 36. In the embodiment of FIG. 15 the nail holes 16 on the second vertical portion 38 are of a size, shape and number to permit both the passage of nails 14 to support the panel 30 and the passage of air, such that moisture trapped between the wall 12 and panels 30 is allowed to evaporate. Alternatively, air holes, in addition to nail holes 16, may be incorporated into the first vertical portion 34. In embodiments where the air holes are located on the first vertical portion 34, care must be had to ensure that the panels 30 are shaped so that there is sufficient space between the body 50 of a first panel 30 and the top flange 32 of an adjacent panel 30 to allow air to flow, as indicated by arrow 40, between the panels 30.

[0039] Referring to FIG. 3, a prior art starter strip 60 is shown. Starter strips 60 are secured at the bottom edge of a wall area that is to be covered by vinyl or aluminum siding. The starter strip 60 is supported on wall 12 by nails 14 which pass through nail holes 16. The starter strip 60 has a folded flange 64 which is operative to receive the bottom flange 22 of a panel 10 (see FIG. 1). The folded flange 64 performs a similar function to that of the fold 20 of panel 10.

[0040] Referring to FIG. 4, a starter strip 70 of the present siding system is shown. The starter strip 70 is attached to wall 12 by nails 14 which pass through nail holes 16. The folded flange 72 of the starter strip 70 comprises a horizontal portion 74 and a folded portion 76. The horizontal portion 74 is perforated by air holes 78. The starter strip 70 forms the bottom edge of the siding system of the present invention and therefore the air holes 78 allow air to enter the space between the panels 30 and the wall 12. The bottom flange 48 of a first panel 30 is received by the folded portion 76 so as to secure the bottom of the first panel 30 (see FIG. 2). In the preferred embodiment, the horizontal portion 74 of the folded flange 72 is of a width such that points 44 of panel 30 are ⅜″ to ″, from the wall 12.

[0041] Referring to FIG. 5, a prior art J-trim element 80 is shown. The J-trim 80 is used to form a border and to seal and protect the edge of siding panels around windows, doors, and gable lines. The J-trim 80 is connected to the wall 12 by nails 14 that pass through nail holes 16. The J-trim 80 has a flange 82 comprising a horizontal portion 84 and a vertical portion 86. The U-shaped channel 90 formed by the flange 82 and the body 88 of the J-trim 80 is operative to receive the edge of a panel 10 (see FIG. 1).

[0042] Referring to FIG. 6, a J-trim element 100 of the present invention for use along the gable line is shown. The J-trim 100 is attached to the wall 12 by nails 14 which pass through nail holes 16. The J-trim 100 has a flange 104 comprising a horizontal portion 106 and a vertical portion 108. The U-shaped channel 112 formed by the flange 104 and the body 102 of the J-trim 100 is operative to receive the edge of a panel 30 (see FIG. 3). The J-trim 100 is distinguished from the prior art J-trim 80 in that the horizontal portion 106 is perforated by a plurality of air holes 110. The J-trim 100 forms the bottom edge of the siding system along the gable line and therefore, in a manner similar to that of the starter strip 70 of FIG. 4, the air holes 110 allow air to enter the space between the panels 30 and the wall 12.

[0043] Referring to FIG. 7, a J-trim element 120 of the present invention for use along windows, doors, etc., is shown. The J-trim 120 is attached to the wall 12 by nails 14 which pass through nail holes 16. The J-trim 120 has a flange 122 comprising a horizontal portion 124 and a vertical portion 126. The U-shaped channel 132 formed by the body 128 of the J-trim and the flange 122 is operative to receive the edge of a panel 30.

[0044] Referring again to FIGS. 1 and 5, in prior art siding systems, rain water can penetrate around the edge of the panel 10 that is situated within the U-shaped channel 90. In this manner water is able to reach the wall 12 behind the panel 10, thereby damaging it.

[0045] Referring again to FIGS. 1, 2, 5 and 7, the body 128 includes a bead 130, which is operative to prevent water from reaching the wall 12 behind the panel 30. Water is able to penetrate around the edge of the panel 30 that is situated within the U-shaped channel 132 in the same manner as with the prior art J-trim 80, however, it is prevented from reaching the wall 12 by bead 130. Water is effectively channeled between the bead 130 and the horizontal portion 124 of the flange 122, and is drained down and away by gravity.

[0046] Referring to FIGS. 6 and 7, the siding system of the present invention additionally contemplates a J-trim element for use, for example, along gable lines and above and below doors and windows, which combines the air holes 110 of FIG. 6 and the bead 130 of FIG. 7. Such a J-trim element would allow air to enter the space behind the siding panels and prevent water from penetrating behind the siding panel.

[0047] Referring to FIG. 8, a prior art inside corner element 200 is shown. The inside corner element 200 is symmetrical, comprising two terminal flanges, each comprising an inner face 204, an intermediate face 206, and an outer face 208. Two cavities 210 are formed between the inner, intermediate and outer faces 204, 206, 208. Each of the cavities 210 is operative to receive the edge of a siding panel 10 (see FIG. 1). The inside corner element 200 is supported on wall 12 by nails 14 which pass through nail holes 16.

[0048] Referring to FIGS. 1, 5 and 8, in a manner similar to that described above with respect to the prior art J-trim 80, water is able to penetrate around the edge of panel 10 that is situated in the U-shaped channel 210, thereby contacting the wall 12 and causing damage thereto.

[0049] Referring to FIG. 9, an inside corner element 220 of the present invention is shown. The inside corner element 220 is symmetrical, comprising two terminal flanges 222, each comprising an inner face 224, an intermediate face 226, and an outer face 228. Two cavities 230 are formed between the inner, intermediate and outer faces 224, 226, 228. Each of the cavities 230 is operative to receive the edge of a siding panel 30 (see FIG. 2). The inside corner element 220 is supported on wall 12 by nails 14 which pass through nail holes 16. The inside corner element 220 is distinguished from the inside corner element 200 of FIG. 8, in that each of the outer faces 228 of terminal flanges 222 comprises a bead 232. The bead 232 prevents water that penetrates around the edge of panel 30 that is situated in the U-shaped channel 230 (see FIG. 2) from coming into contact with the wall 12. The water to be channeled between bead 232 and intermediate face 226 is drained downward by gravity.

[0050] Referring to FIGS. 2, 8 and 9, if used in conjunction with the panels 30 of the present invention, inside corner element 220 must have intermediate faces 226 wider than the intermediate faces 206 of the prior art inside corner elements 200 in order to allow the body 50 of the panel 30 to be spaced from the wall 12.

[0051] Referring to FIG. 10, a prior art outside corner element 240 is shown. The outside corner element 240 is symmetrical, comprising two terminal flanges 242, each comprising an inner face 244, an intermediate face 246, and an outer face 248. Two cavities 250 are formed between the inner, intermediate and outer faces 244, 246, 248. The cavities 250 are operative to receive the edge of a siding panel 10 (see FIG. 1). The outside corner element 240 is supported on wall 12 by nails 14 which pass through nail holes 16.

[0052] Referring to FIGS. 5, 8 and 10, in a manner similar to that described above with respect to the prior art J-trim 80 and inside corner element 200, water is able to penetrate around the edge of the panel 10 (see FIG. 1) that is situated in the U-shaped channel 250, thereby contacting the wall 12 and causing damage thereto.

[0053] Referring to FIG. 11, an outside corner element 260 of the present invention is shown. The outside corner element 260 is symmetrical, comprising two terminal flanges 262, each comprising an inner face 264, an intermediate face 266, and an outer face 268. Two cavities 270 are formed between the inner, intermediate and outer faces 264, 266, 268. Each of the cavities 270 is operative to receive the edge of a siding panel 30 (see FIG. 2). The outside corner element 260 is supported on wall 12 by nails 14 which pass through nail holes 16. Each of the outer faces 268 of terminal flanges 262 comprises a bead 272. The bead 272 prevents water that penetrates around the edge of panel 30 from coming into contact with the wall 12. The bead 272 causes the water to be channeled downward such that it is drained away.

[0054] Referring to FIGS. 2, 10 and 11, if used in conjunction with the panels 30 of the present invention, outside corner element 260 must have intermediate faces 266 wider than the intermediate faces 246 of the prior art outside corner elements 240 in order to allow the body 50 of the panel 30 to be spaced from the wall 12.

[0055] Referring to FIGS. 7, 9 and 11, beads 130, 232, 272 may be of any profile, however, a bead 130, 232, 272 of square profile, as is shown in FIG. 7, has been found to be most effective in preventing water from penetrating to the wall 12.

[0056] Referring to FIGS. 1 and 12, a prior art siding system is shown where the top of the siding meets meets the soffit. Soffit trim 280 is supported on the wall 12 by nails 14 that pass through nail holes 16. Nails 14 additionally pass through siding panel 10. Rarely is the size of the area to be covered with siding equal to an integer multiple of the size of the siding panels 10. In other words, panels 10 must often be cut in order to conform them to the area being covered. For example in FIG. 12 the siding panel 10 has been cut along its length below the fold 20 (see FIG. 1) in order to reduce its height to conform to the size of the area being covered with siding. Soffit 282 is shown in dashed lines and is supported by soffit trim 280. The soffit 282 has air holes that allow air to move to and from the attic of the building. However, as is obvious from FIG. 12, since soffit trim 280 is nailed directly over panel 10, panel 10 comes into direct contact with the wall 12, thereby trapping air between the panel 10 and the wall 12. Therefore any moisture that penetrates behind panel 10 is unable to escape, resulting in damage to the wall 12.

[0057] Referring to FIG. 13, a novel trim element of the present invention, comprising a double J-trim element 290 is shown. The double J-trim element 290 comprises a lower portion 292 and an upper portion 294. The double J-trim element 290 is supported on wall 12 by nails 14 that pass through nail holes 16 in the lower portion 292. The upper portion 294 has a plurality of air holes 296, a flange 298, and a J-flange 300.

[0058] Referring to FIG. 14, an installed double J-trim element 290, siding panel 30, and soffit 282 are shown. The panel 30 is supported between flange 298, and J-flange 300. Panel 30 may, for example, fixed between flange 298 and J-flange 300 by glue or sealant. Flange 298 also acts to maintain the panel 30 spaced away from the wall 12 so that air can escape from behind the panel 30 through the air holes 296, thus preventing the buildup of moisture between the wall 12 and the panel 30. Air escaping through the air holes 296 can reach the outside of the building through the air holes 284 in the soffit 282.

[0059] Referring to FIGS. 2, 4, 6, 13 and 14, the air holes 42, 78, 110, 296 may be of any shape.

[0060] Referring to FIGS. 2, 6, 13 and 14, air is permitted to enter the space between the wall 12 and the panels 30 through the airholes 110 in the starter strip 100. Alternatively, air can enter the space between the wall 12 and the panels 30 through air holes in the gable line J-trim as described above with reference to FIGS. 6 and 7. The air is able to move past successive panels 30 through the air holes 42 of the panels 30 and out through the air holes 296 of the double J-trim element 290, thereby allowing moisture accumulated between the panels 30 and the wall 12 to evaporate.

[0061] Referring to FIGS. 2, 6, 13 and 14, the movement of air between the panels 30 and the wall 12 that is made possible by this invention additionally performs a cooling function when the siding system is exposed to strong sunlight and high ambient temperatures. This renders the siding system of the present invention resistant to heat induced buckling and warping.

[0062] Referring again to FIGS. 2 and 15, in a further alternative embodiment of the panel 30, the second vertical portion 38 may extend above the horizontal portion 36 so as to form a stepped or zig zag configuration. In this embodiment two sets of nails 14 can be used to secure the panel 30 to the wall 12; one set passing through the second vertical portion 38 (above the a horizontal portion 36) and one set passing through the first vertical portion 34 (above the a horizontal portion 36). This embodiment provides alternative means for securing panels 30 to the wall 12, which is useful in situations where the present siding system will be required to endure, for example, windy conditions.

[0063] Accordingly, while this invention has been described with reference to illustrative embodiments, this description is not intended to be construed in a limiting sense. Various modifications of the illustrative embodiments, as well as other embodiments of the invention, will be apparent to persons skilled in the art upon reference to this description. It is therefore contemplated that the appended claims will cover any such modifications or embodiments as fall within the true scope of the invention.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7487623 *Jan 14, 2004Feb 10, 2009Certainteed CorporationTrim accessory having ventilation apertures hidden from view when mounted on building
US7677004 *Nov 29, 2007Mar 16, 2010Usg Interiors, Inc.Conformable wide wall angle
US7739847 *Apr 28, 2004Jun 22, 2010Alcoa Home Exteriors, Inc.Wind resistant siding panel
US7775009Dec 20, 2006Aug 17, 2010Tapco International CorporationSystem for providing a decorative covering on a support surface using panels with interlocks
US8316600 *Dec 6, 2010Nov 27, 2012Usg Interiors, LlcWall conforming suspended ceiling molding
US20120137614 *Dec 6, 2010Jun 7, 2012Usg Interiors, Inc.Wall conforming suspended ceiling molding
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/543, 52/519, 52/518, 52/546
International ClassificationE04F13/08, E04F19/02
Cooperative ClassificationE04F19/02, E04F13/0864
European ClassificationE04F13/08D