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Publication numberUS20030132274 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/045,044
Publication dateJul 17, 2003
Filing dateJan 15, 2002
Priority dateJan 15, 2002
Also published asWO2003059757A1
Publication number045044, 10045044, US 2003/0132274 A1, US 2003/132274 A1, US 20030132274 A1, US 20030132274A1, US 2003132274 A1, US 2003132274A1, US-A1-20030132274, US-A1-2003132274, US2003/0132274A1, US2003/132274A1, US20030132274 A1, US20030132274A1, US2003132274 A1, US2003132274A1
InventorsRoderick Kalberer, Paul Canino
Original AssigneeKalberer Roderick W., Canino Paul A.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid packaging canister
US 20030132274 A1
Abstract
A container is formed by a single side wall wrapped around to complete an enclosed space. The package is produced with a barrier board including co-extruded polymers, mono-extruded polymers and/or films. The package may or may not have raw edge protection. The container uses a paperboard cup technology to create a bottom. The packages will be able to easily hold 64 and 96 fluid ounces and use a design very different from the conventional gable top container. The paper packages produced will cost less than plastic packages made with barrier materials.
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Claims(19)
We claim:
1. A beverage container comprising:
a side wall formed from a single sheet of barrier board, said side wall having a first arcuate end, a second arcuate end and a pair of straight side walls extending between said first and second ends,
a top wall attached to said side wall, and
a bottom wall attached to said side wall.
2. The beverage container of claim 1, wherein said first end is the same size as said second end.
3. The beverage container of claim 1, wherein said bottom wall is spaced from a bottom edge of said side wall.
4. The beverage container of claim 1, wherein said barrier board is a paperboard.
5. The beverage container of claim 1, wherein said first end is larger than said second end.
6. The beverage container of claim 3, further comprising a dispensing opening in said top wall proximate said first end.
7. The beverage container of claim 1, further comprising a dispensing opening in said top wall.
8. The beverage container of claim 5, further comprising a dispensing opening in said top wall proximate said second end.
9. A beverage container comprising:
a side wall formed from a single sheet of barrier board, said side wall having an elliptical shape,
a top wall attached to said side wall, and
a bottom wall attached to said side wall.
10. The beverage container of claim 9, further comprising a dispensing opening in said top wall.
11. The beverage container of claim 9, wherein said bottom wall is spaced from a bottom edge of said side wall.
12. A beverage container comprising:
a side wall formed from a single sheet of barrier board, said side wall having a first end, a second end, a first side and a second side,
said first and second ends connected to said first and second sides by arcuate corners,
a top wall connected to said side wall, a dispensing opening located in said top wall, and
a bottom wall connected to said side wall.
13. The beverage container of claim 12, wherein said bottom wall is spaced from a bottom edge of said side wall.
14. The beverage container of claim 12, further comprising a dispensing opening in said top wall.
15. The beverage container of claim 12, wherein said dispensing opening is a pour spout.
16. A liquid package canister, comprising:
a continuous shape side wall,
a liquid tight bottom wall, and
a liquid tight top wall,
the side wall, bottom wall and top wall having a liquid proof coating.
17. The liquid package canister of claim 15, wherein said canister has a volume greater than {fraction (1/2)} gallon.
18. The liquid package canister of claim 15, wherein said continuous shape is oval, elliptical or tear drop shaped.
19. The liquid package canister of claim 15, wherein said liquid proof coating is LDPE.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The invention pertains to paperboard-based packaging, particularly for beverages.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] Currently, large paper-based liquid packages consist primarily of the gable top carton. There is no commercial presence in a gable top carton which contains more than the 64 ounces of a product ({fraction (1/2)} gallon). Gable top containers are well known to the average consumer as the primary type of container for milk and juice in sizes ranging up to the {fraction (1/2)} gallon size. When the size of the container goes above the {fraction (1/2)} gallon size, consumers have difficulty holding and pouring the contents from a gable top container, due to its size. There is a need for a paper-based container that holds a volume greater than {fraction (1/2)} gallon and has a cross section that easily fits one hand. With such a cross section, the user can pour from the container without the provision of a handle. The result would be a paperboard container that holds a greater volume and is consumer friendly.

[0003] It is an object of the invention to provide a watertight container having a sidewall without corners.

[0004] It is also an object of the invention to provide a paperboard container that can be made in a wide variety of sizes.

[0005] It is another object of the invention to provide a paperboard container that a user can grasp and manipulate without a handle.

[0006] It is yet another object of the invention to provide a paperboard container that is inexpensive and easy to manufacture.

[0007] It is yet another object of the invention to provide a paperboard container that is provided with a pour spout for the easy dispensing of liquids.

[0008] These and other objects of the invention will become apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art after reading the following disclosure.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] The container or canister is formed by a single side wall wrapped around to complete an enclosed space. The package is produced with a barrier board laminate structure including: co-extruded polymers; mono-extruded polymers; and/or films. The package may or may not have raw edge protection on the side seam. The raw edge protection can be from skiving. The top of the canister is closed off by sealing on a flat paperboard lid with a spout, an injection molded lid (with or without a spout) or a film membrane with or without a plastic over-cap.

[0010] The container uses conventional paperboard cup technology to create a bottom. The bottom edge of the container is folded up to retain a depending flange from the bottom wall. In this manner, the bottom wall is recessed from the bottom edge of the side wall. This technology for making bottom walls is used on non-round containers having symmetrical or non-symmetrical cross sections that are narrow enough to provide easy hand-hold from the ends. Possible cross sections are oval, tear drop, ellipse and rectangular with rounded corners. The packages will be able to easily hold 64 and 96 fluid ounces. The design is very different from the conventional gable top container. The paper packages produced will cost less than, competing plastic packages made with barrier materials.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0011]FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of a tear drop shaped container;

[0012]FIG. 2 is a cross section taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

[0013]FIG. 3 is a cross section taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

[0014]FIG. 4 is a top view of the tear drop shaped container;

[0015]FIG. 5 s a cross section of an elliptical container;

[0016]FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of an oval container;

[0017]FIG. 7 is a top view of the oval container showing a pour spout; and

[0018]FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of a container having a rectangular shape with rounded corners.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0019]FIG. 1 shows one embodiment of a package 10 having a tear drop shape. The package is made of a side wall 12 that is formed by a single panel wrapped into the tear drop shape and having its two free ends joined along a side seam. As mentioned earlier, the side seam can have raw edge protection. The sidewall of the container has a “continuous shape”. By this term, it is meant a sidewall that does not have corners. The sidewall is a single, continuous wall. Since the container is used to hold liquids, the material chosen must be suitable for that purpose. The standard material for making liquid packaging material is paperboard coextruded with multiple layers. The coextruded layers might include nylon for pinhole resistence, an oxygen barrier, EVOH for oxygen and flavor barrier, LDPE, and tie layers to adhere the LDPE to the nylon and EVOH.

[0020] The extended material for making liquid packaging materials and holding juice, punches, teas and lemonade is typically paperboard extruded with multiple layers. Milk cartons are typically produced from materials extruded with a single layer of LDPE on the inner surface, with a single layer coated on the outer surface. An example of a typical barrier board is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,110,548 entitled “Extended Long-Life Juice Carton Structure and Method of Construction”. The inner most layer, in contact with the liquid, and the outer coating of the paperboard are heat sealable which is critical to forming the package. LDPE is commonly used since it is easily heat sealed.

[0021] The seams of the package must be tightly sealed. This is achieved through heat sealing of the polymer at all seams. The packages are formed on a canister forming machine, similar to machines used to produce paper cups. The outer wall of the canister is wrapped around a mandrel with an overlap of 0.25-0.75 inches to form a side seam. Heat is applied to the side seam area, possibly before and/or after the materials are brought together to melt the LDPE. Typically, heat is applied through the use of hot air. After the materials are heated and brought together, they are held together under pressure for two to six seconds while the seal forms. Heavier coating weights can be used in all sealing areas to provide a caulking effect for leak protection. Optionally, paperboard along the side seam can be skived or have a film wrapped around it to eliminate raw edges to reduce the possibility of leaks and to limit the amount of oxygen ingress.

[0022] The bottom of the package is formed by an addition of a recessed bottom, formed from a separate piece of paperboard with the same or similar coatings as the sidewall. The bottom has a depending flange similar to a paper cup. The sidewall material extends down past the bottom of the depending flange and is folded up into the recess, forming a double seam. The bottom of the package is sealed to the sidewall by heating of coatings and holding the material under pressure while the seal forms. The top rim of the open canister would be rolled like a top rim of a paper cup and possibly flattened for potentially easier sealing of a lid. With the top rim folded, the top of the package can then be closed off by heating sealing another piece of coated paperboard onto the top rim or by sealing on a film, foil or rigid plastic lid. The top will have a spout and cap allowing for easy opening, pouring and reclosability.

[0023]FIG. 2 shows the cross-sectional shape of the tear drop container. The container is made by a large arcuate end 16 and a small arcuate end 17. A left side wall 18 and right side wall 19 are tangent to both the large end 16 and small end 17. The two side walls converge toward each other at an angle between 0 and 45 degrees. Besides being made from a single sheet of material, the formed container has no corners.

[0024] Turning now to FIG. 3, the cross section along lines 3-3 of FIG. 1 can be seen. In this section, the side wall 12 can be seen to extend from the bottom 22 to the top 14. Most importantly, the manner in which the bottom is attached to the carton is seen. The bottom 22 has a depending flange 24 about its entire periphery. The bottom edge 13 of the side wall 12 is folded up to capture the depending flange 24 between the side wall 12 and the bottom edge 13. This structure is very similar to the conventional paper cup. The result is that the bottom wall 22 is recessed from the bottom of the side wall 12.

[0025]FIG. 4 is a top view of the tear drop shaped container. A spout 15 is provided in the top wall 14. The spout 15 is close to the large end 16. In fact, the spout is located within the area formed by the radius of the larger end 16. This allows the user to grasp the smaller end 17 and tilt the container in order to dispense through the spout 15. It is possible to also place the spout at the opposite end with the smaller radius.

[0026]FIG. 5 shows a cross section of a elliptical container. The cross section is similar to the cross section of FIG. 2 showing the tear drop container. With the elliptical container, as in the tear drop shaped container, the side wall 112 is formed from a single sheet of material and has no corners.

[0027] An oval container is shown in FIG. 6. The oval container has a first semi-circular end 216 and a second semicircular end 217. The semi-circular ends are connected by a straight left side 218 and a straight right side 219.

[0028]FIG. 7 shows a top view of the oval container with a pour spout 215. As can be seen in this view, the pour spout 215 is almost entirely within the radius of the first rounded end 216. The user would simply grasp the container by the second rounded end 217 in order to dispense from the spout 215.

[0029]FIG. 8 shows the rectangular package having rounded corners. The side wall 312 has a first end 326 and a second end 327. Connecting the two ends is a left side 328 and right side 329. Each of the corners 325 between the sides and ends is rounded.

[0030] The various disclosed containers are suitable for holding large volumes of liquid, yet being able to be dispensed by the user with one hand. The packages are easy to manufacture because the side wall is made from a single sheet of material that is wrapped around a top and bottom wall and has its two free ends joined to one another. While the invention has been described with reference to various preferred embodiments, variations and modifications would be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art without departing from the scope of the invention.

Classifications
U.S. Classification229/4.5, 229/5.5
International ClassificationB65D3/02, B65D3/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D3/02, B65D3/14
European ClassificationB65D3/02, B65D3/14
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 11, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: INTERNATIONAL PAPER COMPANY, NEW YORK
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:KALBERER, RODERICK W.;CANINO, PAUL A.;REEL/FRAME:012554/0227;SIGNING DATES FROM 20020131 TO 20020204