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Publication numberUS20030141353 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/062,914
Publication dateJul 31, 2003
Filing dateJan 31, 2002
Priority dateJan 31, 2002
Publication number062914, 10062914, US 2003/0141353 A1, US 2003/141353 A1, US 20030141353 A1, US 20030141353A1, US 2003141353 A1, US 2003141353A1, US-A1-20030141353, US-A1-2003141353, US2003/0141353A1, US2003/141353A1, US20030141353 A1, US20030141353A1, US2003141353 A1, US2003141353A1
InventorsRobert Wilson
Original AssigneeThe C.W. Zumbiel Co.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sleeve style beverage carton
US 20030141353 A1
Abstract
An improved sleeve style beverage carton can be processed at or near peak production rates for carton blanks and without the need for manual removal of scrap from apertures in the carton blank. The increase in production rates and efficiency is principally obtained because the stripper pins on the stripper drum used in producing the carton blank consistently and reliably puncture and remove the scrap from apertures in the die cut carton blank thereby alleviating the need to slow or stop the machine for manual removal of the scrap. Advantageously, gusset holes which are die cut in the carton blank are preferably generally trapezoidal-shaped to provide for increased surface area of the gusset hole relative to prior art configurations. The trapezoidal-shaped larger gusset holes provide for a more consistent and reliable removal of the carton material scrap from the gusset hole during production of the blank.
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Claims(25)
I claim:
1. A tubular carton sleeve adapted to be formed into a carton for holding a plurality of beverage containers, the carton sleeve comprising:
a top wall;
a bottom wall spaced from the top wall;
a pair of spaced sidewalls foldably joined along respective sides thereof and extending between the top and bottom walls;
a plurality of major end flaps each of which is foldably joined to an end of one of the sidewalls;
wherein the major end flaps are adapted to be folded relative to the respective sidewall and cooperate together to form a pair of spaced end walls of the carton;
a plurality of minor end flaps each of which is foldably coupled to an end of one of the top and bottom walls;
wherein the minor end flaps are adapted to be folded relative to the respective top and bottom walls and juxtaposed to a face of the respective major end flap to form the end walls;
a plurality of gussets each of which is foldably joined to one of the major end flaps and an adjacent one of the minor end flaps; and
a plurality of gusset holes each of which is defined at a juncture of one of the top and bottom walls, one of the sidewalls, one of the major end flaps, one of the minor end flaps and one of the gussets;
wherein each of the gusset holes is generally trapezoidal shaped to provide for increased surface area of the gusset hole and more reliable removal of carton material from the gusset hole during production of the carton sleeve.
2. The carton sleeve of claim 1 further comprising:
a plurality of bevel panels each of which is foldably joined to the end of one of the top and bottom walls and foldably joined to one of the minor end flaps;
wherein each of the bevel panels is generally rectangular shaped.
3. The carton sleeve of claim 1 wherein each of the gusset holes is greater than about 0.35 square inches.
4. The carton sleeve of claim 3 wherein each of the gusset holes is at least about 0.4 square inches.
5. The carton sleeve of claim 4 wherein each of the gusset holes is between about 0.4293 square inches and about 0.4554 square inches.
6. The carton sleeve of claim 1 further comprising:
a carrying handle formed in the top wall.
7. The carton sleeve of claim 1 further comprising:
at least one outlet port in one of the sidewalls adapted to dispense the beverage containers there through, the outlet port being defined by perforated cut lines in the sidewall.
8. The carton sleeve of claim 1 wherein each of the gusset holes has first, second, third and fourth edges;
with respect to each of the gusset holes proximate the top wall, the first and second edges are generally parallel to one another and the third and fourth edges are obliquely oriented relative to each other and relative to the first and second edges.
9. The carton sleeve of claim 1 wherein each of the gusset holes has first, second, third and fourth edges;
with respect to each of the gusset holes proximate the bottom wall, the first and second edges are generally parallel to one another, the third edge is perpendicular to the first and second edges and the fourth edge is obliquely oriented relative to the first, second and third edges.
10. The carton sleeve of claim 1 further comprising:
a pair of bottom lap panels each of which is foldably joined to one of the sidewalls, the bottom lap panels being joined to each other in overlapping relation to form the bottom wall.
11. The carton sleeve of claim 1 wherein a major axis of each of the gusset holes is generally parallel to a longitudinal axis of the carton sleeve.
12. A tubular carton sleeve adapted to be formed into a carton for holding a plurality of beverage containers, the carton sleeve comprising:
a top wall;
a carrying handle formed in the top wall;
a bottom wall spaced from the top wall;
a pair of spaced sidewalls foldably joined along respective sides thereof and extending between the top and bottom walls;
a pair of bottom lap panels each of which is foldably joined to one of the sidewalls, the bottom lap panels being joined to each other in overlapping relation to form the bottom wall;
at least one outlet port in one of the sidewalls adapted to dispense the beverage containers there through, the outlet port being defined by perforated cut lines in the sidewall;
a plurality of major end flaps each of which is foldably joined to an end of one of the sidewalls;
wherein the major end flaps are adapted to be folded relative to the respective sidewall and cooperate together to form a pair of spaced end walls of the carton;
a plurality of minor end flaps each of which is foldably coupled to an end of one of the top and bottom walls;
wherein the minor end flaps are adapted to be folded relative to the respective top and bottom walls and juxtaposed to a face of the respective major end flap to form the end walls;
plurality of bevel panels each of which is foldably joined to the end of one of the top and bottom walls and foldably joined to one of the minor end flaps;
wherein each of the bevel panels is generally rectangular shaped;
a plurality of gussets each of which is foldably joined to one of the major end flaps and an adjacent one of the minor end flaps;
a plurality of gusset holes each of which is defined at a juncture of one of the top and bottom walls, one of the sidewalls, one of the major end flaps, one of the minor end flaps and one of the gussets;
wherein each of the gusset holes is generally trapezoidal shaped to provide for increased surface area of the gusset hole and more reliable removal of carton material from the gusset hole during production of the carton sleeve;
wherein a major axis of each of the gusset holes is generally parallel to a longitudinal axis of the carton sleeve;
wherein each of the gusset holes has first, second, third and fourth edges;
with respect to each of the gusset holes proximate the top wall, the first and second edges are generally parallel to one another and the third and fourth edges are obliquely oriented relative to each other and relative to the first and second edges; and
with respect to each of the gusset holes proximate the bottom wall, the first and second edges are generally parallel to one another, the third edge is perpendicular to the first and second edges and the fourth edge is obliquely oriented relative to the first, second and third edges.
13. The carton sleeve of claim 12 wherein each of the gusset holes is between about 0.4293 square inches and about 0.4554 square inches.
14. A blank for a tubular carton comprising:
a top wall;
a pair of sidewalls each foldably joined to the top wall;
a pair of bottom lap panels each foldably joined to one of the sidewalls;
wherein the bottom lap panels are adapted to folded relative to the respective sidewall and joined to each other in overlapping relation to form a bottom wall;
a plurality of major end flaps each of which is foldably joined to an end of one of the sidewalls;
a plurality of minor end flaps each of which is foldably coupled to an end of one of the top wall and the bottom lap panels;
a plurality of gussets each of which is foldably joined to one of the major end flaps and an adjacent one of the minor end flaps; and
a plurality of gusset holes each of which is defined at a juncture of one of the top wall and one of the bottom lap panels, one of the sidewalls, one of the major end flaps, one of the minor end flaps and one of the gussets;
wherein each of the gusset holes is generally trapezoidal shaped to provide for increased surface area of the gusset hole and more reliable removal of carton material from the gusset hole during production of the blank.
15. The blank of claim 14 further comprising:
a plurality of bevel panels each of which is foldably joined to the end of one of the top wall and the bottom lap panels and foldably joined to one of the minor end flaps;
wherein each of the bevel panels is generally rectangular shaped.
16. The blank of claim 14 wherein each of the gusset holes is greater than about 0.35 square inches.
17. The blank of claim 16 wherein each of the gusset holes is at least about 0.4 square inches.
18. The blank of claim 17 wherein each of the gusset holes is between about 0.4293 square inches and about 0.4554 square inches.
19. The blank of claim 14 further comprising:
a carrying handle formed in the top wall.
20. The blank of claim 14 further comprising:
at least one outlet port in one of the sidewalls adapted to dispense beverage containers there through, the outlet port being defined by perforated cut lines in the sidewall.
21. The blank of claim 14 wherein each of the gusset holes has first, second, third and fourth edges;
with respect to each of the gusset holes proximate the top wall, the first and second edges are generally parallel to one another and the third and fourth edges are obliquely oriented relative to each other and relative to the first and second edges.
22. The blank of claim 14 wherein each of the gusset holes has first, second, third and fourth edges;
with respect to each of the gusset holes proximate one of the bottom lap panels, the first and second edges are generally parallel to one another, the third edge is perpendicular to the first and second edges and the fourth edge is obliquely oriented relative to the first, second and third edges.
23. The blank of claim 14 wherein a major axis of each of the gusset holes is generally perpendicular to a machine direction axis of the blank.
24. A blank for a tubular carton comprising:
a top wall;
a carrying handle formed in the top wall;
a pair of sidewalls each foldably joined to the top wall;
at least one outlet port in one of the sidewalls adapted to dispense beverage containers there through, the outlet port being defined by perforated cut lines in the sidewall;
a pair of bottom lap panels each foldably joined to one of the sidewalls;
wherein the bottom lap panels are adapted to folded relative to the respective sidewall and joined to each other in overlapping relation to form a bottom wall;
a plurality of major end flaps each of which is foldably joined to an end of one of the sidewalls;
wherein the major end flaps are adapted to be folded relative to the respective sidewall and cooperate together to form a pair of spaced end walls of the carton;
a plurality of minor end flaps each of which is foldably coupled to an end of one of the top wall and the bottom lap panels;
wherein the minor end flaps are adapted to be folded relative to the respective top wall and bottom lap panels and juxtaposed to a face of the respective major end flap to form the end walls;
a plurality of bevel panels each of which is foldably joined to the end of one of the top wall and the bottom lap panels and foldably joined to one of the minor end flaps;
wherein each of the bevel panels is generally rectangular shaped;
a plurality of gussets each of which is foldably joined to one of the major end flaps and an adjacent one of the minor end flaps; and
a plurality of gusset holes each of which is defined at a juncture of one of the top wall and one of the bottom lap panels, one of the sidewalls, one of the major end flaps, one of the minor end flaps and one of the gussets;
wherein each of the gusset holes is generally trapezoidal shaped to provide for increased surface area of the gusset hole and more reliable removal of carton material from the gusset hole during production of the blank;
a major axis of each of the gusset holes being generally perpendicular to a machine direction axis of the blank;
wherein each of the gusset holes has first, second, third and fourth edges;
with respect to each of the gusset holes proximate the top wall, the first and second edges are generally parallel to one another and the third and fourth edges are obliquely oriented relative to each other and relative to the first and second edges; and
with respect to each of the gusset holes proximate one of the bottom lap panels, the first and second edges are generally parallel to one another, the third edge is perpendicular to the first and second edges and the fourth edge is obliquely oriented relative to the first, second and third edges.
25. The blank of claim 24 wherein each of the gusset holes is between about 0.4293 square inches and about 0.4554 square inches.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] This invention relates to cartons. More specifically, this invention relates to an improved beverage carton and associated blank and carton sleeve that improves production rates and efficiencies.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] In the marketing of soft drinks, beer and other beverages, such retail consumer products are commonly sold in cans which are grouped together in six or 12 packs. Particularly in the case of 12 can packs, the cans are commonly packaged in cartons to make it easier to handle the product for the wholesaler and the retailer as well as for the retail consumer.

[0003] There are any number of different types of can cartons. One particular type of carton that has found significant commercial success over the years is referred to as a “wrap around” carton. In a wrap around carton, a number of cans, typically 12, are wrapped in a paperboard box or carton that includes top and bottom wall panels, sidewall panels and end flaps on each end. The end flaps at each end of the carton are sealed one to the other, thereby providing a closed or sealed package or carton for the cans.

[0004] A common carton production method involves converting paperboard into carton blanks and then into folded cartons which are eventually erected and filled with the beverage cans. The fabrication of beverage cartons typically begins with paperboard being drawn in a web from a roll of paperboard. Commonly, one surface of the paperboard is printed with a desired graphic design. The paperboard web is then die cut into multiple individual carton blanks. The printed carton blanks are then transferred typically within the same carton manufacturing facility, to a folder/gluer machine where each carton blank is folded and glued into a flattened sleeve or fill-ready carton configuration. The flattened cartons or sleeves are packed and then palletized for shipment to a customer such as a soft drink canner or the like.

[0005] During the conversion of the paperboard into a carton sleeve, the web of paperboard commonly passes between various counter rotating rollers including an impression roller and a stripper drum. Typically, a carton blank includes certain holes or apertures and after each hole is die cut in the paperboard, the paperboard material must be removed from the hole portions of the web as scrap. Such scrap pieces of paperboard are removed by a series of pins arranged on the stripper drum and appropriately configured for the particular carton blank in production. Optimally, the pins puncture the scrap portions of the paperboard and continued movement of the paperboard web and rotation of the stripper drum pulls or strips the scraps from the web.

[0006] However, one inherent requirement in the stripping process is that the pins on the stripper drum be appropriately aligned with the scrap portions of the paperboard web for removal. If the pins do not puncture the scrap portion of the web, the scrap is not removed by the stripper drum and an operator must manually remove the scrap downstream from the stripper drum, for example, by punching the scrap with a screw driver or other tool. Because of the size and processing speed of the converting equipment, it is often difficult to accurately and precisely align the stripper drum with the web for consistent removal of the scrap by the stripper drum. The manual removal of the scrap results in a very inefficient beverage carton sleeve production process. The die cutting machines cannot operate at peek production speeds because of the consistent need to manually remove the scrap from the die cut carton blanks.

[0007] For example, one known type of carton blank is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,292,059, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. The carton blank shown in the '059 patent includes a number of generally triangular-shaped apertures identified by reference numeral 86 in that patent. Such a carton blank is generally shown in FIG. 1 herein. The triangular-shaped apertures according to the '059 patent assist in providing a carton having end walls of increased flatness so that it can be utilized as a billboard, display or advertising space while still maintaining adequate structural integrity for the carton.

[0008] However, one shortcoming of the carton blank shown in the '059 patent and FIG. 1 herein is that the triangular apertures are sized and configured so that the scrap is not consistently, reliably and efficiently removed from the carton blank during production. Therefore, production of carton blanks of this type are significantly more slower because the machines on which the paperboard is converted to produce such carton blanks cannot run at peak speeds due to the fact that the scrap from the triangular apertures often must be manually removed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] As such, there is a need for an improved carton blank and sleeve style carton design which enables the carton manufacturing process to be more efficient and deliver higher production rates.

[0010] Moreover, there is a need for such a carton blank and carton design which provides certain advantages and benefits of known carton designs without the need for repeated manual removal of scrap from apertures in the carton blank during the production process.

[0011] These and other objectives of this invention have been attained by an improved carton and blank design in which the paperboard web can be processed at or near peak production rates into carton blanks and without the need for manual removal of scrap from apertures in the carton blank. Specifically, the carton blank according to this invention can be processed at or near peak production rates of about 625 feet per minute which is a 30 percent or more increase in production rates achieved for similar carton blanks, such as those shown in U.S. Pat. No. 5,292,059 and the like. The increase in production rates is principally obtained because the stripping pins on the stripper drum consistently and reliably puncture and remove the scrap from apertures in the die cut carton blank thereby alleviating the need to slow or stop the machine for manual removal of the scrap.

[0012] In one presently preferred embodiment of this invention, a tubular carton sleeve is adapted to be formed into a carton for holding beverage containers. The carton sleeve is erected and formed from a carton blank that includes a top wall and a pair of sidewalls that are each foldably joined to the top wall. A pair of bottom lap panels are each foldably joined to one of the sidewalls and are adapted for folding relative to the respective sidewalls and joined to each other in overlapping relation to form a bottom wall of the resulting carton. Major end flaps are foldably joined to an end of each of the sidewalls and minor end flaps are likewise foldably coupled to an end of the top wall or bottom wall panels. When the carton is erected, the major and minor end flaps are folded relative to the respective side, top and bottom walls to form end walls of the carton. A plurality of gussets are each foldably joined to one of the major end flaps and an adjacent one of the minor end flaps. The gussets foldably interconnect the major and minor end flaps and are tucked in between those end flaps when the carton is formed. A preferably rectangular bevel panel is formed between the minor end flaps and the associated top and bottom wall adjacent to the gussets. The bevel panel is supported by the adjacent beverage cans when the carton is filled and therefor contributes to the tightness of the carton and the prevention of undesirable crushing of the corners of the carton.

[0013] Advantageously, gusset holes which are formed at a juncture of the top or bottom walls and the adjacent sidewalls in part define the gussets. The gusset holes are preferably generally trapezoidal-shaped to provide for increased surface area of the gusset hole relative to prior art configurations. The trapezoidal-shaped larger gusset holes provide for a more consistent and reliable removal of the carton material scrap from the gusset hole during production of the blank. The trapezoidal-shaped gusset holes are on the average 27 percent larger than triangular-shaped apertures in prior art carton blanks thereby providing for an increased area for the stripper pins on the stripper drums to puncture the scrap material in the gusset hole for removal. As such, even if the paperboard web is not precisely aligned with the location of the stripper pins on the stripper drum, the web can be processed at or near maximum speeds in the production facility because the stripper pin reliably and consistently removes the scrap from the gusset holes, unlike prior art carton blank designs.

[0014] Therefore, the advantages and benefits of certain known wrap around or sleeve style tubular cartons can be achieved with the carton blank, tubular carton sleeve and associated beverage carton of this invention while still allowing for maximum production efficiencies and process rates by avoiding the need for manual removal of the scrap from apertures, gusset holes or the like in the carton blank.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0015] The objectives and features of the invention will become more readily apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

[0016]FIG. 1 is a plan view of a prior art carton blank;

[0017]FIG. 2 is a plan view of a carton blank according to a presently preferred embodiment of this invention;

[0018]FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a stripper pin on a stripper drum rotating to intersect the scrap material in a gusset hole of a carton blank according to one presently preferred embodiment of this invention;

[0019]FIGS. 4A and 4B are sequential views of the stripper pin removing scrap from the gusset hole of the carton blank in FIG. 3;

[0020]FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a tubular carton sleeve formed from the carton blank of FIG. 2;

[0021]FIG. 6 is a partially broken away perspective view of one end of the tubular carton sleeve of FIG. 5 being folded into an end wall of the carton;

[0022]FIGS. 7A and 7B are enlarged partial plan views of trapezoidal-shaped gusset holes from a carton blank according to one presently preferred embodiment of this invention; and

[0023]FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIGS. 7A and 7B of a triangular-shaped aperture in a prior art carton blank.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0024] A presently preferred embodiment of a carton blank 10 according to the present invention is shown in FIG. 2 and includes a top wall 12. Sidewalls 14, 14 are foldably joined to the side edges of the top wall 12 along fold lines 16, 16. Bottom lap panels 18, 18 are foldably joined respectively to the sidewalls 14, 14 along fold lines 20, 20. A carrying handle 22 is provided for the carton and includes a pair of flaps 24, 24. The details of such a carrying handle 22 are disclosed for example in U.S. Pat. No. 5,106,014 issued Apr. 21, 1992, which is hereby incorporated by reference.

[0025] Major end flaps 26, 28 are foldably joined to the end edges of sidewalls 14, 14 along fold lines 30, 32, respectively. Minor end flaps 34, 34 are foldably coupled respectively to bevel panels 36, 36 at the end edges of the top wall 12 along fold lines 38, 38 and 40, 40. Likewise, partial minor end flaps 42, 42, 42, 42 are foldably joined respectively to partial bevel panels 44, 44, 44, 44 at the end edges of the bottom lap panels 18,18 along fold lines 46, 46, 46, 46, and 48, 48, 48, 48.

[0026] Gussets 50 interconnect the adjacent end flaps 26 and 34; 28 and 34; 26 and 42 as well as 28 and 42. Since all of the gussets 50 are virtually identical, only the specific features of the gusset 50 will be described here in detail. With particular reference to FIGS. 2 and 5, the gusset 50 is foldably joined to the minor end flaps 42, 34 along a fold line 52. The opposite end of the gusset 50 is foldably joined to the major end flaps 26, 28 along a fold line 54.

[0027] A rectangular bevel panel 36, 44 is defined between the fold lines 46, 48, and 38, 40 respectively. Bevel panel 36 is foldably joined to the top wall 12 and to the minor end flap 34. Likewise, bevel panel 44 is foldably joined to the bottom lap panels 18 and to the partial minor end flaps 42.

[0028] Specifically, in one presently preferred embodiment the carton blank 10 includes gusset holes 74 that are trapezoidal in shape and likewise provide an increased surface area relative to the prior art blank 11 having triangular apertures 13 (FIG. 1) for more reliable removal of scrap 72 (FIGS. 4A and 4B) from the gusset hole 74 during production of the carton blank 10. In one presently preferred embodiment, the gusset hole 74 is trapezoidal-shaped and the gusset holes 74 a in the carton blank 10 proximate the top wall 12 include first and second edges 76, 78 that are each generally parallel to one another and third and fourth edges 80, 82 that are obliquely oriented relative to each other and relative to the first and second edges 76, 78. These gusset holes 74 a in one presently preferred embodiment have a surface area of about 0.4554 square inches. Additionally, in another presently preferred embodiment the gusset holes 74 b proximate the bottom lap panels 18 of the carton blank 10 have first and second edges 84, 86 that are generally parallel to one another and a third edge 88 is generally perpendicular to the first and second edges 84, 86 and a fourth edge 90 is obliquely oriented relative to the first, second and third edges 84, 86, 88. The gusset holes 74 b proximate the bottom lap panels 18 have a surface area of approximately 0.4293 square inches. The trapezoidal-shaped gusset holes 74 a, 74 b according to this invention are advantageously larger than the triangular-shaped apertures 13 in the prior art carton blank 11 of FIG. 1. More specifically, the triangular-shaped prior art aperture 13 of FIG. 8 has a surface area of approximately 0.3487 square inches. As such, the gusset hole 74 b of FIG. 7A is approximately 23 percent greater than that of the prior art triangular-shaped apertures 13 of FIG. 8; whereas, the trapezoidal-shaped gusset hole 74 a of FIG. 7B is 31 percent larger than the triangular-shaped aperture 13 of the prior art in FIG. 8. On the average, the gusset holes 74 a, 74 b of FIGS. 7A and 7B of this invention are 27 percent larger than the prior art aperture 13 of FIG. 8. While the gusset holes 74 a, 74 b are shown as being different trapezoidal shapes and sizes, the gusset holes 74 may be the same configuration and size and preferably trapezoidal and as large as practically possible to increase the likelihood of removing the scrap. The advantageous size and configuration of the gusset holes 74 a, 74 b result in an increase in production because the web 10 a moves at a rate of approximately 625 feet per minute which is a 30 percent or greater increase relative to production rates for the prior art carton blank 11 of FIG. 1. As such, the carton blank 10 configuration according to this invention and shown in FIG. 2 provides a significant increase in production rate and advantage over known prior art designs due in large part to the configuration of the gusset holes 74 a, 74 b.

[0029] To complete the basic elements of the carton, one or more outlet ports 56 are each defined by severance lines 58 as shown in FIG. 2. The severance lines 58 are formed in at least one of the sidewalls 14. The outlet port(s) 56 provide(s) a dispensing means for dispensing the beverage cans from the carton. A preferred embodiment in the outlet port 56 is disclosed U.S. Pat. No. 5,249,681, issued Oct. 5, 1993 and hereby incorporated by reference.

[0030] To form a tubular carton sleeve 60 from the carton blank 10, the bottom lap panels 18, 18 are partially overlapped onto one another and glued together, typically on a folder-gluer machine as is well known in the art. The sleeve 60 can then be collapsed about fold lines 16 and 20 for storage and/or shipping.

[0031] To form the carton from the sleeve 60, the minor end flaps 34, 42, as viewed in FIGS. 5 and 6, are pivoted and folded into the positions shown in FIG. 6. This action causes the bevel panels 36, 44 to swing inwardly together with each gusset 50 into the respective positions as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. Following this, the major end flap 26 is folded inwardly along the fold line 30 and major end flap 28 is then folded inwardly along fold line 32 until the major end flaps 26, 28 overlap and are glued together to form end walls. Once this is completed on both ends of the sleeve 60, the carton is formed. The articles are loaded into the carton through the open end or ends of the carton.

[0032] It should be recognized that as used herein, the terms “top”, “bottom” and “side” with respect to the various carton walls or components are relative terms, and that the carton and/or its contents may be re-oriented as necessary or as desired. Further, rather than the bottom wall being formed from separate lap panels 18, 18, it will be recognized that the carton blank 10 may be rearranged whereby some other panel is formed as a composite from lap panels.

[0033] One advantage of this invention is that the end walls of the completed carton have large flat surfaces and that the carton still maintains adequate integrity due to the bevel panels 36, 44 at the ends of the top wall 12 and bottom wall. The endwall enlarged flat surfaces are useful as space for carrying printing such as an advertisement, trademark, and other information.

[0034] A principal advantage of this invention is demonstrated in FIGS. 3, 4A, 4B, 7A, 7B and 8. Once a web of paperboard 10 a is die cut, it commonly passes between various counter rotating rollers and drums. One such drum is a stripper drum 62 having a number of stripper pin assemblies 64 with pins 66 projecting from the outer circumference of the drum 62. Each stripper pin is mounted to the drum 62 on a base 68 and a movable sleeve 70 surrounds the pin 66.

[0035] Referring to FIGS. 3, 4A and 4B, as the die cut paperboard web 10 a passes in the direction of arrow A past the stripper drum 62 rotating in the direction of arrow B, the stripper pins 66 are spaced and configured on the stripper drum 62 so that one of the pins 66 puncture the scrap portion 72 of the paperboard 10 a formed in the gusset hole 74. Once the stripper pin 66 punctures the scrap 72 as shown in FIG. 4A, continued movement of the paperboard web 10 a and the stripper drum 62 separates the scrap 72 and pin 66 from the paperboard web 10 a thereby exposing the gusset hole 74 as shown in FIG. 4B. Due to the centrifugal forces of the rotating stripper drum 62, the movable sleeve 70 slides along the stripper pin 66 to project in the direction of arrow C and thereby dislodge the scrap 72 from the pin 66 for disposal. As such, upon subsequent rotation of the stripper drum 62, the stripper pin 66 is free to puncture scrap 72 in a subsequent die cut portion of the paperboard web 10 a.

[0036] The above-described removal process for scrap 72 from die cut holes or apertures in the carton blank 10 is generally the desired objective of many carton blank production facilities and paperboard converters. However, because of the design of prior art carton blanks 11 such as those shown in FIG. 1, frequently the stripper pin does not puncture the scrap portions of the die cut blank and, consequently, does not remove the scrap from die cut holes or apertures in the paperboard web. As a result, the process must be halted or interrupted so that an operator manually punctures the scrap from the die cut holes with a screw driver or the like. The misalignment of the stripper pin 66 relative to the scrap may be the result of a number of factors including misalignment of the web relative to the stripper drum 62, inaccurate placement of the stripper pin assemblies 64 on the stripper drum 62 for a given die cut configuration or the like. Additionally, wobble or loosely mounted stripper pins 66 are commonly utilized so that dust or other foreign matter can be easily and/or automatically ejected from the stripper pin assembly 64 to prevent clogging, jamming or the like. Such inherent movement in the stripper pin 66 may also create inaccuracies in the puncturing of the paperboard web.

[0037] Nevertheless, the carton blank 10 according to one embodiment of this invention overcomes these problems and allows for maximum or near peak production rates because scrap 72 in particular apertures in the gusset hole 74 is consistently and reliably punctured by the stripper pins 66 for removal thereby alleviating the requirement for interruption of the process or manual removal of the scrap.

[0038] From the above disclosure of the general principles of the present invention and the preceding detailed description of at least one preferred embodiment, those skilled in the art will readily comprehend the various modifications to which this invention is susceptible. Therefore, I desire to be limited only by the scope of the following claims and equivalents thereof.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6715639Apr 29, 2003Apr 6, 2004Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Carton with an improved dispensing feature
US8646654 *Feb 17, 2012Feb 11, 2014The C.W. Zumbiel CompanyCarton with dispenser
US8770397Nov 17, 2005Jul 8, 2014Meadwestvaco Packaging Systems, LlcCutting method to prevent interlocking of adjacent panels
US20120145775 *Feb 17, 2012Jun 14, 2012The C.W. Zumbiel CompanyCarton with dispenser
WO2007058656A1 *Nov 17, 2005May 24, 2007Meadwestvaco Packaging SystemsCutting method to prevent interlocking of adjacent panels
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/103.2, 206/427
International ClassificationB26D7/18, B31B1/20, B65D71/00, B65D71/36
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2571/0066, B31B2201/143, B65D2571/00141, B65D2571/00549, B26D7/1836, B65D2571/00728, B65D71/36, B31B1/20, B65D2571/0087, B65D2571/0045
European ClassificationB31B1/20, B26D7/18D, B65D71/36
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 31, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: C.W. ZUMBIEL CO., THE, OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WILSON, ROBERT W.;REEL/FRAME:012570/0644
Effective date: 20020130