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Publication numberUS20030146115 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/061,713
Publication dateAug 7, 2003
Filing dateFeb 1, 2002
Priority dateFeb 1, 2002
Publication number061713, 10061713, US 2003/0146115 A1, US 2003/146115 A1, US 20030146115 A1, US 20030146115A1, US 2003146115 A1, US 2003146115A1, US-A1-20030146115, US-A1-2003146115, US2003/0146115A1, US2003/146115A1, US20030146115 A1, US20030146115A1, US2003146115 A1, US2003146115A1
InventorsDavid Sharp
Original AssigneeSharp David R.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple compartment mixing unit dose
US 20030146115 A1
Abstract
A multiple compartment mixing unit dose is provided. A rupturable smaller unit dose within a flexible larger unit dose allows mixing of desired composition immediately prior to use. The composition is mixed by rupturing the smaller unit dose and massaging the composition in the flexible larger unit dose. The components of the desired composition are different colors and produce a third color when completely mixed. This color can be viewed through a transparent portion of the larger unit dose. The composition is dispensed out of the tip of the elongated portion of the larger unit dose.
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Claims(19)
1) A compartmented package adapted for containing a first component separately circumscribed from an additional component or components of a desired composition, comprising:
(A) a flexible receptacle containing the first component of the desired composition;
(B) a sealed rupturable bladder or bladders filled with the additional component or components of the desired composition contained within the body of said flexible receptacle, wherein the additional component or components can be forced out of said rupturable bladder or bladders and mixed with the first component in said flexible receptacle creating said desired composition; and,
(C) an elongated portion of said flexible receptacle capable of dispensing the desired composition out of said flexible receptacle.
2) A compartmented package, comprising:
(A) a flexible receptacle containing a first component of a desired composition;
(B) a sealed rupturable bladder or bladders filled with an additional component or components of said desired composition contained within the body of said flexible receptacle, wherein said additional component or components can be forced out of said rupturable bladder or bladders and mix with said first component in said flexible receptacle creating said desired composition; and,
(C) an elongated portion of said flexible receptacle capable of dispensing said desired composition out of said flexible receptacle.
3) A package according to claim 1 wherein said first component of said desired composition is a different color than said additional component or components of said desired composition thereby producing a third color when said desired composition is properly mixed.
4) A package according to claim 1 wherein said flexible receptacle is transparent or has a transparent window to view mixture of said desired composition.
5) A package according to claim 1 wherein said flexible receptacle is constructed of material that is impervious to said desired composition, allows user to burst said rupturable bladder or bladders through the walls of said flexible receptacle, and user can control proper mixing of said desired composition by massaging said flexible receptacle.
6) A package according to claim 1 wherein said flexible receptacle has a wide body capable of encompassing the entire volume of said desired composition and said body tapers into a narrow elongated portion of said flexible receptacle.
7) A compartmented package containing a first component separately circumscribed from an additional component or components of a desired composition, comprising:
(A) a flexible receptacle containing said first component of said desired composition;
(B) a sealed rupturable bladder or bladders filled with said additional component or components of said desired composition contained within the body of said flexible receptacle, wherein said additional component or components can be forced out of said rupturable bladder or bladders and mix with said first component in said flexible receptacle creating said desired composition; and,
(C) a color scheme wherein said first component of said desired composition is a different color than said additional component or components of said desired composition thereby producing a third color when said desired composition is properly mixed.
8) A package according to claim 7 with an elongated portion of said flexible receptacle capable of dispensing said desired composition out of said flexible receptacle.
9) A package according to claim 7 wherein said flexible receptacle is transparent or has a transparent window to view mixture of said desired composition.
10) A package according to claim 7 wherein said flexible receptacle is constructed of material that is impervious to said desired composition, allows user to burst said rupturable bladder or bladders through the walls of said flexible receptacle, and user can control proper mixing of said desired composition by massaging said flexible receptacle.
11) A package according to claim 7 wherein said flexible receptacle has a wide body capable of encompassing the entire volume of said desired composition and said body tapers into a narrow elongated portion of said flexible receptacle.
12) A compartmented package containing a first component separately circumscribed from an additional component or components of a desired composition, comprising:
(A) a flexible receptacle containing said first component of said desired composition;
(B) a sealed rupturable bladder or bladders filled with said additional component or components of said desired composition contained within the body of said flexible receptacle, wherein said additional component or components can be forced out of said rupturable bladder or bladders and mix with said first component in said flexible receptacle creating said desired composition; and,
(C) said flexible receptacle is transparent or has a transparent window to view mixture of said desired composition.
13) A package according to claim 12 with an elongated portion of said flexible receptacle capable of dispensing said desired composition out of said flexible receptacle.
14) A package according to claim 12 wherein said first component of said desired composition is a different color than said additional component or components of said desired composition thereby producing a third color when said desired composition is properly mixed.
15) A package according to claim 12 wherein said flexible receptacle is constructed of material that is impervious to said desired composition, allows user to burst said rupturable bladder or bladders through the walls of said flexible receptacle, and user can control proper mixing of said desired composition by massaging said flexible receptacle.
16) A package according to claim 12 wherein said flexible receptacle has a wide body capable of encompassing the entire volume of said desired composition and said body tapers into a narrow elongated portion of said flexible receptacle.
17) A compartmented package containing a first component separately circumscribed from an additional component or components of a desired composition, comprising:
(A) a flexible receptacle containing said first component of said desired composition;
(B) a sealed rupturable bladder or bladders filled with said additional component or components of said desired composition contained within the body of said flexible receptacle, wherein said additional component or components can be forced out of said rupturable bladder or bladders and mix with said first component in said flexible receptacle creating said desired composition;
(C) an elongated portion of said flexible receptacle capable of dispensing said desired composition out of said flexible receptacle;
(D) a color scheme wherein said first component of said desired composition is a different color than said additional component or components of said desired composition thereby producing a third color when said desired composition is properly mixed; and,
(E) said flexible receptacle is transparent or has a transparent window to view mixture of said desired composition.
18) A package according to claim 17 wherein said flexible receptacle is constructed of material that is impervious to said desired composition, allows user to burst said rupturable bladder or bladders through the walls of said flexible receptacle, and user can control proper mixing of said desired composition by massaging said flexible receptacle.
19) A package according to claim 17 wherein said flexible receptacle has a wide body capable of encompassing the entire volume of said desired composition and said body tapers into a narrow elongated portion of said flexible receptacle.
Description
    BACKGROUND OF INVENTION
  • [0001]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    This invention relates to packaging of different materials to be mixed before dispensing. More particularly, this invention relates to flexible packages comprising multiple compartments for isolating materials prior to mixing and use and a method for determining proper mixing of the same.
  • [0003]
    2. Description of Related Art
  • [0004]
    In some industries compositions can degrade quickly upon mixing the components of the composition, thus inhibiting the length of time the composition is useful. An example is the short shelf life of certain dental amalgams. An ultimate consumer, such as a dentist, may be utilizing several types of compositions. The requirement that he store the components of the compositions separately imposes a considerable burden upon him. A stock of as many as five or ten different compositions may require one or more separately stored components each. The possibility that the wrong components will be mixed can lead to confusion and waste. A considerable amount of shelf space for storage is often needed. These problems could be alleviated if separate storage were not necessary.
  • [0005]
    Multicompartment packages containing solid, liquid or gel substances have been used to enable a user to conveniently handle the contained substances until immediately before desired use. Often one or more substances are isolated in a separate compartment or compartments to prevent mixing until immediately prior to use. These packages have ranged in manufacture from rigid, renitent material to flexible, pliant and elastic material.
  • [0006]
    For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,362,242 (Cheetham) shows a non-disposable rigid container, where the main cavity of the container is separated by a thin plastic partition creating two compartments of approximately equal volume. A high specific gravity liquid component of a composition, such as a dental amalgam, is required to be contained in the first compartment, and a second component of the composition is contained in the second compartment. This enables the components of the desired composition to be stored separately until immediately prior to use. When desired for use, the container must be subjected to rapid oscillatory motion so as to give the high specific gravity liquid enough kinetic energy to rupture the partition whereupon the two components are mixed to form the desired composition. After mixing, the composition is retrieved by separating the bowl shaped members of the container and scooping out the mixture.
  • [0007]
    One disadvantage of a renitent container is that proper mixing can only be accomplished with a plunger, or a vibrator subjecting the container to rapid oscillatory motion. Controlled mixing is more difficult to accomplish in a rigid container than a pliable one. Another disadvantage of the Cheetham invention is the requirement of a high specific gravity component to gain sufficient kinetic energy to rupture the partition separating the two compartments, thus limiting the usefulness of the invention to only certain specific types of compositions. Yet another disadvantage of like inventions is that the desired composition must be scooped out of the container, without a clean and tidy method of application, leaving residue in the container and on the instruments used to scoop out the composition.
  • [0008]
    An example of a flexible compartmented package is U.S. Pat. No. 3,964,604 (Prenntzell), which discloses a package having a primary chamber serving as a mixing chamber, and one or more secondary chambers containing a substance to be mixed immediately before use with the substance in the primary chamber. The secondary chambers are separated from the primary chamber by a channel with a sealing seam capable of being ruptured by means of applying pressure, thus allowing the separated substances to mix. The primary chamber is sized to contain, for example, x-ray film. One disadvantage is that this process yields a dead volume in the secondary chamber as it is emptied into the primary chamber, thus requiring a bulkier package than one that yields no dead volume. Another disadvantage of the Prenntzell invention is the lack of an applicator for clean and tidy dispensing of the desired compositions.
  • [0009]
    Another example of a multicompartment, flexible package is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 2,864,492 (Lappala), which discloses a body of polymerizable material containing catalyst and carrier. The package is a sealed, flexible tape dispenser that contains solid polymerizable material on a porous tape carrier folded in accordion-like pleats. Within the body of the package is an encapsulated catalyst that can be pinched through the wall of the container to rupture the membrane and release the activating material whereupon the container is kneaded to mix the catalyst with the polymerizable material, immediately prior to use. Aside from the fact that the Lappala invention is an adhesive tape dispenser, thus limiting its use in other applications, there is no means or method for determining when the encapsulated material has been sufficiently or adequately mixed with the rest of the contents of the package.
  • [0010]
    Prior inventions, which are recommended to the reader for background of multicompartment packaging, include the following United States patent documents: U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,343,664, 3,563,414, 3,608,709, 3,814,287, 4,534,509, 4,550,825, 4,563,174, 4,731,053, 4,874,107, 4,882,062, 4,998,671, 5,246,142, 5,447,236, 5,672,359, 6,022,528, and 6,039,719 each of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety for the material disclosed therein
  • SUMMARY OF INVENTION
  • [0011]
    It is desirable that mixtures of easily degradable substances be packaged in an economical way that increases shelf life by separating reactive components of the desired composition. In particular, it is desirable to provide a method of multicompartment packaging, separating two reactive compositions for mixing until immediately prior to dispensing. It is further desirable to provide a method for determining proper mixing of the substances and a clean and convenient way of dispensing the same
  • [0012]
    Accordingly, it is a general object of this invention to provide a method of packaging that increases the shelf life of substances that are easily degradable upon mixing.
  • [0013]
    Another object of this invention is to provide a compact method of packaging for convenient storage by minimizing dead volume.
  • [0014]
    Yet another object of this invention is to provide an inexpensive and disposable method of multicompartmental packaging.
  • [0015]
    And yet another object of this invention is to provide multicompartmental packaging of substances that can be easily mixed immediately prior to use without the aid of other instrumentalities or limiting its usefulness to specific types of compositions.
  • [0016]
    A further object of this invention is to provide a means to control the amount and adequacy of mixing of substances in multicompartmental packaging.
  • [0017]
    And yet a further object of this invention is to provide a means for Indicating the sufficiency of the mixing of substances within the packaging.
  • [0018]
    It is still a further object of this invention to provide a clean, tidy and convenient way of dispensing the composition after mixing.
  • [0019]
    Another object of this invention is to provide a generally precise means of dispensing mixed materials by forcing the mixed material through a generally pointed dispensing end.
  • [0020]
    Additional objects, advantages and other novel features of this invention will be set forth in part in the description that follows and in part will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon examination of the following or may be learned with the practice of this invention. The objects and advantages of this invention may be realized and attained by means of the instrumentalities and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims. Still other objects of the present invention will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the following description wherein there is shown and described the present embodiments of this invention, simply by way of illustration of some of the modes best suited to carry out this invention. As it will be realized, this invention is capable of other different embodiments, and its several details are capable of modification in various aspects without departing from the scope of this invention. Accordingly, the drawings and descriptions should be regarded as illustrative in nature and not restrictive.
  • [0021]
    To achieve the foregoing and other objectives, and in accordance with the purposes of the present invention, one or more unit doses within a larger flexible unit dose for mixing two or more parts before dispensing is provided. The smaller unit dose or doses are squeezed through the wall of the larger unit dose until the former is ruptured, thus allowing the substances to mix immediately prior to use. The composition is mixed by massaging the flexible larger unit dose until the product is completely mixed. The components of the composition are different colors and produce a third color when completely mixed. This color can be viewed through a transparent portion of the larger unit dose packaging. The composition is dispensed out of the tip of the elongated and generally pointed portion of the larger unit dose similar to dispensing material out of a tapered rigid dispensing tip.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • [0022]
    The accompanying drawings incorporated in and forming a part of the specification, illustrate a preferred embodiment of the present invention. Some, although not all, alternative embodiments are described in the following description.
  • [0023]
    In the drawings:
  • [0024]
    [0024]FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a present embodiment of the multiple compartment container of the invention.
  • [0025]
    [0025]FIG. 2 is a perspective view of an alternative present embodiment of the multiple compartment container of the invention.
  • [0026]
    [0026]FIG. 3 is a perspective view of yet another embodiment of the multiple compartment container of the invention.
  • [0027]
    Reference will now be made in detail to the present embodiments of the invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0028]
    [0028]FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of a present embodiment of the multiple compartment container of the invention. In its present embodiment this invention consists of a smaller unit dose 104 concentrically contained within a larger unit dose 101 for mixing two parts before dispensing. The walls of the larger unit dose 101 may comprise any suitable flexible material impervious to liquids and the particular composition used. A variety of plastics, polymerized material, papers or other flexible material may be suitable, including, but not limited to, polypropylene, polyethylene, polycarbonate, polyvinyl chloride, polyvinyl alcohol, hydrochlorinated rubber, cellophane, cellulose acetate, polyvinyl acetate, polyethylene terephthalate, polytrifluorochloroethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, Teflon, and the like. The smaller unit dose 104 contains the first component of the composition 105 that must be kept separate until ready to mix. In the present preferred embodiment, the smaller unit dose 104 is contained within the volume of the larger unit dose 101. The second component of the composition 103 is in the larger unit dose 101 and fills about 33% to about 50% of the volume of the larger unit dose 101 as shown by the meniscus 107.
  • [0029]
    Immediately prior to use, the smaller unit dose 104 is squeezed through the walls of the larger unit dose 101 until the smaller unit dose 104 is ruptured, thereby exposing the first component of the composition 105 to the second component of the composition 103. The bladder of the smaller unit dose 104 remains in the larger unit dose 101. The composition, a combination of the first component 105 and the second component 103 is then mixed by massaging the larger unit dose 101 until the composition is completely mixed. Preferably the first component of the composition 105 is a different color than the second component of the composition 103 and thereby producing a third color when the composition is properly mixed. The larger unit dose 101 is transparent or has a transparent window to enable the user to view the mixture of the two components 105 and 103 and control and ensure proper mixing of the same. In some embodiments of this invention the smaller unit dose 104 may also be transparent, thereby permitting the user to identify color differences, if any, before mixing with the desired uniform color of the mixture after mixing.
  • [0030]
    The composition (a mixture of the two components 105 and 103) is then dispensed in a clean and tidy fashion by cutting off the tip of the elongated portion 102 of the larger unit dose 101. Optionally, in some embodiments, the elongated portion 102 extends into an increasingly narrow generally pointed dispensing section 109. By rolling the larger unit dose 101 from the larger end 106, similar to a tube of toothpaste, the composition (a mixture of the two components 105 and 103) is pushed into the narrow portion 108 of the larger unit dose 101, causing the narrow portion 108 to become rigid and act like a dispensing tip. Once the composition (a mixture of the two components 105 and 103) is dispensed, the larger unit dose 101 can be disposed.
  • [0031]
    [0031]FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of another present embodiment of the multiple compartment container of the invention. In this present embodiment the invention consists of a smaller unit dose 204 concentrically contained within a larger unit dose 201 for mixing two parts before dispensing. The walls of the larger unit dose 201 may comprise any suitable flexible material impervious to liquids and the particular composition used. A variety of plastics, polymerized material, papers or other flexible material may be suitable, including, but not limited to, polypropylene, polyethylene, polycarbonate, polyvinyl chloride, polyvinyl alcohol, hydrochlorinated rubber, cellophane, cellulose acetate, polyvinyl acetate, polyethylene terephthalate, polytrifluorochloroethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, and the like. The smaller unit dose 204 contains the first component of the composition 205 that must be kept separate until ready to mix. The second component of the composition 203 is in the larger unit dose 201 and fills about 50% of the volume of the larger unit dose 201 as shown by the meniscus 207.
  • [0032]
    Immediately prior to use, the smaller unit dose 204 is squeezed through the walls of the larger unit dose 201 until the smaller unit dose 204 is ruptured, thereby exposing the first component of the composition 205 to the second component of the composition 203. The bladder of the smaller unit dose 204 remains in the larger unit dose 201. The composition, a combination of the first component 205 and the second component 203 is then mixed by massaging the larger unit dose 201 until the composition is completely mixed. Preferably the first component of the composition 205 is a different color than the second component of the composition 203 and thereby producing a third color when the composition is properly mixed. The larger unit dose 201 is transparent or has a transparent window to enable the user to view the mixture of the two components 205 and 203 and control and ensure proper mixing of the same.
  • [0033]
    The composition (a mixture of the two components 205 and 203) is then dispensed in a clean and tidy fashion by cutting off the tip of the elongated portion 202 of the larger unit dose 201. By rolling the larger unit dose 201 from the larger end 206, similar to a tube of toothpaste, the composition (a mixture of the two components 205 and 203) is pushed into the narrow portion 208 of the larger unit dose 201, causing the narrow portion 208 to become rigid and act like a dispensing tip. Once the composition (a mixture of the two components 205 and 203) is dispensed, the larger unit dose 201 can be disposed.
  • [0034]
    [0034]FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of yet another present embodiment of the multiple compartment container of the invention. In its present embodiment this invention consists of a smaller unit dose 304 concentrically contained within a larger unit dose 301 for mixing two parts before dispensing. In some embodiments of this invention the smaller unit dose 304 is physically connected to the inner walls of the larger unit dose 301. While in other alternative embodiments, the smaller unit dose 304 is unconnected to, although contained within, the larger unit dose 301. The walls of the larger unit dose 301 may comprise any suitable flexible material impervious to liquids and the particular composition used. A variety of plastics, polymerized material, papers or other flexible material may be suitable, including, but not limited to, polypropylene, polyethylene, polycarbonate, polyvinyl chloride, polyvinyl alcohol, hydrochlorinated rubber, cellophane, cellulose acetate, polyvinyl acetate, polyethylene terephthalate, polytrifluorochloroethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, and the like. The smaller unit dose 304 contains the first component of the composition 305 that must be kept separate until ready to mix. The second component of the composition 303 is in the larger unit dose 301 and fills about generally from 33% to 50% of the volume of the larger unit dose 301 as shown by the meniscus 307.
  • [0035]
    Immediately prior to use, the smaller unit dose 304 is squeezed through the walls of the larger unit dose 301 until the smaller unit dose 304 is ruptured, thereby exposing the first component of the composition 305 to the second component of the composition 303. The bladder of the smaller unit dose 304 remains in the larger unit dose 301. The composition, a combination of the first component 305 and the second component 303 is then mixed by massaging the larger unit dose 301 until the composition is completely mixed. Preferably the first component of the composition 305 is a different color than the second component of the composition 303 and thereby producing a third color when the composition is properly mixed. The larger unit dose 301 is transparent or has a transparent window to enable the user to view the mixture of the two components 305 and 303 and control and ensure proper mixing of the same.
  • [0036]
    The composition (a mixture of the two components 305 and 303) is then dispensed in a clean and tidy fashion by cutting off the tip of the elongated portion 302 of the larger unit dose 301. By rolling the larger unit dose 301 from the larger end 306, similar to a tube of toothpaste, the composition (a mixture of the two components 305 and 303) is pushed into the narrow portion 308 of the larger unit dose 301, causing the narrow portion 308 to become rigid and act like a dispensing tip. Once the composition (a mixture of the two components 305 and 303) is dispensed, the larger unit dose 301 can be disposed. In some alternative embodiments of this invention an attachment for connecting to a threaded device 309 is provided fixed to the end of elongated portion 302.
  • [0037]
    These methods of packaging different components of a composition before mixing, as illustrated in the present embodiments of the invention, can also be used with more than two components of a composition, where more than one rupturable smaller unit dose is present inside a flexible larger unit dose. This method of packaging can be used in the adhesive, dental, medical or any industry where two or more part unit doses are required.
  • [0038]
    The foregoing description of the present embodiments of the invention has been presented for the purposes of illustration and description of the best mode of the invention currently known to the inventors. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. Obvious modifications or variations are possible and foreseeable in light of the above teachings. This embodiment of the invention was chosen and described to provide the best illustration of the principles of the invention and its practical application to thereby enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize the invention in various embodiments and with various modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated. All such modifications and variations are within the scope of the invention as determined by the appended claims when they are interpreted in accordance with the breadth to which they are fairly, legally and equitably entitled.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7275640Feb 5, 2004Oct 2, 2007Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Packaging for imparting anti-microbial properties to a medical device
US7770611Aug 10, 2010Baxter International Inc.Peelable seal closure assembly
US8100294Dec 18, 2007Jan 24, 2012James Alexander CorporationContainer assembly
US8403178Mar 26, 2013James Alexander CorporationContainer assembly
US8910830Dec 18, 2007Dec 16, 2014James Alexander CorporationContainer assembly
US9004761May 1, 2006Apr 14, 2015Baxter International Inc.Multiple chamber container with mistake proof administration system
US20040078023 *Oct 17, 2002Apr 22, 2004Paul-Andre GollierPeelable seal
US20050173270 *Feb 5, 2004Aug 11, 2005George BournePackaging for imparting anti-microbial properties to a medical device
US20050194060 *Mar 3, 2004Sep 8, 2005Vincent HouwaertPeelable seal closure assembly
US20070074980 *Sep 2, 2005Apr 5, 2007Bankoski Brian RImplant rehydration packages and methods of use
US20070144923 *Oct 26, 2006Jun 28, 2007Vincent HouwaertPeelable seal closure assembly
US20090191132 *Jul 30, 2009Sniadach Joseph ACoded medication and methods of preparing same for identification and distinguishment
US20090226378 *May 18, 2009Sep 10, 2009Sniadach Joseph ACoded medications and methods of preparing same for identification and distinguishment
EP2955130A1 *Dec 17, 2008Dec 16, 2015James Alexander CorporationContainer assembly capable of separately storing two flowable substances
WO2009079543A2 *Dec 17, 2008Jun 25, 2009James Alexander CorporationContainer assembly capable of separately storing two flowable substances
WO2009079543A3 *Dec 17, 2008Aug 13, 2009Alexander T DavidsonContainer assembly capable of separately storing two flowable substances
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/219
International ClassificationB65D81/32
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/3272
European ClassificationB65D81/32H2