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Publication numberUS20030153399 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/385,991
Publication dateAug 14, 2003
Filing dateMar 10, 2003
Priority dateMar 7, 1996
Also published asCA2282619A1, US6089993, US6554721, WO1998039068A1
Publication number10385991, 385991, US 2003/0153399 A1, US 2003/153399 A1, US 20030153399 A1, US 20030153399A1, US 2003153399 A1, US 2003153399A1, US-A1-20030153399, US-A1-2003153399, US2003/0153399A1, US2003/153399A1, US20030153399 A1, US20030153399A1, US2003153399 A1, US2003153399A1
InventorsJay Woodward, Robert Bottema
Original AssigneeJay Woodward, Robert Bottema
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club head
US 20030153399 A1
Abstract
A golf club head comprises a main body that defines a front face. The front face includes a plurality of projections extending from the front face. The ends of the projections define a plurality of individual contact surfaces for striking a golf ball. The plurality of projections prevent a golf ball from contacting the front face thereby resulting in a change of the golf ball general contact area. A golf club incorporating the club head provides improved control of a golf ball and also provides improved feel when the club head impacts a golf ball.
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Claims(59)
What is claimed is:
1. A golf club head, comprising:
a main body defining a strike portion sized to strike a golf ball, the strike portion comprising:
a main surface;
a plurality of projections integrally formed with the main surface, the plurality of projections extending outward from the main surface, the projections being spaced apart and defining individual flat end surfaces for contacting the surface of a golf ball, the flat end surfaces extending along a plane substantially parallel to the main surface, wherein the projections are stiff enough to prevent a golf ball from contacting the main surface when the golf club head strikes the golf ball.
2. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the golf club head comprises one of a wood-type head and an iron-type head.
3. The golf club head of claim 2, wherein the projections are sized to fit within the dimples of a golf ball.
4. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the golf club head comprises a putter head.
5. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the flat end surfaces collectively define an area that is between 15%-45% of the area of the strike portion.
6. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the density of the projections on the strike portion is at least 30 projections per square inch.
7. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the projections are uniformly distributed on the strike portion to form a plurality of interlinked hexagonal patterns.
8. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein each of said plurality of projections is separated from adjacent other of said plurality of projections by a distance between 0.020 and 0.078 inches.
9. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the end surfaces of the projections are circular.
10. The golf club head of claim 9, wherein the end surfaces of the projections have a diameter of approximately 0.020-0.078 inches.
11. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the projections have a length of at least approximately 0.010 inches.
12. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the projections have a length of approximately 0.010-0.045 inches.
13. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the projections extend in a direction substantially normal to a plane defined by the main surface of the front face.
14. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the end surfaces of the projections each define an elliptical shape or a polygonal shape.
15. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the head defines a lower edge and an upper edge, and wherein the projections are uniformly spaced from the lower edge to the upper edge.
16. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the end surfaces of the projections located within a lateral region of the strike portion are larger than the end surfaces of the projections located within a central region of the strike portion.
17. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the main body further comprises a face insert sized to fit within a recess, and wherein the projections extend outward from the face insert.
18. The golf club head of claim 1, wherein the front surface and the projections are integrally formed of a metallic material.
19. A golf club head comprising;
a main body defining a front face;
a plurality of projections extending from the front face, the ends of the projections defining a plurality of individual contact surfaces for striking a golf ball, wherein the plurality of projections prevent a golf ball from contacting the front face thereby resulting in a decrease of the golf ball general contact area.
20. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the ends of the projections are flat.
21. The golf club head of claim 20, wherein the ends of the projections collectively define a strike face that is substantially parallel to the front face.
22. The golf club head of claim 21, wherein the projections are integrally formed with the main body.
23. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the head comprises a peripheral portion defining a peripheral surface and a strike portion surrounded by the peripheral portion, and wherein the projections extend from the strike portion.
24. The golf club head of claim 23, wherein the strike face is recessed with respect to the peripheral surface.
25. The golf club head of claim 23, wherein the strike face is coplanar with the peripheral surface.
26. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the ends of the projections collectively have an area that is between 15%-45% of the area of the strike portion.
27. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the density of the projections in the strike portion of the head is at least 30 projections per square inch.
28. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the projections are uniformly distributed on the strike portion to form a plurality of interlinked patterns.
29. The golf club head of claim 28 wherein the interlinked patterns comprise hexagons.
30. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein each of said plurality of projections is separated from adjacent other of said plurality of projections by a distance between 0.020 and 0.078 inches.
31. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the ends of the projections have a circular shape.
32. The golf club head of claim 31, wherein the ends of the projections have a diameter of approximately 0.020-0.078 inches.
33. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the projections have a length of at least approximately 0.010 inches.
34. The golf club head of claim 33, wherein the projections have a length of approximately 0.010-0.045 inches.
35. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the projections extend in a direction substantially normal to a plane defined by the front face.
36. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the ends of the projections each define an elliptical shape.
37. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the ends of the projections each define a polygonal shape.
38. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the head defines a lower edge and an upper edge, and wherein the projections are uniformly spaced from the lower edge to the upper edge.
39. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the size of the ends of the projections varies across the strike portion of the golf club head.
40. The golf club head of claim 38, wherein the sizes of the ends of the projections located within a lateral region of the front face are larger than the sizes of the ends of the projections located within a central region of the front face.
41. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the main body further comprises a face insert sized to fit within a recess, and wherein the projections extend outward from the face insert.
42. The golf club head of claim 19, wherein the front surface and the projections are both formed of a metallic material.
43. In a golf club for use in striking a golf ball having a plurality of dimples formed therein, a club having a head with a faceplate which contacts the surface of a golf ball when said golf ball is being driven, the improvement comprising:
a plurality of rigid projections having spaces therebetween formed on said faceplate integrally therewith and extending therefrom, said projections being distributed in a substantially uniform pattern with their distal ends forming a striking surface of said face plate, surfaces being formed in said spaces which are substantially parallel to the striking surface of said projections, said projections being of a small enough size to fit within the dimples of a golf ball;
whereby when said faceplate strikes a golf ball, a substantial number of said projections enter and frictionally engage a corresponding substantial number of dimples on a golf ball to enhance the spin characteristics of a golf ball.
44. The golf club of claim 43, wherein said projections are all of uniform length and diameter.
45. The golf club head of claim 43, wherein said projections are cylindrical in shape.
46. The golf club head of claim 45, wherein said projections have a diameter of 0.08-0.12 inch.
47. The golf club head of claim 43, wherein said projections extend from the main body of the faceplate 0.03-0.06 inch.
48. The golf club head of claim 46, wherein the spacing between said projections is approximately 0.14 inch.
49. The golf club head of claim 45, wherein said projections extend in a direction substantially normal to a plane parallel to said striking surface of said faceplate.
50. A golf club head with a faceplate for use in striking a golf ball having a plurality of dimples formed therein, said faceplate having a striking surface which contacts the surface of a golf ball when a golf ball is driven, comprising:
a plurality of substantially cylindrical projections having spaces therebetween formed on the faceplate, the distal ends of said projections forming a striking surface of the faceplate, surfaces being formed in the spaces which are substantially parallel to the distal ends of the projections,
said projections extending from said faceplate in a direction substantially normal to a plane parallel to the striking surface of said faceplate,
said projections being distributed substantially uniformly over said striking surface and being small enough to fit within the dimples of a golf ball,
whereby when said faceplate strikes a golf ball a substantial number of said projections enter a corresponding substantial number of dimples on a golf ball to enhance the spin characteristics of a golf ball.
51. The golf club head of claim 50, wherein said projections have a diameter of 0.08-0.12 inch.
52. The golf club head of claim 50, wherein said projections extend from the main body of the faceplate 0.03-0.06 inch.
53. The golf club head of claim 51, wherein the spacing between said projections is approximately 0.14 inch.
54. In a golf club for use in striking a golf ball having dimples formed therein, said club having a head with a faceplate which contacts the surface of a golf ball when a golf ball is driven, the improvement comprising:
a plurality of projections formed on said faceplate and extending therefrom, said projections being distributed in a substantially uniform pattern with their distal ends forming a striking surface of said faceplate, said projections being of a small enough size to fit within the dimples of a golf ball, the projections at a top of said faceplate being larger in diameter than those at a bottom of said faceplate, the diameter of the projections gradually decreasing from the top to the bottom of the faceplate.
55. The golf club head of claim 54, wherein said projections have a diameter of 0.08-0.12 inch.
56. The golf club head of claim 54, wherein said projections are cylindrical in shape.
57. The golf club head of claim 54, wherein said projections extend from the main body of the faceplate 0.03-0.06 inch.
58. The golf club head of claim 54, wherein said projections extend in a direction substantially normal to a plane parallel to the striking surfaces of said faceplate.
59. A golf club comprising;
a shaft;
a grip on a first end of the shaft;
a golf club head on a second end of the shaft, comprising:
a main body defining a front face;
a plurality of projections extending from the front face, the ends of the projections defining a plurality of individual contact surfaces for striking a golf ball, wherein the plurality of projections prevent a golf ball from contacting the front face thereby resulting in a decrease of the golf ball general contact area.
Description
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present application is a continuation-in-part of: (1) U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/984,466, filed Dec. 5, 1997, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/811,699, filed Mar. 5, 1997, which claims priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 60/013,012, filed Mar. 7, 1996; and (2) U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/811,699, filed Mar. 5, 1997, which claims priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 60/013,012, filed Mar. 7, 1996.
  • [0002]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0003]
    The invention relates to a golf club head and, more particularly, to a golf club head having a face with projections extending outwardly therefrom for contacting a golf ball.
  • [0004]
    2. Discussion of the Related Art and Summary of the Invention
  • [0005]
    The faceplates or front faces of many golf club heads often have striations or other protrusions which extend outward from a base surface of the faceplate. Golf club manufacturers have used the striations or protrusions to delineate the strike area of the club head and to vary the friction between the strike face of the club head and the golf ball and thereby cause the ball to spin at impact.
  • [0006]
    The Applicant has determined that the use of protrusions on the club strike face may also be used to vary the “feel” of the club by varying the amount of contact area between the club head and the golf ball at impact. The “feel” of the club generally relates to the feeling that-the club confers to the player's hands upon impact of the club head with the golf ball. By changing the size and shape of the projections, the amount of contact area between the club head and the golf ball may be reduced or enlarged. In general, it is desirable to configure the protrusions such that the ball only contacts the tips of the protrusions at impact, rather than also contacting the base surface of the protrusions, so that the amount of contact area between the golf ball and the club is not overly increased.
  • [0007]
    Depending on the particular club type, however, the optimal amount of contact area between the tips of the protrusions and the golf ball may vary. For example, with certain clubs types, such as woods and irons, it is generally desirable to increase the amount of contact area, such as to enhance the level of friction between the club head and the golf ball at impact. This may be accomplished, for example, by using projections that are sized to fit within the golf ball dimples at impact. However, the projections of prior club heads are not configured to enter the dimples of the golf ball and thus are limited in their contact area to the smooth surfaces of the ball. As the dimples cover most of the ball surface, the contact area with such prior art club head faceplates is substantially limited. This limits the striking force on the ball and lessens the driving distance accordingly. Also with the faceplate of the club head only contacting the smooth surfaces of the ball, there is a strong possibility of hitting a slice or hook shot.
  • [0008]
    On the other hand, the desired amount of contact area between the club face and the golf ball is different for putters than for irons and woods, as putters are used in different environments and with a different swinging style than irons and woods. When putting a golf ball, golfers generally use a pendulum-type motion with a putter head to strike a golf ball with the front face of the putter head and propel the golf ball towards a hole in the green. As the putter head strikes the golf ball, a portion of the front face of the putter head contacts the golf ball for a brief period of time and transfers the momentum of the putter head to the golf ball. The amount of time that the putter head remains in contact with the golf ball during the putting stroke is referred to as the “dwell time.”
  • [0009]
    Golf club manufacturers are attempting to create putters that transfer sufficient momentum to the golf ball while also providing an improved feel for the player. The feel of the putter head is primarily a function of the spring constant (k) of the putter face. The spring constant is generally determined by the Young's modulus of the material, as well as the amount of surface area on the putter face that actually contacts the ball during the putting stroke.
  • [0010]
    To improve the feel of the putter, golf club manufacturers are providing the putter head with soft plastic inserts that are mounted on the face of the putter head. The plastic inserts are mainly directed toward improving the feel of the putter through the use of low modulus material. U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,928,965 and 5,575,472 are examples of golf putters having soft plastic face inserts. The plastic inserts generally have a low Young's modulus to improve the feel of the putter, but unfortunately also presents certain disadvantages. In particular, plastic inserts have a tendency to lower the sound when the club impacts the ball which causes a lack of audio feedback to the player.
  • [0011]
    The Applicant has observed that the feel of the putter head may be improved by lowering the spring constant of the putter head. This can be accomplished by lowering the total area of the putter face that contacts the ball during the putting stroke. That is, the “contact area” of the putter face on the golf ball is reduced. Desirably, while the contact area of the putter head is reduced to improve feel, there is still maintained a sufficient amount of contact between the putter face and the golf ball to retain precision and control of the putt. This may be accomplished by manufacturing the putter face with a unique structural design comprising projections that extend outward from the putter face to define a reduced contact area.
  • [0012]
    In the past, golf club manufacturers have provided projections on the face of golf clubs to impart certain characteristics to the ball upon impact. On the other hand, most of these designs are directed to high impact clubs, such as the irons and woods. For example, Japanese Patent No. 0023877 to Shirayanagi discloses a golf club head having a face plate upon which a plurality of small synthetic resin bumps are formed. The Shirayanagi patent is directed toward a high impact club, rather than a putter. The primary purpose of the face plate is to provide high friction between the ball and the face of the club. Additionally, the inclined orientation of the Shirayanagi face and the bumps on the face promote the transfer of spin to the ball, which is from above a certain level undesirable for a putter. The bumps on the face are also small and resilient so that only a very small deformation of the golf ball causes the ball to wrap around the bumps and contact additional club face. The contact area of the Shirayanagi club is thus not significantly reduced.
  • [0013]
    British Patent No. 4301 discloses a golf club head for an iron-type club. The head includes hemispherical or conical protuberances which are formed on the club face. The protuberances produce a certain level of roughness to the head upon impact with a golf ball. Unfortunately, this increases the amount of friction between the club face and the ball, which results in ball spin and would lead, if the protuberances were applied to a putter club, to an unpredictable putt.
  • [0014]
    When projections have been used in connection with putters, the projections unfortunately do not have the proper structure to effectively improve the feel and control of a putter. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,964,641 to Miesch et al. discloses a golf club with a machined face. The face of the Miesch club includes a plurality of contiguous pyramidal-shaped elements having sharp tips which collectively form the contact face of the club. However, because the tips of the pyramidal-shaped elements are sharp points, the contact area of the Miesch golf club is extremely small, which causes the ball trajectory to be less controllable. The lack of sufficient contact area may also result in inconsistencies between putting strokes, since the impact of the club upon the ball varies significantly depending upon the location and the angle of the putter face with the ball. Additionally, the sharp ends of the pyramidal structures increase the friction between the club face and the ball, which can result in the club conferring too much spin to the ball so that the golf ball trajectories are unusual and unpredictable. None of the above-described references provides a putter head which improves the feel of the putter at impact while also providing satisfactory levels of control and consistency when putting a golf ball.
  • [0015]
    Thus, there is a need for a golf club that optimizes the contact area between the strike face and the golf ball at impact. The club desirably has protrusions that are configured to prevent the ball from contacting the base surface of the club face at impact. In the case of woods and irons, the club desirably facilitates the control of the driving action of a golf club and has a faceplate which engages a greater surface area of a golf ball, such as through the use of striker projections which engage the dimples of the club at impact. In the case of a putter, the club head desirably provides improved feel by reducing the amount of contact area at impact, while maintaining a sufficient level of contact area so that control and precision of the putt does not suffer.
  • [0016]
    The aforementioned needs are satisfied by the present invention. One aspect of the invention relates to a club head comprising a main body defining a strike portion sized to strike a golf ball. The strike portion comprises a main surface and a plurality of projections integrally formed with and extending outward from the main surface. The projections are spaced apart and define individual flat end surfaces for contacting the surface of a golf ball. The flat end surfaces extend along a plane substantially parallel to the main surface, wherein the projections are stiff enough to prevent a golf ball from contacting the main surface when the club head strikes the golf ball.
  • [0017]
    Desirably, the flat end surfaces collectively define an area that is between 15%-45% of the area of the strike portion. The density of the projections on the strike portion is desirably at least 30 projections per square inch and the projections are desirably uniformly distributed on the strike portion to form a plurality of interlinked hexagonal patterns. In one embodiment, each of the plurality of projections is separated from adjacent other of the plurality of projections by a distance between 0.020 and 0.078 inches.
  • [0018]
    In one embodiment, the end surfaces of the projections are desirably circular and have a diameter of approximately 0.020-0.078 inches. The projections desirably have a length of at least approximately 0.010 inches and preferably approximately 0.010-0.045 inches. The projections desirably extend in a direction substantially normal to a plane defined by the main surface of the front face. In another embodiment, the end surfaces of the projections each define an elliptical shape or a polygonal shape.
  • [0019]
    Desirably, the club head defines a lower edge and an upper edge, and the projections are uniformly spaced from the lower edge to the upper edge. The end surfaces of the projections located within a lateral region of the strike portion are desirably larger than the end surfaces of the projections located within a central region of the strike portion.
  • [0020]
    In another embodiment, the main body further comprises a face insert sized to fit within a recess, wherein the projections extend outward from the face insert. The front surface and the projections may be integrally formed of a metallic material.
  • [0021]
    In another aspect of the invention, there is disclosed a club head comprising a main body defining a front face. Desirably, a plurality of projections extending from the front face, the ends of the projections defining a plurality of individual contact surfaces for striking a golf ball. The plurality of projections prevent a golf ball from contacting the front face thereby resulting in a decrease of the golf ball general contact area.
  • [0022]
    In yet another aspect of the invention, there is disclosed a club head having projections which are distributed over the striking surface of the faceplate and extend substantially normally from a plane parallel to the striking surface. The distal ends of the projections form a striking surface for driving a golf ball. These projections are of a size which permits them to enter the dimples of the golf ball. Thus, the striking surface includes not only the smooth portions of the ball but also the surface area covered by the dimples. This provides a substantially greater contact surface between the club head and the ball. Further, the striker projections which enter the dimples are frictionally engaged by the dimple walls to make for a straighter shot. In addition, this engagement tends to give the ball spin for a controlled roll. In the case of sand irons, more lift can be attained with differences in the sizes of the projections placed in different positions on the face thereby contributing to more or less loft, as may be desired.
  • [0023]
    In one embodiment, the striker projections are preferably cylindrical or oval in configuration and preferably are smooth on their tops. The size of the projections are preferably small enough so that they can fit within most ball dimples. For durability the projections are generally made solid but can be made hollow to save weight. The projections are desirably dimensioned and positioned on the faceplate to avoid damage to the ball and to as closely as possible align with ball dimples.
  • [0024]
    In one embodiment, all of the clubs in a set employ the same basic striker projection design which is directed to make for a solid hit. It has been found that forged irons produce truer online shots with a positive feel on impact. The long irons tend to give straighter shots adding distance while the short irons tend to have greater accuracy. The sand irons are afforded more lift and back spin due to the action of the projections on the dimples. Differences in the size of the projections on different portions of the faceplate can contribute to differences in the amount of loft and spin obtained.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0025]
    These and other features of the invention will now be described with reference to the drawings of a preferred embodiment, which are intended to illustrate and not to limit the invention and in which:
  • [0026]
    [0026]FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a golf iron incorporating the device of the invention;
  • [0027]
    [0027]FIG. 1A is a cross-sectional view taken along the plane indicated by 1A-1A in FIG. 1;
  • [0028]
    [0028]FIG. 2 is a top perspective view of one embodiment of a putter incorporating the device of the invention;
  • [0029]
    [0029]FIG. 3 is a top perspective view of a wood incorporating the device of the invention;
  • [0030]
    [0030]FIG. 4 is a left side elevational view showing a golf iron engaging a golf ball;
  • [0031]
    [0031]FIG. 5 is a side elevational view illustrating a second embodiment of the invention incorporated in a golf iron; and
  • [0032]
    [0032]FIG. 5A is a cross-sectional view taken along the plane indicated by 5A-5A in FIG. 5 FIG. 6 is a front view of another embodiment of a putter head of the invention;
  • [0033]
    [0033]FIG. 7 is an enlarged view of the front face of the putter head of FIG. 6;
  • [0034]
    [0034]FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of the putter head of FIG. 7 taken along line 8-8;
  • [0035]
    [0035]FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a putter head of the invention;
  • [0036]
    [0036]FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view of yet another embodiment of the putter head of the invention;
  • [0037]
    [0037]FIG. 11A is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a putter head of the invention;
  • [0038]
    [0038]FIG. 11B is an enlarged view of the front of the putter head of FIG. 6A;
  • [0039]
    [0039]FIG. 12 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of a projection on the putter head of the invention;
  • [0040]
    [0040]FIG. 13 is an enlarged view of a second embodiment of a projection;
  • [0041]
    [0041]FIG. 14 is an enlarged view of a projection used to form the projection of FIG. 13;
  • [0042]
    [0042]FIG. 15 is an enlarged view of a plurality of projections arranged in a predetermined pattern;
  • [0043]
    [0043]FIG. 16 is another enlarged view of the front face of a putter head;
  • [0044]
    [0044]FIG. 17 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the putter head of the present invention including an insert that attaches to the putter head;
  • [0045]
    [0045]FIG. 18 is a perspective view of a golf club of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0046]
    Referring to FIGS. 1-4, one embodiment of the invention is shown. The device of the invention is shown as incorporated into an iron in FIGS. 1, 1A and 4, in a putter as shown in FIG. 2, and a wood as shown FIG. 3. As will be appreciated by one of skill in the art, one aspect of the invention is incorporating one of any of the embodiments of the golf club heads described herein into a golf club having a shaft and a grip, as shown in FIG. 18.
  • [0047]
    A plurality of rigid projections 14 are distributed in a substantially uniform pattern with their distal ends forming the striking surface of each faceplate 11. The striking surface 11A of the putter shown in FIG. 2 is indented. In the case of a wood or an iron, the projections 14 preferably have rounded ends which can fit into the dimples 16 of a golf ball, as shown in FIG. 4. In one embodiment, the projections extend between 0.06 and 0.03 of an inch from the main body of the faceplate and the spacing between adjacent projections is typically 0.14 of an inch. In the embodiments shown in FIGS. 1-4, the projections extend in a direction substantially normal to a plane parallel to the striking surface formed by the projections. The projections may be placed on the surface of the faceplate by forming them in the mold from which the faceplate is forged.
  • [0048]
    As previously noted, the projections preferably enter into the dimples and provide both a greater contact surface and a frictional engagement with the ball for woods and irons.
  • [0049]
    Referring now to FIGS. 5 and 5A, another embodiment of the invention is shown. This embodiment incorporates the device of the invention into an iron such as a wedge wherein the projections all will fit within the dimples of the golf ball but vary in size going from the top to the bottom of the faceplate. In one embodiment, the projections on the top of the faceplate are about 0.12″ in diameter while those at the bottom of the faceplate are about 0.08″ in diameter. Preferably, the projections gradually decrease in diameter between these dimensions in going from the top to the bottom of the faceplate.
  • [0050]
    In one embodiment, the projections extend from the main body of the faceplate between 0.06″ for the largest projections and 0.03″ for the smallest projections. The space between the projections is preferably 0.14″. The projections in this embodiment may be formed in the same manner as for the first embodiment, i.e., by forming them in the mold from which the faceplate is forged. The use of smaller projections near the bottom of the faceplate contributes to greater loft. Back spin is also given the ball which tends to make the ball stop rolling.
  • [0051]
    FIGS. 6-17 show a preferred embodiment of a putter head 30 which is used to putt a golf ball (not shown) toward a hole on a putting green (not shown). FIG. 6 is a front view of the putter head 30 of the present invention. The putter head 30 generally comprises an elongated main body 32 having a neck 34 which extends upwardly from the main body 32. The neck 34 allows the putter head 30 to be connected to a golf club shaft (not shown) in a well known manner.
  • [0052]
    [0052]FIG. 7 is an enlarged view of a portion of a front 35 of the putter head 30. FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional side view of the putter head 30 along line 8-8 of FIG. 7. The main body 32 defines a bottom or sole surface 40, a top surface 42 opposed to the bottom surface 40, and a rear surface 44 opposed to the front 35 of the putter head 30. The front 35 of the putter head defines a lower edge 46 and an upper edge 50. The lower edge 46 extends in a substantially horizontal direction and connects the front 35 of the putter head 30 to the sole surface 40. The upper edge 50 extends substantially parallel to the lower edge 46 and connects the front 35 to the top surface 42. The front 35 of the putter head 30 also defines a pair of opposed side edges 51 and 53 (FIG. 6).
  • [0053]
    With reference to FIG. 7, the front 35 of the putter head 30 is generally divided into a peripheral portion 52 and a strike portion 54. The peripheral portion 52 is bounded by the edges 46, 50, 51, and 53 (FIG. 6) and defines a substantially planar peripheral surface 37. The peripheral portion 52 surrounds the strike portion 54 of the front 35 of the putter head 30. The strike portion 54 is the region of the putter head 30 that is adapted to impact a golf ball during a putt.
  • [0054]
    The strike portion 54 of the front 35 of the putter head 30 defines a main or front surface 36, from which a plurality of projections 56 extend outwardly, as described more fully below. The strike portion 54 desirably has a shape that conforms to the desired general strike location of a golf ball with the putter head 30, but may also define various other shapes. The strike portion 54 may comprise only a central region of the front 35 of the putter head 30, or alternatively, the strike portion 54 may comprise the entire front 35 of the putter head 30 so that the peripheral portion 52 is either minimized or eliminated. If the putter head 30 has a peripheral portion 52, the strike portion 54 will generally have visual indicia to distinguish itself from the peripheral portion 52, such as a border, recess, or simply the projections 56 themselves.
  • [0055]
    In the embodiment shown in FIG. 8, the front face 36 of the strike portion 54 is co-planar with the peripheral surface 37 of the peripheral portion 52 the putter head 30. In another embodiment shown in FIG. 9, at least a portion of the front face 36 of the strike portion 54 may be slightly raised with respect to the peripheral surface 37. In yet another embodiment, the front face 36 may be recessed with respect to the peripheral surface 37, as shown in FIG. 10.
  • [0056]
    As mentioned, the plurality of projections 56 extend outwardly from the front surface 36 defined by the strike portion 54 of the putter head 30. As shown in FIG. 8, the projections 56 each have a first end 57 that is desirably integrally formed with the front face 36, and a second end 58 that is outwardly spaced from the front face 36. Each projection has a length L, defined as the distance between the first end 57 and the second end 58 of the projection 56. The first end 57 of the projection 56 is defined as the location on the projection where the projection 56 joins the front face 36 on at least one side of the projection 56.
  • [0057]
    The second end 58 of each of the projections 56 defines a substantially flat strike surface or end surface 59. The end surfaces 59 of the projections collectively form the contact or strike face of the putter head 30 when the putter head 30 strikes a golf ball, as described in more detail below. Preferably, the end surfaces 59 collectively define a strike plane 61 that is substantially parallel to the front face 36.
  • [0058]
    In the embodiments shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, the projections 56 extend outwardly so that the end surfaces 59 of the projections 56 are spaced outward with respect to the peripheral surface 37. That is, the strike plane 61 defined by the end surfaces 59 of the projections 56 is spaced outward from a plane defined by the peripheral surface 37. The projections 56 are thus visible looking downward at the putter head 30 from the player's perspective. Alternatively, if the front face 36 is recessed, the length L of the projections 56 may be selected such that the strike plane 61 is co-planar with the peripheral surface 37, as shown in FIG. 10. Accordingly, looking downward toward the putter head 30, the projections 56 will appear hidden from the player perspective so as to be less distracting during a shot.
  • [0059]
    As shown in FIG. 11A, the depth of the front face 36 relative to the end surfaces 59 of the projections 56 may vary across the strike portion 54 so that the entire front face 36 is not coplanar. FIG. 11B is an enlarged view of the front 35 of the putter head 30. As shown, the length L of each projection 56 is equal to the length of the shorter side of the projection 56.
  • [0060]
    The projections 56 preferably have a length L that is desirably at least approximately 0.010 inches and is preferably between approximately 0.010 and 0.045 inches. As shown in FIG. 7, the projections are preferably spaced uniformly moving from the vicinity of the lower edge 46 of the front face 36 toward the vicinity of the upper edge 50 of the front face 36 so as to eliminate the possibility of a golf ball hitting the lower edge 46. Additionally, the projections 56 are preferably arranged in a predetermined pattern, as described in more detail below.
  • [0061]
    [0061]FIG. 12 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of one embodiment of a single projection 56. In this embodiment, the projection 56 comprises a cylindrically shaped structure having a substantially uniform thickness moving along the length L. The end surface 59 of the projection 56 is substantially flat and merges with side surfaces 60 of the projection 56 through a rounded connecting surface 63 having a radius R. The rounded connecting surface 63 eliminates a sharp edge between the end surface 59 and the side surfaces 60 of the projection 56. The rounded connecting surfaces 63 may be formed using any of a wide variety of manufacturing methods, such as, for example, sandblasting.
  • [0062]
    The radius R of the rounded connecting surface 63 is desirably selected to improve the putting characteristics of the putter head 30. For example, the radius R may be selected so that a golf ball that impacts the end surfaces 59 over any of a wide range of impact angles will consistently rebound off the end surfaces 59 in a desired direction. A sharp edge between the end surfaces 59 and the side surfaces 60 of the projections 56 may cause a golf ball to rebound off the putter head 30 at wider angles so that the ball travels widely to the left or right of the desired target. Desirably, the radius R of the rounded connecting surface 63 is at least 0.0001 inches, and preferably between 0.005-0.012 inches.
  • [0063]
    [0063]FIG. 13 shows a second embodiment of a projection, referred to as projection 56 a. In this embodiment, the side surfaces 60 of the projection 56 a are curved or rounded. The end surface 59 of the projection 56 a is substantially flat so that the projection 56 a has a truncated hemispherical shape. With reference to FIG. 14, the projection 56 a may be formed by first forming a hemispherical-shaped projection 56 a using a well-known manufacturing method, such as, for example, die casting, injection molding, forging, etc. The projection 56 a is then subjected to a finishing operation in which the second end 58 a of the projection 56 a is ground to form the flat end surface 59, as shown by the dashed line.
  • [0064]
    The sizes and shapes of the projections 56 may be varied across the front face 36 of the putter head 30. Additionally, the flat end surfaces 59 of the projections 56 30 may define any of a wide variety of shapes, such as circles, ellipses, or any of a wide variety of polygons, such as, triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, etc. Preferably, the projections 56 all have the same length L so as to ensure a consistent feel resulting from a symmetrical contacting of the ball by the projection pattern.
  • [0065]
    As shown in FIGS. 7 and 15, the projections 56 preferably define a series of predetermined uniform patterns across the front 35 of the putter head 30. FIG. 15 is an enlarged view of a group of projections 56 arranged in a desired pattern. Specifically, the projections 56 collectively form interlinked hexagonal patterns, wherein the hexagons have a radius R. Within each of the hexagonal patterns, the projections 56 are separated by a horizontal distance S, which is preferably between 0.020 and 0.078 inches. Additionally, each projection 56 has a diameter D which is preferably between 0.020 and 0.078 inches. The spacing S is desirably smaller than the size of the dimples on a golf ball to prevent the projections 56 from entering the dimples when the putter head 30 strikes the golf ball.
  • [0066]
    Desirably, the number of projections 56 within a given area of the front 35 of the putter head 30, or the density n of the projections, is maintained within a certain level. Preferably, the density n of the projections 56 is at least 30 projections per square inch. The density (n) of the projections 56 in the interlinked hexagonal pattern may desirably be calculated by using the following formula:
  • n=(2{square root}{square root over (3/3)})1/(S+D)2)
  • [0067]
    The putter head 30 is used to propel a golf ball toward a hole by striking the golf ball with the strike face that is collectively formed by the end surfaces 59 of the projections 56. Desirably, the end surfaces 59 of the projections are the only portion of the putter head 30 to contact the golf ball during the putting stroke. Because the combined surface area of the end surfaces 59 comprise only a percentage of the area of the entire front 35 of the putter head 30, the total area of the putter head 30 that actually contacts or strikes the golf ball is advantageously reduced. The projections 56 thus improve the feel of the putter head 30 when striking a golf ball. However, although the contact area is reduced, the flat end surfaces 59 of the projections 56 still provide sufficient contact area between the ball and the putter head 30 so that control of the golf ball is not adversely affected.
  • [0068]
    Preferably, the combined surface area of the flat end surfaces 59 of the projections 56 is between 15 to 45 percent of the surface area of the strike portion 54 of the front face 36. In general, the more the contact area of the putter head 30 is reduced, the lower the spring constant of the front face 36 and the softer the putter head 30 feels upon impact with a golf ball. It has been noticed that the dwell time, or the amount of time that the, putter head 30 remains in contact with the ball at impact, tends to increase as the amount of contact surface of the putter head 30 with the ball is reduced. The reason is that the reduction of contact area results in a concentration of stress on the surface of the ball. The concentration of stress causes the ball to -deform more upon impact and therefore to stay more in contact with the face. A longer dwell time provides improved control of the golf ball and a more precise putting shot.
  • [0069]
    In a preferred embodiment, the projections 56 are stiff enough and long enough to prevent a golf ball from contacting the front face 36 when the putter head 30 strikes the golf ball at normal putting speeds. The stiffness, or the resistance to deflection upon impact, of the projections 56 thus contributes to the improved feel of the putter head 30. Nonetheless, the projections 56 may still have a certain degree of controlled deflection. According to the USGA rules, the hardness of the material constituting the projections should not be lower than 95 shore A.
  • [0070]
    As shown in FIG. 16, the size or surface area of each of the end surfaces 59 of the projections 56 may be varied across the strike portion 54. For example, at lateral ends 66 and 68 of the strike portion 54, the flat end surfaces 59 of the projections 56 may be larger than the flat end surfaces 59 of the projections 56 located within a central region 70 of the strike portion 54. Such a configuration desirably increases the area of the strike face defined by the end surfaces 59 of the projection 56 located in the lateral ends 66, 68 of the strike portion 54. This design results in an enhanced distribution of energy transference to the golf ball when struck by the putter head 30, even when the putter head 30 is hit off-center, or near the lateral ends 66, 68 of the strike portion 54. This compensates for the loss of energy that typically results from off-centered hits on the front face of prior putter heads. The increased surface area of the end surfaces 59 at the lateral ends 66, 68 provides for a stiffer feel than in the central region 70, where the end surfaces 59 are smaller.
  • [0071]
    [0071]FIG. 17 illustrates an alternative embodiment of the putter head 30, which includes a face insert 74 that is sized and shaped to fit within a recess 76 in the front 35 of the elongated body 32. The face insert 74 comprises a plate-like structure that defines the strike portion 54. A plurality of projections 56 extend outwardly from the face insert 74, as described above with respect to the previous embodiment. In use, the face insert 74 is positioned within the recess 76 of the club head 30 and attached thereto. The face insert 74 may be attached to the main body 32 using any suitable means, such as mechanical bonding, adhesive bonding, welding, brazing, etc.
  • [0072]
    The face insert 74 may advantageously be formed of a material having a lower Young's modulus than the main body 32. The face insert 74 may be formed either from a metallic or from a polymeric material. A metallic material for the face insert 74 provides the putter head 30 with a more solid feel at impact with a golf ball, whereas a polymeric material, such as plastic or rubber, provides a softer feel than a metallic face insert 74. The face insert 74 may be manufactured of the same material as the main body 32 or it may be manufactured of a different material to vary the characteristics of the putter head 30. For example, the face insert 74 may be manufactured of plastic for promoting a soft feel at impact, and the main body 32 may be manufactured of a high density material, such as brass, copper, lead, etc., which provides improved mass distribution.
  • [0073]
    The putter head 30 of the present invention provides an increase in dwell time and a decrease in the rebound of the putter head 30 at impact with a golf ball. The rebound generally relates to the tendency of the golf ball to bounce off the club head. In an experimental test, performance characteristics of the putter head 30, such as rebound, dwell-time, and acceleration of the golf ball, were measured. The experiment consisted of testing seven putters including (1) a standard NC2 Taylor Made Putter, (2) an Odyssey DF660, (3) a Titleist Cameron putter with a Teryllium insert (copper alloy insert), (4) a Ping Isopur with a urethane insert, (5) a steel putter head 30 of the invention with 20% contact area (with respect to the front surface 36), (6) a steel putter head 30 of the invention with 30% contact area, and (7) a putter head 30 of the invention with 30% contact area and a urethane insert of 95 shore A. Each of the putters were standardized with respect to loft, lie, head mass, shaft length, and swing weight.
  • [0074]
    The testing method consisted of using a putting pendulum to strike a golf ball, as is known in the art. An accelerometer was attached to each of the putter heads to measure the impact force and dwell time. An indoor artificial putting surface was used primarily for consistency and to eliminate environmental variances. The putting pendulum was calibrated for an approximate 100 inch putt. The distance, peak force, and dwell time were recorded after impact with the putters.
  • [0075]
    A rebound measurement is typically measured as a percentage with respect to a standard putter. In the current experiment, the NC2 Taylor Made putter was used as the standard putter based on the uniform steel face of the NC2 putter. The rebound was calculated using the following equation:
  • % Rebound=(distance of ball with putter )(distance of ball with NC2 putter)100
  • [0076]
    The peak force measurements relate to the maximum force induced into the putter during impact with the golf ball. It is assumed that a higher peak force value results in a greater shock being transferred to the player's hands. For each putter, the measurements were performed 10 times and averages were calculated for more consistency. The results are reported in the following table:
    REFERENCE INVENTION
    (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
    Rebound 104.5 101.0 102.9 113.9 98.6 100.5 95.0
    (in.)
    Dwell Time 848 874 890 916 956 950 1139
    (in μsec.)
    Peak Accel. 0.054 N/A* 0.0516 N/A* 0.0458 0.050 N/A*
    (in g)
  • [0077]
    As shown, the dwell time increases significantly for the putter head 30 of the present invention with respect to the other putters. Additionally, the rebound and peak acceleration both decreased for the putter head 30, which indicates that the putter head 30 provides a user with an improved feel at impact.
  • [0078]
    The projections 56 of the putter head 30 thus improve the feel of the putter head 30 with respect to prior putters. The reduced contact area provided by the end surfaces 59 of the projections 56 lowers the spring constant of the putter head 30 to provide a softer feel. However, the flat end surfaces 59 still provide sufficient contact area with a golf ball to provide the putter head 30 with control and consistency in putting a golf ball. Additionally, the projections 56 provide the putter head 30 with an increased dwell time and a reduction in rebound and impact force to further improve the feel of the putter head 30.
  • [0079]
    Although the foregoing description of the invention has shown, described and pointed out fundamental novel features of the invention, it will be understood that various omissions, substitutions, and changes in the form of the detail of the apparatus and method as illustrated and described, as well as the uses thereof, may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the present invention. Consequently, the scope of the invention should not be limited to the foregoing discussion, but should be defined by the appended claims.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7794333Feb 21, 2008Sep 14, 2010Sri Sports LimitedStrike face insert
US7942757Jul 27, 2010May 17, 2011Sri Sports LimitedStrike face insert
US8105181Apr 8, 2011Jan 31, 2012Sri Sports LimitedStrike face insert
US8109841 *Nov 10, 2010Feb 7, 2012M-System Co., Ltd.Putter face and golf putter having the same
US8480513 *Dec 24, 2008Jul 9, 2013Sri Sports LimitedPutter-type golf club head
US8628434 *Dec 19, 2007Jan 14, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club face with cover having roughness pattern
US8641556Jun 4, 2013Feb 4, 2014Sri Sports LimitedPutter-type golf club head
US9028339 *Mar 12, 2013May 12, 2015Mark DoranHybrid golf club heads and hybrid golf clubs incorporating the same
US9174099Dec 27, 2012Nov 3, 2015Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club face
US20090163291 *Dec 19, 2007Jun 25, 2009Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club face with cover having roughness pattern
US20100113184 *Dec 24, 2008May 6, 2010Roger Cleveland Golf Co., Inc.Putter-type golf club head
US20100184531 *Jan 22, 2009Jul 22, 2010Hwang Sung DarStructure of putter head for golf
US20110143859 *Nov 10, 2010Jun 16, 2011M-System Co., Ltd.Putter face and golf putter having the same
US20130172101 *Mar 12, 2013Jul 4, 2013Mark DoranHybrid golf club heads and hybrid golf clubs incorporating the same
EP2044981A1 *Jun 18, 2008Apr 8, 2009Tae Woo YooThe face structure of golfclub
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/331, 473/342, 473/349, 473/350, 473/345
International ClassificationA63B53/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2053/0416, A63B2053/0445, A63B2053/005, A63B53/0487, A63B53/04, A63B2053/0408
European ClassificationA63B53/04P, A63B53/04