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Publication numberUS20030171191 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/382,460
Publication dateSep 11, 2003
Filing dateMar 5, 2003
Priority dateMar 6, 2002
Also published asEP1480868A1, WO2003076259A1
Publication number10382460, 382460, US 2003/0171191 A1, US 2003/171191 A1, US 20030171191 A1, US 20030171191A1, US 2003171191 A1, US 2003171191A1, US-A1-20030171191, US-A1-2003171191, US2003/0171191A1, US2003/171191A1, US20030171191 A1, US20030171191A1, US2003171191 A1, US2003171191A1
InventorsDouglas Crawford, Zachary Krapfl
Original AssigneeNautilus, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Exercise bicycle handlebar
US 20030171191 A1
Abstract
The invention involves a base handle bar configuration having a stem and a base gripping portion connected with the stem. A variety of combinations of stub grips, spanning bars, arcuate bars, cross bars, prong grips, and the like are connected with the base gripping portion. The handle bar may be connected with any type of exercise device and is particularly suited for connection with an exercise bicycle. The various handlebar configurations provide a user with numerous gripping alternatives during use of the exercise device.
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Claims(39)
We claim:
1. An exercise device comprising:
a handlebar assembly comprising:
a handlebar stem;
a base handlebar structure including a main bar connected transversely with the handlebar stem, the main bar defining a first portion and a second portion,
the base handlebar structure further including a first outer bar extending forwardly from the first portion of the main bar and a second outer bar extending forwardly from the second portion of the main bar,
the first outer bar defining a first section and a first angularly offset section being angularly offset from the first section,
the second outer bar defining a second section and a second angularly offset section being angularly offset from the second section;
a first stub grip extending inwardly from the first outer bar toward the second outer bar; and
a second stub grip extending inwardly from the second outer bar toward the first outer bar.
2. The exercise device of claim 1 wherein the handlebar stem comprises a forwardly extending support arm defining a first side and a second side, and wherein the first portion of the main bar extends outwardly and downwardly from the first side of the support arm and the second portion of the main bar extends outwardly and downwardly from the second side of the support arm.
3. The exercise device of claim 2 further comprising:
an exercise bicycle including a head tube defining an aperture; and
wherein the handlebar stem is in engagement with the aperture.
4. The exercise device of claim 1 further comprising:
a third stub grip extending inwardly from the first outer bar toward the second outer bar; and
a fourth stub grip extending inwardly from the second outer bar toward the first outer bar.
5. The exercise device of claim 1 further comprising:
a third stub grip extending outwardly from the first outer bar; and
a fourth stub grip extending outwardly from the second outer bar.
6. The exercise device of claim 1 wherein:
the first stub grip extends inwardly from the first outer bar at about a right angle to the first outer bar;
the second stub grip extends inwardly from the second outer at about a right angle to the second outer bar.
7. The exercise device of claim 4 wherein:
the third stub grip extends inwardly from the first outer bar at about a right angle to the first outer bar; and
the fourth stub grip extends inwardly from the second outer bar at about a right angle to the second outer bar.
8. The exercise device of claim 5 wherein:
the third stub grip extends outwardly from the first outer bar at about a right angle to the first outer bar; and
the fourth stub grip extends outwardly from the second outer bar at about a right angle to the second outer bar.
9. The exercise device of claim 1 further comprising:
a spanning bar defining a first bar section, a second non-linear section, and a third bar section, the first bar section connected with the first outer bar, the third bar section connected with the second outer bar, and the second non-linear section located between the first bar section and the third bar section.
10. The exercise device of claim 9 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines a rearwardly directed curve.
11. The exercise device of claim 9 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines a rearwardly and upwardly directed curve.
12. The exercise device of claim 9 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines a rearwardly and a downwardly directed curve.
13. The exercise device of claim 9 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines a forwardly directed curve.
14. The exercise device of claim 9 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines an upwardly and forwardly directed curve.
15. The exercise device of claim 9 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines a forwardly and a downwardly directed curve.
16. An exercise device comprising:
a handlebar assembly comprising:
a handlebar stem;
a base handlebar structure including a main bar connected transversely with the handlebar stem,
the main bar defining a first portion and a second portion,
the base handlebar structure further including a first outer bar extending forwardly from the first portion of the main bar and a second outer bar extending forwardly from the second portion of the main bar,
the first outer bar defining a first section and a first angularly offset section being angularly offset from the first section,
the second outer bar defining a second section and a second angularly offset section being angularly offset from the second section;
a first arcuate bar, having a first end and a second end and defining an arc therebetween, the first end connected with the first portion of the main bar and the second end connected with the first outer bar; and
a second arcuate bar, having a first end and a second end and defining an arc there between, the first end connected with the second portion of the main bar and the second end connected with the second outer bar.
17. The exercise device of claim 16 wherein the handlebar stem comprises a forwardly extending support arm defining a first side and a second side, and wherein the first portion of the main bar extends outwardly and downwardly from the first side of the support arm and the second portion of the main bar extends outwardly and downwardly from the second side of the support arm.
18. The exercise device of claim 17 further comprising:
an exercise bicycle including a head tube defining an aperture; and
wherein the handlebar stem is in engagement with the aperture.
19. The exercise device of claim 16 further comprising a cross bar connected between the first arcuate bar and the second arcuate bar.
20. The exercise device of claim 19 further comprising:
a first stub grip extending outwardly from the first outer bar; and
a second stub grip extending outwardly from the second outer bar.
21. The exercise device of claim 19 wherein the first arcuate bar extends forwardly from the first portion of the main bar and outwardly to the first outer bar; and
wherein the second arcuate bar extends forwardly from the second portion of the main bar and outwardly to the second outer bar.
22. An exercise device comprising:
a handlebar assembly comprising:
a handlebar stem;
a base handlebar structure including a main bar connected transversely with the handlebar stem,
the main bar defining a first portion and a second portion,
the base handlebar structure further including a first outer bar extending forwardly from the first portion of the main bar and a second outer bar extending forwardly from the second portion of the main bar,
the first outer bar defining a first section and a first angularly offset section being angularly offset from the first section,
the second outer bar defining a second generally horizontal section and a second angularly offset section being angularly offset from the second generally horizontal section;
a first stub grip extending inwardly from the first outer bar toward the second outer bar; and
a second stub grip extending inwardly from the second outer bar toward the first outer bar; and
a spanning bar defining a first bar section, a second non-linear section, and a third bar section, the first bar section connected with the first outer bar, the third bar section connected with the second outer bar, and the second non-linear section located between and connected with the first bar section and the third bar section.
23. The exercise device of claim 22 wherein the handlebar stem comprises a forwardly extending support arm defining a first side and a second side, and wherein the first portion of the main bar extends outwardly and downwardly from the first side of the support arm and the second portion of the main bar extends outwardly and downwardly from the second side of the support arm.
24. The exercise device of claim 23 further comprising:
an exercise bicycle including a head tube defining an aperture; and
wherein the handlebar stem is in engagement with the aperture.
25. The exercise device of claim 22 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines a rearwardly directed curve.
26. The exercise device of claim 25 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines a rearwardly and an upwardly directed curve.
27. The exercise device of claim 25 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines a rearwardly and a downwardly directed curve.
28. The exercise device of claim 22 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines a forwardly directed curve.
29. The exercise device of claim 28 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines an upwardly and forwardly directed curve.
30. The exercise device of claim 28 wherein the second non-linear section of the spanning bar defines a forwardly and a downwardly directed curve.
31. The exercise device of claim 22 further comprising:
a first stub grip extending forwardly from the first portion of the main bar at about a right angle to the first portion of the main bar; and
a second stub grip extending forwardly from the second portion of the main bar at about a right angle to the second portion of the main bar.
32. The exercise device of claim 22 further comprising an arcuate bar, having a first end and a second end and defining an arc therebetween, the first end connected with the first portion of the main bar and the second end connected with the second portion of the main bar.
33. The exercise device of claim 32 further comprising:
a first stub grip extending outwardly from the first outer bar at about a right angle to the first outer bar; and
a second stub grip extending outwardly from the second outer bar at about a right angle to the second outer bar.
34. An exercise device comprising:
a handlebar assembly comprising:
a handlebar stem;
a base handlebar structure including a main bar connected transversely with the handlebar stem,
the main bar defining a first portion and a second portion,
the base handlebar structure further including a first outer bar extending forwardly from the first portion of the main bar and a second outer bar extending forwardly from the second portion of the main bar,
the first outer bar defining a first section and a first angularly offset section being angularly offset from the first section,
the second outer bar defining a second section and a second angularly offset section being angularly offset from the second section;
a first angled stub grip extending forwardly, upwardly, and inwardly from the first outer bar; and
a second angled stub grip extending forwardly, upwardly, and inwardly from the second outer bar.
35. The exercise device of claim 33 wherein the handlebar stem comprises a support arm defining a first side and a second side, and wherein the first portion of the main bar extends outwardly and downwardly from the first side of the support arm and the second portion of the main bar extends outwardly and downwardly from the second side of the support arm.
36. The exercise device of claim 34 further comprising:
an exercise bicycle including a head tube defining an aperture; and
wherein the handlebar stem is in engagement with the aperture.
37. The exercise device of claim 33 further comprising:
a first stub grip extending inwardly from the first outer bar toward the second outer bar at about a right angle to the first outer bar; and
a second stub grip extending inwardly from the second outer bar toward the first outer bar at about a right angle to the second outer bar.
38. The exercise device of claim 33 further comprising an arcuate bar, having a first end and a second end and defining an arc therebetween, the first end connected with the first portion of the main bar and the second end connected with the second portion of the main bar.
39. An exercise device comprising:
a handlebar assembly comprising:
a means for adjustably mounting the handlebar assembly on the exercise device;
a first base gripping means for providing gripping alternatives;
at least one second gripping means for providing additional gripping alternatives, wherein the at least one second gripping means is attached to the first base gripping means.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

[0001] This application is a non-provisional application claiming priority to provisional application No. 60/362,580 titled “Exercise Bicycle Handlebar” filed on Mar. 6, 2002, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety as though fully set forth herein.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The invention generally relates to handlebar configurations for an exercise bicycle that provide the user of the exercise bicycle with a plurality of gripping alternatives.

BACKGROUND

[0003] One of the most enduring types of exercise equipment is the exercise bicycle. As with other exercise equipment, the exercise bicycle and its use are continually evolving. Early exercise bicycles were primarily designed for daily in home use and adapted to provide the user with a riding experience similar to riding a road bicycle in a seated position. In many examples, early exercise bicycles include a pair of pedals to drive a bicycle-type front wheel. To provide resistance, early exercise bicycles and some modern exercise bicycles are equipped with a brake pad assembly operably connected with a bicycle type front wheel so that a rider can increase or decrease the pedaling resistance by tightening or loosening the brake pad engagement with the rim of the front wheel.

[0004] As exercise bicycles became increasingly popular in health clubs, the use and features provided by exercise bicycles evolved as many riders sought to achieve an exercise bicycle riding experience more similar to actual riding, which often includes pedaling up-hill, standing to pedal, and the like. One point in the evolution of the exercise bicycle is the replacement or substitution of the standard bicycle front wheel with a flywheel. The addition of the flywheel, which is oftentimes quite heavy, provides the rider with a riding experience more similar to riding a bicycle because a spinning flywheel has inertia similar to the inertia of a rolling bicycle tire.

[0005] Another point in the evolution of the use of the exercise bicycle is in group riding programs at health clubs, where transition between various different types of riding is popular, such as riding at high revolutions per minute (RPM), low RPM, changing the resistance of the flywheel, standing up and pedaling, leaning forward, and various combinations of these types of riding. One particular component of the exercise bicycle that is involved in the transition between various type of exercising positions is the handlebars.

[0006] It is with this background in mind that the handlebar configurations of the present invention were developed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0007] The handlebar configurations of the present invention provide the user of the exercise bicycle with a plurality of gripping positions. Whether exercising alone or in group riding programs, having a plurality of gripping positions facilitates the user's ability to transition from standing to sitting, from leaning forward to leaning backward, and the like. In addition, having a plurality of gripping positions allows the user to alternate between various gripping positions to reduce fatigue. For example, a user standing to pedal for several minutes might become fatigued in one gripping position, and move to a different gripping position to reduce the fatigue while maintaining the standing position.

[0008] Providing a plurality of gripping alternatives also allows the user to exercise different upper body muscles. For example, while riding, the user can simulate a pushup using the handlebar of the present invention to exercise the chest. The user can also simulate a dip to exercise the triceps and shoulders.

[0009] One handlebar configuration of the present invention, which may be connected with an exercise device such as an exercise bicycles, comprises a handlebar stem and a base handlebar structure including a main bar connected transversely with the handlebar stem support arm, the main bar defining a first portion and a second portion. The base handlebar structure further includes a first outer bar extending forwardly from the first portion of the main bar and a second outer bar extending forwardly from the second portion of the main bar. The first outer bar defines a first section and a first angularly offset section being angularly offset from the first section. The second outer bar defines a second section and a second angularly offset section being angularly offset from the second section. A first stub grip extends inwardly from the first outer bar toward the second outer bar. And, a second stub grip extending inwardly from the second outer bar toward the first outer bar.

[0010] The handlebar configuration may further comprise a forwardly extending support arm defining a first side and a second side, and wherein the first portion of the main bar extends outwardly and downwardly from the first side of the support arm and the second portion of the main bar extends outwardly and downwardly from the second side of the support arm.

[0011] The handlebar configuration may further comprise a third stub grip extending inwardly from the first outer bar toward the second outer bar, and a fourth stub grip extending inwardly from the second outer bar toward the first outer bar. The handlebar configuration may further comprises a third stub grip extending outwardly from the first outer bar, and a fourth stub grip extending outwardly from the second outer bar. The first stub and third grips may extend inwardly from the first outer bar at about a right angle to the first outer bar. The second and fourth stub grips may extend inwardly from the second outer at about a right angle to the second outer bar. The handlebar configuration may further include a spanning bar defining a first bar section, a second non-linear section, and a third bar section, the first bar section connected with the first outer bar, the third bar section connected with the second outer bar, and the second non-linear section located between the first bar section and the third bar section. The non-linear section of the spanning bar may define a rearwardly directed curve, a rearwardly and upwardly directed curve, arearwardly and a downwardly directed curve, a forwardly directed curve, upwardly and forwardly directed curve, and a rearwardly and a downwardly directed curve.

[0012] Another handlebar configuration comprises a handlebar stem and a base handlebar structure including a main bar connected transversely with the handlebar stem. The main bar defines a first portion and a second portion. The base handlebar structure further including a first outer bar extending forwardly from the first portion of the main bar and a second outer bar extending forwardly from the second portion of the main bar. The first outer bar defines a first section and a first angularly offset section being angularly offset from the first section. The second outer bar defines a second section and a second angularly offset section being angularly offset from the second section. The handlebar configuration further comprises a first arcuate bar having a first end and a second end and defining an arc therebetween, the first end connected with the first portion of the main bar and the second end connected with the first outer bar and a second arcuate bar, having a first end and a second end and defining an arc there between, the first end connected with the second portion of the main bar and the second end connected with the second outer bar.

[0013] The handlebar configuration may further include a cross bar connected between the first arcuate bar and the second arcuate bar. A first stub grip may extend outwardly from the first outer bar, and a second stub grip extending outwardly from the second outer bar. The first arcuate bar extends forwardly from the first portion of the main bar and outwardly to the first outer bar, and the second arcuate bar extends forwardly from the second portion of the main bar and outwardly to the second outer bar.

[0014] Another handlebar configuration includes a handlebar stem and a base handlebar structure including a main bar connected transversely with the handlebar stem. The main bar defines a first portion and a second portion. The base handlebar structure further including a first outer bar extending forwardly from the first portion of the main bar and a second outer bar extending forwardly from the second portion of the main bar. The first outer bar defines a first section and a first angularly offset section being angularly offset from the first section. The second outer bar defines a second generally horizontal section and a second angularly offset section being angularly offset from the second generally horizontal section. A first stub grip extending inwardly from the first outer bar toward the second outer bar, and a second stub grip extending inwardly from the second outer bar toward the first outer bar. A spanning bar defines a first bar section, a second non-linear section, and a third bar section, the first bar section connected with the first outer bar, the third bar section connected with the second outer bar, and the second non-linear section is located between and connected with the first bar section and the third bar section.

[0015] The non-linear section of the spanning bar may define a rearwardly directed curve, a rearwardly and an upwardly directed curve, a rearwardly and a downwardly directed curve, a forwardly directed curve, an upwardly and forwardly directed curve, or a forwardly and a downwardly directed curve. A first stub grip extends forwardly from the first portion of the main bar at about a right angle to the first portion of the main bar, and a second stub grip extends forwardly from the second portion of the main bar at about a right angle to the second portion of the main bar. The handlebar configuration may further include an arcuate bar having a first end and a second end and defining an arc therebetween, the first end connected with the first portion of the main bar and the second end connected with the second portion of the main bar. The handlebar configuration may further include a first stub grip extending outwardly from the first outer bar at about a right angle to the first outer bar, and a second stub grip extending outwardly from the second outer bar at about a right angle to the second outer bar.

[0016] Another handlebar configuration of the present invention comprises a handlebar stem and a base handlebar structure including a main bar connected transversely with the handlebar stem. The main bar defines a first portion and a second portion. The base handlebar structure further includes a first outer bar extending forwardly from the first portion of the main bar and a second outer bar extending forwardly from the second portion of the main bar. The first outer bar defines a first section and a first angularly offset section being angularly offset from the first section. The second outer bar defines a second section and a second angularly offset section being angularly offset from the second section. A first angled stub grip extends forwardly, upwardly, and inwardly from the first outer bar, and a second angled stub grip extends forwardly, upwardly, and inwardly from the second outer bar.

[0017] A first stub grip may extend inwardly from the first outer bar toward the second outer bar at about a right angle to the first outer bar, and a second stub grip extending inwardly from the second outer bar toward the first outer bar at about a right angle to the second outer bar. The handlebar configuration may further include an arcuate bar having a first end and a second end and defining an arc therebetween, the first end connected with the first portion of the main bar and the second end connected with the second portion of the main bar.

[0018] Another alternative handlebar configuration comprises a means for adjustably mounting the handlebar assembly on the exercise device, a first base gripping means for providing gripping alternatives, and at least one second gripping means for providing additional gripping alternatives, wherein the at least one second gripping means is attached to the first base gripping means.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0019]FIG. 1 is an isometric view of an exercise bicycle according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0020]FIG. 2 is a top view of a handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0021]FIG. 3 is side view of the handlebar illustrated in FIG. 2;

[0022]FIG. 4 is a rear view of the handlebar illustrated in FIG. 2;

[0023]FIG. 5 is an isometric view of a second handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0024]FIG. 6 is a top view of the second handlebar illustrated in FIG. 5;

[0025]FIG. 7 is a side view of the second handlebar illustrated in FIG. 5;

[0026]FIG. 8 is an isometric view of a third handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0027]FIG. 9 is a top view of the third handlebar illustrated in FIG. 8;

[0028]FIG. 10 is a side view of the third handlebar illustrated in FIG. 8;

[0029]FIG. 11 is a rear view of the third handlebar illustrated in FIG. 8;

[0030]FIG. 12 is a top view of a fourth handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0031]FIG. 13 is a side view of the fourth handlebar illustrated in FIG. 12;

[0032]FIG. 14 is a top view of a fifth handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0033]FIG. 15 is a side view of the fifth handlebar illustrated in FIG. 14;

[0034]FIG. 16 is a top view of an alternative configuration of the fifth handlebar illustrated in FIG. 14;

[0035]FIG. 17 is a side view of the handlebar illustrated in FIG. 16;

[0036]FIG. 18 is a top view of a sixth handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0037]FIG. 19 is a side view of the sixth handlebar illustrated in FIG. 18;

[0038]FIG. 20 is a top view of a seventh handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0039]FIG. 21 is a side view of the seventh handlebar illustrated in FIG. 21;

[0040]FIG. 22 is a top view of an eighth handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0041]FIG. 23 is a side view of the eighth handlebar illustrated in FIG. 22;

[0042]FIG. 24 is a top view of a ninth handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0043]FIG. 25 is a side view of the ninth handlebar illustrated in FIG. 24;

[0044]FIG. 26 is a top view of a tenth handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0045]FIG. 27 is a side view of the tenth handlebar illustrated in FIG. 26;

[0046]FIG. 28 is a top view of an eleventh handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0047]FIG. 29 is a side view of the eleventh handlebar illustrated in FIG. 28;

[0048]FIG. 30 is a top view of a twelfth handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0049]FIG. 31 is a side view of the twelfth handlebar illustrated in FIG. 30;

[0050]FIG. 32 is a top view of a thirteenth handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention;

[0051]FIG. 33 is a side view of the thirteenth handlebar illustrated in FIG. 32;

[0052]FIG. 34 is a top view of a fourteenth handlebar according to one embodiment of the invention; and

[0053]FIG. 35 is a side view of the fourteenth handlebar illustrated in FIG. 34.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0054] A handlebar configuration conforming to the present invention is adapted for use with exercise bicycles, bicycles, and generally exercise equipment of all kinds. Any of the various exercise handlebar configurations described below provide a user with a variety of gripping alternatives. In an exercise bicycle employing one of the handlebar configurations of the present invention, a user may shift the placement of his or her hands to the various gripping locations to relieve fatigue and to support various exercise positions. Moreover, the user may shift the placement of his or her hands to the various gripping locations in order to perform a variety of upper body, arm, abdominal, and other exercises.

[0055]FIG. 1 is an isometric view of one particular exercise bicycle 10 employing one handlebar configuration 12 illustrated in FIGS. 5-7, in accordance with the present invention. Other particular exercise bicycles that may employ a handlebar configuration, in accordance with the present invention, are illustrated in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/093,325 entitled “Exercise Bicycle Frame,” filed on Mar. 6, 2002, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety as though fully set forth herein. Another particular exercise bicycle that may employ a handlebar of the present invention is illustrated in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/051,602 entitled “Exercise Bicycle,” filed on Jan. 17, 2002, which is hereby incorporated in its entirety as though fully set forth herein.

[0056] The exercise bicycle 10 illustrated in FIG. 1 includes a frame 14 and a front fork assembly 16 supporting a wheel 18, a flywheel 20, or the like. At the top of the fork assembly, a head tube 22 extends upwardly from the front fork. The head tube defines an aperture for adjustably receiving a handlebar stem 24. In the exercise bicycle illustrated in FIG. 1, the head tube defines a square aperture adapted to receive a square handlebar stem. Each embodiment of the invention illustrated herein includes a square handlebar stem adapted to fit within the square aperture defined by the head tube. The head tube aperture and the cooperating handlebar stem, however, can be any other suitable cooperating shapes, such as round, triangular, or trapezoidal.

[0057]FIG. 2 is a top view, FIG. 3 is a side view, and FIG. 4 is a rear view of a base handlebar structure 26 that is common to each handlebar configuration of the present invention. The base handlebar structure includes the box beam type handlebar stem 24 adapted to be received by the head tube 26. In one particular configuration, the top portion of the handlebar stem includes a support arm 28. When the handlebar stem is secured in the head tube of the exercise bicycle shown in FIG. 1, the support arm extends forwardly from the head tube and is oriented horizontally or roughly parallel with the surface that the frame is resting on. The support arm, however, may be oriented at other angles with respect to the handlebar stem and/or the surface that the frame is resting on.

[0058] A generally U-shaped base gripping bar 30 or portion is connected with the top portion of the handlebar stem. The base gripping portion is the part of base handlebar structure that a user will grasp and it provides various gripping alternatives for the user seated or standing during use of a piece of exercise equipment employing a handlebar in accordance with the present invention. In one configuration, the base gripping portion is connected with the forward end region of the support arm. As best illustrated in FIG. 4, the base gripping portion includes an inverted V-shaped main bar 32 connected transversely to the front of the support arm. The inverted V-shaped bar defines a left 34 and a right 36 outwardly and downwardly extending bar portion. The main bar, however, may be a generally straight member or may have upwardly and outwardly extending portions. A left 38 and a right 40 outer grip extend forwardly from the outer end of the respective left 34 and right 36 outwardly and downwardly extending transverse bar portion. Each outer grip defines a first section (42 a, 42 b) extending forwardly from the respective end of the inverted V-shaped bar, and a second section (44 a, 44 b) extending forwardly and upwardly from the respective first section.

[0059] In one example, the entire base gripping bar 30 is formed from a single tubular member. As such, the inverted V-shaped portion 32 and the left and right outer grip portions (34, 36) of the base gripping bar are formed by appropriately bending the singular tube member into the shape as generally shown in FIGS. 1-4. A left radius 46 is defined at the transition area between the left portion of the inverted V-shaped bar and the left outer grip. A right radius 48 is defined at the transition area between the right portion of the inverted V-shaped bar and the right outer grip. A second left radius 50 is defined at a second transition area between the first section 42 a of the left outer grip and the second section 44 a of the left outer grip. A second right radius 52 is defined at a second transition between the first section 42 b of the right outer grip and the second section 44 b of the right outer grip. Rather than a single tubular member, the base gripping bar and other handlebar configurations discussed herein may be constructed from a molded polymer, welded metal or alloy tubular pieces, or the like. In such alternatives where bending a tubular member is not necessary, the base gripping portion may not have radiuses defined at the first transition areas and second transition areas.

[0060] The base gripping bar 30 provides the user with numerous gripping alternatives. The user may grip the handlebar in a first gripping position along the inverted V-shaped bar 32 on either side of the support arm 28. Having outwardly and downwardly extending bars (34, 36) the inverted V-shaped bar provides the user with a natural and comfortable gripping position. When griping the inverted V-shaped section, the user's hands and wrists assume a natural position with the fingers and the thumb generally defining a cylinder around the bars. From a seated position on the exercise bicycle, the cylindrical area defined by the user's left hand has a left side lower than a right side, and the cylindrical area defined by the user's right hand has a left side that is higher than a right side. The cylindrical area defined by each hand is roughly perpendicular to the user's forearm between the elbow and the hand and may be achieved with little or no bend at the wrist.

[0061] A second gripping position is provided by the first sections (42 a, 42 b) of the outer grips (38, 40). As best illustrated in FIG. 3, the first sections of the outer grips are roughly horizontal or parallel with the surface upon which the exercise bicycle 10 is supported. The first sections of the outer grips are also roughly perpendicular to the inverted V-shaped bar 32 as best shown in FIG. 2, and therefore extend forwardly from the inverted V-shaped bar. In one example, from a standing position on the exercise bicycle, when the user grips the first sections (42 a, 42 b) of the outer grips (38, 40), the cylinders formed by the hands are roughly parallel to the ground and extend forwardly away from the user's body. For many users in such an orientation, the hands are positioned with the thumb and index finger forwardly with respect to the other fingers and with a slightly downward orientation of the hand with regard to the forearm forming a slight bend at the wrist. The farther the user leans forward in the standing pedaling position, the lesser the angle at the wrist. When the user is positioned with the shoulder directly above the first sections, the cylinder defined by the user's hands when gripping the first sections of the outer grips is roughly transverse to the user's forearm and with little or no bend at the wrist.

[0062] A third gripping position is provided by the second sections (44 a, 44 b) of the outer grips (38, 40). In one example, the second sections of the outer grips extend forwardly and upwardly from the first sections (42 a, 42 b) of the outer grips as best illustrated in FIG. 3. When the user is in a seated position on the exercise bicycle and leaning forward, for example, the user can grip the second sections in an orientation that is natural and comfortable. In such an orientation, the cylinders defined by the user's hands in the gripping position are aligned with the second portions of the outer grips so that there is little or no bend at the wrist between the hand and the forearm.

[0063] When standing and gripping the base handlebar 30 at the first, second, third, or other gripping positions provided by the base grip, the user is able to exercise various upper body muscles in addition to the muscles normally exercised when riding a stationary exercise bicycle. For example, the user can grip the left first section 42 a of the left outer grip 38 with his left hand and grip the right first section 42 b of the right outer grip 40 with his right hand, and raise and lower the upper body to exercise parts of the chest and arms. The user might also grasp the inverted V-shaped bar 32 adjacent and on both sides of the support arm, and raise and lower the upper body to concentrate exercise on the triceps, for example.

[0064]FIG. 5 illustrates a perspective view of a second handlebar structure 12 according to one embodiment of the present invention. FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate a top view and a side view, respectively, of the handlebar illustrated in FIG. 1. The second handlebar structure includes the base handlebar structure 26 described with reference to FIGS. 2-4. In addition, the second handlebar structure includes a first stub grip 54 and a second stub grip 56 that each extend inwardly from the left outer grip 38 and the right outer grip 40, respectively. The first stub grip is connected with the left outer grip adjacent the second radius 50 at the transition between the first section 42 a and the second section 44 a of the left outer grip. In one configuration, the first stub grip extends generally perpendicular to the outer grip. In addition, the first stub grip extends upwardly from the left outer grip and inwardly generally toward the right outer grip. As shown in FIGS. 5-7, in one particular configuration, the first stub grip 54 is generally parallel with the left portion 34 of the inverted V-shaped bar 30 in all views.

[0065] The second stub grip 56 is connected with the right outer grip 40 adjacent the second radius 52 at the transition between the first section 42 b and the second section 44 b of the right outer grip. In one example, the second stub grip is generally perpendicular to the right outer grip. In addition, the second stub grip extends upwardly from the right outer grip and inwardly generally toward the left outer grip. As shown in FIGS. 5-7, in one particular configuration, the second stub grip is generally parallel with the right portion 36 of the inverted V-shaped bar 32, in all views.

[0066] The first stub grip 54 and the second stub grip 56 extend toward each other from the respective outer grips (38, 40). In one example, the inner ends (58, 60) of the left and right stub grips are spaced apart by approximately 6.5 inches. Alternatively, the inner ends of the stub grips may be spaced apart by a lesser or greater distance than 6.5 inches. During use, in one example, the user may rest his or her forearms on the first portion 34 and the second portion 36 of the inverted V-shaped bar 32, respectively, and grasp the first and second stub grips, respectively, in a natural and comfortable manner. When resting the forearms on the inverted V-shaped section, mostly the lower muscles of the forearm rest on the first and second portions of the inverted V-shaped bar rather than the bones in the arm, which makes it more comfortable to rest the forearms on the bars. With forearms resting on the inverted V-shaped bar, the cylinders defined by the hands are naturally orientated roughly parallel to the orientation of the first and second stub grips. To provide a comfortable gripping position, the first and second stub grips are aligned with the natural position that the hands assume when the forearms are resting on the inverted V-shaped bar.

[0067]FIGS. 8, 9, 10 and 11 illustrate a perspective view, top view, side view, and a rear view, respectively, of a third handlebar structure 62 according to the present invention. The third handlebar structure includes the base gripping structure 26 illustrated in FIGS. 2-3 and the stub grips (54, 56) illustrated in FIGS. 4-7. In addition, the third handlebar structure includes a third 64 and a fourth 66 stub grip that each extend inwardly from the second sections (44 a, 44 b) of the left and the right outer grips (38, 40), respectively. The third stub grip extends inwardly and generally toward the right outer grip from the forward end area of the second section of the left outer grip. In one example, as best shown in FIGS. 9 and 11, the third stub grip is connected with the second section of the left outer grip in such a manner that the third stub grip is generally parallel with the floor or other surface that the exercise bicycle of FIG. 1 is supported on when the handlebar is assembled with the exercise bicycle.

[0068] The fourth stub grip 66 extends inwardly from the forward end area of the second section 44 b of the right outer grip 40. In one example, as best shown in FIGS. 9 and 11, the fourth stub grip is connected with the second section of the right outer grip at a right angle in such a manner that the fourth stub grip is generally parallel with the floor or other surface that the exercise bicycle of FIG. 1 is supported on when the handlebar is assembled with the exercise bicycle. Generally, the third 64 and fourth 66 stub grips are perpendicular to a forwardly extending plane defined by the handlebar stem 24.

[0069] In contrast to the first stub grip 54 and second stub grip 56, which are connected with the outer grips (38, 40) at an angle with regard to the floor and/or with regard to the forwardly extending plane defined by the handlebar stem 24, the third and fourth stub grips (64, 66) are parallel with the floor. In one example, the user may grasp the third and fourth stub grips in a standing pedaling position. Gripping the third and fourth grips in such a manner allows the user to exercise upper body muscles in addition to the lower body muscles exercised during pedaling. The upper body muscles exercised while standing and grasping the third and fourth stub grips are somewhat different than the muscles that are exercised while standing and grasping the outer grips (38, 40), the inverted V-shaped bar 32, or the first and second stub grips (54, 56). The third and fourth stub grips may also be grasped from a seated position. Due to the particular orientation of the third and fourth stub grips, for many users the hands will assume a natural and comfortable orientation when grasping the third and fourth stub grips in either a standing or seated position. Generally, when grasping the third and fourth stub grips with the left and right hand, respectively, the cylinder defined by each hand will be at roughly a right angle to the longitudinal axis of a user's forearm. As such, a user may grasp the third and fourth stub grips (64, 66) with a minimal bend of the wrist.

[0070] A top view and a side view of a fourth alternative handlebar configuration 68 according to the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13, respectively. The fourth handlebar configuration includes the base gripping portion 26 discussed above with respect to FIGS. 2-4 and the first and second stub grips (54, 56) discussed above with regard to FIGS. 5-7. In addition to the base gripping bar and the first and second stub grips, the fourth handlebar configuration also includes a third and a fourth stub grip (70, 72) that each extend outwardly from the left and the right outer grips (38, 40), respectively. The third and fourth stub grips (64, 66) of FIGS. 8-11, in contrast, each extend inwardly from the left and right outer grips, respectively.

[0071] In one example, the third stub grip 70 extends outwardly from the left outer grip 38 adjacent the second radius 50 at the transition between the first section 42 a and the second section 44 a of the left outer grip. From the perspective of the top view, the combination of the third stub grip 70 and the first stub grip 54 form a cross shape with the left outer grip. The third stub grip is connected generally at a right angle to the left outer grip, and is orientated generally horizontally or parallel with the floor when the handlebar is assembled with the exercise bicycle 10 of FIG. 1. The fourth stub grip 72 extends outwardly from the right outer grip 40 adjacent the second radius 52 at the transition between the first section 42 b and the second section 44 b of the right outer grip 40, in one example. From the perspective of the top view, the combination of the fourth stub grip 72 and the second stub grip 56 form a cross shape with the right outer grip. The fourth stub grip is generally perpendicular to the right outer grip, and is orientated generally horizontally or parallel with the floor when the handlebar is assembled with the exercise bicycle. Generally, the third stub grip and fourth stub grip are each perpendicular to the forwardly extending plane defined by the handlebar stem.

[0072] The third and fourth stub grips (70, 72) of the fourth handlebar configuration 68 provide the user with the ability to grasp the handlebar with a wider spread between the left and right hands. For many users, when gripping the third and fourth stub grips, the hands will be wider apart than the shoulders of the user. Such a wide grip position, especially in the standing cycling position, provides the user with additional upper body exercise positions and additional gripping positions. When gripping the third and fourth stub grips, in some instances, the hands will be angled slightly inwardly toward the inner side of the forearms with a bend at the wrist.

[0073]FIGS. 14 and 15 illustrate a top view and a side view of a fifth handlebar configuration 74, respectively. The fifth handlebar configuration 74 includes the base gripping bar configuration 26 and the first and second stub grips (54, 56) described with regard to the configuration described with respect to FIGS. 5-7. In one example, the first and second stub grips (54, 56) are connected with the left and right outer grips, respectively, somewhat rearward of the radii (50, 52) defining the transitions between the first sections (42 a, 42 b) and the second sections (44 a, 44 b) of the outer grips. In addition, the fifth configuration includes a spanning bar 76 connected between the second sections of the outer grips.

[0074] In one example, the spanning bar 76 is connected with the forward end area of the second section 44 a of the left outer grip and is connected with the second section 44 b of the right outer grip to span the distance therebetween. Recall, that the respective second sections (42 a, 42 b) of the outer grips (38, 40) extend upwardly and forwardly from the respective first sections (42 a, 42 b). Thus, the forward end areas of the second sections of the outer grips are slightly higher than any other portions of the handlebars. Because the spanning bar is located between the forward sections of the outer grips, the overall height of the spanning bar allows the user to grasp the bar with less of a bend of the lower back than would be required if the spanning bar was oriented with less height, which can somewhat reduce stress on the lower back when gripping the spanning bar.

[0075] The spanning bar 76 initially extends inwardly and substantially perpendicular to the forward end region of the second section of the outer grips, in one example, similar to the third and fourth stub grips (64, 66) described with regard to the third alternative handlebar (see FIGS. 8-11). Thus, the user can grip the portions of the spanning bar 76 adjacent the left and right outer grips (38, 40) in substantially the same manner in which a user can grip the third and fourth stub grips (64, 66) of the third alternative handlebar configuration 62. The spanning bar further defines a centrally located downwardly and rearwardly oriented non-linear generally arcuate section 78, which provides additional gripping alternatives for the user. For example, for many users, in the standing riding position, the user can grip the central arcuate portion 78 so that the user's hands are closer together than the user's shoulders and so that the cylinder defined by the left hand and the right hand will each be downwardly and rearwadly orientated. Oriented as such, each of the user's hands and forearms will be rotated slightly inwardly and positioned with little or no bend at the wrists providing a natural and comfortable grip on the bars.

[0076] Alternatively, the spanning bar defines a centrally located upwardly oriented non-linear generally arcuate section as shown in FIGS. 16 and 17, which illustrate a top view and a side view, respectively, of the alternative spanning bar configuration. The upwardly arcuate section may be tilted forwardly or rearwardly. The alternative spanning bar is connected between the outer grips, but somewhat rearwardly as compared to the spanning bar illustrated in FIGS. 14 and 15.

[0077] The alternative spanning bar 76 b provides various gripping alternatives. For example, the user may rest his or her forearm on the inverted V-shaped bar 32 adjacent each side of the support arm 28 and grasp the arcuate section 80 of the alternative spanning bar in a natural and comfortable manner. When laying the forearms on the main bar, the cylinder defined by the user's hands naturally fall into a position rotated slightly away from vertical (e.g., between one and two o'clock for the left hand and ten and eleven o'clock for the right hand) and with no rearward or forward bend at the wrist. The arcuate section of the spanning bar is adapted to cooperate with such a natural position of the user's hand when the forearm is resting on the main bar, in one example.

[0078]FIGS. 18 and 19 illustrate a top view and a side view, respectively, of a sixth handlebar 82 embodiment, in accordance with the present invention. The sixth handlebar embodiment includes the base gripping bar structure 26 and the spanning bar (76, 76 b) as described with regard to the fifth embodiment (see FIGS. 14-17). In contrast to the fifth handlebar embodiment 74, the sixth embodiment 82 does not include the first and second stub grips, and does include a non-linear generally arcuate bar 84 connected with the inverted V-shaped bar 32. In one example, the arcuate bar is connected at its left end 85 with the left portion 34 of the inverted V-shaped bar and is connected at its right end 86 with the right portion 36 of the inverted V-shaped bar. The arcuate bar defines a curve between its left end and its right end, with the apex of the curve 90 directly forward of the support arm 28. In one example, the arcuate bar also defines a plane that is generally parallel with the floor where a handlebar is connected with the exercise bicycle 10 of FIG. 1. The plane defined by the arcuate bar, however, may be oriented upwardly or downwardly with regard to the floor and the inverted V-shaped bar.

[0079] The user may grip the arcuate bar 84 in the standing or seated riding positions at any portion of the arcuate bar, which provides numerous alternative gripping positions for the user. In addition, the user may rest his or her forearms on the left and right portions (34, 36) of the inverted V-shaped section as discussed with regard to the second embodiment, and may grasp the arcuate bar with his or her hands.

[0080]FIGS. 20 and 21 illustrate a top view and a side view, respectively, of a seventh handlebar 92 embodiment, in accordance with the present invention. The seventh handlebar embodiment includes the base handlebar configuration 26, the spanning bar (76, 76 b) and the arcuate bar 84 discussed with regard to the sixth embodiment 82 (see FIGS. 18 and 19). In addition, the seventh handlebar embodiment includes third and fourth stub grips (70, 72) connected with the left and right outer grips (38, 40), respectively, as described with regard to the fourth embodiment (see FIGS. 12 and 13). Accordingly, the sixth embodiment provides all of the gripping alternatives provided by the fifth embodiment of the invention along with the gripping alternatives provided by the third and fourth stub grips (70, 72) of the fourth embodiment of the invention.

[0081]FIGS. 22 and 23 illustrate a top view and a side view, respectively, of an eighth handlebar 94 embodiment, in accordance with the present invention. The eighth handlebar embodiment includes the base handlebar configuration 26 and the spanning bar (76, 76 b) discussed with regard to the fifth through seventh embodiments. The handlebar of the eighth embodiment also includes a first prong grip 96 and a second prong grip 98 extending forwardly from the inverted V-shaped main bar 32. In one example, the first and second prong grip (96, 98) extend forwardly from the lower and outer ends of the left and right portions (34, 36), respectively, of the inverted V-shaped bar. The prong grips, however, may be located anywhere along the inverted V-shaped main bar. In one example, each of the prong grips are perpendicular to the inverted V-shaped bar and are substantially parallel with the ground when the handlebar is assembled with the exercise bicycle of FIG. 1. Alternatively, the prong grips may be angled upwardly or downwardly from the main bar.

[0082] The prong grips (96, 98) may be gripped by the user in either the standing or seated position. In the standing position, for example, the user may grip the prongs such that the cylinder defined by the hands is oriented forwardly, i.e., perpendicularly to the main bar, so that the thumb is above the index finger, and so that the thumb and index finger are positioned forwardly of the other fingers. In such a position, the user, in addition to pedaling, may repeatedly raise and lower his or her upper body and thus focus upper body exercise on the triceps and the chest. Raising and lowering the upper body may also be achieved with any of the other bar configurations discussed herein. In addition, the user may rest his or her left and right forearms along the entire length of the left and right prong grips, respectively. When lying the forearm along the length of the prong grip, the user may also grasp the forward end of the prong grip in a cupping manner or may grasp the portion of the spanning bar directly forward the end of the prong grip. The portions of the spanning member directly forward the end of the prong grips (96, 98) is roughly perpendicular to the length of the prong grips so that a user laying his or her forearms along the length of the prong grips can grasp the spanning bar with little or no angle at the wrist.

[0083] A ninth alternative handlebar (100) configuration is illustrated in FIGS. 24 and 25, which are a top view and a side view of the ninth configuration, respectively. The ninth handlebar configuration according to the present invention includes the base handlebar structure 26 shown in FIGS. 2-4. The ninth handlebar configuration also includes a left or second arcuate bar 102 and a right or third arcuate bar 104. The left arcuate bar 102 is connected at one end to the left portion 34 of the inverted V-shaped bar 32 and is connected at its other end to the left outer grip 38. In one example, the left arcuate bar extends forwardly from the left portion of the inverted V-shaped bar. The left arcuate bar is connected to the main bar about midway between the support arm 28 and the radius 46 at the transition from the inverted V-shaped bar and the left outer bar. From the forwarding extending portion, the left arcuate bar arcs outwardly and is connected at its forward end with the second or forward section 44 a of the left outer grip.

[0084] The right or third arcuate bar 104 is basically a mirror image of the left arcuate bar 102. The right arcuate bar is connected at one end to the right portion 36 of the inverted V-shaped bar and is connected at its other end to the right outer grip 40. In one example, the right arcuate bar extends forwardly from the right portion of the inverted V-shaped bar. The right arcuate bar is connected to the main bar about midway between the support arm 28 and the radius 48 at the transition from the inverted V-shaped bar and the right outer bar. From the forwardly extending portion, the right arcuate bar arcs outwardly and is connected at its forward end with the second or forward section 44 b of the right outer grip.

[0085]FIGS. 26 and 27 illustrate a top view and a side view, respectively, of a tenth alternative embodiment 106 of the invention. The tenth alternative handlebar includes all of the gripping surfaces provided by the ninth alternative 100. In addition, the tenth alternative handlebar includes a crossbar 108 connected between the left arcuate bar 102 and the right arcuate bar 104. As shown best in FIG. 26, the crossbar 108 along with the left arcuate bar 102 and the right arcuate bar 104 together form a shape similar to an oddly shaped outwardly flaring U.S. style football goalpost. In one example, the crossbar is connected to about the midpoint of the left arcuate bar and the midpoint of the right arcuate bar.

[0086] The crossbar 108 provides yet another alternative gripping position for the user in both the seated and standing riding positions. The user can grip the crossbar with both hands touching or nearly touching. Such a position, allows the user to exercise different upper body muscles and different aspects of the upper body muscles than would be exercised with any of the other gripping alternatives. For example, the user's hands will oftentimes be closer together than the user's shoulders, and the hands will be at a slight angle with regard to the user's forearm thus having a slight bend at the wrist. This position exercises the chest and triceps somewhat differently than gripping the first section of the outer bars, for example.

[0087] An eleventh alternative handlebar 110 embodiment is illustrated in FIGS. 28 and 29, which illustrate a top view and a side view of the eleventh alternative, respectively. The eleventh alternative handlebar includes all of the aspects of the tenth alternative handlebar 106, and thus provides all of the gripping positions of the tenth alternative handlebar. The eleventh alternative handlebar also includes the third and fourth stub grips (70, 72) as shown with regard to the fourth alternative (see FIGS. 12 and 13). Accordingly, the eleventh alternative handlebar also provides all of the gripping alternatives provided by the third and fourth stub grips (70, 72).

[0088]FIGS. 30 and 31 illustrate a top view and a side view, respectively, of a twelfth alternative handlebar 112 embodiment, in accordance with the present invention. The twelfth alternative handlebar includes the base handlebar configuration 26 illustrated in FIGS. 2-4. In addition, the twelfth alternative handlebar configuration includes a left angled stub grip 114 and a right angled stub grip 116. The left angled stub grip extends upwardly, forwardly, and inwardly from the second section 44 a of the left outer grip 38, and the right angled stub grip extends upwardly, forwardly and inwardly from the second section 44 b of the right outer grip 40. In one example, as best shown in FIG. 31, the left and right angled stub grips (114, 116) are in the same plane defined by the second section 44 a of the left outer grip and the second portion 44 b of the right outer grip, respectively.

[0089] The angled stub grips (114, 116) provide a comfortable and natural gripping position for the user especially in the standing riding position. When gripping the angled stub grips, in many instances, the user's hands will be about the same width as the user's shoulders or slightly wider. The angle of the stub grips will orient the hand and the forearm with little angle at the wrist for most users.

[0090]FIGS. 32 and 33 illustrate a top view and a side view, respectively, of a thirteenth handlebar 118 configuration according to the invention. The thirteenth alternative handlebar includes the base handlebar configuration 26 and the angled stub grips (114, 116) as shown in FIGS. 30 and 31. In addition, the thirteenth embodiment includes the first and second stub grips (54, 56) as shown in FIGS. 5-7, or as shown in FIGS. 14 and 15. Recall, that the stub grips shown in FIGS. 14 and 15 are located somewhat more rearwardly on the outer grips than the stub grips shown in FIGS. 5-7. The thirteenth embodiment of the invention provides the various alternative gripping positions provided by the embodiments of the invention shown in FIGS. 5-7, 30-31, and 32-33.

[0091]FIGS. 34 and 35 illustrate a top view and a side view, respectively, of a fourteenth handlebar 120 configuration according to the invention. The fourteenth handlebar embodiment 120 includes the base handlebar 26 and the angled stub grips (114, 116) as shown in FIGS. 30 and 31. In addition, the fourteenth embodiment includes an arcuate bar 84 connected with the inverted V-shaped bar as shown in FIGS. 18-21. Thus, the fourteenth embodiment provides all of the gripping alternatives of the twelfth embodiment along with the gripping alternatives provided by the arcuate bar as discussed with regard to FIGS. 18-21.

[0092] Various embodiments of the invention are shown and described with a degree of particularity. It should be recognized, however, that various changes may be made to these embodiments without departing from the spirit and the scope of the present invention. For example, third and fourth stub grips such as those shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, may be added to the embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 14-19, 22-27, or 30-34. In another example, a spanning bar, one or more arcuate bars, or first and second stub grips, may be added to embodiments of the invention that are not particularly shown with such features.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7708251Mar 17, 2006May 4, 2010Nautilus, Inc.Mechanism and method for adjusting seat height for exercise equipment
US7927258 *Aug 17, 2007Apr 19, 2011Real Ryder, LLCBicycling exercise apparatus
US8092352 *Mar 3, 2008Jan 10, 2012Realryder, LlcBicycling exercise apparatus with multiple element load dispersion
US8480545 *Jan 9, 2012Jul 9, 2013Colin IrvingBicycling exercise apparatus with multiple element load dispersion
US20120108399 *Jan 9, 2012May 3, 2012Realryder, LlcBicycling exercise apparatus with multiple element load dispersion
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/57
International ClassificationB62K21/12, A63B22/08
Cooperative ClassificationA63B22/0605, A63B22/0046, B62K21/12
European ClassificationB62K21/12, A63B22/08
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